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University of Iowa News Release


May 13, 2011

UI researcher says Iowa's first minority majority town is sign of state's growing diversity

For the first time in decades Iowa has a minority majority town and a University of Iowa researcher said it's a sign of how quickly the state's cultural face is changing.

According to 2010 U.S. census data, the Muscatine County town of West Liberty has a Latino population of 52 percent. Of the town's 3,736 residents, 1,951 identified themselves as Latino.

Jeff Schott, director of the UI Institute of Public Affairs, said that makes it the first town in Iowa with a population majority made up of minorities, possibly the first since the heyday of the Black majority coal mining town of Buxton a century ago. He said that in 2000, West Liberty's Latino population was 42 percent.

"The overall population of racial minorities in Iowa increased moderately between 2000 and 2010, but the impact on individual cities is much more dramatic," said Schott, who analyzed census data for the Iowa League of Cities.

He said the state's Latino population grew from 2.8 percent to 5 percent. However, the census shows 50 cities now have a Latino population of 10 percent or more of their overall population, compared to only 22 cities in 2000.

Schott said that growth also happened in cities of all sizes and in different parts of the state, especially in small towns. Of those 50 cities with a 10 percent Latino population, 24 have populations of less than 1,000.

Schott said the impact of larger Latino populations is significant for policy makers and local governments. Many of the Latinos are immigrants who work in lower wage jobs and are also in need of additional government services. School districts also need to adapt to educate large numbers of students who speak little or no English.

Several other towns are close to joining West Liberty as minority majority towns, including Columbus Junction at 48 percent Latino and Denison at 42 percent. Storm Lake is 36 percent Latino and Perry is 35 percent.

Schott said the state's Black/African American population also grew, but at a much more moderate rate than the Latino population, from 2.1 percent to 2.9 percent. African American population growth was also confined to fewer locations and focused primarily in the larger cities.

In 2010, 22 cities had African American populations of 5 percent or more, compared to seven cities in 2000. Schott noted that only three cities have a black population of 10 percent or more and all are larger than 50,000 population—Waterloo, Des Moines and Davenport.

STORY SOURCE: University of Iowa News Service, 300 Plaza Centre One, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-2500

MEDIA CONTACTS: Jeff Schott, Institute for Public Affairs, 319-335-7586,; Tom Snee, 319-384-0010 (office), 319-541-8434 (cell),