The University of Iowa
University News Services
Archives Services Contact Us A-Z Search

UI in the News

March 2008

See UI in the New Archive Index

Lutgendorf study cited (Chicago Daily Herald, March 31)
A study by researcher SUSAN K. LUTGENDORF of the Department of Psychology at the University of Iowa, published in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine, showed that people who are moving report more illnesses. But folks who prepare in advance for a move and who have a sense of control in the relocation process feel less stressed or overwhelmed and have a better sense of wellbeing.
http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=162027

UI studied teen driving safety (Wisconsin State Journal, March 31)
About 3,000 young drivers in Madison, Wis., are participating in the Teen Safe Driver Program, which uses a camera to record potentially dangerous events. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study of 25 teens in Tiffin, Iowa, found that the worst drivers improved 72 percent after nine weeks in the program.
http://www.madison.com/wsj/topstories/279304

Lee comments on technology and driving (MSNBC, March 31)
A columnist writing about new technological devices loaded onto cars and other vehicles wonder if the gizmos are too distracting to drivers. Unlike the drug approval process governed by the Food and Drug Administration, many car systems are sold independently of the vehicles, complicating the ability of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to monitor their safety. "So from a regulatory side, there's some gaps in terms of who's responsible," said JOHN LEE, Director of Human Factors Research at the National Advanced Driving Simulator at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "Also, there hasn't been a really well-stated or well-defined arrangement for assessing how new technology is changing driving for the better or the worse."
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23812128/

Story cites UI credit card agreement with Bank of America (Motley Fool, March 31)
A story about the potential dangers of college students using credit cards refers to a study by the United States Public Interest Research Group that cites an agreement between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Bank of America, in which the school gives out mailing lists of students to help market school-branded credit cards to students and alumni.
http://www.fool.com/personal-finance/credit/2008/03/31/dont-start-out-on-the-wrong-foot.aspx

Warner discusses student loan credit crunch (BusinessWeek, March 30)
The college acceptance letters are coming in, and for many families the search for student loans is just beginning. For this year's crop of students, however, shopping for a loan, especially a private student loan, can be more difficult than usual because of turmoil in the credit markets. In the past few months, dozens of lenders have announced they are suspending some of their student loan programs or, in some instances, eliminating them entirely. Students can take some actions to combat the uncertainty, however. Among them is to exhaust Federal loans first. "Private loans should absolutely be a last resort for a student," says MARK WARNER, University of Iowa's student financial aid director. Federal loans have a set interest rate that is fixed by the government for the life of the loan; private loans may not.
http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/content/mar2008/bs20080330_510051.htm?chan=search

Porter cited in foreclosure story (The Ledger, March 30)
A story about the jump in foreclosures cites recent analysis of 1,733 foreclosures across the country by KATHERINE M. PORTER, associate professor of law at the University of Iowa, which showed that questionable fees were added to borrowers' bills in almost half the loans. The Ledger is published in Florida. A March 30 story about the foreclosure woes of a Georgia couple, in the Atlanta Journal Constitution, also cited Porters research.
http://www.theledger.com/article/20080330/ZNYT01/803300358/1001/BUSINESS
http://www.ajc.com/business/content/business/stories/2008/03/28/countrywide_0330.html

Sampson is feature subject (Columbia Tribune, March 30)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA intermedia art alumna Cherie Sampson is the subject of a feature. The Columbia Tribune is published in Missouri.
http://www.columbiatribune.com/2008/Mar/20080330Ovat003.asp

Stegner biography is reviewed (Boston Globe, March 30)
A review of "Wallace Stegner and the American West" notes his time as a student and teacher in the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa.
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2008/03/30/portrait_of_stegner_slightly_skewed/

Peterson book is reviewed (St. Catharine's Standard, March 29)
"Strange Bedfellows: How Late-Night Comedy Turns Democracy Into a Joke" by University of Iowa American studies faculty member RUSSELL L. PETERSON is reviewed. The St. Catharine's Standard is published in Canada. A variety of reviews of Peterson's book continue to appear internationally.
http://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=963823

Hogan research cited (Earthtimes, March 28)
A story about the 60th anniversary of the Marshall Plan cites reconstruction-resource research by MICHAEL HOGAN of the University of Iowa. Earthtimes is published in the UK. This story is appearing internationally.
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/195324,historic-marshall-plan-marks-60th-anniversary--feature.html

Gronbeck comments on t-shirts (AzCentral/Columbia News Service, March 28)
Does the volume of t-shirts and other political merchandise predict the outcome of elections? "We're using our bodies and extensions of our bodies to create a political identity of who we are," said BRUCE GRONBECK, a professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa. "You hope it becomes psychological confirmation that you picked right, that you backed the winning horse, and you have the t-shirt to prove it."
http://www.azcentral.com/ent/pop/articles/0328politicalmerch0328.html

UI campus minister supports gay marriage (365Gay.com, March 28)
A campus minister at the UI has joined two former Iowa Lieutenant Governors in submitting an amicus brief to the Iowa Supreme Court on behalf of six same-sex couples and their families seeking marriage in Iowa. "As a minister I value marriage and family and believe that loving couples should have an equal chance to experience the joy, comfort and responsibility that marriage provides. Couples who seek to care for one another and their families within the bonds of marriage should be embraced and celebrated," said the Rev. Paul Schultz, director of the Wesley Foundation at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who was a signatory on the faith leader amicus brief. 365Gay.com is a U.S.-based gay news Web site.
http://www.365gay.com/Newscon08/03/032808iom.htm

Onwuachi-Willig comments on gay marriage (Pink News, March 28)
As the issue of gay marriage goes before the Iowa Supreme Court, ANGELA ONWUACHI-WILLIG, professor of law at the University of Iowa, pointed to Iowa's history of marriage equality: "We look back with pride that Iowa eliminated its ban on interracial marriage 116 years before the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision in Loving v. Virginia which struck down such laws around the country and declared that marriage is a fundamental right," she said. "One hundred and sixteen years from now I hope Iowans will be able to look back proudly at its place in history allowing same-sex couples to marry." Pink News is a gay news outlet that originates in the UK.
http://www.pinknews.co.uk/news/view.php?id=7255

Thompson chaired cancer taskforce (Omaha World-Herald, March 28)
NANCY THOMPSON, a University of Iowa faculty member in public health, chaired an Iowa colorectal cancer screening task force. She said the Iowa Department of Public Health plans to employ a person whose main focus is colon and rectal cancer.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1219&u_sid=10295809

Report cites UI-branded credit card (Inside Higher Ed, March 28)
A new survey, "The Campus Credit Card Trap," from the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG), finds widespread student support for restricting aggressive marketing practices on campuses. The report devotes significant space to the University of Iowa-branded Bank of America card marketed to students. University alumni associations, like Iowa's, benefit financially from the affinity, or university branded, credit cards, by lending the university's name in exchange for fees. STEVE PARROTT, the spokesman for the University of Iowa, said the terms of the agreement with Bank of America have since been renegotiated. They are no longer providing student information to the bank, he said. But, he added, any information in the directory not restricted by individual students, staff or faculty is publicly available under state open records laws.  A related story about the report appeared in the BERKSHIRE EAGLE in Massachusetts.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2008/03/28/credit

Universities crack down on late grade submissions (Inside Higher Ed, March 28)
Various institutions have tried various measures to crack down on the problem of faculty turning their grades in late: sending nasty notes, putting warnings in instructors' personnel files, even delaying the paychecks of faculty members who turn in their grades late, as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES threatens to do.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2008/03/28/grades

'Dark Matter' film screened (New York Times, March 28)
Director Chen Shi-Zheng recently returned from Los Angeles, where he screened his intentionally disturbing film, "Dark Matter," a fictionalized version of a 1991 shooting by a distraught Chinese graduate student who killed five UNIVERSITY OF IOWA colleagues and himself at a physics department meeting. The stunned audience at Caltech clapped and cried. This is Chen's first foray into filmmaking and lasts just 88 minutes. "I wanted to create the cinematic equivalent of a Chinese scroll painting," he says. "To many Chinese students in the early 1990s, the tragic shooting that spawned the idea for this film mirrored their own struggles to thrive in a new and unwelcoming culture. These students had shrunk their American dreams to fit American realities."
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/28/nyregion/28lives.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion&oref=slogin

UI policy on graduate thesis noted (Los Angeles Times, March 28)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA caused a bit of a dust-up recently by changing the terms for graduate theses -- to make them "open access," available online, for free, to anyone. Students in the writing program, one of the country's most prestigious, balked. Eventually, the issue was resolved: The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that the university will not publish theses from students in the writing programs as open-access documents. This item appeared in the "Jacket Copy" blog on the Times' Web site.
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/jacketcopy/2008/03/a-strong-thesis.html

Academic's finance research seen as relevant  (CFO.com, March 27)
A task force of the AACSB (a school-accrediting organization that also goes by the moniker Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) strongly suggested that academic studies do more to fill the needs presented by American business. Even as business schools draw fire for producing too little research of real relevance to corporate America, the area of finance may be the single most notable exception -- an area in which theory after theory is used to solve daily business problems. The AACSB task force noted the work on stock-option backdating done in recent years by professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and New York University, which lay the groundwork for policy changes -- and perhaps even prosecutions of managers who abused the system by picking artificially low strike prices that gave executives "in the money" compensation that wasn't properly recorded and taxed. CFO.com is the Web presence for CFO Publishing, which produces a number of magazines including CFO, CFO Asia, CFO Europe, an in-language edition, CFO China, and the new CFO Russia.
http://www.cfo.com/article.cfm/10927537/c_10923636?f=home_todayinfinance

UI sociologist comments on Sueppel case (CBS.com, March 27)
Before he died in a fiery crash, Steven Sueppel, 42 of Iowa City, left a hand-written. four-page note in which he detailed how he killed his family, then tried to kill himself. Sueppel mentioned in the note the embarrassment and other fallout from criminal charges he faced. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sociologist and police investigators told the Des Moines Register that Sueppel may have felt pressure to maintain his family's standard of living after his wife stopped working and the couple adopted four children.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/03/27/national/main3974308.shtml

Loh named UI provost (Seattle Times, March 27)
Wallace Loh, dean of the Seattle University College of Arts and Sciences, has been named executive vice president and provost of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It's a homecoming of sorts for Loh, who left China for Peru as a child and came to Iowa at age 16 to enroll in college at Iowa Wesleyan. He transferred to Grinnell College, where he earned his undergraduate degree, and later earned a law degree from Yale University. This Associated Press story also appeared on MONTANASNEWSSTATION.COM, a Web site for seven TV stations in Montana.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2004309711_apiauiprovost.html

