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UI in the News

May 2008

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Langerud provides career services for law alumni (ABA Journal, May 2008)
STEVE LANGERUD is the University of Iowa College of Law's assistant dean for career services, and for nearly two years he's been making house calls to career-challenged alumni, meeting face to face with them across Iowa and in major cities like Denver, Phoenix and Washington, D.C. So far, he's helped more than a hundred Hawkeye lawyers, from the newly minted to the nearly retired, figure out what they need to do to become well-adjusted, contributing members of the legal profession. The ABA Journal is published monthly by the American Bar Association.
http://www.abajournal.com/magazine/house_calls/

Rothman will be UI medical dean (Chicago Tribune, May 31)
The University of Iowa has tapped the head of its internal medicine department to be the new dean of the Carver College of Medicine. PAUL ROTHMAN has served as head and professor of the college's internal medicine since 2004. His new post begins on June 1 and is subject to approval by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-iowamedicaldean1s,0,396861.story

UI Writing Festival inspired sociologist (Lower Hudson Journal News, May 31)
Lloyd Rogler, a 77-year-old sociologist, turned to writing fiction after attending the IOWA SUMMER WRITING FESTIVAL. The publication covers the Lower Hudson Valley (New York's Westchester, Rockland and Putnam counties).
http://lohud.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080531/LIFESTYLE01/805310309/1164/ENTERTAINMENT

Asthma is not the only cause of wheezing (Fox Business, May 30)
When children wheeze after exercise, asthma is usually suspected. But when researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA examined 142 pediatric patients, 98 of whom had been presumed to have asthma by their primary care physician, they found that only 11 patients (9 percent) actually had asthma.
http://www.foxbusiness.com/story/pediatric-wheeing-asthma/

Wolitzer taught at the UI (Syosset-Jericho Tribune, May 30)
A feature about writer Meg Wolitzer notes that she taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The Syosset-Jericho Tribune originates in New York.
http://www.antonnews.com/syossetjerichotribune/2008/05/30/news/

Kalas is nominated to Radio Hall of Fame (Philadelphia Business Journal, May 30)
Baseball broadcaster Harry Kalas, who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has been nominated to the National Radio Hall of Fame.
http://philadelphia.bizjournals.com/philadelphia/stories/2008/06/02/newscolumn4.html?jst=pn_pn_lk

UI alumna Frederick is interviewed (Taiwan News, May 30)
Tanna Frederick, the UI political science and theater arts alumna who is the star of the film "Hollywood Dreams," is interviewed.
http://www.taiwannews.com.tw/etn/news_content.php?id=664823&lang=eng_news&cate_img=186.jpg&cate_rss=Arts,Entertainment_WORLD

Gordon's study sparks heated discussion (River Front Times, May 30)
"Mapping Decline: St. Louis and the Fate of the American City" by University of Iowa history professor COLIN GORDON, sparked heated discussion about the future of St. Louis.
http://blogs.riverfronttimes.com/stlog/2008/05/mapping_decline_st_louis_an

Nauseef to speak at conference (Bernama, May 30)
Some 3,000 delegates from the health industry representing 100 countries are expected to attend the 13th International Congress On Infectious Diseases. Hosted by the International Society for Infectious Diseases, the four-day congress starting June 19 will serve as a forum for infectious disease experts worldwide to seek answers to challenges posed by communicable diseases. Dr. WILLIAM NAUSEEF from the University of Iowa is among the speakers who will conduct a plenary lecture. BERNAMA is the Malaysian national news agency.
http://web7.bernama.com/bernama/v3/news.php?id=336267

Professors found options grants were backdated (CIO Today, May 30)
Recent high-profile Securities and Exchange Commission cases involving the backdating of stock options were set off by academic researchers examining corporate data. Professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Indiana University spent months poring over data from SEC documents and found that many options grants were timed to exploit marketwide price depressions that not even insiders could predict, indicating that at least some of the grants must have been backdated. As a result, hundreds of companies were investigated by the SEC or conducted their own internal inquiries. The CIO TODAY Network provides technology's top decision-makers with the inside track on strategies for purchasing enterprise hardware and software systems. CIO Today, based in Woodland Hills, Calif., provides daily news needs for and about Chief Information Officers and other C-level executives interested in business technology.
http://www.cio-today.com/story.xhtml?story_id=13200BRN21GC

Anthology addresses truth in nonfiction (TimeOut Chicago, May 29)
Controversies continue to erupt over the disputed "truthiness" of memoirs and other nonfiction. Most recently, Margaret B. Jones admitted her memoir of Los Angeles gangster life, "Love and Consequences," was wholly fraudulent. So the new anthology "Truth in Nonfiction: Essays" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, $19.95) appears at an opportune time to help readers take stock of the hall-of-mirrors of literary veracity.
http://www.timeout.com/chicago/articles/books/29820/truth-and-consequences

Gordon's St. Louis book reviewed (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, May 29)
COLIN GORDON, a University of Iowa history professor, was at Left Bank Books in St. Louis Thursday, May 29, to talk about his new book "Mapping Decline: St. Louis and the Fate of the American City." A reviewer said of the book: "Mr. Gordon gives us a bird's eye view of the worst and most intractable civic pathologies that afflicted the St. Louis region: Combining maps and geographically based data, he plots this community's grim and determined 20th century defense of racial division."
http://www.stltoday.com/blogzone/the-platform/editorial-writers-notebooks/2008/05/st-louis-and-the-picture-of-dorian-grey/

Robinson: antidepressants can help stroke victims (Baltimore Sun, May 29)
Doctors may want to give stroke victims antidepressants right away instead of waiting until they develop depression, a common complication, new research suggests. "We showed you could in fact prevent the development of depression after stroke," said DR. ROBERT ROBINSON of the University of Iowa who led the study. "I hope I don't have a stroke, but if I do, I would certainly want to be placed on an antidepressant." This Associated Press story was used by dozens of news outlets including the THE LEDGER in Lakeland, Fla.; THE OREGONIAN; THE TULSA WORLD, THE CANADIAN PRESS; CTV, Canada's largest private broadcaster; and KPIC in Roseburg, Ore.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/health/bal-te.stroke28may28,0,64489.story?track=rss

Warrants issued for former Hawks (AOL Sports, May 29)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
police have issued arrest warrants for two former Hawkeye defensive backs in connection with an alleged sexual assault which took place on campus last October. Cedric Everson and Abe Satterfield were both suspended by Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz on October 23.
http://sports.aol.com/fanhouse/2008/05/28/warrants-issued-for-two-iowa-hawkeye-defensive-backs-in-campus-s/#cont

Former UI football player denies involvement in assault (KMTV, May 28)
Two former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football players are accused of sexual abuse. University police have issued arrest warrants for Cedric Everson and Abe Satterfield, both former defensive backs. They're wanted for an incident on campus last fall. In an interview with The Des Moines Register, Satterfield denies he was involved in the abuse of a female student and said he hasn't decided if he will turn himself in on the warrant. KMTV is a CBS affiliate in Omaha, Neb. This Associated Press story appeared widely through news outlets including KTVO in Kirksville, Mo. and THE POST-BULLETIN in Rochester, Minn.
http://www.kmtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=8385209&nav=menu550_1

Niebyl: drug label improvements long overdue (USA Today, May 28)
The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday proposed replacing a 30-year-old system for classifying drugs in favor of labels that provide far more detailed information about a medication's risks and benefits. Under the new proposal, labels will provide updated, comprehensive information about the risks to a woman and her child during pregnancy and breastfeeding, as well as the risks of failing to treat medical conditions. JENNIFER NIEBYL, head of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, says better labels have been needed for a long time.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2008-05-28-fda-drug-labels_N.htm

Durham: sexualization of girls tied to profit motives (The Final Call, May 28)
The sexualization of 'tween girls, girls between the ages of 8 and 12 is a growing problem fueled by marketers' efforts to create cradle-to-grave consumers, according to University of Iowa journalism professor GIGI DURHAM. She points out that "a lot of very sexual products are being marketed to very young kids," and explains that the body ideals presented in the media are virtually impossible to attain, but girls don't always realize that, and "they'll buy an awful lot of products to try to achieve those bodies." THE FINAL CALL is a news and information source about issues and events relative to the black community.
http://www.finalcall.com/artman/publish/article_4777.shtml

Robinson led study on preventing stroke victims' depression (USA Today, May 28)
Preventive use of antidepressants reduces the depression rate of stroke patients by more than half and could help them live years longer, a landmark study out Tuesday suggests. It's the first randomized, controlled research to show that treatment for depression for stroke victims who haven't displayed symptoms of depression can lead to significantly fewer becoming depressed within a year. Some reports suggest more than half of stroke survivors will develop depression within two years, says ROBERT ROBINSON, the study leader and psychiatry department head at University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2008-05-27-stroke-depression_N.htm

Atchison comments on Commonwealth Fund report (Salt Lake Tribune, May 28)
A report released Wednesday by The Commonwealth Fund, a private foundation that studies health issues, ranked Iowa first in the nation in children's health care. Top-ranked Iowa attributes its success in part to providing a range of services and coordinating care among doctors, hospitals and clinics. "We focus on coverage to be sure, but also access to social, emotional and mental health services, dental services and prenatal care," says CHRISTOPHER ATCHISON, associate dean of the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa.
http://www.sltrib.com/news/ci_9402095

Artman discusses Iowa's No. 1 ranking for children's health care (ABC, May 28)
A report by the Commonweath Fund, a private foundation focused on health care issues, ranked Iowa ahead of all other states in overall children's care. According to DR. MICHAEL ARTMAN, executive director and physician in chief at the University of Iowa's Children's Hospital, that's due in large measure to learning how to localize care for kids. "Sometimes health care delivery in a rural state like Iowa is a little difficult," he said. "I think Iowa was very perceptive in recognizing that and working to develop systems so at least the screening systems and well-children care and identifying kids at risk -- all of that can be done in the local communities."
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=4942128&page=1

