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University of Iowa News Release

 

Sept. 28, 2011

At A Glance

Grassian receives national environmental science and technology award

Vicki H. Grassian, professor in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and the College of Engineering Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, has been named the 2012 recipient of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology.

Sponsored by the ACS Division of Environmental Chemistry, the award is given to encourage creativity in research and technology or methods of analysis to provide a scientific basis for informed environmental control decision-making processes, or to provide practical technologies that will reduce health risk factors.

Grassian was recognized for her original and creative contributions in understanding mineral dust aerosol and its impact on atmospheric chemistry and climate.
 
Grassian, F. Wendell Miller Professor of Chemistry and director of The Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Institute at the UI, has research interests involving particulate matter, including nanoparticles, with respect to atmospheric and environmental chemistry as well as human health. She was named an ACS Fellow in August.
 
A nonprofit organization chartered by Congress, the ACS has more than 163,000 members and is the world's largest scientific society.

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RVAP promotes 'Live Free: A Life on Campus Free from Violence'

The Rape Victim Advocacy Program at the University of Iowa has launched its fall awareness campaign "Live Free: A Life on Campus Free from Violence" now through mid October.

The campaign involves sharing educational materials on table tents and posters in the UI residence halls, in the Iowa Memorial Union, through sororities and fraternities and on the Cambus, thanks to funding from UI Student Government and the Executive Council of Graduate and Professional Students.

The campaign's goal is to educate people about the power of bystanders in violence prevention. The campaign also offers suggestions for taking action, speaking out and getting involved to make the campus and community free from interpersonal violence.

Susan Junis, RVAP prevention education coordinator, said sharing this information is crucial because one in four women and one in six men will be sexually assaulted or abused in their lifetime. She added that the beginning of the academic year is an especially important time since many students are separated from their major support systems for the first time, making them more vulnerable. Junis said perpetrators target these students and take advantage of them because of their lack of experience or loneliness.

For more information, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/~rvap/, http://fyi.uiowa.edu/09/20/susan-junis-rvap/ or http://news-releases.uiowa.edu/2011/september/092611shoes.html.

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Alloy Orchestra to perform score to restored Fritz Lang film 'Metropolis' Sept. 30

The renowned Alloy Orchestra will take the Englert Theatre stage at 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30 to perform their original score with a screening of the complete, restored version of Fritz Lang's classic silent film "Metropolis," a pioneering work of science fiction made in 1927.

Alloy Orchestra is a three-man musical ensemble writing and performing live accompaniment to classic silent films: Roger Miller on synthesizer; Terry Donahue on junk percussion, accordion, saw and banjo; and Ken Winokur on junk percussion and clarinet.

Tickets are $15 for the general public and $12 for students and Senior Center members.

Sponsors are the UI Department of Cinema and Comparative Literature in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Iowa City/Johnson County Senior Center. A free talk with Winokur will be held at the Senior Center, 28 S. Linn St., at 2:30 p.m. the day of the show.

The show is presented by Iowa City filmmaker/promoter and UI film alumnus Andy Brodie, under the banner of his Garage Filmworks. At the show, Brodie and filmmaker Andrew Sherburne of Iowa City will announce plans for a nonprofit film organization that would operate an independent cinema downtown Iowa City.

More information: Andy Brodie, 319-541-5443, andy@andybrodie.com, http://englert.org/event_details.php?id=571.

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Old Capitol HiStory Time: 'Traveling on the Prairie' Oct. 1

Elementary-aged children and their families are invited to learn about the lives of pioneer children traveling across the prairie during HiStory Time, "Traveling on the Prairie," from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 1, in the Old Capitol Museum Discovery Center. The free, public event includes stories and activities and no registration is required.

Long ago, pioneers traveled along the Oregon Trail to find a new home in the West. Traveling to the west was often very long and arduous. It would take families several months to reach their destination. Though the journey was difficult, children would find the prairie a new and wonderful place to learn and explore. Come discover what made traveling on the prairie so much fun.

For more information, call 319-335-0548, or visit http://www.uiowa.edu/~oldcap.

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UI Museum of Natural History's 'Movies@MNH' series continues Oct. 2

The University of Iowa Museum of Natural History will continue its fall "Movies@MNH" series at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 2 with the free, public screening of "Lost Nation-The Ioway " in Macbride Auditorium.

In the twilight of a Native American empire, two Ioway brothers travel to Washington, D.C. in 1824 to meet with Superintendent ofIndian Affairs William Clark. Both sign a treaty ceding a large portion of tribal land for settlement. White Cloud sees cooperation as the only way for his people to survive, while Great Walker regrets the loss of land where his ancestors are buried. More territory is lost, and the Ioway people are divided, with some regarding one brother as a traitor, and the other as a patriot. After the tribe is removed, the 36 million acres they once called home is named "Iowa." Then, they are forgotten.

"Lost Nation: The Ioway" tells the dramatic true tale of two brothers' struggle to save their people from inevitable American conquest, and the Ioway's current fight to reclaim and maintain their unique history and culture.

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Photos for At A Glance items, if available, may be found at http://www.flickr.com/photos/uinews.

Campus events are searchable on the UI Master Calendar: http://calendar.uiowa.edu.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all UI-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to participate in a program, please contact the sponsoring department in advance.