Sale analyzes Paulson speech on U.S. economy (Marketplace, March 26)
HILLARY SALE, a professor of corporate and securities law at the University of Iowa, helped analyze Wednesday's speech by U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson about the credit crunch currently roiling the economy. Marketplace is heard on many public radio stations.
http://marketplace.publicradio.org/display/web/2008/03/26/paulson_candc/

Carmichael study examines impact of soot (New York Times, March 26)A new study published online this week in Nature Geoscience, finds that soot may be more than twice as potent a warming influence as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated last year. The study, co-authored by GREG CARMICHAEL of the University of Iowa, also proposes that regional emissions of dark carbon particulates in south Asia could be contributing to the melting of the ice locked in the Himalayas.
http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/03/26/soot-in-the-greenhouse-and-kitchen/

UI virtual soldier project noted (Detroit News, March 26)
The same motion-capture technology that is used to animate movies and video games is tapped by Ford to model the way workers move on the assembly line and design processes that are less stressful on their bodies. The U.S. Department of Defense is interested in Ford's work. It has asked the automaker to collaborate with a team at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to develop a virtual soldier.
http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080326/AUTO01/803260352&imw=Y

Former UI athlete faces sexual predator sentence (Seattle Times, March 26)
King County prosecutors argued in court Tuesday that a former Bothell man should be civilly committed as a sexually violent predator because of a penchant for assaulting, stalking and propositioning women. Toney Bates, 38, a former star athlete who had a brief stint with the Canadian Football League, has been involved in more than two dozen incidents of sexual misconduct, including 21 while he was attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on a football scholarship in 1993, according to charging documents filed in King County Superior Court. Prosecutors are seeking to have Bates sentenced indefinitely to the Special Commitment Center on McNeil Island as a sexually violent predator.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2004306501_sexoffender26m.html

Iowa City on 'Live and Launch' list (Fortune Small Business, March 26)
The magazine has ranked Iowa City 21st on its "Best Places to Live and Launch" list, which ranks towns with the best mix of business advantages and lifestyle appeal. An accompanying article notes that "the economic corridor that stretches from Iowa City to Cedar Rapids has emerged as a powerful locus of economic growth, not only in film but also in computer simulation, bioengineering and renewable energy. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a major research institution, and Kirkwood Community College (with 15,000 students across seven counties and programs supporting emerging high-tech industries in the area) supply one of the best-trained work forces in the country."
http://money.cnn.com/2008/03/18/smbusiness/iowa_city.fsb/

Officer retires, but will stick with bagpipes (East Valley Tribune, March 26)
During a formal ceremony Tuesday, the Scottsdale Police Department honored Cmdr. David Marshall, retiring after 31 years with Scottsdale police. He has played the bagpipes for more than four years for the department's honor guard, which plays at special events and memorializes officers who have died. Marshall said he became interested in playing the bagpipes when he saw the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA marching band as a young boy. The newspaper is published in Arizona.
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/story/112186

Purdue names provost (WTHI-TV, March 26)
Purdue University's dean of agriculture has been chosen as the school's next provost. Purdue named William "Randy" Woodson to replace Victor Lechtenberg, who has been interim provost since SALLY MASON left to become president of the University of Iowa. The ASSOCIATED PRESS report appeared in several Indiana media outlets. WTHI serves the Terre Haute, Ind. area.
http://www.wthitv.com/Global/story.asp?S=8071274&nav=menu593_2

Peterson examines politics, late night comedy (Associated Press, March 25)
Ask a 30-something to impersonate George H.W. Bush, and chances are you'll get the Saturday Night Live version -- an imitation of former cast member Dana Carvey nasally intoning "Not gonna do it" or "Wouldn't be prudent." As time passes, the senior Bush will be remembered more by those Carvey impressions than for his accomplishments, suggests RUSSELL PETERSON, a former stand-up comic who teaches American studies at the University of Iowa. That's just one example of how late-night comedy can influence the way we think of, and remember, our political figures, he writes in "Strange Bedfellows: How Late-Night Comedy Turns Democracy Into a Joke."  The article appeared in the COLUMBUS (Ohio) DISPATCH.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080325/ap_en_ot/book_review_strange_bedfellows

Sale comments on Clear Channel buyout (Reuters, March 25)
The $20 billion leveraged buyout of U.S. radio operator Clear Channel Communications Inc was in jeopardy on Tuesday, with banks increasingly reluctant to provide financing, a source familiar with the situation said. If the deal does fall apart, it could follow others such as United Rentals into litigation. "A lot has changed since this deal was announced," said HILLARY SALE, professor of corporate finance and law at the University of Iowa College of Law. "Someone's going to have to pay breakup fees, and the question is, whether it's just private equity firms, or whether the banks are on the hook ... It depends on the nature of the agreements with the banks." The article appeared on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES and several other media outlets.
http://www.reuters.com/article/businessNews/idUSWEN465420080326?sp=true

Umbach finds gender-based salary gap is real (Inside Higher Ed, March 25)
Surveys abound showing that women in academe (and the rest of society) earn less than men. Likewise theories abound for why this is the case so many years after it ceased to be acceptable for deans (or other bosses) to automatically assume a woman could make do with less. PAUL UMBACH, a scholar at the University of Iowa who has been mining national data, presented his latest findings Monday at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. The results, in short, say that -- even using the most sophisticated possible approach to take into consideration nonsexist reasons for pay differentials -- a pay gap remains, based on gender. And while this can't be definitively tied to sexism, there aren't a lot of likely alternative explanations. But the study also found that some of the explanations that do exist -- in particular based on disciplines and the types of institutions where women are more likely to find jobs -- suggest that the salary gaps may be here to stay, unless higher education thinks very differently about reward structures.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2008/03/25/salarygap

Umbach searches for source of salary gap (The Chronicle of Higher Ed, March 25)
It's where women teach, more than what they teach, that accounts for their poorer earnings in the academic work force, a researcher from the University of Iowa suggested at a conference here on Monday. For decades, scholars have tried to sort out how much of the gender gap in wages is caused by raw discrimination and how much is driven by mediating factors. Female faculty members have sometimes been found, for example, to have fewer and less-prestigious postgraduate degrees, on average, than their male colleagues. Some studies have also found that women are concentrated in fields or institutions that attract relatively little external research money, or where faculty members publish less frequently. Those mediating factors do not necessarily excuse the gender gap, because they might themselves reflect various kinds of past and present sexism. But they complicate efforts to understand and remedy wage disparities. On Monday afternoon, a scholar suggested a way to clarify the question. During a panel discussion at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, PAUL D. UMBACH, an assistant professor of higher education at the University of Iowa, offered a new statistical technique for assessing wage inequalities. He argued that his method -- known as a cross-classified random-effects model -- offers a richer and more accurate picture than scholars' previous analyses of the gender gap.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2008/03/2238n.htm

Carmichael: Carbon worsens climate change (Los Angeles Times, March 25)
Black carbon pollution, or soot, produced by burning wood, coal, cow dung and diesel fuel, may be a much greater contributor to global warming than previously suspected, according to a study released this week. The report concludes that the atmospheric warming effect of black carbon pollution is as much as three to four times the consensus estimate released last year in a report by the U.N.-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The findings are of concern to areas such as the Indian subcontinent, where retreating glaciers in the Himalayas have the potential to flood densely populated areas and affect the drinking water of billions of people. Unlike carbon dioxide, which traps solar energy radiating back from Earth's surface, black carbon particles absorb solar radiation as it enters Earth's atmosphere, increasing its heat. In addition, when they precipitate onto snowy areas, they increase heat absorption that leads to glacial melting. The particles come from burning dung, wood, coal and other materials for household use, and travel in "brown clouds." "In Los Angeles, it's what you see outside your door on the horizon," said V. Ramanathan, an atmospheric scientist with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Ramanathan performed the study with GREG CARMICHAEL, a chemical engineer at the University of Iowa. (French and English news service wire stories on this research continue to appear in newspapers around the world.)
http://www.latimes.com/wireless/avantgo/la-na-carbon25mar25,0,4408343.story

Survey finds Tippie M.B.A. has competitive students (Entrepreneur, March 25)
A survey of M.B.A. programs ranks the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS number seven in the category of "Most Competitive Students."
http://www.entrepreneur.com/magazine/entrepreneur/2008/april/191426.html

Everson comments on language development in children (Lansing State Journal, March 25)
A story about teaching a second language to children notes that early education is especially important for learning a language. Children are particularly tuned in to acquiring language and figuring out how language is built, says MICHAEL EVERSON, an associate professor in the University of Iowa College of Education who specializes in foreign-language acquisition. "Very early, children can break this code that there are different sounds in the language," Everson says. "[Nursery rhymes and poems] help kids develop . . . how the sound system of their language works." The State Journal is published in Michigan.
http://www.lsj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080325/LIFE03/803250306/1079/life

UI sends alert after Iowa City killings (Associated Press, March 24)
A story about an apparent murder-suicide in Iowa City Monday notes that based on the police alert of a gunman, students and faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA received text and telephone messages warning that there was an active shooter in the Iowa City area. Versions of this story appeared on the Web sites of dozens of news organizations.
http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5hUSHKMDe-bOU2STvsbOMXahsCLKgD8VJVUR82

Carmichael research expands on carbon's link to global warming (Popular Science, March 24)
In a new review article in Nature Geoscience, two scientists say that black carbon, the stuff that gets kicked up into the air from biomass burning and diesel engines, among other things, could account for as much as 60 percent of the warming effect of carbon dioxide. That's three to four times greater than most estimates, and more than that of any greenhouse gas save CO2. Scripps atmospheric scientist V. Ramanathan and University of Iowa chemical engineer GREG CARMICHAEL looked at data from satellites, aircraft and surface instruments to gauge the real effect of black carbon.
http://www.popsci.com/environment/article/2008-03/breaking-down-bad-stuff-air

Carmichael study shows carbon soot worsens global warming (Sify News, March 24)
Black carbon pollution -- soot, diesel exhaust -- is a greater contributor to global warming than believed earlier, according to leading atmospheric scientist V. Ramanathan of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. And China and India are major culprits, together accounting for between 25 and 35 percent of black carbon emissions. Produced by biomass burning, cooking with solid fuels and diesel exhaust, black carbon has a warming effect three to four times greater than estimated, Madurai-born Ramanathan has written in the journal Nature Geoscience. The article, co-authored by GREG CARMICHAEL of the University of Iowa, said that soot and other forms of black carbon could have as much as 60 percent of the current global warming effect of carbon dioxide, more than that of any greenhouse gas. Sify News is published in India. The same story appeared on the Web sites of WEBINDIA 123 and THE HINDU.
http://sify.com/news/fullstory.php?id=14629010

