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University of Iowa News Release

 

Sept. 11, 2008

At A Glance

Engineering students notified of computer breach

Some 500 students in the University of Iowa College of Engineering are being notified by the college that their personal information may have been exposed in a recent computer breach.

The compromised computer contained a file with names and Social Security numbers of students stored on its hard drive. However, the file did not contain information such as birth dates, grades or any financial information.

According to Alec Scranton, associate dean of academic programs in the college, there is no evidence the file was viewed or copied, and it appears that the purpose of the breach was to use College of Engineering resources to store copies of music and movies.

Scranton sent a letter to students today notifying them of the incident and alerting them that they may want to monitor their credit information as a precaution. He said the college has no knowledge of any data being accessed or misused.

International Crossroads Community hosts annual open house Sept. 14

The International Crossroads Community (ICC) is hosting its annual open house from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 14, in Mayflower Hall 8CD. The open house will feature cuisine, culture, arts and crafts, a brief show and more. Students from all over the world, including Thailand, South Korea, China, France, the United States, Netherlands and Russia are living in the ICC living/learning community this year to promote international understanding, friendship and learning.

For more information visit http://international.uiowa.edu/outreach/about/news.asp or http://international.uiowa.edu/outreach/community/international-crossroads-community.asp.

Ludes to discuss American national security at Sept. 15 luncheon

James Ludes, executive director of the American Security Project, will present "American National Security: Looking Beyond the Military" at a noon luncheon of the Iowa City Foreign Relations Council Monday, Sept. 15, at the Iowa City Public Library, Meeting Room A.

For those unable to attend, WSUI-AM 910 will carry the program at Sunday, September 21st at 9 p.m. on the Iowa Public Radio network. City Channel 4 will also record the program for re-broadcast; check local cable listings for schedules.

For more information see http://international.uiowa.edu/outreach/community/icfrc/events.asp, or call 335-0351.

Café Scientifique presents free talk on climate change Sept. 18

"The ABC's of Climate Change" will be the subject of a free, public talk from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at T-Spoons, corner of Linn and Market streets, in Iowa City. Greg Carmichael, professor of chemical and biochemical engineering, associate dean and co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research in the UI College of Engineering, will speak.

Carmichael, an internationally recognized air quality researcher, says that he plans to discuss "what we think we know" about the science of Global Warming and associated regional impacts, including glacier retreat and implications for fresh water and agriculture. He will also discuss possible actions, including what science can do, to give early warning and direction to policy makers.

The talk is presented by Café Scientifique of Iowa City, whose discussion sessions are held on the second Thursday of the month from September to May. Café Scientifique of Iowa City is a meeting forum where the public is invited to explore and debate the latest ideas in science, mathematics, medicine and technology.

For more information on Café Scientifique, visit http://www.physics.uiowa.edu/cafe/.

Mahave-Veglia will play Baroque cello recital Sept. 22

Pablo Mahave-Veglia, a cello professor at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Mich., will present a solo recital on the Baroque cello at 8 p.m., Monday, Sept. 22, in the Herb and Janice Wilson Auditorium of Preucil School of Music, 524 N. Johnson St. in Iowa City.

His University of Iowa guest recital will be free and open to the public.

Due to the closure of the Voxman Music Building following the record floods in June, the School of Music does not have access to its usual performance venues. Instead, many of the faculty and guest recitals will be held at the Preucil School of Music during the coming year.

Performing on historical instruments, Mahave-Veglia will perform three of J.S. Bach's suites for solo cello: the Suite No. 1 in G Major, the Suite No. 3 in C Major and the Suite No. 6 in D Major. He will perform the Sixth Suite on a five-string cello, a replica of the instrument for which it was composed.

Bach's six suites for solo cello, composed around 1720, are the earliest works to earn a permanent place in the virtuoso cello repertoire. They not only display the performance techniques and possibilities of the cello, they also cover an exceptionally broad range of expressive possibilities.

Mahave-Veglia's extensive repertoire ranges from the Baroque, performed on period instruments, to the work of contemporary Latin-American composers.

For more information visit http://www.gvsu.edu/music/.

Poets Cate Marvin and Rick Barot read Sept. 23

University of Iowa Writers' Workshop alumni Cate Marvin and Rick Barot will present a free poetry reading at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 23, in the Prairie Lights bookstore in downtown Iowa City.

Marvin will read from "Fragment of the Head of a Queen" and Barot will read from "Want" -- both published by Sarabande Books.

Marvin, a faculty member of the City University of New York's College of Staten Island, is the author of "World's Tallest Disaster," which was chosen by Robert Pinsky for the Kathryn A. Morton Prize, and co-editor of "Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century." Her poems have appeared in the Paris Review, Poetry, the New England Review, Ploughshares, Fence, Slate, the Kenyon Review and other journals.

Barot's previous collection was "The Darker Fall," also a winner of the Kathryn A. Morton Prize in Poetry. He teaches in the Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College and at Pacific Lutheran University. Barot has been a National Endowment for the Arts fellow, and his poems and essays have appeared in the New England Review, the New Republic, Poetry, the Virginia Quarterly Review, "The New Young American Poets," "Asian-American Poetry: The Next Generation" and "Legitimate Dangers."

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Photos for At A Glance items, if available, may be found at http://www.flickr.com/photos/artsiowa/ (for arts news) or
http://www.flickr.com/photos/uinews/
(for all other news).

For arts information and calendar items visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all UI-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to participate in a program, please contact the sponsoring department in advance.