UI study supports antidepressants for strokes (Philadelphia Inquirer, May 28)
Doctors may want to give stroke victims antidepressants right away instead of waiting until they develop depression, a common complication, a small new study suggests. The findings could lead to an expanded use for antidepressants. Someday, high-risk people such as stroke patients might take the drugs before suffering depression -- just as people now take cholesterol drugs to prevent heart attacks, the lead author said. "We showed you could in fact prevent the development of depression after stroke," said ROBERT ROBINSON of the University of Iowa, who led the study. This AP story also appeared in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, USA TODAY, The BOSTON GLOBE, YAHOO CANADA, the NEW YORK POST, the HOUSTON CHRONICLE, CNN, the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, MSNBC and dozens of other news outlets.
http://www.philly.com/inquirer/world_us/20080528_Study_supports_antidepressants_for_stroke_patients.html

Bloom documents life of Hasidic Jews in book (Lincoln Journal Star, May 28)
A national organization representing conservative Jews called attention to what a leader called abuses of workers at the Agriprocessors plant in Postville, Iowa, but has stopped short of calling for a boycott of kosher meat produced there. The plant and the town of Postville have drawn national attention in recent years because the plant is owned by the Rubashkin family, members of the Lubavitch sect of Hasidic Jews, who live in strict compliance with commandments in the Torah. The laws dictate their dress, prayer, study, diet and gender roles. Their operation of the kosher meat plant in Postville was documented in the 2000 book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" by STEPHEN BLOOM, a journalism professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.journalstar.com/articles/2008/05/28/news/business/doc483c858d3a479302726728.txt

Therapies may reduce depression following stroke (Science Daily, May 27)
In the year following a stroke, patients who received the medication escitalopram or participated in a problem-solving therapy group had a lower risk of depression compared to patients who received placebo. ROBERT. G. ROBINSON, M.D., of the University of Iowa, and colleagues assessed the efficacy of the antidepressant drug or problem-solving therapy in the study.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080527183026.htm

Atchinson: health services help Iowa to lead in kid's health (USA Today, May 27)
An article discusses the results of a report conducted by The Commonwealth Fund that shows Iowa ranking as the number one, top-performing state when it comes to measures on children's health. Top-ranked Iowa attributes its success in part to providing a range of services and coordinating care among doctors, hospitals and clinics. "We focus on coverage to be sure, but also access to social, emotional and mental health services, dental services and prenatal care," says CHRISTOPHER ATCHINSON, associate dean of the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2008-05-27-kids-health_N.htm

Wu: hanging with the young helps fruit flies (iAfrica.com, May 27)
Forget radical calorie restriction or human growth hormone. If it's longevity you are after, you may want to consider spending more time with members of the younger generation, according to an animal study released on Monday. The study was done on fruit flies and builds on earlier research showing that interaction with younger members of the species appears to be a factor in healthy aging, both in humans and animals. The results show that social interaction with younger members of the species confers physiological benefits at least in mutant fruit flies, said lead author of the paper, CHUN-FANG WU, professor of biology at the University of Iowa. IAFRICA.COM is one of South Africa's largest news portals.
http://technology.iafrica.com/news/science/395593.htm

Durham: sexuality is key aspect of marketing to girls (Straights Times, May 27)
Some pre-teen girls dress and behave beyond their years. Nowadays, it seems that it's never too young to be sexy. Even tweens -- children between eight and 12 years old -- are being bombarded by product and media images of women who are slim, svelte and pouty. Many experts link American-style consumerism to the sexualization of young girls, typically teenagers but, increasingly, tweens too. Ms. M. GIGI DURHAM, associate professor of journalism and mass communication at the University of Iowa, said, "Part of it is that sexuality is a key aspect of marketing a variety of products, especially to girls, like cosmetics, diet aids and fashion." The STRAIGHTS TIMES is based in Singapore.
http://meltwaternews.com/prerobot/sph.asp?pub=ST&sphurl=www.straitstimes.com//Mind%2BYour%2BBody/In%2BThe%2BKnow/Story/STIStory_241594.html

Former Hawkeyes accused of sex abuse (KMTV-TV, May 27)
Two former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football players are accused of sexual abuse. University police have issued arrest warrants for Cedric Everson and Abe Satterfield, both former defensive backs. They're wanted for an incident on campus last fall. When they're found, both will be brought back to Iowa to be charged. KMTV is based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.kmtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=8385209

UI research: thriving social life can boost lifespan (ABC News, May 27)
They say you're only as old as you feel, and now we might be closer to understanding why. It has been suggested that humans and other vertebrates live longer if they have more social interactions, and now this has been verified -- in fruit flies. CHUN-FANG WU and HONGYU RUAN at the University of Iowa in Iowa City studied fruit flies with a genetic mutation that reduces their lifespan by interfering with an enzyme that mops up dangerous free radicals. Mutant flies that shared a home with younger flies, or nonmutants, lived longer and were more mobile than those sharing a home with similar-aged flies. They were also more resistant to the effects of extreme physical exertion, heat and oxidative stress.
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=4939428&page=1

Ponseti method helps Ugandans find cure for clubfoot (AllAfrica.com, May 27)
Like any thrilled mother, Ms. Amina Nalugo cherished the day she finally gave birth to bouncing twins, a girl and a boy. Unknown to her though, her joy was later to turn into sorrow when a few days later she noticed that the legs of her newly born babies did not look normal and were bent inward. They were diagnosed with clubfoot. "It's then that medical workers at a health centre in Butambala in Mpigi district advised me to seek help from Mulago referral hospital," Nalugo said. Clubfoot is treated with manipulation using the Ponseti method. Dr. IGNACIO PONSETI, at the University of Iowa, developed the Ponseti treatment method more than 60 years ago. This method corrects most clubfeet without major surgery, a marked contrast to treatment methods that were common at the time of Dr. Ponseti's initial work. AllAfrica.com is the largest electronic distributor of African news and information worldwide.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200805270751.html

 

Olshansky: doctors sometimes give placebos (New York Times, May 27)
A story about a new placebo pill that parents can give their children has prompted discussion in the health care field about how appropriate such pills are. Some are opposed to the idea. But doctors themselves have been known to dole out placebos to overwhelmed parents, said Dr. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, a physician at the University of Iowa Hospitals. A screaming child with an earache may leave the emergency room with a prescription for antibiotics, even though the drug will not speed recovery and could potentially cause harm.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/27/health/27plac.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=%22university+of+iowa%22&st=nyt&oref=slogin

Hanson studies life of renowned Illinois nurse (Chicago Tribune, May 27)
At the time of her death in Ottawa on May 20, 1897, Sarah Gregg, 86, was revered as a remarkable woman for her service during the Civil War as a Union army nurse. "To her should be erected a monument commemorating her patriotic virtues and honoring her name to future generations," the Republican-Times newspaper reported soon after her passing. But unlike the recognition for local soldiers, the community memory of Sarah Gregg has nearly flickered out. "Mrs. Gregg was a woman of impulse," according to "Ottawa: Old and New," a history of Ottawa published in 1914 by the Republican-Times. "When she wanted something done she wanted it at once, and usually did it herself." That's also close to the sense of Sarah Gregg arrived at by KATHLEEN HANSON, a registered nurse and associate professor at the University of Iowa College of Nursing. Hanson has researched and written about the history of nursing and Sarah Gregg. "I've always thought of Sarah Gregg as a person who took charge of her life," Hanson said. The same story was published in the OTTAWA (Ill.) TIMES.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-il-civilwarnurse,0,373897.story

Engelhardt comments on gene therapy (South Florida Sun Sentinel, May 27)
Replacing one amino acid on the surface of a virus that shepherds corrective genes into cells could be the breakthrough scientists have needed to make gene therapy a more viable option for treating genetic diseases such as hemophilia, University of Florida researchers say. Reporting in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on May 19, UF geneticists say they have developed a new version of the adeno-associated virus used in gene therapy that works about 30 times more efficiently in mice than on which vectors scientists currently rely. "I think this is a very promising step forward," said JOHN ENGELHARDT, the director of the University of Iowa Center for Gene Therapy, who was not involved with the study but also plans to use the UF-developed vector in upcoming research. "From a basic biological standpoint, this clarifies our understanding of how the virus acts in the cell. The more we understand, the better we are going to be at engineering viruses for use in humans."
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/health/sfl-fljjpsgene0527jjpnmay27,0,2727556.story

Wu: interacting with the young may benefit the old (Oman Tribune, May 27)
Forget radical calorie restriction or human growth hormone. If it's longevity you are after, you may want to consider spending more time with members of the younger generation, according to an animal study released on Monday. The results show that social interaction with younger members of the species confers physiological benefits at least in mutant fruit flies, said lead author of the paper, CHUN-FANG WU, professor of biology at the University of Iowa. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the TIMES OF OMAN, THE WEST ONLINE, YAHOO! NEWS, CHANNEL NEWS ASIA, DAILY INDIA, LIVE NEWS AUSTRALIA, AGENCE FRANCE PRESS and other news organizations.
http://www.omantribune.com/index.php?page=news&id=27202&heading=Americas

Ponseti developed clubfoot treatment at UI (Uganda Daily Monitor, May 27)
A story about children born with clubfoot in Uganada notes that clubfoot is treated with manipulation using the Ponseti method. Dr. IGNACIO PONSETI, at the University of Iowa, developed the Ponseti treatment method more than 60 years ago. This method corrects most clubfeet without major surgery, a marked contrast to treatment methods that were common at the time of Dr. Ponseti's initial work. The method's long-term effectiveness was proven to be successful in over 90 percent of cases and since then it has become the leading treatment for clubfoot around the world. The same story appeared on the Web site of ALLAFRICA.COM.
http://www.monitor.co.ug/artman/publish/features/Finding_a_cure_for_clubfoot.shtml

Reitz: Iowa banks OK compared to national trends (Chicago Tribune, May 26)
Unrest in the nation's housing industry is having an impact on Iowa banks, which saw a surge in the number of problem loans last year. But despite the downturn, Iowa banks are doing well compared to the national average, according to calculations by TOM REITZ, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa. Under Reitz's calculations, Iowa-chartered banks had on average 1.07 percent of their loans of all types noncurrent. Nationally that figure was 1.39 percent of all loans.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-iowabankloans,0,7339069.story

LaRue Jones praises cellist/conductor (New Orleans Times Picayune, May 25)
Jean Montes, the renowned New Orleans cellist, is now conducting orchestras. WILLIAM LaRUE JONES, Montes' mentor at the University of Iowa, says he has just the right set of skills to appreciate the experience. "He's relaxed, he has a mellow style," Jones says. "He's not aggressive or high-pressured. It's not autocratic conducting. He is demanding in an artistic way and he does have high expectations. But where some people might throw their batons and stamp their feet and cuss and yell, he asks -- respectfully."
http://www.nola.com/living/t-p/index.ssf?/base/living-10/121169355865120.xml&coll=1