Yankowitz explains increase in C-sections (ABCNews.com, March 24)
In 10 years, the proportion of American women having surgical deliveries jumped by 62 percent, from 800,000 women in 1995 to 1.3 million in 2005, according to a report released in February by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. That means nearly one in three pregnancies now ends with a C-section. Dr. JERRY YANKOWITZ, director of maternal-fetal medicine at the University of Iowa, said the increase can be explained partially by medical advancements that decrease the risk of a surgical delivery. A number of women choose to have C-sections out of convenience or to avoid some of the side effects of a vaginal delivery. "You put it all together and it gives doctors more permission to do C-sections," said Yankowitz. "Our threshold (for performing C-sections) today would be much, much lower than any past decade."
http://www.abcnews.go.com/Health/ReproductiveHealth/story?id=4513196&page=1

Katsouros discusses warning sirens (The Chronicle of Higher Ed, March 24)
Colleges and universities around the country, ever more mindful of campus safety, are installing outdoor sirens. The systems can blast spoken messages or tone alerts of danger -- and one of the preset messages on many of the public-address systems warns: "There is a shooter on campus. Seek shelter immediately." At least a dozen campuses have installed sirens or announced plans to do so in the past year. The systems are expensive, often costing more than $100,000 to purchase and set up. Still, "it's pretty prevalent out there," says MARK S. KATSOUROS, director of telecommunication and network services at the University of Iowa, who has spoken at recent conferences about emergency-notification strategies. "Many of the peers I've talked to are at least looking at similar systems." (Iowa installed one over the summer.)
http://chronicle.com/free/2008/03/2221n.htm

UI student's short play performed in Broadway festival (Broadway World, March 24)
Aspen's acclaimed Theater Masters will present its second annual "Take 10," an evening of nine, 10-minute plays from aspiring playwrights across the country as part of its National M.F.A. Playwrights competition April 15-18 at Off Broadway's 59E59 Theaters in New York. Among the plays in the line-up are "The Echo," by Jennifer Fawcett from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, in which a tragic accident haunts the adult soul of a childhood survivor.
http://broadwayworld.com/viewcolumn.cfm?colid=26325

Carmichael comments on soot findings (Guardian, March 24)
Most particulates in the atmosphere reduce the warming effect from greenhouse gases by bouncing radiation back into space -- so-called global dimming. But black carbon has the opposite effect and its contribution to global warming has been underestimated. "The aerosols in aggregate are either acting to, you could say, cool the atmosphere or mask the effect of CO2," said GREG CARMICHAEL of the University of Iowa, "[Black carbon] is the only component of this aerosol mix that in and of itself is a heating element. Trying to develop strategies that really go after black carbon is really a very good short-term strategy and a win-win strategy for both climate and air pollution perspectives." The Guardian originates in the UK.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/mar/24/climatechange.fossilfuels

Carmichael soot study noted (Australian Broadcasting Company, March 24)
In a radio interview broadcast throughout Australia, GREG CARMICHAEL of the University of Iowa said, "Black carbon's contribution to global warming is more significant than originally thought and amounts to about 60 per cent as powerful as carbon dioxide as a greenhouse warming agent."
http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2008/s2197191.htm

Gronbeck comments on 'HillPublicans' (Mail & Guardian, March 24)
Some pundits are calling them the HillPublicans. They are hardcore Republicans who are going against their previous political beliefs and voting for Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton to disrupt the party's nomination process, a strategy pushed by Rush Limbaugh. "With Hillary Clinton there are just so many possible targets. I am sure that Republicans would be licking their lips at the thought of having her in their sights again," said BRUCE GRONBECK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. The Mail & Guardian originates in Zimbabwe.
http://www.mg.co.za/articlepage.aspx?area=/breaking_news/breaking_news__international_news/&articleid=335295&referrer=RSS

UI will test North Dakota water (InForum, March 24)
Fargo, N.D., will begin testing for traces of pharmaceutical drugs in drinking water supplies. Fargo has hired a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA lab to do the testing.
http://www.in-forum.com/ap/index.cfm?page=view&id=D8VJ79H02

Hageman makes macular degeneration discoveries (Forbes, March 24)
University of Iowa ophthalmologist GREGORY HAGEMAN, at the forefront of research on lasting treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), uncovered how AMD is linked to three variations of the so-called complement factor H gene, which is a crucial player in regulating the immune system.
http://www.forbes.com/home/forbes/2008/0324/076.html

Carmichael researches global warming (Terra Daily, March 23)
GREG CARMICHAEL of the University of Iowa is co-author of an article in Nature arguing that sharply reducing the amount of black carbon -- a form of particulate air pollution most often produced from biomass burning, cooking with solid fuels and diesel exhaust -- in the atmosphere could help slow global warming. This French news wire story is appearing internationally, and other versions of the story are also appearing widely. http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Curbing_soot_could_blunt_global_warming_study_999.html

McCormally studies voting machines (Statesman, March 23)
Eight years after glitches marred the 2000 presidential elections, Americans are still struggling over voting machine technology amid growing concerns about the reliability of electronic systems. About 80 per cent of Americans use systems where votes are cast or tabulated by computer including 38 percent who used so-called direct recording electronic voting machines, according to a study by JOHN MCCORMALLY of the University of Iowa. The Statesman is published in India. This story is appearing internationally. http://www.thestatesman.net/page.news.php?clid=8&theme=&usrsess=1&id=196391

UI alumna wins lifetime achievement award (News-Press, March 23)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
alumna Phebe Scott received a lifetime achievement award for her championing of women's athletics as athletic director at Illinois State University. The News-Press originates in Florida. http://www.news-press.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080323/LIFESTYLES/803230321/1013/LIFESTYLES

UI alumnus writes after retirement (Wall Street Journal, March 22)
Russell Miller's career in international marketing took him to more than 100 countries. But it wasn't until he retired that he began to explore Central Europe and the former Soviet-bloc countries. His experiences in that part of the world have inspired him to write and publish four books, including his first novel, "The Spy With a Clean Face," released early this year. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1952.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120578922140143095.html

McNulty is featured (Valley Independent, March 22)
University of Iowa emeritus geology professor MICHAEL MCNULTY is the subject of a feature. The Valley Independent is published in Pennsylvania.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/valleyindependent/news/s_558562.html

Catlett earned first M.F.A. degree at UI (Winston-Salem Chronicle, March 21)
Poet and author Dr. Maya Angelou will conduct a conversation with famed artist Elizabeth Catlett on Saturday, April 12 in Winston-Salem's Delta Arts Center. The event will serve as a fundraiser for Catlett's 93rd birthday and as a fundraiser for Delta Arts Center. Catlett obtained her masters at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "There, I got into my first sculpture class," she recalls, "and I liked it better than painting. So I decided to get my degree in sculpture instead of painting." The degree she earned, in 1940, was the first Master of Fine Arts -- the highest degree in art ever granted at the University of Iowa at that time. The newspaper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.wschronicle.com//index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=977&Itemid=41

Kerber writes about conference rules (Chronicle, March 21)
UI history and law faculty member LINDA KERBER, who recently finished a term as president of the American Historical Association, writes about rules for managing conferences.
http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2008/03/2008032101c/careers.html

UI dramaturgy alumna is interviewed (Pegasus News, March 20)
A feature about freelance dramaturg Julie M. Gale notes that she received her M.F.A. in dramaturgy from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she received the UI Department of Theatre Arts IRAM award for Excellence in New Play Dramaturgy. Pegasus News originates in Texas.
http://www.pegasusnews.com/news/2008/mar/20/interview-julie-m-gale-freelance-dramaturg/

UI alumnus has Texas exhibition (Pegasus News, March 20)
Justin Quinn, who received an M.F.A. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 2000 and is now a faculty member at St. Cloud State in Minnesota, has an exhibition of his visual art works opening in Dallas.
http://www.pegasusnews.com/news/2008/mar/20/conduit-gallery-presents-vincent-falsetta-justin-q/

Soderdahl comments on Google project (InfoToday, March 20)
In an effort to broaden the reach of its ambitious Google Book Search project, last week Google announced the release of a new application-programming interface (API) for the service that enables external Web sites to connect directly to any of the texts in the Google Book Search index. PAUL SODERDAHL, director of library information technology at the University of Iowa, says, "We were impressed with how quickly this moved from idea to implementation. Just one week after we agreed to take part in the pilot, we already had the link in place." InfoToday originates in Medford, N.J.
http://newsbreaks.infotoday.com/nbReader.asp?ArticleId=41293

Saudis trained at UI for drug database (Khaleej Times, March 20)
Saudi Arabia will launch a drug information system, which is expected to be up and running by next year. To have a staff capable of handling the center, two Saudi pharmacists received training at the drug information service database designed by the COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Khaleej Times originates in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticleNew.asp?xfile=data/middleeast/2008/March/middleeast_March311.xml&section=middleeast&col=

Whitmore finalist for president position (Portland Business Journal, March 20)
Jon Whitmore is among three finalists for the job of university president at Portland State University. Whitmore is currently president at Texas Tech University, and was provost of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA from 1996 to 2003. The newspaper is based in Oregon.
http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/stories/2008/03/17/daily31.html?b=1205726400^1608684

UI M.F.A. graduate talks about dramaturgy (Pegasus News, March 20)
This interview features freelance dramaturg Julie Gale, who earned a Master of Fine Arts in dramaturgy from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE ARTS, in 2006. During her studies at UI, she was new play dramaturg for numerous readings, workshops and productions. In 2006, she received the UI Department of Theatre Arts IRAM award for Excellence in New Play Dramaturgy. The publication is based in Texas.
http://www.pegasusnews.com/news/2008/mar/20/interview-julie-m-gale-freelance-dramaturg/

Interns assist military community (Military.com, March 20)
Allison Billhardt is helping Camp Adventure -- a not-for-profit educational program based out of the University of Northern Iowa -- which provides college-age students with learning experiences while assisting communities. She is one of three interns who rotate between the U.S. Army Garrison Hohenfels (Germany) Child Development Center and School Age Services, filling in where needed. Billhardt, a recent graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with an education degree, said Camp Adventure allows her to further hone skills captured in school. "It helps you to learn how to react to things and gives you ideas for your own classroom," she said, adding that it also allows her to travel and gain experiences before settling down into a first job.
http://www.military.com/features/0,15240,164475,00.html

Story notes UI involvement with Raices Project (Times-News, March 20)
A teenager is making a video about his life as a young Latino man working with 13 other kids through the Raices Project, a four-year initiative to strengthen rural Latino communities in Idaho, Iowa, Minnesota and Oregon. The Raices Project is a partnership between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Institute for Support of Latino Families and Communities, The Main Street Project, which is a Minnesota-based nonprofit, and the Northwest Area Foundation. THE TIMES-NEWS is based in Twin Falls, Idaho.
http://www.magicvalley.com/articles/2008/03/20/news/local_state/133177.txt

Oat husks burned at Quaker Oats Scotland plant (SmartPlanet.com, March 19)
Quaker Oats will be using waste oat husks to provide heat and electricity to its Uthrogle Mills plant in Scotland. This is not the first time the company has been involved with oat fuel. In 2002 the University of Iowa started adding Quaker's waste oat husks to fire the university's power plant. By 2007, oat husks generated 10,000 megawatt hours of electricity for the institution. The Web site is part of the CNET NETWORK.
http://www.smartplanet.com/news/business/10000928/quaker-oats-to-use-porridge-for-power.htm

Kuusisto participates in roundtable discussion on blindness (NPR, March 18)
STEVE KUUSISTO, a University of Iowa professor of creative nonfiction writing and disability studies who has been blind since birth, took part in a roundtable discussion of blind Americans on the show "On Point." The discussion was sparked by the swearing in of New York Gov. David Paterson, who is legally blind.
http://www.onpointradio.org/shows/2008/03/20080318_b_main.asp

Study examines memory loss (Reuters, March 18)
An estimated 5.2 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, and it could steal the minds of one out of eight baby boomers, according to a report released on Tuesday by the Alzheimer's Association. Another study released this week found that more than a third of Americans over the age of 70 have some form of memory loss. The team at Duke University Medical Center, the University of Michigan, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Southern California and the Rand Corporation found that about 12 percent of patients with cognitive impairment progress to full dementia every year. The article also appeared in YAHOO! NEWS, MSNBC, SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, and several other media outlets.
http://www.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUSN1823885220080318?

UI will not post all theses online (The Chronicle of Higher Ed, March 18)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has backtracked on a plan to post all graduate students' theses online and make them freely available to the public. The reversal came in response to vigorous protests last week from students in the university's prestigious graduate program in writing, who said that the plan could threaten the commercial value of their novels, plays and other creative works.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2008/03/2152n.htm

Kuusisto discusses New York's blind governor (NPR, March 17)
On NPR's "Talk of the Nation," author STEPHEN KUUSISTO, a University of Iowa creative nonfiction writing and disability studies professor who has been blind since birth, discusses his recent New York Times op-ed about David Paterson, the new governor of New York, who is legally blind. "New Yorkers once underestimated Franklin Roosevelt," Kuusisto wrote, "Now David Paterson can show how a legally blind person can lead."
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=88405780

Study: memory loss affects one-third of people over age 70 (NBC 17, March 17)
A Duke University study says one in three people over the age of 70 have some form of memory loss. It's the first population-based study to determine the number of people who have some form of cognitive impairment, with and without dementia. The study was conducted by a team of researchers at Duke University Medical Center, the University of Michigan, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Southern California and the RAND Corporation. NBC 17 is based in Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill, N.C.
http://www.nbc17.com/midatlantic/ncn/news.apx.-content-articles-NCN-2008-03-17-0027.html

UI alumnus founded "10,000 Hours Show" (Chicago Tribune, March 17)
A story about people making a difference in small but significant ways notes that during his years as a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, Mike Brooks and a friend began a campus event called "The 10,000 Hours Show," which encouraged students to donate community service. As an incentive, a band would be brought to campus for a concert, but only for students who completed 10 hours of service. A concert has taken place at the UI for the past three years, and the nonprofit went on to encourage this event on several other college campuses.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/magazine/chi-070819better-story,0,969608,full.story

UI marketing study cited (Bluhalo, March 17)
A recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study indicates that consumers may be more likely to purchase items from a company's Web site if they're given a limited number of choices, rather than being forced to select from among a multitude of options. Based on that information, the article says, companies should consider giving Web visitors more filtering options. Bluhalo originates in the UK.
http://www.bluhalo.com/news/view/297/tesco-site-should-offer-email-contact-options

Harwig collection is 'lit pick' (San Francisco Chronicle, March 16)
"In Praise of the Unfinished: Selected Poems" by Polish poet Julia Harwig, who taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is a "lit pick."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/03/16/RVSSVG6FU.DTL&feed=rss.books

Rove lecture at UI noted (San Antonio Express-News, March 16)
A commentary article stated, "Getting $40,000 for a speaking gig does not guarantee you a friendly reception. Ask Karl Rove, the erstwhile 'architect' of the Bush administration. He got interrupted repeatedly during a recent appearance at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, CNN reported. 'You have a chance to ask your questions later and make your stupid statements,' he told the crowd, according to the cable news network. 'Let me make mine.'"
http://www.mysanantonio.com/opinion/stories/MYSA031708.02O.BottomLine.240e567.html

Peterson book is reviewed (Chortle, March 16)
Professor RUSSELL PETERSON, a former stand-up comedian, said the monologues of late-night talk show hosts such as David Letterman or Jay Leno trivialize the importance of American politicians. In his new book, "Strange Bedfellows: How Late-Night Comedy Turns Democracy Into a Joke," he said, "The jokes play into the public perception of politics -- that every candidate in every party is, has been, and always will be the same: corrupt, inadequate or self-interested." Chortle originates in the UK.
http://www.chortle.co.uk/news/2008/03/16/6535/comics_make_politics_a_joke

Peterson critiques political humor (NetIndia123, March 16)
Stand-up comedians have always targeted politicians to generate good humor in their shows. However, University of Iowa professor RUSSELL PETERSON, a former stand-up comedian and political cartoonist, has insisted that such potshots at politicians might cause more damage than one might imagine.
http://www.netindia123.com/showdetails.asp?id=910587&cat=World&head=Political+humour+may+do+more+damage+than+you+might+think

UI Press book is cited (Huffington Post, March 16)
Blogger John Lundberg writes about "Poems from Guantánamo: The Detainees Speak," published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-lundberg/poems-from-guantanamo-bay_b_91575.html

Pediatrics receives grant (Medical News Today, March 16)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS has been awarded a five-year, $2.1 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, part of the National Institutes of Health, to continue a mentorship project that helps junior faculty members embark on research careers. Medical News Today originates in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/100501.php

Artist attended UI (Lincoln Journal Star, March 15)
A feature about artist and French professor Julia Lauer-Cheenne notes that she attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she joined the Peace Corps and changed the course of her life.
http://www.journalstar.com/articles/2008/03/17/living/gz/performances/doc47d841417d9ab759412320.txt

Peterson book cited (Kansas City Star, March 15)
A politics columnist writes, "Listen up, Leno, Letterman and Conan. University of Iowa prof RUSSELL PETERSON suggests in a new book that all the digs about John Edwards' $400 haircut and Clinton's near-tears episode do more damage than you think." The columnist cites a passage from Peterson's book: "The jokes play into the public perception ... every candidate in every party is, has been and always will be the same: corrupt, inadequate or self-interested."
http://www.kansascity.com/news/politics/story/533163.html

Playwright attended UI (Boston Globe, March 15)
A feature about playwright Kirsten Greenidge notes that she is an alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PLAYWRIGHTS WORKSHOP.
http://www.boston.com/ae/theater_arts/articles/2008/03/15/a_place_on_stage_for_the_quirky/

Olshansky defibrillator FAQ cited (Industry Standard, March 15)
An article about the development of defibrillators that are easier to implant and program links to a FAQ by cardiologist BRIAN OLSHANSKY at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Industry Standard originates in California. Based in San Francisco, the Industry Standard features news and analysis that covers emerging technologies and companies, venture funding, acquisitions, site launches, and other developments in the internet space.
http://www.thestandard.com/news/2008/03/15/defibrillator-maker-cameron-health-takes-14m

Cameron's play is focus of article (Salt Lake Tribune, March 15)
Two new dramas about gay members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints -- one that played to sold-out houses last month at the University of Iowa and another produced in a well-attended workshop in New York City -- suggest there's still artful vigor left in mining the painful collision of faith and homosexuality. "14" was written by JOHN CAMERON, head of the University of Iowa's acting program.
http://origin.sltrib.com/ci_8574767

Nayakankuppam finds blissful ignorance effect (NY Times, March 15)
DHANANJAY NAYAKANKUPPAM
, an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Iowa, released a study last month -- to be published this year in The Journal of Consumer Research -- that says that people who have more ambiguous information about a product expect to be happier with what they have bought than those who have more specific details. It is aptly named "The Blissful Ignorance Effect."
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/15/business/15shortcuts.html?ref=yourmoney

Photographer attended UI (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, March 14)
A feature about photographer Arnie Gore notes that he majored in photojournalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=728448

Welsh leads UI cystic fibrosis research (Ag Professional, March 14)
Researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Iowa have taken the first step in developing a porcine cystic fibrosis model that may more closely mimic the disease in humans. The study will be published in the upcoming edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The UI team was led by MICHAEL WELSH, M.D., a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and UI professor of internal medicine and molecular physiology and biophysics. The publication, based in Lenexa, Kan., covers agronomic and business management news.
http://www.agprofessional.com/show_story.php?id=51314

Kuusisto: legally blind governor can lead (New York Times, March 14)
STEPHEN KUUSISTO, who teaches creative nonfiction writing at the University of Iowa, describes the challenges that David Paterson will face when he takes the oath of office in Albany on Monday, but also the special strengths and skills he will bring to this leadership position as a legally blind individual. Paterson will not only become the third African-American governor since Reconstruction, he will also be the first legally blind chief state executive, Kuusisto writes in an op-ed contribution that explores how he believes it's a safe bet that Paterson's visual impairment will be harder for the public to understand than his race. Kuusisto is also the author, most recently, of "Eavesdropping: A Memoir of Blindness and Listening."
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/14/opinion/14kuusisto.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Kerber shares rules for conferences (Chronicle, March 14)
LINDA K. KERBER
, a professor of history and a lecturer in law at the University of Iowa, describes the rules of successful conferences in a first-person column for the Chronicle Careers section. She recently finished a term as president of the American Historical Association. This is Part I. In a sequel to this column, she will look at rules for presenting a paper at a conference.
http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2008/03/2008031401c/careers.html