UI study of returning Iraq War vets noted (Eau Claire Leader Telegram, May 25)
A story about the difficult adjustment that Iraq War veterans have when returning home notes that researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Minnesota and North Hennepin Community College in Brooklyn Park, Minn., recently conducted a survey on those campuses to identify and tackle student veteran issues. According to the survey, top issues included difficulty returning to the community, guilt about separation from comrades, and a general loss of respect.
http://www.leadertelegram.com/story-features.asp?id=BGM0SQJOD2G

UI alum breaks stereotypes as Muslim country singer (Times-Picayune, May 25)
He wears a mighty nice cowboy hat, hails from a small town in Oklahoma, and sings with a twang about wantin' to hear the "ayyyn-gels." He drove a pickup truck in high school and admits he used to take his dog hunting. And did we mention that he's a devout Muslim? There have been Muslim comedians, Muslim runway models, Muslim sitcoms and even a Muslim punk band. So perhaps it's no surprise that there's now a Muslim country singer -- although Kareem Salama doesn't fit most people's image of either. Salama, 30, already has two self-produced albums and is in talks with an independent record label about making a third. Besides an affinity for country, he has a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and an interest in classical Arabic poetry. The TIMES PICAYUNE is based in New Orleans, La.
http://www.nola.com/living/t-p/index.ssf?/base/living-10/1211896824229120.xml&coll=1

Bloom's book on Postville noted (la Repubblica, May 24)
An article discusses University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM's book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," in particular the history of AgriProcessors, a kosher slaughterhouse begun by a group of ultra-orthodox Hasidic Jews from Brooklyn, and the company's employment of Mexican and, more recently, Guatemalan workers, many of whom were arrested recently for violation of immigration law. La Repubblica is Italy's largest daily newspaper.
http://ricerca.repubblica.it/repubblica/archivio/repubblica/2008/05/24/236un.html

Economic development study cited (Daytona Beach News Journal, May 24)
A story about a controversial economic development plan in Daytona Beach, Fla., cites a study by ALAN PETERS and PETER FISHER in the Journal of the American Planning Association demonstrates that opposite perspective in its title alone, "The Failures of Economic Development Incentives." In the article, published in 2004, Peters and Fisher -- both professors at the University of Iowa -- argue that a review of research on the subject reveals there are good reasons to believe that incentives have little or no impact on the decisions of companies looking to expand or relocate operations. Peters said in the last 10 years the dollar amount of incentives "has gone up quite dramatically" even though some experts had expected incentive activity to slow down. Overall, Peters said research on incentives has not been particularly positive. "Since the Second World War there have been 110 major studies of economic development on growth," he said. "The findings are mixed to mostly negative."
http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/News/Neighbors/NewsTribune/flaNT21052408.htm

UI student to cover Olympics (Albert Lea Tribune, May 24)
Nathan Cooper, a junior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, writes that he will be covering the Beijing Olympics this summer as part of a student journalism program for the Olympic News Service. He notes that his journalism professor JUDY POLUMBAUM, who specializes in sports and Chinese media, passed out fliers in a lecture class asking students who were interested in covering the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics to show up for an informational meeting. The Tribune is published in Minnesota.
http://www.albertleatribune.com/articles/2008/05/24/sports/sports11.txt

Kinnick remembered on Memorial Day (Wilmington News Journal, May 24)
A columnist writing about athletes who served in the armed forces notes that Nile Kinnick won the 1939 Heisman Trophy for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before he was killed in a training accident during World War II. The News Journal is published in Delaware.
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080525/SPORTS/805250378/1002/SPORTS

Redlawsk: Most Iowa Democrats look safe in November (Huffington Post, May 23)
A story about Iowa's course in the upcoming general election notes that the Democrats currently have the momentum. "The Iowa Republicans seem demoralized at the moment," according to DAVID REDLAWSK at the University of Iowa. Redlawsk mentions the indisputable fact that Democrats have taken control of the state house and senate and have kept the governor's office. "And it looks like Republicans will not have strong candidates against Harkin or Braley, and marginal against Loebsack -- even Boswell looks reasonably safe if he gets through his primary."
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mayhill-fowler/republicans-for-change_b_103237.html

UI's role cited in helping find company misdeeds (Reuters, May 23)
Professors have long been friends to securities regulators, uncovering suspicious trading and accounting patterns that lead to multimillion-dollar settlements. These researchers are about to get a new tool in the form of XBRL-tagged data, which will provide a treasure trove of easily accessible information to comb through, and could potentially lead to more enforcement actions. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission last week proposed a timetable requiring about 500 of the largest public companies to begin filing their financial data in XBRL, or extensible business reporting language, in early 2009. Professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Indiana University spent months poring over data from SEC documents and found many options grants were timed to exploit marketwide price depressions that not even insiders could predict, meaning that at least some of the grants must have been backdated.
http://www.reuters.com/article/reutersEdge/idUSN2317922720080523

Solows get degrees from Iowa (The Chronicle of Higher Education, May 23)
Benjamin L. Solow was looking forward to receiving a degree from the University of Iowa when we spoke to him this month. So was his grandfather. Mr. Solow is earning his bachelor's degree in political science and economics. His grandfather, the Nobel Prize-winning economist Robert M. Solow, is getting an honorary doctorate. The timing worked out, as the elder Mr. Solow was already going to be on the campus to celebrate with his grandson, said JOHN L. SOLOW, Benjamin's father and a professor of economics at the University of Iowa.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v54/i37/37a00601.htm

Ryken comments on brain tumor affecting Ted Kennedy (Omaha World-Herald, May 22)
Malignant glioma, the type of tumor that U.S. Sen. Edward Kennedy has, is difficult to treat, partly because even when the tumor can be removed it often grows back. Dr. TIMOTHY RYKEN, associate neurosurgery professor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, said a malignant glioma is hard to remove surgically. The tumors come from cells native to the brain, so the brain doesn't recognize them as abnormal and "allows them to wander about among the normal cells," Ryken said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1219&u_sid=10340702&u_rss=1&

Stanford to study treatment for jaw disorder (Phoenix Business Journal, May 22)
A $400,000 National Institutes of Health grant will fund a study of a technique called the Activator Method treatment for TMJ, or temporomandibular joint disorders, usually acute or chronic inflammation of the joint that connects the lower jaw to the skull. Dr. James DeVocht, associate professor of the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research in Iowa, will be the principal investigator, along with CLARK STANFORD, a dentist and associate dean for research at the University of Iowa.
http://phoenix.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/2008/05/19/daily54.html

Durham discusses spa trend (The Morning Show with Mike and Juliet, May 22)
University of Iowa journalism professor GIGI DURHAM, author of "The Lolita Effect," a book about the sexualization of young girls in the media, is interviewed during a segment about moms taking their 4- and 10-year-old daughters to spas. Durham said young girls often feel pressure to act older than their developmental age, and while occasional trips to the spa could be a fun bonding experience and stress-reliever for women and their daughters, too many trips could contribute to girls feeling anxious about their appearance. She recommends that moms mix up activities with their daughters -- riding bikes, reading books, playing board games -- to reflect the fact that women are multidimensional and to avoid placing too much emphasis on beauty. "THE MORNING SHOW WITH MIKE AND JULIET" airs on FOX stations in Minneapolis, Chicago and other major markets.
http://www.mandjshow.com/videos/pint-size-pampering/

Iowa newspaper seeks records in UI sexual assault case (Argus Leader, May 22)
An Iowa City newspaper on Wednesday filed a motion asking a judge to force the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to release an index of documents it's withholding in a sexual assault case. The Press-Citizen filed a lawsuit in January seeking access to records in the university's investigation into an alleged sexual assault at Hillcrest Hall that allegedly involved three Hawkeye football players. The ARGUS LEADER is published in Sioux Falls, S.D.
http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080522/UPDATES/80522002

Teen mom who overcame odds coming to UI (KTVO-TV, May 22)
Many Heartland seniors are marching down the aisle to the tune of Pomp and Circumstance for graduation. One soon-to-be graduate never thought she'd be taking those steps with her classmates. "I got pregnant second semester of my junior year, so I decided to drop out," said Ottumwa High School Senior Brissa Ceja. Ceja plans to go to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and major in dentistry. KTVO-TV is an ABC affiliate based in Kirksville, Mo.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/news/news_story.aspx?id=137826

Iowa Public Radio director steps down (Argus Leader, May 22)
The executive director of Iowa Public Radio is stepping down. Officials say Cindy Browne, who led the effort to merge the public radio stations at Iowa's three public universities into one network, will leave June 30. The Iowa Board of Regents established Iowa Public Radio in 2004 to oversee stations at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa. The ARGUS LEADER is published in Sioux Falls, S.D.
http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080522/UPDATES/80522011

UI researcher helps describe impact of vaccine (Individual.com, May 22)
Yale University researchers have determined how a key component of many vaccines activates an immune system response, a finding that opens up promising new avenues of research on better ways to prevent infections. FAYYAZ S. SUTTERWALA, now of the University of Iowa, was among the team of scientists led by Stephanie C. Eisenbarth and Richard A. Flavell of the departments of immunobiology and laboratory medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. They describe one way aluminum hydroxide -- a key adjuvant used in many of the world's vaccines -- helps fight off pathogens in a paper published Wednesday in the online edition of the journal Nature. INDIVIDUAL.COM is an online publication based in Washington, D.C.
http://www.individual.com/story.php?story=83006139

UI President Mason to teach leadership class (Chicago Tribune, May 21)
University of Iowa President SALLY MASON will teach a leadership course at the president's mansion starting this fall. Thirty incoming freshmen will meet at Mason's home for classes and to occasionally dine with Mason and others. "I'm a big believer that the president's residence belongs to (the university), and it should be used for public events," she said. "This is part of my design to keep the house open to students and the entire UI community." This AP story contains information from the IOWA CITY PRESS-CITIZEN.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-presidentsclass,0,4604981.story