Lubovitch began dance career at UI (Denver Post, March 13)
A feature about choreographer Lar Lubovitch notes that his first dance was created when he was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.denverpost.com/entertainment/ci_8551094

Diekema comments on MRSA research (MedPage Today, March 11)
Swiss researches have found that screening thousands of surgical patients for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at or before hospital admission did nothing to prevent infections acquired in the hospital. The report in the Journal of the American Medical Association was accompanied by an editorial co-written by DANIEL DIEKEMA of the University of Iowa College of Medicine.
http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/tb/8679

UI's Gaffney opposes use of HGH, testosterone (Sports Illustrated, March 11)
In an article exploring steroids in America and how the culture of enhancement extends far beyond sports, Jack McCallum writes that we're entering a brave new world. A serious academic and research war rages between those who say that HGH and testosterone are natural substances that need to be replenished when the body's supply runs low and those who proclaim such a philosophy as quackery. "There are very basic questions we're trying to get answers to," says GARY GAFFNEY, associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine. He is against doctors prescribing HGH and testosterone for anti-aging reasons, and even dislikes the term. "Is aging a disease? Should it be treated?" Gaffney believes there hasn't been nearly enough testing on the potential long-term effects of HGH and testosterone-replacement therapies.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/magazine/03/11/steroids1/index.html

Hindman comments on cost, reliability of brain monitor (ABC News, March 13)
New research suggests that in those rare instances when patients become aware of their surroundings during surgery, a brain monitor specifically intended to alert doctors to this phenomenon is not doing its job. The study also questions whether the Bispectral Index System (BIS) is worth the cost. Dr. BRAD HINDMAN, professor of anesthesia at University of Iowa, is quoted in the story. "Because awareness is rare, the BIS monitor [is unreliable], and the use of the monitor is relatively costly," he said. "It is hard to justify the use of these monitors solely on a cost-effectiveness basis."
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/MindMoodNews/Story?id=4439048&page=1

Ceilley: tanning a 'bad idea' for seniors (U.S. News & World Report, March 12)
A recently published report by Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers found that about 10 percent of 50-to-64-year-olds surveyed and 8 percent of those 65 and older had basked in artificial rays. Dermatologists aren't thrilled. People over 50, especially men, are already at heightened risk for skin cancer because of long sun exposure, says ROGER CEILLEY, clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa and a past president of the American Academy of Dermatology; getting extra is a "very bad idea."
http://health.usnews.com/articles/health/2008/03/12/a-risky-pastime-for-the-older-set-too.html

Regents OK planning on UI hospital expansion (Chicago Tribune, March 12)
The Iowa Board of Regents has given the OK for planning to move forward on a proposed expansion at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS. But the board expressed concerns about patient access and convenience and asked hospital leaders to address those issues in their planning. The 10-year, $700 million project calls for construction of an 800,000-square-foot critical care tower and a 600,000-square-foot children's hospital tower. Construction on the towers would begin in 2010 with occupancy expected in 2013.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-iowatoday,0,3711402.story?page=2

Leira comments on in-flight medical emergencies (USA Today, March 12)
A pilot's decision about whether to divert his aircraft when a passenger falls ill can be one of life and death, says ENRIQUE LEIRA, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Leira has taught new pilots what questions to ask flight attendants to determine quickly whether a passenger has had a fainting spell or a stroke that needs immediate intervention to save the brain. He says having more data from airlines would help "improve outcomes."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2008-03-11-inflight-medical-emergencies_N.htm?csp=34

Davidson lectures on Huntington's disease (Times Daily, March 12)
Geneticist Dr. BEVERLY L. DAVIDSON, an associate director for the Iowa Center for Gene Therapy and vice chair for research in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa, talked to students on the Northwest-Shoals Community College campus Tuesday about research in finding a cure for Huntington's disease. She was in the Shoals through a fellowship grant with the Lori C. Sasser Foundation. "We're getting closer to being able to develop therapies to keep brain cells from dying," Davidson said. "Huntington's isn't as reversible as it once seemed." The publication is based in Alabama.
http://www.timesdaily.com/article/20080312/NEWS/803120331/1011

Cleaning house can ease asthma symptoms (NBC San Diego, March 12)Elevated allergen levels in the home are associated with asthma symptoms in allergic individuals, results from a new national survey demonstrate. The study suggests that asthmatics who have allergies may alleviate symptoms by reducing allergen exposures inside their homes. The findings show that exposure to multiple indoor allergens was common in U.S. households. The work was carried out by researchers at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIEHS, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Rho Inc., and the Constella Group.
http://www.nbcsandiego.com/goinggreen/15479218/detail.html

Iowa City in list of top 10 up-and-coming tech centers (Forbes, March 10)
Iowa City is ranked eighth in a list of the top 10 up-and-coming tech centers, saying the city is "a hotbed of new technologies in health care and renewable energy." The Grow Iowa Values Fund puts up $2 million a year to support the IOWA CENTERS FOR ENTERPRISE at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Philip Auerswald, professor of public policy at George Mason University, surveyed regional innovation trends across the U.S. and made the list of up-and-coming tech centers.
http://www.forbes.com/2008/03/10/columbus-milwaukee-houston-ent-tech-cx_wp_0310smallbizoutlooktechcity_slide_9.html

Berg compares Iowa Electronic Markets, polls (Financial Times, March 11)
A recent study by the University of Iowa shows that it Iowa Electronic Markets are more accurate than polls in predicting the outcome of elections. JOYCE BERG, the director of the IEM, said the market was more accurate for several reasons. First, it uses real money. Investors open accounts of between $5 and $500 and trade contracts based on which candidate or party they think will win a presidential election. Berg said IEM investors are also self-selected: they join the market voluntarily and tend to be people who are interested in politics and thus well informed. "Polls tend to be a static, one-time prediction," she said. "The market is a dynamic system that can respond instantaneously to the arrival of new information and asks traders to forecast how everyone will vote in the actual upcoming election, not just how they, the individual, will vote."
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/7d51829e-ef0b-11dc-97ec-0000779fd2ac.html

Redlawsk discusses Democratic race (Christian Science Monitor, March 11)
Despite the hotter rhetoric from both camps this month, the highly competitive race for the Democratic nomination remains civil as campaigns go, some analysts say. In 2004, crossfire between then-US Rep. Richard Gephardt and former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean was far fiercer -- and helped their rivals, Senator Kerry and then-Sen. John Edwards, finish first and second in the Iowa caucuses, says DAVID REDLAWSK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. The recent exchanges are a necessary if belated effort by the candidates to win over an electorate seemingly unable to settle on a front-runner, says Dr. Redlawsk. "One of the real challenges Democratic voters are having this time is that distinctions have not been drawn very clearly at all," he says. "We've had relatively little 'compare and contrast,' and I think in the end voters are left with less information than they would otherwise have. "Now we're at the point," he adds, "where even the Obama campaign recognizes they have to make distinctions."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0311/p01s01-uspo.html?page=1

Iowa Electronic Markets traders still favor Obama (Reuters, March 11)
Traders on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, continue to put their money on Barack Obama winning the Democratic Party's nomination for president. This story also appeared on the Web sites of numerous news organizations.
http://www.reuters.com/article/wtMostRead/idUSN1046846820080310

Squire compares Iowa, Texas caucuses (Austin American-Statesman, March 11)
A week after Texas Democrats trooped to nighttime caucuses to choose between Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, Texans don't know which presidential candidate won the town-hallish events -- and might not for about 18 days. No one knows for sure how well presidential hopeful Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y., who greeted supporters during a campaign stop in Scranton, Pa., on Monday, did in Texas caucuses a week ago. The delay in Texas contrasts with Iowa, where results typically settle out the night of its caucuses, said Peverill Squire, a University of Missouri political scientist who worked until recently at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The difference "is a result of not being prepared for the tidal wave of participation," Squire said. "Given the importance attached to these numbers, I'm a little surprised that they're not going to move more quickly."
http://www.statesman.com/news/content/region/legislature/stories/03/11/0311txdems.html

Sources of Vargo tap water research can't be disclosed (USA Today, March 10)
When water providers find pharmaceuticals in drinking water, they rarely tell the public. When researchers make the same discoveries, they usually don't identify the cities involved. There are plenty of reasons offered for the secrecy: concerns about national security, fears of panic, a feeling that the public will not understand -- even confidentiality agreements. One reason is that utilities generally only allow scientists to test their water if they ensure confidentiality. JOHN VARGO, program manager at the University of Iowa's University Hygienic Laboratory, said he found traces of pharmaceuticals in the finished drinking water of several major Midwestern cities but, under terms of those contracts, he could not disclose their identity. The story also appeared on the Web sites of BUSINESSWEEK, MSNBC, MONEY/CNN.COM, CARLISLE (Penn.) SENTINEL and other news organizations. 
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-03-10-cities-water_N.htm

Kochanska studies parent-child link (Newark Star Ledger, March 10)
Close ties between parents and babies are good for families -- and society, too -- according to a study that tracked children from infancy to preschool. Children who had positive relationships with parents as babies and toddlers showed more patience, restraint and maturity at the age of 4, according to researchers at the University of Iowa. "Your investment in building a mutually responsive, positive, close relationship early on will generate considerable payoff several years later," said GRAZYNA KOCHANSKA, a developmental psychology professor and lead author of the study, which appeared in the journal Child Development.
http://blog.nj.com/parentalguidance/2008/03/study_finds_babies_benefit_fro.html

Rahmouni leads Bardet-Biedl obesity research (Modern Medicine, March 10)
Findings derived from mouse models of Bardet-Biedl syndrome offer insight into mechanisms underlying the obesity and hypertension associated with the condition, according to an article published online March 3 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. KAMAL RAHMOUNI, Ph.D., of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City, and colleagues research the disorder associated with obesity and increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders.
http://www.modernmedicine.com/modernmedicine/Cardiovascular+Disease/Mouse-Models-Shed-Light-on-Obesity-Blood-Pressure/ArticleNewsFeed/Article/detail/501701?contextCategoryId=40247

Rove greeted with student protests at UI (The Chronicle of Higher Ed, March 10)
There seems to have been little love lost between Karl Rove, President Bush's former political adviser, and students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where Mr. Rove spoke Sunday. His remarks to an audience of about 1,200 were often interrupted by about 200 vocal student protesters, according to various news accounts. Reports on the same lecture were published by CNN, ABC NEWS, ALTERNET.ORG and WEBINDIA 123.
http://chronicle.com/blogs/election/1827/karl-rove-greeted-with-student-protests-in-iowa

Alumnus writes book about spying (Abilene Reporter News, March 10)
James M. Olson said patriotism, faith and a desire to serve his country led him from a small town in Iowa to become a spy and eventually head of counterintelligence for the CIA. These attributes also carried him through two of the most scary times in his career -- when terrorists made a death threat against his wife and children, and the time he went down a manhole in Moscow for a cable-tapping operation. Olson, now teaching at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University and the author of the book "Fair Play: The Moral Dilemmas of Spying," is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://reporternews.com/news/2008/mar/10/hell-tell-you-but-he-wont-kill-you-probably/

UI helped Stringer stand tall (North Jersey.com, March 10)
A feature prompted by the release of C. Vivian Stringer's memoir "Standing Tall" includes her time as coach at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. North Jersey.com is the Web presence of The Record newspaper.
http://www.northjersey.com/sports/rutgers/Challenges_misfortune_stand_no_chance_against_this_coach.html

Obama campaign quotes Daily Iowan (ABC, March 10)
Senior National Correspondent Jake Tapper, who called the UNIVERSITY OF
IOWA's
Daily Iowan newspaper "Barack Obama's favorite newspaper," cites its coverage of the weekend lecture on campus by Karl Rove. "Six different community coalitions formed 'The Karl Rove Welcoming Committee' asked cops to arrest Rove for treason, war crimes, and crimes against humanity, the paper reports."
http://blogs.abcnews.com/politicalpunch/2008/03/the-belly-of-th.html

International Writing Program seeks Bulgarian writer (Novinite, March 10)
The UI INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM has begun the process of selecting a writer from Bulgaria for the 2008 residency. Novinite originates in Bulgaria and is a publication of the Sofia News Agency.
http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=91144

UI improves emergency-room efficiency (Nurse.com, March 10)
As hospitals explore new ways to reduce emergency-room congestion and long waiting times, they may want to turn to Iowa hospitals for advice. According to a recent study, Iowa hospitals were the quickest in the country to provide emergency medical attention. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS conducted a weeklong evaluation and process improvement study of its emergency room about two years ago to identify areas for improvement. Since the hospital implemented a series of improvement practices, it has seen emergency-room length of stay drop from 2 hours and 52 minutes to 2 hours and 33 minutes. Nurse.com originates in Virginia and is published by Gannett Healthcare Group.
http://include.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080310/NATIONAL02/303100019/-1/frontpage

UI consumer-satisfaction research cited (Bluhalo, March 10)
In the wake of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study showing that information is inversely correlated with customer satisfaction, marketing analysts say that consumer choice -- giving consumers a wide variety of options -- is overrated in online marketing. Bluhalo originates in the UK.
http://www.bluhalo.com/news/view/286/consumer-choice-is-overrated

Durham's book is reviewed (Publishers Weekly, March 10)
"The Lolita Effect" by University of Iowa journalism professor GIGI DURHAM is reviewed and called "a well-written and well-researched book."
http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA6538931.html?industryid=47159

Hovenkamp cites party interest in Microsoft antitrust case (Bloomberg, March 10)
The Bush administration has curtailed oversight of the Microsoft antitrust settlement, in a case the administration inherited from the Clinton years. "This was a Democrat case to begin with" and "Republicans have never shown the same level of enthusiasm about it," said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa law school in Iowa City.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=aZlZaQM5xGZg&refer=news

UI contributes to nutria solution (Science Daily, March 10)
A 10-pound rodent pest called nutria ravaging southern wetlands in the United States, which has been especially damaging to the marshland ecology in the Mississippi Delta following Hurricanes Rita and Katrina, may have finally met its match thanks to molecular science that includes the work of a team including scientists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080306094624.htm

UI study mentioned in story on specialty hospitals (Forbes, March 10)
A story on medical errors says that there are 200 specialty hospitals in the United States (out of 60,000 hospitals overall), and they often deliver services better, more safely, and at lower cost. The article mentions a recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study of tens of thousands of Medicare patients found that complication rates (bleeding, infections or death) are 40 percent lower for hip and knee surgeries at specialty hospitals than at big
community hospitals.
http://www.forbes.com/home/healthcare/forbes/2008/0310/086.html

UI studied medical complications (Forbes, March 10)
A recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study of tens of thousands of Medicare patients found that complication rates (bleeding, infections or death) are 40 percent lower for hip and knee surgeries at specialty hospitals than at big community hospitals.
http://www.forbes.com/healthcare/forbes/2008/0310/086.html

UI analyzes data from Galileo spacecraft (Science Daily, March 9)
Radio waves accelerate electrons within Jupiter's magnetic field in the same way as they do on Earth, according to new research published in Nature Physics this week. The discovery overturns a theory that has held sway for more than a generation and has important implications for protecting Earth-orbiting satellites. Using data collected at Jupiter by the Galileo spacecraft, a team including scientists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that a special type of very low frequency radio wave is strong enough to accelerate electrons up to very high energies inside Jupiter's magnetic field.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080309151238.htm

UI grad student directs jazz festival (Galesburg Register-Mail, March 9)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA doctoral student Nikki Whittaker is the director of the Knox-Rootabaga Jazz Festival. The Galesburg Register-Mail originates in Illinois.
http://www.galesburg.com/lifestyles/x1993295867

UI treating young girl with cyst behind eye (Leelanau Enterprise, March 9)
Friends and family of 2-year-old Charlise "Twinkie" Carlson of Suttons Bay, Mich., will be eating the snack cakes as she undergoes surgery to remove a benign cyst from behind her eyes. The girl is the daughter of Clay and Jennifer Carlson of Suttons Bay. "Clay started it out as a way for people to keep good thoughts coming her way," Jennifer said Tuesday from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL in Iowa City. Concerned about the intricacies of the surgery, the Carlsons turned to Jennifer's brother, Dr. FRED S. "SANDY" LAMB, director of the University of Iowa's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, who recommended a friend who is a highly regarded national specialist in the field of pediatric otolaryngology.
http://www.leelanaunews.com/blog/2008/03/08/twinkies-for-twinkie/

Artist attended UI (Columbia Tribune, March 9)
A feature about emerging artist Sara Fletcher notes that she received her master's in art from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Columbia Tribune originates in Missouri.
http://www.columbiatribune.com/2008/Mar/20080309Ovat003.asp

UI alumna is honored at age 100 (Boca Raton News, March 9)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumna Rita Hutcherson was honored on her 100th birthday by the Broward County Music Teachers Association and the Palm Beach County Music Teachers Association in recognition of her career as a piano teacher.
http://www.bocaratonnews.com/news/local/302-teacher-associations-honor-piano-instructor-age-100.php

Hartwig taught at UI (San Francisco Chronicle, March 9)
A review of a new collection by poet Julia Hartwig, "one of the foremost Polish poets of the 20th century," notes that she taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA: "Her thoughts about the Iowa she encountered in the '70s are sharp and affectionate. Its residents and terrain were good to her, and she does right by them..."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/03/09/RV6OUJT3G.DTL

Novelist Hansen attended the UI (Hillsdale Daily News, March 8)
A feature about award-winning novelist Ron Hansen notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he studied under John Irving and John Cheever. The Hillsdale Daily News originates in Michigan.
http://www.hillsdale.net/stories/030808/entertainment_20080308014.shtml

Atkins assesses defibrillators (Saipan Tribune, March 8)
The availability of defibrillators at sporting events is being considered after the sudden death of a basketball player. DIANNE ATKINS, a cardiologist at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital, described AEDs as "instant help for heart attack victims."
http://www.saipantribune.com/newsstory.aspx?cat=1&newsID=77777

Smith works with Operation Smile (Transworld News, March 7)
An Operation Smile Medical Mission team will arrive in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, for an international medical mission, March 13-21, 2008, to assist children born with facial deformities. The team includes ALICE SMITH, speech pathology adjunct assistant professor at University of Iowa. Transworld News is a worldwide news service.
http://www.transworldnews.com/NewsStory.aspx?id=39512&cat=10

Stringer book is reviewed (Goleta Valley Voice, March 7)
"Standing Tall" by former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA women's basketball coach C. Vivian Stringer is reviewed. The Goleta Valley Voice is published in California.
http://www.goletavalleyvoice.com/cgi-bin/entertain/readarticle.cgi?article=1457

UI researchers use pigs to create model (Medical News Today, March 7)
Cystic fibrosis is the most common genetic disease in Caucasians. The median lifespan for those with the disease is 36 years, and lung disease is the major cause of mortality. For years, scientists have studied cystic fibrosis using mice in which the cystic fibrosis gene was altered. However, mice do not develop lung disease like humans with cystic fibrosis. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have taken the first step in developing a porcine cystic fibrosis model that may more faithfully mimic the disease in humans.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/99824.php

Wallace: study finds some risks stay after stopping hormones (WNBC-TV, March 7)
Taking a combination of estrogen and progestin was meant to be a miracle drug for women at menopause. But after a long-term study found higher risks for heart disease, blood clots, stroke and breast cancer, doctors decided that the risks of consistent use outweighed the benefits. A follow-up study recently found, however, that three years after stopping treatment, the risk of breast cancer stayed high, while the other risks dropped right away. University of Iowa professor Dr. ROBERT WALLACE said that the risk of breast cancer was 25 percent higher for those taking the hormones. Versions of this story were also picked up by TV stations in Ohio and West Virginia.
http://www.wnbc.com/health/15500077/detail.html

UI worm therapy research cited in article (Wisconsin State Journal, March 7)
Some University of Wisconsin Hospital patients will soon test an unusual treatment: They'll drink a cocktail of worm eggs, which will hatch inside their bodies. Doctors say the low-grade infection of worms, harvested from pigs, can help regulate faulty immune systems. The patients have multiple sclerosis, in which the immune system attacks nerve cells. "The yuck factor is hard to get over," acknowledged Dr. John Fleming, the UW Hospital neurologist who plans to launch a study of worm therapy next month. "But the idea has scientific merit." Fleming admits he was skeptical when he first heard of worm therapy, which was initially carried out a few years ago by JOEL WEINSTOCK at the University of Iowa. Weinstock is now at Tufts University in Boston.
http://www.madison.com/wsj/topstories/275998

UI Museum of Art features Wilson's work (Christian Science Monitor, March 7)
What happens when you take Winona Ryder, Brad Pitt, Johnny Depp, the Queen of Morocco, an auto mechanic, and a panther and put them together in a museum? For Robert Wilson, the answer is a fresh way of looking at art, and at the big, busy, brash modern world outside. The Museum of Art at the University of Iowa has assembled a collection of Wilson's work -- likenesses ranging from celebrities to poets, from authors to dancers and ordinary people (and animals). Museum director HOWARD COLLINSON says that Wilson's VOOM work is an "amalgam of theatre and the visual arts, and that's what makes his work unique. Each piece can be seen as a small production."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0307/p12s03-alar.html