Woman ordered to pay tuition of victim's son (Fond du Lac Reporter, May 21)
A woman accused of killing a motorcyclist in a drunken-driving accident last summer has been ordered to pay half of the college tuition of the victim's teenage son. As part of her probation, defendant Darcy L. Schehr will pay cost of tuition, books, room and board for one semester each of the four years the victim's son attends the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Schehr was found guilty of causing the death of Daniel D. Christ, 40, of Iowa, on July 15, 2007. The newspaper is published in Wisconsin. http://www.fdlreporter.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080521/FON0101/805210430/1985/FONopinion

Four UI student journalists make UWIRE 100 list (Editor & Publisher, May 21)
UWIRE, the 14-year-old college journalism association, has unveiled its list of the 100 most promising student journalists in the country. Four UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students were selected: Jason Brummond, Jay Knoll, Dean Treftz and Anna Wiegenstein.
http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003806037

Tucker to present on vessel sealing system (MSN Money, May 21)
CSMG Technologies, Inc., CTGI, a technology management company, and its subsidiary Live Tissue Connect ("LTC") announced that the performance of LTC's newly developed bipolar vessel sealing system will be presented at an international congress by ROBERT D. TUCKER Ph.D., M.D. Dr. Tucker is with the University of Iowa, Department of Pathology and the Department of Biomedical Engineering.
http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/provider/providerarticle.aspx?feed=BW&date=20080521&id=8675366

Artist studied printmaking at the UI (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, May 21)
Artist Aaron Hequembourg finds inspiration and supplies to create his mixed-media, engraved paintings in the dilapidated sharecropper and slave quarters, gin mills and trading posts surrounding a 193-year-old plantation. The feature story notes that he trained in printmaking at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, then moved to Atlanta, where he married into a Southern dynasty.
http://www.ajc.com/living/content/living/stories/2008/05/21/folkart_0522.html

Durham comments on R. Kelly trial (New York Times, May 20)
A story about the upcoming trial of R&B star R. Kelly, who is being tried on charges that he made a film of himself having sex with an under-age girl, quotes M. GIGI DURHAM, a University of Iowa professor who wrote "The Lolita Effect," about the sexualization of girls. The story notes that the crowd outside the courthouse was minimal on the first day of jury selection. "We increasingly see young teens and even preteens being presented as sexual objects in mainstream media," Durham said. That would render Mr. Kelly as less of an aberration. She also suspects sexism. "As the Michael Jackson case showed, we tend to take the abuse of boys more seriously than girls," she said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/20/arts/music/20kelly.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&sq=R.%20Kelly&st=cse&scp=1

 

UI researchers develop prostate cancer vaccine (Orlando Sentinel, May 20)
At the American Urological Association's annual meeting in Orlando Fla., researchers described a new treatment under development for advanced prostate cancer that would harness the body's natural defenses. Dr. RICHARD D. WILLIAMS described a vaccine being tested in a small number of patients with more advanced cancers, including those that have spread to nearby lymph nodes or bone, Not a vaccine in the traditional sense, the treatment does not prevent prostate cancer but mobilizes the body's immune system to fight existing cancer cells. It was developed by researcher DAVID LUBAROFF at the University of Iowa. Vaccines may play a pivotal role in cancer treatment someday, Williams said. "It's unlikely that any single treatment is going to cure this disease," said Williams, head of the University of Iowa urology department. "It's going to be a combination approach, and [vaccines like this] could be a major part of this down the road." The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/orl-prostate2008may20,0,711420.story

Coleman earned law degree at UI (Ag Weekly, May 20)
In a story about how Sen. Norm Coleman of Minnesota has become an advocate for agriculture, it's noted that he earned his law degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1976. The publication is based in Idaho.
http://www.agweekly.com/articles/2008/05/20/headlines/farm_and_ranch_guide/ag_news/regional_news/news21.txt

Study examined traders' emotions (Yahoo!Finance, May 20)
In 2005, a study published in Psychological Science reported that people with injuries to the emotional part of the brain made better trading decisions. The research team from Stanford, Carnegie Mellon University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA discovered that those with normal brains often made irrational decisions based on results from the previous round. Those with injuries that blocked an emotional response made better choices. The article originally appeared in INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY.
http://biz.yahoo.com/ibd/080520/corner.html?.v=1

Grant elected to Hall of Fame (KMTV-TV, May 20)
Former University of Iowa women's athletic director CHRISTINE GRANT is being inducted into a hall of fame. She is one of eight college sports administrators to join the National Association of College Athletic Directors Hall of Fame. KMTV is based in Omaha.
http://www.action3news.com/Global/story.asp?S=8335972

Durham discusses sexualization of young girls (Salon, May 19)
An interview with GIGI DURHAM, a professor at the University of Iowa, and author of the book, "The Lolita Effect: The Media Sexualization of Young Girls and What We Can Do About It." In her new book, Durham, who heads the Iowa Center for Communication Study at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, critiques the many ways that young girls' sexuality is shaped and exploited by a marketplace where younger is better and the line between child porn and art gets ever blurrier.
http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/2008/05/20/lolita_effect/index.html

Stuart comments on Carnegie libraries in Iowa (KAAL-TV, May 19)
Iowa has about 80 of the historic buildings still in use -- but fewer are being used as libraries. Some are now offices or art museums. SHANA STUART is the director of the Carnegie Libraries in Iowa Project at the University of Iowa. She says most towns have tried to keep their libraries, even if they now use them for something else. KAAL is based in Austin and Albert Lea, MN.
http://KAALtv.com/article/stories/S449312.shtml?cat=10218

Bloom: Postville is 'no-win situation' for everyone (Washington Post, May 19)
"The problem is, who is going to do the work?" said STEPHEN G. BLOOM, a University of Iowa journalism professor who wrote a 2000 book on the clash of cultures in Postville as Agriprocessors' Lubavitch Jewish leaders gained influence in the mostly Lutheran town. "This is a no-win situation."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/17/AR2008051702474.html

Stewart: Handshakes make first impression (Chattanooga Times Free Press, May 19)
With jobs tough to come by, it's even more important to make a good first impression during a job interview. New research by University of Iowa business professor GREG STEWART shows how important the handshake is to creating that good first impression.
http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2008/may/19/chattanooga-get-grip-new-motto-job-seekers/?local

Stewart researches handshakes (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, May 18)
Shaking hands like a man whether you're a man or a woman will give you a leg up in landing a job. That is, if you shake hands like the stereotypical male -- with a firm, strong grip, according to a new study at the University of Iowa. "We found that the first impression begins with a handshake that sets the tone for the rest of the interview," said GREG STEWART, an Iowa business professor whose study, to be published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, marks the first time researchers have quantified the importance of a good handshake.
http://www.ajc.com/business/content/printedition/2008/05/18/bright.html

Lubaroff comments on cancer vaccine trial (Washington Post, May 18)
A therapeutic vaccine to treat prostate cancer appears safe and may be effective, according to the results of an early trial. "The primary objective of the study was to determine whether or not the vaccine was safe or whether it induced any serious adverse events," said lead researcher Dr. DAVID LUBAROFF, director of urology research at the University of Iowa. "The vaccine was quite safe."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/18/AR2008051800866.html

Stegner attended UI (New York Times, May 18)
Reviewing "Wallace Stegner and the American West," Philip L. Fradkin wrote, "As a student working toward a master's degree in an innovative writing program and as a professor with a doctorate in a recognized academic specialty (both degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA); as a teacher in the top writing programs in the country (Iowa, Bread Loaf, Harvard, and Stanford); and as a writer of volumes of commercially published fiction and nonfiction, Stegner not only bridged the gap between professor and professional writer but also constructed by example and teaching the tenuous structure that allowed many others to cross that same chasm."
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/18/books/chapters/first-chapter-wallace-stegner.html

Covington comments on Obama prospects (Guardian, May 18)
A congressional victory by a Democrat in the Deep South has Republican operatives worried. But does this signify a trend that could carry a Democrat into the White House? "The Mississippi result bodes well for the Democrats in Congress. It does not mean anything for the national election," said Professor CARY COVINGTON, a political scientist at the University of Iowa.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/may/18/johnmccain.barackobama

Keel comments on purging (Canada.com/Reuters, May 18)
Whether or not a person with an eating disorder uses more than one method of purging may be a better indicator of the severity of the disorder than how frequently purging occurs, results of a study suggest. But purging frequency was linked to other, related psychological problems, Dr. PAMELA K. KEEL of the University of Iowa in Iowa City and her colleagues found. "Purging frequency was significantly associated with depression and anxiety," Keel told Reuters Health, "whereas multiple purging methods were significantly associated with eating disorder severity. So, each feature provided unique and clinically useful information."
http://www.canada.com/topics/bodyandhealth/story.html?id=2e07498d-d7c2-4590-b145-c6234a5eaed1

Catlett gets honorary degree (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 18)
Prominent black artist Elizabeth Catlett, an alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, received an honorary doctorate from Carnegie-Mellon University, 76 years after she was denied admission because of her race. Carnegie-Mellon had awarded the budding artist a scholarship and she had traveled from her hometown of Washington, D.C. to Pittsburgh to pursue her passion. However, when university officials saw that she was African American -- "colored" in those days -- they denied her admittance.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08140/882983-42.stm

Durham's book is 'required reading' (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, May 17)
A column about society's obsession with sexy little girls called UI journalism Professor GIGI DURHAM's book "The Lolita Effect" "required reading for parents."
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/lifestyle/columnists.nsf/dirtylaundry/story/ADDB0475D2D732358625744800739021?OpenDocument

UI policy on graduate theses noted (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 16)
Starting next fall, the coordinator of the campuswide electronic-thesis program at West Virginia University wants to require creative writing graduate students, who hope to become published authors, to submit their writing projects electronically and make them publicly available after five years. On other campuses, however, writing students have beaten back open-access policies for their theses. LOLA L. LOPES, interim provost at the University of Iowa, abruptly reversed course in March on a plan to make fine-arts theses freely available online after hearing vigorous complaints from students in the university's prestigious writing programs.
http://chronicle.com/free/v54/i36/36a01401.htm

Playwright frequently visits UI as guest artist (The Austin Chronicle, May 16)
A feature about playwright Sherryt Kramer and her new play, "When Something Wonderful Ends" -- about the history of American involvement in the Middle East, Kramer's childhood as a Jewish girl growing up in a decidedly Baptist community, and the loss of a parent -- notes that she frequently returns as a guest artist at the IOWA PLAYWRIGHTS WORKSHOP, the University of Iowa's Master of Fine Art program in playwriting. The Austin Chronicle is an alternative weekly newspaper in Austin, Tx.
http://www.austinchronicle.com/gyrobase/Issue/story?oid=oid%3A624895

Stewart's research shows firm grip gets job (Globe and Mail, May 16)
Ready for the job interview: Your hair is immaculate, your shoes shine and your résumé is extraordinary. None of that will matter if you have a wimpy handshake, according to new research. Proffering up a dead-fish handshake can end your shot at a job before it even begins, the research by GREG STEWART, an associate professor at the University of Iowa, found. "It was intriguing to think that a two-second handshake can be a predictor of success in a 30-minute interview," Stewart says. GLOBE AND MAIL is an English-language Canadian national newspaper based in Toronto, Ontario.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20080516.CASHAKE16//TPStory/Business

San Jose State hires former UI provost (East Bay Business Times, May 15)
San Jose State University on Wednesday named Jon Whitmore, a one-time dean at the University at Buffalo, as its new president. Whitmore, currently head of Texas Tech University, was one of three finalists for the position who spent last week visiting the campus. He succeeds retiring President Don Kassing, who has led the university since 2004. From 1996 to 2003, Whitmore was provost and professor of theatre arts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and was dean, College of Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin from 1990 to 1996. The newspaper is based in Pleasanton, Calif.
http://eastbay.bizjournals.com/eastbay/othercities/buffalo/stories/2008/05/12/daily38.html?b=1210564800^1636611

Alumna nets award for dedication (Lawrence Journal-World & News, May 15)
Deb Engstrom, a special education teacher at Lawrence High School in Nebraska and alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is a recipient of The 20008 Bobs' Award for outstanding teaching, which carries a $10,000 gift and was created in 1996 by a number of Bobs who decided to remain anonymous so the attention would focus on the honored educator. Engstrom knew the Bobs' Award was hers after hearing the words "UNIVERSITY OF IOWA," her alma mater, and seeing her granddaughter in the crowd.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2008/may/15/lhs_special_education_teacher_receives_bobs_award/?city_local

UI's Gaeth challenges for MBA programs in China (Business Week, May 15)
An article that explores why Western schools are leaving China and closing executive MBA programs gives several reasons, including red tape, difficult partners, and weak demand. Recently another, not entirely unexpected, challenge has arisen: a growing number of sophisticated programs taught in Mandarin and Cantonese. Thirty Chinese universities are now authorized by Beijing to provide executive MBA programs. "The Chinese schools are coming right at the teeth of what I offer," says GARY GAETH, the associate dean of the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie School of Management," which will start a program with the highly regarded Peking University this year. "And their MBA programs are every bit as good as everyone else's."
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/08_21/b4085056706207.htm?campaign_id=rss_null

Bloom: undocumented workers 'one of worst-kept secrets' (Forward, May 15)
In a development with potential repercussions for consumers of kosher meat worldwide, the country's largest kosher slaughterhouse greatly curtailed production this past week after a raid by federal agents led to the arrest of hundreds of undocumented workers. On May 12, The United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement stormed the AgriProcessors meatpacking plant in Postville, Iowa, detaining nearly 400 of the slaughterhouse's 968 employees and prompting others to go into hiding. "The big issue wasn't whether this would happen, but when it would happen," said STEPHEN BLOOM, a professor of journalism at the University of Iowa who in 2001 published a book about the impact that AgriProcessors had on the once homogenously white and Christian town of Postville. "It was the worst-kept secret in Iowa." The FORWARD is a daily newspaper dedicated to the voice of the American Jew and is based in New York.
http://www.forward.com/articles/13394/

Schwartz shares understanding of detainees statuses (Individual.com, May 15)
An unknown number of the 390 people arrested Monday in a raid at AgriProcessors Inc. will not face criminal charges but will be charged with administrative violations of U.S. immigration law. BARBARA SCHWARTZ, University of Iowa Law Clinic professor, said she understands from immigration attorneys working with detainees that only about 50 of those arrested Monday won't face criminal charges. The story was published from THE GAZETTE and MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE INFORMATION SERVICES and appears in INDIVIDUAL.COM, an online publication based in Washington, D.C.
http://www.individual.com/story.php?story=82654575

UI study: mother is role model in son's choice of wife (Canada.com, May 15)
If a man's mother is highly educated, chances are the woman he marries will have a similar education, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Iowa found that nearly 80 percent of high-achieving men who were sons of mothers with college degrees married women with a similar education. And 62 percent of men whose mothers had graduate degrees tied the knot with a graduate degree holder. "These young men look up to their mothers as role models. They grew up in a family where their mothers were educated women," sociologist CHRISTINE WHELAN, who conducted the study, said in an interview. CANADA.COM is a leading news and information online source based in Don Mills, Ontario.
http://www.canada.com/topics/lifestyle/relationships/story.html?id=ca4f267d-0b4f-4b46-910a-31f5b1f11211

Porter comments on mortgage loan servicers (CNN, May 15)
Drowning in a mortgage you can't afford? Whether or not you get a new one will be decided by someone you've probably never met at a company whose role is barely visible: the mortgage servicer. "Servicers are intermediaries, not the owners of the notes," said KATHERINE PORTER, a professor of real estate law at the University of Iowa. "And their incentives are not the same as the owners." Porter, who has testified before Congress on mortgage lending issues, said more than half of 1,700 foreclosures she has studied involved questionable servicer fees.
http://money.cnn.com/2008/05/15/real_estate/servicers_who_are_they/index.htm?postversion=2008051503

Kelley comments on lead contamination (Bismarck Tribune, May 14)
The Peregrine Fund, based in Boise, Idaho, has released study findings that it says show ground venison from 80 percent of 30 deer killed with high-velocity lead bullets contains metal fragments. The group, together with researchers from Washington State University in Pullman, Wash., says it is further evidence that people who eat meat from game animals shot with lead bullets risk exposure to the toxic metal. In March and April, North Dakota and Minnesota instructed food banks there to pull hunter-donated venison from their shelves. RICK KELLEY, assistant director of the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory where samples were sent by North Dakota for testing, said he feared venison was destroyed prematurely. He said more study is needed before public policy changes are made. "I have a concern with the way that people respond to the results of that study," Kelley said. "In at least one location, they landfilled all the deer meat." The newspaper is published in North Dakota. The story also appeared on the Web sites of the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER and KGW-TV in Portland, Ore.
http://www.bismarcktribune.com/articles/2008/05/14/news/state/155527.txt

IEM noted as first prediction market (Jewish World Review, May 14)
In this story about prediction markets, such as futures markets where people bet on the future price of oil, gold and pork bellies, it's noted that the first computerized political market, the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, was created at the University of Iowa. "That market outperformed polls three-quarters of the time, and its election-eve forecasts were better than any pundit's and better than any poll," says James Surowiecki, author of "The Wisdom of Crowds."
http://jewishworldreview.com/0508/stossel.php3

Column notes Iowa Electronic Markets (The World, May 14)
A column on prediction markets notes that the first computerized political market was created at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "That market outperformed polls three-quarters of the time, and its election-eve forecasts were better than any pundit's and better than any poll," said James Surowiecki, author of "The Wisdom of Crowds." That Iowa prediction market begged for special permission from the government and got a waiver that limits bets to $500. "That makes them less accurate," Surowiecki said. "Real money is what makes it work." The World is a daily newspaper based in Oregon.
http://www.theworldlink.com/articles/2008/05/14/opinion/editorial/doc482b23179e426631515126.txt

Former UI provost takes job at San Jose State (San Jose Mercury News, May 14)
Jon S. Whitmore, president of the large public research-focused Texas Tech University, has been named to succeed Don Kassing to lead San Jose State University. He will arrive Aug. 1. Prior to his position at Texas Tech, he was provost of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://origin.mercurynews.com/peninsula/ci_9258220?nclick_check

UI alumni find success in software industry (Forbes, May 13)
Jive Software, which aims to change the way people work by bringing social networking to the office, was founded seven years ago by Matthew Tucker and William Lynch, two students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Jive's newest product, Clearspace, uses Web collaboration and communication tools such as forums, wikis and blogs to allow people in different offices to work on a short-term project using a single Web calendar, to-do list and discussion rooms. A manager can scroll over names of subalterns and see what they're working on and whether they're in the office, traveling or at home. Jive raised $15 million in August from Sequoia Capital and may be ready for a public offering as early as 2010.
http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2008/0602/062.html

Rove cites Obama's showing in Iowa (Fox News, May 13)
In an appearance on "On the Record," Karl Rove, former Bush adviser and Fox political analyst, commented on how students influenced Barack Obama's results in Iowa. "Students have a disproportionate effect in caucus states because they -- you know, they can organize and it's easy for them to get there and they come in a group . . . Take a look at Iowa. You go to Johnson County, the site of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and Obama does very, very well. You go to some of these rural counties, where there's no college, and he doesn't do so well."
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,355677,00.html

IEM predicts McCain's presidential chances (Barron's, May 13)
John McCain's presidential campaign is doomed -- at least, if you still believe what political futures markets indicate. In the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, set up at the University of Iowa, Mr. McCain's Republican Party gets a 41 percent chance of winning the popular vote for the White House.
http://online.barrons.com/article/SB121063385437486555.html?mod=rss_Ahead_of_the_Tape&apl=y

Peterson comments on talk show host choice (Conde Nast Portfolio, May 13)
NBC has named Jimmy Fallon as Conan O'Brien's successor on the "Late Show." "He strikes me as an unusual choice," says RUSSELL PETERSON, a visiting assistant professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of Iowa, and the author of "Strange Bedfellows: How Late-Night Comedy Turns Democracy Into A Joke," published in March. "Fallon has a kind of likeability," Peterson adds, "but I have my doubts about how well that likeability will wear based on the fact that he hasn't had a real career
since [his stint on] 'Saturday Night Live' ended."
http://www.portfolio.com/news-markets/top-5/2008/05/13/Late-Night-Fight-for-Young-Viewers?rss=true