Chang earned doctorate at UI (Orange County Register, March 6)
Avid golfer Won Chang, who a earned a doctorate in journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has written 16 books and helped found the China Daily. Won published a research book, "Retirement without Retiring," in Korea last year, and continues to write his second book on retirement. The first one is in Korean, but the second one is in English, and he posts some of his writings on his web site http://www.whchang.pe.kr. The Orange County Register is published in California.
http://www.ocregister.com/news/won-golf-university-1994062-one-years

UI courses with sex in title generate discussion (FoxNews.com, March 6)
In a FOXSexpert column, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is cited as offering more than 35 courses with the word "sex" in the title. Upon hearing this, Iowa Republican state Rep. Mike May became critical of the school's offerings. He feels there are other courses that would be more worthwhile given today's job demands. While, at quick glance, classes such as "Gender and Sexuality in French Cinema" may seem like a waste of time, many at U of I are pointing out that such courses delve into an issue's psychological, philosophical and ethical considerations. All of these equip students with the information they need in certain fields.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,335792,00.html

Buckwalter: weight loss may delay arthritis (TIME, March 6)
The number of knee replacements done annually in the U.S. will jump 525 percent by 2030. You read correctly: 525 percent. This prediction comes out of a paper presented Thursday at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. One factor contributing to the epidemic of failing joints: obesity. While many people are genetically prone to develop arthritis as they age, there are steps individuals can take to reduce the odds that they will become part of the joint replacement epidemic. Weight control is paramount, says Dr. JOSEPH BUCKWALTER, an arthritis specialist at the University of Iowa Medical Center.
http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1720041,00.html

Iowa Electronic Markets cited in article on voters, economy (USA Today, March 6)
Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama want universal health care. John McCain's health care solution is more market-based. Most economists agree that Social Security, Medicare and other big entitlement programs that are massively underfunded must be addressed by the next president. Energy independence and protecting the environment are also top priorities. But tackling those problems costs money. Bottom line: Taxes may rise no matter which party is elected. Right now, traders are placing their bets at the online IOWA ELECTRONICS MARKET. As of Thursday, trading indicates that Obama has a 70 percent chance of winning the Democratic nomination.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/markets/2008-03-06-markets-election_N.htm

UI's political futures market cited in column (Washington Post, March 5)
In an op-ed piece about the volatility of financial markets, columnist Sebastian Mallaby credits amateur traders on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's political futures market with predicting elections more accurately than professional pollsters. Despite periodic bouts of wantonly irrational investor behavior, most people now accept that financial markets -- indeed, all markets in which people trade views about the future -- are the least bad way of processing information. Today, markets are used to predict everything from influenza outbreaks to the sales of a new Harry Potter book.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/04/AR2007030401048.html?nav=rss_opinion/columns

Hageman research offers hope for people with eye disease (Forbes, March 24)
A breakthrough in gene research may offer hope for the millions suffering from macular degeneration. University of Iowa ophthalmologist GREGORY HAGEMAN is at the forefront of research on lasting treatments for dry AMD. Over the past four years Hageman has uncovered how AMD is linked to three variations of the so-called complement factor H gene, which is a crucial player in regulating the immune system.
http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2008/0324/076.html

Blumberg comments on violence against researchers (Chronicle of Higher Ed, March 7)
Recent violence against professors who conduct research using animals is driving people out of research, says Frankie L. Trull, president of the Foundation for Biomedical Research. One professor who conducts experimental surgery told her that he couldn't fill six postdoctoral research fellowships for which he had funds. But MARK S. BLUMBERG, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa, has seen the opposite effect. In 2004 extremists broke into a research facility where he works and destroyed experiments and equipment. After that, he says, "I didn't have a single student who ever said, 'Oh, my God, what am I doing in this business?' In fact, it was the opposite. It emboldened them."
http://chronicle.com/free/v54/i26/26a00104.htm

Miller urges Pennsylvania primary excitement (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 6)
Thousands upon thousands of campaign operatives and volunteers coming to Pennsylvania; a constant drumbeat of political advertising on the airwaves and Internet; phone banks and robo-calls on overdrive; sold-out hotels and conference rooms; stressed-out police departments managing crowd control at rallies and concerts; swarming national media, some already plying tired rust-belt stereotypes -- all this and more is headed to Pittsburgh, Pa. The neck-and-neck campaigns of Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama have trained their sights on the delegate-rich territory in hopes of clinching the Democratic nomination for president. Keystone State voters will get a taste of what Iowans experience every four years when their caucus is the first political test for presidential hopefuls. ARTHUR MILLER, professor of political science at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, said the experience is more blessing than curse. "It gets a bit tiring. Not an evening goes by without three or four phone calls, so call screening becomes popular. But it's an opportunity to get involved, think about the issues and the candidates, and have a real impact on the outcome," he said. "People in Pennsylvania should be excited about it."
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08066/862910-176.stm

Wallace studies estrogen, progestin effects (KHBS-TV, March 5)
Taking a combination of estrogen and progestin was meant to be a miracle drug for women at menopause. But after a long-term study found higher risks for heart disease, blood clots, stroke and breast cancer, doctors decided that the risks of consistent use outweighed the benefits. A follow-up study recently found, however, that three years after stopping treatment, the risk of breast cancer stayed high, while the other risks dropped right away. University of Iowa professor Dr. ROBERT WALLACE said that the risk of breast cancer was 25 percent higher for those taking the hormones. "This is a randomized trial, it's an experiment and that gives us a fair degree of certainty that this was related to the drug," he said. KHBS is based on Arkansas.
http://www.4029tv.com/health/15500077/detail.html?rss=fts&psp=health

Story cites UI carbohydrate intolerance study (Raleigh News & Observer, March 5)
A story about dietary intolerance notes that one five-year study by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that people with carbohydrate intolerances got some relief when they ate a diet low in fructose.
http://www.newsobserver.com/105/story/984741.html

Hay selected as VP/provost at Arizona (Inside Higher Ed, March 5)
In a listing of administrative appointments, it's noted that MEREDITH HAY, vice president for research at the University of Iowa, has been selected as executive vice president and provost at the University of Arizona.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2008/03/05/presidents

Porter comments on developer lawsuit (Chicago Tribune, March 5)
Financially troubled builder Kennedy Homes sued the parent company of Harris Bank on Tuesday, accusing Harris of making accounting errors that constituted fraud and pushed the South Barrington-based company into insolvency. The suit, filed in Cook County Circuit Court, says that the Bank of Montreal, Harris' parent, miscalculated the balance of funds available to Kennedy, causing the builder to overdraw its line of credit by more than $11 million. The suit reflects the tumult in housing, said KATHERINE PORTER, an associate professor of law at the University of Iowa. "The last time we saw a wave of lawsuits in which businesses claimed that lenders caused their downfall was in the late 1980s," when real estate and energy companies went under in Texas," she said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-wed-kennedy-sues-lender_0305mar05,0,2271009.story

Countrywide delays foreclosure sales (Wall Street Journal, March 5)
Countrywide Financial Corp. voluntarily postponed 103 foreclosure sales scheduled for yesterday in Texas in connection with a private lawsuit that accuses it of trying to foreclose on homeowners who emerged from bankruptcy and were current on their mortgages. That allegation, which the company denies, is also one of the issues raised by a federal bankruptcy watchdog in suits it filed against the company last week. The Calabasas, Calif. lender agreed to be acquired by Bank of America Corp. later this year. KATHERINE PORTER, a bankruptcy law professor at the University of Iowa who published an influential study on problems with claims made by mortgage companies in the bankruptcy system, has said Bank of America needs to help Countrywide rebuild its technology to overcome "structural shortcomings."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120468574826612573.html.html?mod=home_law_middle

IEM predicts Democratic presidential win (Wall Street Journal, March 5)
Some attorneys and investment bankers are telling their clients to carry out corporate acquisitions before the November elections because they think a Democratic presidential victory could create more roadblocks for takeovers. Both Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton cranked up populist, anti-business themes in the just-finished Democratic primary battles in Ohio and Texas. A widely watched gauge of national sentiment, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, now puts the prospect of a Democrat winning the White House this year at about 60 percent.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120467618194011797.html?mod=world_news_featured_articles

Nayakankuppam studied spending behaviors (Wall Street Journal, March 5)
In a column about how to help kids be financially savvy, Jonathon Clements says we're usually more careful about our spending if we are paying with cold cash rather than a credit card. To test this in your kids, try varying the form of their pocket money. One week, give them five singles. The next week, give them a $5 bill. You will likely find your children are slower to spend the $5 bill.  "It seems to be perceived as having more value," says DHANANJAY NAYAKANKUPPAM, a marketing professor at the University of Iowa. "The subjective pain of parting with the $5 bill is greater than the subjective pain of parting with five $1 bills." Adults show the same tendency. In a study that appeared in the March 2006 Journal of Consumer Research, Nayakankuppam and his co-authors, Arul Mishra and Himanshu Mishra, found that people were less inclined to spend if they had, say, a $50 bill rather than 10 $5 bills.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120468099339812197.html?mod=Getting+Going+Sunday

UI study examined hormone treatment risks (WMAQ-TV, March 5)
Taking a combination of estrogen and progestin was meant to be a miracle drug for women at menopause. But after a long-term study found higher risks for heart disease, blood clots, stroke and breast cancer, doctors decided that the risks of consistent use outweighed the benefits. A follow-up study recently found, however, that three years after stopping treatment, the risk of breast cancer stayed high, while the other risks dropped right away. University of Iowa professor Dr. ROBERT WALLACE said that the risk of breast cancer was 25 percent higher for those taking the hormones. "This is a randomized trial, it's an experiment and that gives us a fair degree of certainty that this was related to the drug," he said. The TV station is based in Chicago. This article appeared on the Web sites of several other TV stations in Boston, Arizona, Florida, Maine, Pennsylvania, and others.
http://www.nbc5.com/health/15500077/detail.html

UI conducted hypnosis study (South Bend Tribune, March 5)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA used functional MRIs to show that hypnosis alters brain activity in a way that relieves pain. The brain scans showed that different areas of the brain "lit up" when pain was inflicted on the patients who were under hypnosis, resulting in significant pain reduction. Hypnosis reduced pain in all 12 patients, from an average score of 8 out of 10, down to less than 3 out of 10 and even no pain in some. The newspaper is based in Indiana. The article originally appeared in the AKRON (Ohio) Beacon Journal.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080305/Lives/803050433/1047/Lives