Bloom's book documented Postville packing plant (Lincoln-Journal-Star, May 13)
Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials say 390 people have been arrested on immigration charges after a raid Monday, May 12, at Agriprocessors Inc. in Postville, Iowa, the world's largest kosher meatpacking plant. The plant and the town of Postville have drawn national attention in recent years because the plant is owned by the Rubashkin family. Family members are part of the Lubavitch sect of Hasidic Jews, who live in strict compliance with commandments in the Torah.  Their operation of the Kosher meat plant in Postville was documented in a 2000 book, "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," by STEPHEN BLOOM, a journalism professor at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Lincoln, Neb.
http://www.journalstar.com/articles/2008/05/13/news/business/doc4829ea3277c96146436530.txt

Gronbeck: Length of this year's campaign unprecedented (Baltimore Sun, May 13)
This year's Democratic Party nomination campaign has taken its toll on the candidates participating, both physically and mentally. At least one observer thinks a lack of sleep and other pressures has led to some bad word choices, such as Obama's comment that working-class people are "bitter." BRUCE GRONBECK, professor of communications studies at the University of Iowa, said the long-running primary season, which began with campaign stops in February 2007, is "unprecedented."
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/bal-to.candidates13may13,0,2397224.story

Limitations of prediction markets noted (Wall Street Journal, May 13)
An opinion piece questioning the value of political prediction markets notes that six months ago, Barack Obama was given less than a 30 percent chance of being the Democratic presidential nominee on the Iowa Electronic Markets, set up by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121063385437486555.html?mod=2_1569_leftbox

Workshop alumnus book reviewed (Philadelphia Inquirer, May 13)
After beginning his career in an Australian law firm, Nam Le left to attend the prestigious IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, a move which was fortunate for the now 29-year-old author. To be holed up in a straight-laced, soul-sucking office, wearing slicked-backed hair and a structured suit would have been a tremendous waste of talent. In his debut short story collection "The Boat," Le demonstrates that leaving law and turning toward literature was the best decision he possibly could have made. One of the stories in the collection features as a main character a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/351-05132008-1533278.html

Sparks comments on UI fertility lab policy (Omaha World-Herald, May 12)
Increasing numbers of single women nearing the end of their childbearing years are turning to sperm banks to become pregnant. AMY SPARKS, director of the University of Iowa reproductive testing laboratory, said that until two years ago, her lab did not serve single women because its ethics advisory board believed the two-parent model was vastly preferable. Ultimately, Sparks said, the lab's fertility services were in demand from single women. Further, she and the board decided that a single person who chooses to be a parent can do the job as well and in many cases has thought it through more fully than many couples.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1219&u_sid=10332462&u_rss=1&

Writer discusses Durham's 'Lolita Effect' (NetIndia123, May 12)
The racy photo shoot of 15-year-old Miley Cyrus has been dubbed as "The Lolita Effect" by an Indian-origin professor from University of Iowa. MEENAKSHI GIGI DURHAM, associate professor of journalism and mass communication at the University of Iowa, has slammed the media for circulating damaging myths that distort, undermine and restrict girls' sexual progress. The sexualization of teen girls, which she dubs "The Lolita Effect" in her book of the same name, is part of a larger marketing effort to create cradle-to-grave consumers. While writing in Dalhousie University's Nabokov Online Journal, Durham said that since the publication of the novel "Lolita" more than 50 years ago, it has become the favorite metaphor for a child vixen. Yet that perception is a misreading of Vladimir Nabokov's famous novel. Indeed, Lolita does nothing to attract Humbert Humbert's devouring and doomed passion. NetIndia123 bills itself as a premier online publisher of news and information specific to India.
http://www.netindia123.com/showdetails.asp?id=951247&cat=Entertainment&head=Miley+Cyrus+photo+scandal+latest+example+of+%27The+Lolita+Effect%27

Rosenquist co-chaired pain panel (Medical News Today, May 12)
RICHARD ROSENQUIST, assistant professor of anesthesiology at the University of Iowa, co-chaired a panel that has recommended new guidelines for treatment of chronic lower back pain. Medical News Today originates in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/107037.php

Iowa faces shortage of psychiatrists (Chicago Tribune, May 12)
Psychiatric help in rural areas is getting harder to find as Iowa continues to see a serious shortage of mental health professionals. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has the state's only psychiatric training program. The widely respected program attracts top students from around the country only to see most of them leave the state after graduation.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-psychiatristshort,0,1872138.story

UI medical student wins hematology award (Medical News Today, May 12)
Daniel Tawfik, a student in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, won a $4,000 Trainee Research Award from the American Society of Hematology to support research on blood and blood-related diseases.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/107042.php

Kramer collaborated on addiction research (Omniomix, May 12)
JOHN KRAMER
of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine collaborated on research that has discovered a gene linked to alcohol and cocaine dependence.
Omniomix is an online biotech magazine.
http://www.omniomix.com/inthenews.php?id=95252

UI will check athlete's websites (Arizona Daily Star, May 11)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA athletics board has approved guidelines allowing school administrators to check players' sites on public networking Web sites, such as Facebook and MySpace. This AP story is appearing widely.
http://www.azstarnet.com/allheadlines/238435

Shullaw assesses donations (WCCO, May 11)
Donations to the University of Iowa Foundation are up and it could be attributed to a more stable environment brought by the hiring of a new president in August. Donations are up nearly 5 percent so far this year, said SUSAN SHULLAW, senior vice president of the university's foundation. "It is always hard to make a direct correlation, but we have always said donors respond well when the organization is in good hands and has steady leadership," Shullaw said. WCCO is located in Minnesota. This story originated on Iowa AP.
http://wcco.com/iowawire/22.0.html?type=local&state=IA&category=n&filename=IA--UniversityDonatio.xml

Gordon book is examined (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, May 11)
In "Mapping Decline," author COLIN GORDON of the University of Iowa uses a new system for merging maps and statistics to survey the decline and fall of St. Louis as a great American city. An accompanying story looks at possible solutions.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/reviews.nsf/book/story/C83C0DC5A9076DD68625744400680379?OpenDocument

Lawrence finds newlyweds are aggressive (New Kerala, May 11)
A study by ERIKA LAWRENCE, assistant professor of psychology in the University of Iowa College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, discovered that 29 percent of newlywed couples are physically aggressive. More wives than husbands are aggressive: 24 percent versus 16 percent. Pushing, grabbing and shoving are the most common tactics. New Kerala is published in India. This story is appearing widely.
http://www.newkerala.com/one.php?action=fullnews&id=58645

UI researcher: educated mothers are role models for men (Daily Mail, May 10)
A study of high-achieving young men revealed their wives were highly likely to have been educated to the same level as their mothers. Two-thirds of those whose mothers were educated to masters or doctoral levels had wives with equivalent qualifications. "These young men look up to their mothers as role models," said researcher CHRISTINE WHELAN of the University of Iowa. ""They grew up in a family where their mothers were educated women. When they make their own choices about someone who they think will be a good wife in the future, or a good mother, they go back to their role models." The newspaper is published in the United Kingdom.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/femail/article.html?in_article_id=5652

Goree comments on plasma needles (NetIndia, May 10)
Chinese researchers have reported the successful development of "plasma needles," i.e. luminous jets of bacteria-killing ionized gas, which when put to use can revolutionize dental treatment and other medical uses. According to JOHN GOREE of the University of Iowa, the devices could lead to better understanding of what is happening inside the plasma, which could even help them develop peak bacteria-killing performance. This syndicated story is appearing widely.
http://www.netindia123.com/showdetails.asp?id=950810&cat=India&head=Soon%2C+%27plasma+needles%27+to+revolutionise+dental+treatment

Clinton falls in IEM (Electric New Paper, May 10)
A writer reporting on the latest data from the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS suggests that people betting on Hillary Clinton to win the Democratic nomination should forget it. "At press time last night, Mrs. Clinton was worth only around 4 U.S. cents while her rival Barak Obama was at a high of 88 U.S. cents," the story says, describing the IEM as an "experiment by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA." The Electric New Paper originates in Singapore.
http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/news/story/0,4136,164338,00.html

Story contrasts UI and UW approaches (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, May 9)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA committee on athletics approved new guidelines that will give school administrators the right to randomly check the social networking sites of Iowa athletes, and discipline those who violate school policies. At the University of Wisconsin, administrators are instructing athletes on the proper use of networking sites.
http://blogs.jsonline.com/badgers/archive/2008/05/09/uw-facebook-and-athletes.aspx

UI study shows firm handshakes helps land jobs (Business World, May 9)
Smartening up and smiling are key tactics for job seekers, but a simple well-delivered handshake could trump them both, according to a new study. Research by the University of Iowa found applicants with a firm handshake are far more likely to get the job than candidates with a limp grip. "We found that the first impression begins with a handshake that sets the tone for the rest of the interview," said researcher GREG STEWART, associate professor of management and organizations in the Tippie College of Business, in a statement. This article also appeared in the TIMES OF INDIA and REUTERS INDIA.
http://www.bworldonline.com/BW050908/content.php?id=082

Whelan: highly educated mothers role models for men (Times of India, May 9)
If a man's mother is highly educated, chances are the woman he marries will have a similar education, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Iowa found that nearly 80 precent of high-achieving men who were sons of mothers with college degrees married women with a similar education. And 62 percent of men whose mothers had graduate degrees tied the knot with a graduate degree holder. "These young men look up to their mothers as role models. They grew up in a family where their mothers were educated women," said sociologist CHRISTINE WHELAN, who conducted the study.
http://epaper.timesofindia.com/Default/Layout/Includes/TOI/Artwin.asp?From=Archive&Skin=TOI&BaseHref=TOIM/2008/05/09&EntityId=Ar01707&ViewMode=HTML&AppName=1

UI study cited in article on depression in moms (OhmyNews International, May 9)
According to researchers, postpartum depression affects as many as one in five women, particularly during the first year of motherhood. A study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA revealed that low-income women are much more likely to suffer from postpartum depression than wealthier women. OHMYNEWS INTERNATIONAL is a citizen journalism site covering issues around the globe.
http://english.ohmynews.com/articleview/article_view.asp?article_class=4&no=382531&rel_no=1

UI study: intelligent men choose wives like their moms (GQ Magazine UK, May 8)
It's previously been suggested by some brave (or foolish) individuals that all women turn into their mothers, but now it seems that intelligent men choose wives that resemble theirs. According to Reuters, researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that 80 percent of high-flying males whose mothers had college degrees married women with the same level of education.
http://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/daily_news/default.aspx?sid=52344

Solid handshake key in job interviews, study shows (Reuters, May 8)Smartening up and smiling are key tactics for job-seekers, but a simple well-delivered handshake could trump them both, according to a new study. Research by the University of Iowa found applicants with a firm handshake are far more likely to get the job than candidates with a limp grip. "We found that the first impression begins with a handshake that sets the tone for the rest of the interview," said researcher GEORGE STEWART, associate professor of management and organizations in the Tippie College of Business.
http://in.reuters.com/article/entertainmentNews/idINIndia-33471820080508

Study links weight issues to dementia, Alzheimer's (Daily Mail, May 7)
Researchers from the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md., and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, found obese people had a higher chance of dementia. Dangerously overweight subjects were 42 percent more likely to develop dementia. When it came to Alzheimer's disease, obesity pushed up the risk by 80 percent.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id

Study: Mother is role model in son's choice of wife (Reuters, May 7)
If a man's mother is highly educated, chances are the woman he marries will have a similar education, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Iowa found that nearly 80 percent of high-achieving men who were sons of mothers with college degrees married women with a similar education. And 62 percent of men whose mothers had graduate degrees tied the knot with a graduate degree holder. "These young men look up to their mothers as role models. They grew up in a family where their mothers were educated women," said sociologist CHRISTINE WHELAN, who conducted the study.
http://in.reuters.com/article/lifestyleMolt/idINN0647129420080507

UI team identifies treatment for vascular depression (WATE, May 7)
A team at the University of Iowa found that vascular depression can be treated with an experimental technique called repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. "These findings suggest that this new method of treatment may be particularly useful for these late-life onset depressions and that even greater response rates might be achieved by utilizing more pulses of magnetic stimulation," said DR. ROBERT ROBINSON, a professor of psychiatry. WATE is an ABC affiliate in Knoxville, Tenn.
http://www.wate.com/Global/story.asp?S=8283375&nav=menu7_2

Porter: mortgage companies improperly sought fees (San Jose Mercury News, May 7)
Mortgage lender Countrywide Financial, which is under investigation for inflating certain borrowers' fees, acknowledged Tuesday that it has made errors and pledged to take steps to improve its operations. But KATHERINE PORTER, a professor at the University of Iowa, testified that mortgage companies and servicers have improperly sought repayment for attorneys' fees and other costs without fully disclosing or documenting the fees. The Associated Press story also appeared on the Web site of THE SACRAMENTO BEE.
http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_9179099?source=rss

UI research shows handshakes matter in job interviews (China Daily, May 7)
If you're seeking employment, get a grip. A firm handshake is key to landing a job. A new study led by GREG STEWART, associate professor of management and organizations at the University of Iowa, put 98 students through mock job interviews with businesspeople. Students who got high handshake marks were also rated most hireable. This story also appeared on Yahoo News.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/world/2008-05/08/content_6670473.htm

Porter testifies about loan fees (Seattle Times, May 7)
KATHERINE PORTER, a professor at the University of Iowa, testified to a U.S. Senate panel that mortgage companies and servicers have improperly sought repayment for attorneys' fees and other costs without fully disclosing or documenting the fees. In some cases, companies have sought to foreclose on homes even after borrowers have discharged their debts through Chapter 13 bankruptcy, which allows debtors to keep their homes while working out payment plans for their debts. "The upsetting reality is that the current bankruptcy system routinely forces borrowers to pay bloated amounts and permits mortgage servicers to misbehave without serious consequence," she told the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on administration oversight and the courts. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared in the LOS ANGELES TIMES, NEW YORK TIMES, USA TODAY, HOUSTON CHRONICLE and many more media outlets.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2004396947_countrywide07.html

Treatments for vascular depression under development (Daily Advance, May 7)
New treatments for a type of depression in the elderly related to blood vessels -- called vascular depression -- are under development, and researchers have discovered why some patients with this condition fail to respond to current medications. A team at the University of Iowa found that vascular depression can be treated with an experimental technique called repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). They found that rTMS led to better remission rates than standard medication treatment, and that increasing the number of magnetic pulses significantly improved remission rates. "These findings suggest that this new method of treatment may be particularly useful for these late life onset depressions and that even greater response rates might be achieved by utilizing more pulses of magnetic stimulation," ROBERT ROBINSON, a professor of psychiatry, said in a prepared statement. The newspaper is published in Elizabeth City, N.C.
http://www.dailyadvance.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/agng/615210.html

Obesity linked to Alzheimer's disease (Daily Mail, May 7)
Obesity can increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease by up to 80 percent, researchers said. Cutting the prevalence of obesity in the population could help prevent people progressing to the stage they suffer dementia, they added. The experts, from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md., and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, found obese people had an increased risk of all types of dementia. The newspaper is based in Great Britain.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=564569&in_page_id=1770

UI moves up campus-wide smoking ban (KAAL-TV, May 7)
The University of Iowa is getting ready to go smoke free a year ahead of schedule. The timetable has been moved up because of a statewide public smoking ban that takes effect July 1. In February, UI President SALLY MASON approved recommendations from a task force to ban smoking campus-wide by July 1, 2009. That will now happen a year earlier to coincide with the statewide ban. The TV station serves the Rochester, Minn. area.
http://kaaltv.com/article/stories/S435269.shtml?cat=10218

UI research cited in article on treating vascular depression (KMPH, May 7)
Vascular depression is a recently recognized type of depression that usually develops in patients older than age 60. The condition is associated with loss of blood supply to the brain. A team at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that vascular depression can be treated with an experimental technique called repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). This article originated in HEALTHDAY NEWS and appeared in six other media outlets. KMPH is a FOX affiliate based in Fresno, Calif.
http://www.kmph.com/Global/story.asp?S=8283375

Study: men with well-educated moms seek well-educated wives (Jezebel.com, May 6)
The old adage that men marry their mothers has some truth to it, according to researchers at the University of Iowa. They discovered that "If a man's mother is highly educated, chances are the woman he marries will have a similar education." Sociologist CHRISTINE WHELAN, the co-author of the study, said "For an increasing number of these men ... when they make their own choices about someone who they think will be a good wife in the future or a good mother, they go back to their role models." JEZEBEL is a women's blog that features "celebrity, sex and fashion without airbrushing." Note: some content on this site is for adult audiences.
http://jezebel.com/search/%22university%20of%20iowa%22/

UI's Porter testifies on mortgage companies and servicers (WGGT, May 6)
Mortgage lender Countrywide Financial Corp., which is under investigation for inflating certain borrowers' fees, acknowledged Tuesday that it has made errors and pledged to take steps to improve its operations. KATHERINE PORTER, a professor at the University of Iowa, testified to a Senate panel that mortgage companies and servicers have improperly sought repayment for attorneys' fees and other costs without fully disclosing or documenting the fees. WGGT is a FOX affiliated based in Washington, D.C.
http://www.myfoxdc.com/myfox/pages/Business/Detail?contentId=6478235&version=1&locale=EN-US&layoutCode=TSTY&pageId=4.3.1

UI's Porter testifies before senate panel (Huffington Post, May 6)
KATHERINE PORTER
, a professor at the University of Iowa, testified in front a senate panel that mortgage companies and servicers have improperly sought repayment for attorneys' fees and other costs without fully disclosing or documenting the fees. In some cases, companies have sought to foreclose on homes even after borrowers have discharged their debts through the Chapter 13 bankruptcy process, which allows debtors to keep their homes while working out payment plans for their debts.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/05/07/countrywide-admits-to-mak_n_100598.html

Peterson comments on late-night comedy and politics (WTAX, May 5)
RUSSELL PETERSON, a faculty member in the UI's Department of American Studies, talks about his new book, "Strange Bedfellows: How Late-Night Comedy Turns Democracy into a Joke." He says some political comedy can reinforce the cynicism and apathy about the democratic process. The radio station is based in Springfield, Ill. [Note: If the link to an audio clip of the story below doesn't work please copy and paste it into your browser address window.]
http://70.84.248.232/station_files/original_1210004855__.mp3

Durham explains "The Lolita Effect" (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, May 4)
University of Iowa journalism professor GIGI DURHAM discusses how marketers' efforts to create lifelong consumers have contributed to sexualization of young girls in the media. Her book, "The Lolita Effect: The Media Sexualization of Young Girls and What We Can Do About It" is featured in the package. Please note: The full article is only available in PDF format. Clicking the link below will download the PDF and/or launch your PDF software, such as Adobe Acrobat.
http://news-releases.uiowa.edu/2008/may/Lolita_Effect_AJC.pdf

Porter research exposes potential wrongdoing by lenders (NBC Today Show, May 6)
Research by University of Iowa law professor KATHERINE PORTER has found that some lenders may have engaged in wrongdoing that is making the housing crisis worse. This is a video clip. To access the video, scroll to and click on "Are lenders making crisis worse?" under the "video from TODAY" category.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/24480566#24480566

Redlawsk: Pressure might be on Clinton to drop out (Bloomberg, May 6)
In the ongoing campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, the economy, especially energy costs, has moved front and center as the two candidates focused their messages for today's primaries in Indiana and North Carolina. Both candidates need at least one victory. For Clinton "the pressure to drop out will be immense if she loses both of these states," DAVID REDLAWSK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, said.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aZCLxfJBdXHU&refer=home

UI moves up smoke-free timetable (Chicago Tribune, May 6)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is getting ready to go smoke free -- a year ahead of schedule. The time table has been moved up because of the statewide public smoking ban that starts July 1. In February, university President Sally Mason approved recommendations from a task force to ban smoking campuswide by July 1, 2009. That will now happen a year earlier to coincide with the statewide ban.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-uismokingban,0,7921950.story

UI breakthrough is step in fighting staph infections (UPI, May 6)
U.S. scientists say they have succeeded in killing established biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus by using one of the bacteria's own regulatory systems. Although the discovery isn't ready for clinical application, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers said their findings offer insight into a dispersal mechanism for staph biofilms and might help identify therapeutic targets.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Science/2008/05/05/upi_newstrack_health_and_science_news/2957/

UM-Flint chancellor is UI alumna (Flint Journal, May 6)
A profile of Sousan Coultrap-McQuin, new chancellor of the University of Michigan-Flint, notes that she earned her doctorate in American Studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.mlive.com/flintjournal/index.ssf/2008/05/umflint_chancellor_candidate_h.html