Cookbook author attended UI (Island Packet, March 5)
In a feature about Matt and Ted Lee, authors of the acclaimed, "The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook: Stories and Recipes for Southerners and Would-Be Southerners," it's noted that Ted earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in South Carolina.
http://www.islandpacket.com/lowcountrylife/story/244381.html

Rahmouni leads hormone research (ThaiIndia News, March 4)
Researchers focusing on the rare genetic disorder Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), have identified a clue to show how resistance to the hormone leptin might disrupt the brain signals that tell the body when to stop eating. Researchers at the University of Iowa, led by KAMAL RAHMOUNI, Ph.D., assistant professor of internal medicine at the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, also found a link between leptin resistance and high blood pressure. Their findings, based on mouse models, may have implications for the treatment of BBS as well as obesity and high blood pressure in people without BBS. "Bardet-Biedl syndrome is rare but its symptoms, including obesity and increased risk of heart disease, are similar to problems faced by many people without the syndrome. Leptin normally suppresses appetite and increases caloric use. The more we know about how leptin and gene defects affect people with BBS, the more likely it is that we can improve treatment for them and people with similar symptoms," said Rahmouni. A similar article appeared in NEW KERALA in India. ThaiIndia News is based in Bangkok, Thailand, to provide a common platform to the Indian community in Thailand.
http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/health/study-on-rare-syndrome-sheds-light-on-obesity-blood-pressure_10023742.html

Iowa Electronic Markets forecasts are accurate (Scientific American, March 2008)
In 1988 the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA launched an experiment to test whether a market using securities for presidential candidates could predict the outcome of the election. In presidential elections from 1988 to 2004, the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS have predicted final results better than the polls three times out of four.
http://www.sciam.com/article/id/markets-predict-outcome-better-than-polls/SID/mail

Porter study finds improperly sold mortgages (New York Times, March 4)
A story about home ownership confusion resulting from bundled and securitized mortgages noted that KATHERINE M. PORTER, an associate professor of law at the University of Iowa, conducted a recent study of 1,733 foreclosures that began in 2006. The study found that 40 percent of creditors foreclosing on borrowers did not show proof of ownership, what is often called "proper assignment" of the note or security interest in the property. Dubious fees charged by lenders have also emerged as a rising problem. Ms. Porter's study found that questionable fees had been added to almost half of the loans she examined. Last year, the United States Trustee, charged with overseeing the integrity of the nation's bankruptcy courts, said it would move against lenders that file false or inaccurate claims or assess unreasonable fees. The same story was published on the Web site of the LAKELAND (Fla.) LEDGER.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/04/business/04auction.html?_r=1&ref=business&oref=slogin

Increased allergies may be due to cleanliness (Washington Post, March 4)
First, asthma cases shot up, along with hay fever and other common allergic reactions, such as eczema. Then, pediatricians started seeing more children with food allergies. Now, experts are increasingly convinced that a suspected jump in lupus, multiple sclerosis and other afflictions caused by misfiring immune systems is real. Experts estimate that many allergies and immune-system diseases have doubled, tripled or even quadrupled in the last few decades, depending on the ailment and country. Some studies now indicate that more than half of the U.S. population has at least one allergy. The cause remains the focus of intense debate and study, but some researchers suspect the concurrent trends all may have a common explanation rooted in aspects of modern living -- including the "hygiene hypothesis" that blames growing up in increasingly sterile homes, changes in diet, air pollution, and possibly even obesity and increasingly sedentary lifestyles. "If you look at the incidence of these diseases, a lot of them began to emerge and become much more common after parasitic worm diseases were eliminated from our environment," said ROBERT SUMMERS of the University of Iowa, who is experimenting with whipworms. "We believe they have a profound symbiotic effect on developing and maintaining the immune system."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/03/AR2008030303200.html

Copeland comments on Hunter Syndrome (Willkes-Barre Times Leader, March 4)
Hunter syndrome is one of about a dozen inherited diseases in which the body doesn't produce enzymes needed to break down certain waste products in cells. The waste products build up and cause a host of problems over time. In the case of Hunter syndrome, these include coarsened facial features, stiffened joints, enlarged internal organs, deafness and eye problems. In severe cases, children develop mental retardation, aggressive behavior and hyperactivity. SARA COPELAND, a genetics expert at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital, sees good reasons for newborn screening for Hunter syndrome. A very accurate blood test is available. And getting an early diagnosis provides the opportunity to test infants for problems related to Hunter syndrome, such as hearing loss or heart ailments. But with drugs for treatment so expensive, Copeland is cautious about encouraging its early use. "We can't just do this willy-nilly. We're talking about hundreds of thousands of dollars per patient. We have to be responsible with our resources," she said. The Times Leader is published in Pennsylvania.
http://www.timesleader.com/living/20080304_04_hunters_hea_ART.html

Rahmouni leads UI obesity researchers (Yahoo! India, March 4)
Researchers focusing on the rare genetic disorder Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), have identified a clue to show how resistance to the hormone leptin might disrupt the brain signals that tell the body when to stop eating. Researchers at the University of Iowa, led by KAMAL RAHMOUNI, Ph.D., assistant professor of internal medicine at the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, also found a link between leptin resistance and high blood pressure. Their findings, based on mouse models, may have implications for the treatment of BBS, as well as obesity and high blood pressure in people without BBS. "Bardet-Biedl syndrome is rare but its symptoms, including obesity and increased risk of heart disease, are similar to problems faced by many people without the syndrome. Leptin normally suppresses appetite and increases caloric use. The more we know about how leptin and gene defects affect people with BBS, the more likely it is that we can improve treatment for them and people with similar symptoms," said Rahmouni.
http://in.news.yahoo.com/ani/20080304/r_t_ani_hl/thl-study-on-rare-syndrome-sheds-light-o-3b18f0d.html

Iowa Electronic Markets still predicts Obama nomination (Fortune.com, March 4)
A story about futures predictions markets notes that on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Hillary Clinton has a roughly 18 percent chance of winning the nomination versus Obama's 79 percent chance.
http://money.cnn.com/2008/03/04/markets/election_bets/index.htm?postversion=2008030404

Tolbert: Democratic hostility helps McCain (WDTN-TV, March 3)
Despite aggression early in Ohio's Democratic president debate, Barack Obama ended last Tuesday's night debate with high praise for opponent Hillary Rodham Clinton. University of Iowa professor CAROLINE TOLBERT says if Obama and Clinton knock each other down too far en route to the nomination, it only ends up helping McCain. WDTN is based in Dayton, Ohio.
http://www.wdtn.com/Global/story.asp?S=7954905&nav=menu590_2_2

Police investigate graffiti at UI students' apartment (KAAL-TV, March 3)
Police are investigating a possible hate crime after racial epithets were found written on the apartment door of two UNIVERSITY OF IOWA seniors. KAAL is based in Austin and Albert Lea, Minn.
http://KAALtv.com/article/stories/S365666.shtml?cat=10218

UI School of Public Health controversy cited (Inside Higher Ed, March 3)
It's standard practice these days for colleges to depend on corporate philanthropy to see campus buildings or endowed chairs with company names. But are there lines that shouldn't be crossed? At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last year, professors objected to a plan to name the School of Public Health after a company.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2008/03/03/hunter

UI studies tooth enamel (Press of Atlantic City, March 3)
Some children get cavities because of deviations from normal tooth enamel. According to scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, it is difficult to pinpoint a cause for enamel hypoplasia in children. Research has found that both environmental and genetic factors can interfere with tooth formation.
http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/114/story/96752.html

Bang attended UI (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, March 2)
A feature about poet Mary Jo Bang notes that she attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/books/story/1647DCCE57AAD55A8625740100083711?OpenDocument

UI studied hypnotism (McClatchy-Tribune, March 2)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA used functional MRIs to show that hypnosis alters brain activity in a way that relieves pain. The brain scans showed that different areas of the brain "lit up" when pain was inflicted on the patients who were under hypnosis, resulting in significant pain reduction.
http://www.hometownannapolis.com/cgi-bin/read/2008/03_02-49/LIF

UI collaborated an asthma survey (Physorg.com, March 1)
Results from a new national survey demonstrate that elevated allergen levels in the home are associated with asthma symptoms in allergic individuals. The work was carried out by researchers at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Rho Inc., and the Constella Group. Physorg.com is a science and medical news Web site. This story is running on science and medical news sites worldwide. Physorg covers topics related to science, physics and technology.
http://www.physorg.com/news123577769.html

Kuwana studied cell death (Medical News Today, March 1)
TOMOMI KUWANA of University of Iowa collaborated in a new study that identified a compound that blocks an early step in cell death, a discovery that could lead to new drugs to treat heart attacks and strokes. Medical News Today, owned by MediLexicon International Ltd., is the largest independent health and medical news Web site on the Internet. Its head office is based in the United Kingdom.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/98933.php

Johnson's coach came to U.S. to study at UI (Washington Post, March 1)
Qiao Liang, the coach of Olympic hopeful Shawn Johnson of West Des Moines, came to the United States to study English and coach at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/29/AR2008022903992.html?hpid=sec-sports

Cody attended UI (Straits Times, March 1)
A feature on Diablo Cody (Brook Busey) notes that she earned a degree in media studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Singapore.
http://www.straitstimes.com//Life%2521/Life%2BNews/Story/STIStory_211766.html

Kramer comments on waterboarding (Omaha World-Herald, March 1)
Today's debate over waterboarding as a technique for interrogating terrorism suspects eerily echoes one that's a century old during the Filipino insurrection. PAUL KRAMER, an associate professor of history at the University of Iowa who's written a book on the Philippine-American conflict, said that the century-old events "haunt" today's controversy. A key question Kramer posed from the historic events -- "How much was global power worth in other people's pain?"-- lies at the heart of today's debate over interrogation in the war on terror.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1100&u_sid=10271804

UI studied chicken genes (Mother Earth News, February/March 2008)
Java chickens were once among the most popular farm birds, but the pressures of industrial agriculture pushed them near extinction. Now a genetic study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has confirmed that a small contemporary flock is descended from the stock of the last-known commercial supplier, offering hope that the breed can be reestablished.
http://www.motherearthnews.com/Sustainable-Farming/2002-02-01/Java-Chickens-Back-From-the-Brink.aspx

 

 

 

 

 

The University of Iowa All rights reserved copyright 2006