Story notes UI student loan borrowers (Chicago Tribune, May 5)
A story about a new Iowa law protecting Iowa student loan borrowers notes a recent report that showed that last year students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Northern Iowa graduated with an average debt of more than $22,000. Students at Iowa State University graduated with an average debt of more than $30,000, that report said. About 73 percent of students at ISU took out loans, compared to 78 percent at Northern Iowa and 61 percent at the University of Iowa, the report said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-xgr-culver-loans,0,3904735.story

Dogan is on award-winning research team (Daily Zaman, May 5)
A team of Turkish and U.S. doctors, including A. UMRAN DOGAN of the University of Iowa, has received an award of $100,000 for advances in cancer research related to their work in Cappadocia. Zaman Today is published in Turkey.
http://www.todayszaman.com/tz-web/detaylar.do?load=detay&link=140934

Art historian attended UI (San Francisco Chronicle, May 5)
An interview/feature about art historian Jane Dillenberger, who has documented Andy Warhol's religious interests, says she studied painting at the UI. "At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, I studied with the artist Grant Rutledge. That was wonderful -- I was one of his studio assistants when he was working on a mural. At that point, I had no idea that there was such a thing as art history. I'd always been a painter."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2008/05/05/findrelig.DTL

Rocklin comments on retention task force (Chicago Tribune, May 5)
Officials at Iowa's public universities want to close the graduation and retention gap between white and minority students. A task force has recommended closely monitoring grades of students at risk of failing, and improving the pool of minority applicants to the universities. "We must improve efforts to help more students of color do what is needed to be prepared for college," said University of Iowa Vice Provost TOM ROCKLIN, who served on the task force.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-regents-minorityr,0,4263572.story

Erik Lie says backdating actions are waning (Financial Week, May 5)
Option-backdating enforcement emerged from hibernation last week, as the Securities and Exchange Commission charged two former executives of Monster Worldwide with rigging option grant dates and settled its case against Broadcom. In addition, Pixar's former CFO, now a director at Google, was revealed to be under investigation for backdating. But regulators are now focusing on the credit crisis. "I imagine this issue has mostly disappeared [as a priority among regulators]," said ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa professor whose research in 2005 touched off the investigations into backdating.
http://www.financialweek.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080505/REG/500788054

Sculptor attended the UI (Deseret News, May 4)
A feature about sculptor JinMan Jo notes that he received his Master of Fine Arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,695275796,00.html

Lim was at UI on Fulbright grant (Straits Times, May 4)
A feature about writer Christine Lim notes that she was at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1996 on a Fulbright grant. The Straits Times is published in Singapore.
www.straitstimes.com/Lifestyle/Read/Story/STIStory_233683.html

UI Press writer reviews Graham's poetry (Guardian, May 3)
M. Wynn Thomas, author of "Transatlantic Connections: Whitman U.S., Whitman U.K." from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, reviewed the new collection of poems by UI alumna and former faculty member Jorie Graham. The Guardian is published in the U.K.
http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,,2277615,00.html

UI discovery has heart disease implications (Bioresearch Online, May 2)
A study, led by University of Iowa researchers, reveals a new dimension for a key heart enzyme and sheds light on an important biological pathway involved in cell death in heart disease. "Our results suggest that oxidation of CaM kinase is a dynamic and reversible process that may direct cell signaling in health and disease," said MARK ANDERSON, UI professor of internal medicine and molecular physiology and biophysic. "Because CaM kinase activity is involved in arrhythmias, hypertrophy and heart cell death, this work also provides new insights into a disease pathway in heart that may lead to development of new drugs to treat heart disease."
http://www.bioresearchonline.com/content/news/article.asp?DocID={5730788E-9B8E-4A46-BA99-694B2B9DF912}&Bucket=Current+Headlines&VNETCOOKIE=NO

Holtz was grad assistant at the UI (Lincoln Journal Star, May 2)
Stories about the election of former football coach and current TV sports analyst Lou Holtz to the Hall of Fame note that the UI played an important role in his career. One story starts, "Lou Holtz's first big break in his Hall of Fame career came when he got dumped by his girlfriend. With no good reason to stay in Ohio, he left a job coaching high school football and became a graduate assistant at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1960."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/wire/chi-ap-fbc-halloffame,0,7296675.story

Kutcher once passed out on a frozen river (Sunday Mirror, May 2)
In a feature on Ashton Kutcher, the actor revealed, "I've done quite a few things while drunk. Probably the worst was falling asleep on a frozen river when I was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. My buddy dared me to walk across the river and I slipped and passed out while I was doing so. He was too frightened to come and rescue me so I just stayed there, asleep on the ice, for a couple of hours." The Sunday Mirror is published in the UK.
http://www.sundaymirror.co.uk/showbiz/celebsonsunday/2008/05/02/ashton-kutcher-i-want-to-be-a-success-at-marriage-98487-20402967/

Gruca research is cited (Forbes, May 2)
Research shows companies that double down on customer service and store improvements during bad times rebound when the economy comes around. As tempting as it is to save a buck by cutting back when business is slow, studies like those by TOM GRUCA, a University of Iowa business professor, show a strong link between customer satisfaction and revenue over the long term.
http://www.forbes.com/home/2008/05/02/retail-home-depot-biz-commerce-cx_kn_0502homedepot.html

IEM one of two regulated prediction markets (Globeinvestor.com, May 2)
Only two U.S. prediction markets are officially regulated by the U.S. Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) -- the IOWA ELECTRONICS MARKET (IEM) at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which specializes in politics, and HedgeStreet, a division of Britain's IG Group Holdings, which offers a wide assortment of contracts. However, dozens of other exchanges have popped up around the world to cash in on the hype. The Hollywood Stock Exchange uses play money and focuses on entertainment topics such as movie box office receipts. GLOBEINVESTOR.COM is the online presence of THE GLOBE AND MAIL, based in Toronto, Canada.
http://www.globeinvestor.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080502.wrevent02/GIStory/

Berg: IEM used for research, teaching purposes (AOL Money, May 2)
The rising popularity of markets where guesses are wagered on the outcome of everything from presidential elections to celebrity marriages has led to a situation that, well, many had predicted. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission on Thursday said it is considering whether these markets should be regulated, and how. In the United States, the Iowa Electronic Markets, run by the University of Iowa business school, is one of the better-known markets in operation. It has about 1,000 traders at any given time who can invest up to $500 to trade on a variety of contracts, including the outcome of the presidential elections. In 1993, the commission granted an exemption to IEM, which is primarily used for research and teaching purposes, said the market's director, JOYCE BERG, who is also an accounting professor. This AP story appeared in seven other media outlets.
http://money.aol.com/news/articles/_a/regulators-seek-input-on-event-wagering/20080501222909990001

UI scientists receive photos of Saturn storm (Yahoo!7 News, May 2)
An amateur astronomer from far western New South Wales is providing NASA with information about a storm on Saturn. Trevor Barry from Broken Hill says he first noticed the storm in February, when he was photographing the planet on a webcam. He has been sending pictures of the storm to scientists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The images ended up with NASA, which had been tracking the storm since November last year with equipment aboard the Cassini spacecraft. YAHOO!7 originates in Western Australia.
http://au.news.yahoo.com/080502/21/16p9h.html

McMurray finds parallels between bird, baby babbling (ABC News, May 1)
The happy babbling that entertains parents as their babies try to mimic speech turns out to have a parallel in the animal world. Baby birds babble away before mastering their adult song, researchers report in today's edition of the journal Science. Michale S. Fee and colleagues at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology studied the brains of baby zebra finches as the little birds learned the unique song they would use as adults. The baby birds practiced making sounds incessantly, the team reports. "The parallels between human and bird language are indeed striking," said psychology professor BOB MCMURRAY of the University of Iowa, though there are also important differences between the structure of human language and bird song. The VENTURA COUNTY STAR is published in Camarillo, Calif. This AP story also appeared in more than 60 other media outlets nationally and internationally.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=4766154

UI researchers help wipe out staph biofilms (BrightSurf.com, May 1)
University of Iowa researchers have succeeded in wiping out established biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus (staph) by hijacking one of the bacteria's own regulatory systems. Although the discovery is not ready for clinical application, the findings offer insight into a dispersal mechanism for staph biofilms and might help identify therapeutic targets. The findings were published in the journal Public Library of Science - Pathogens on April 25. "We have shown that activating the cells' communication system, also known as quorum sensing, in established biofilms causes the biofilms to disperse rapidly," said ALEXANDER HORSWILL, Ph.D., UI assistant professor of microbiology and senior study author. BRIGHTSURF.Com is an online news source providing science news and current science events in health, the environment, space and technology.
http://www.brightsurf.com/news/headlines/37541/Turning_on_cell-cell_communication_wipes_out_staph_biofilms.html

UI alumnus supports new wind innovation alliance (Business Week, May 1)
Iowa Gov. Chet Culver announced Wednesday the creation of an alliance to train Iowans for high-paying jobs in the growing wind energy industry. Culver said the newly formed Iowa Alliance for Wind Innovation and Novel Development would combine research, public policy, training and education. The alliance will include the state's three public universities and community colleges, which will work together to expand offerings in wind technology programs. Randall Swisher, the executive director of the American Wind Energy Association, offered his support to the alliance. Swisher, who grew up in Atlantic and attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said the state's central location, strong transportation network and its strategic economic development program are keys to its wind energy success.
http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D90CU3Q07.htm

Solow: not everyone's income falls during a recession (Yahoo Sports, May 1)
Gas prices are up. Food prices are up. So, oddly enough, is attendance at Major League Baseball games. JOHN SOLOW, an economics professor at the University of Iowa points out that not everyone's income falls during a recession. "In total, people are getting poorer or it wouldn't be considered a recession," he said. "But there are some people whose income continues to rise. What fraction of those tickets are sold to Joe Six-Pack and his family as opposed to corporations?"
http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/news?slug=jo-mlbandrecession043008&prov=yhoo&type=lgns

Arkansas dean Nance is UI law alumna (The Lutheran, May 2008)
A profile of Cynthia Nance, dean of the University of Arkansas School of Law and the first African-American woman to head any school at the university, notes that she is a alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://www.thelutheran.org/article/article.cfm?article_id=7101&id=1

 

 

 

 

 

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