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UI in the News

June 2008

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UI researchers find new signs of early menopause (Red Orbit, June 30)
A new study from researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has found that shortened times between menstrual periods may be an initial sign of menopause, while heavy bleeding seems to have other causes. The researchers found that a shortened interval between periods, fewer than 21 days, in women aged 42 to 52 indicated the women were in the early stages of menopause.
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1456947/shorter_cycles_can_indicate_initial_phases_of_menopause/index.html

Guckert: 'Is 100-year-flood plan still relevant?' (Chronicle, June 30)
In an article exploring how the rise in tornados and floods poses a risk to universities and colleges, DONALD J. GUCKERT, associate vice president and director of facilities management at the University of Iowa, discusses how officials may need to shift their thinking from dealing with 100-year floods to 500-year floods and revise their disaster plans accordingly. In June the U.S Climate Change Science Program, which is sponsored by 13 government agencies, released a report saying that extreme weather like heat waves, heavy downpours, and superpowered hurricanes would be more common in the future.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v54/i43/43a00101.htm

Gronbeck: electronic age makes marketing cheaper (Montreal Gazette, June 30)
Shoppers in New York City might be excused for mistaking Barack Obama for a cult hero in the league of Bob Marley or Che Guevara. Retailers in Manhattan and on the Internet are using creative slogans and images to profit from the image of the White House hopeful. There are campaign buttons, jewelry, teddy bears, even women's underwear thongs. As part of the campaign's efforts to reach out to small donors via the Internet, Web site barackobama.com also has a store offering products ranging from T-shirts to winter garb. "We now have the tremendous ability to market and in an electronic age to reproduce so much more cheaply than we did before," University of Iowa communications professor BRUCE GRONBECK said. This article originated with REUTERS. This article also appeared in YAHOO NEWS.
http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=3af2b071-df28-4f47-bc27-0ba446bfb301

Weinstock explores role of worms in bowel disease (New York Times, June 29)
In the early 1990s, Joel Weinstock, a gastroenterologist, encountered a puzzle. The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (I.B.D.) across North America increased markedly during the 20th century. Many thought that "bad" genes would eventually explain the spike, but Weinstock didn't buy it. In areas where fewer than two generations ago the I.B.D. incidence might have been as low as 1 in 10,000, it was now 1 in 250. A defective gene couldn't spread that quickly, he reasoned. It had to be something in the environment. But what? Stumped, Weinstock tried turning the question around. Instead of asking what triggered I.B.D., he asked what, before the 20th century, protected against it? At the time, Weinstock, then at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was editing a book on parasitic worms.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/29/magazine/29wwln-essay-t.html?_r=1&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss&oref=slogin

Bush taps UI law alum for state department post (Chicago Tribune, June 29)
President Bush is tapping a Bettendorf native to be an assistant secretary of state. Brian H. Hook has been selected to be the assistant secretary of state for international organizational affairs. Previously, he'd been counselor to the United Nations ambassador and has worked in a policy role at the White House. Hook, who has a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, faces Senate confirmation.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-bettendorfappoint,0,2283711.story

Black offers advice to help compulsive shoppers (Washington Post, June 29)
Shannon Hassemer went on a shopping spree when she got her first credit card in college. Tired of owning just one pair of tennis shoes, she quickly filled her closet with luxury items from designers such as Gucci, Coach and Louis Vuitton. Hassemer is not unlike many Americans. According to a study in the American Journal of Psychiatry, 5.8 percent of Americans are compulsive buyers. DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and an expert on compulsive shopping, says the first step is admitting to having a problem.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/28/AR2008062800229.html?hpid=smartliving

Mutel sheds insights into sounds from aurora emissions (Science Daily, June 29)
The first thing an alien race is likely to hear from Earth is chirps and whistles, a bit like R2-D2, the robot from Star Wars. In reality, they are the sounds that accompany the aurora. Now ESA's Cluster mission is showing scientists how to understand this emission and, in the future, search for alien worlds by listening for their sounds. Scientists call this radio emission the Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR). It is generated high above the Earth, by the same shaft of solar particles that then causes an aurora to light the sky beneath. By analyzing 12 000 separate bursts of AKR, a team of astronomers have determined that the AKR is beamed into space in a narrow plane. "We can now determine exactly where the emission is coming from," says ROBERT MUTEL, University of Iowa, who conducted the three-year study with colleagues.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080627163048.htm

Catastrophic specialist helps UI clean up muck (Newsweek, June 27)
Flood victims don't have to go it alone. One catastrophe specialist explains how his business is helping the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA clean up the muck. Dennis McKinley is the professional to call when the floodwaters recede. With more than 20 years in the industry, he serves as a project manager for BMS Catastrophe, a privately held company with 731 employees in Fort Worth, Texas, that specializes in cleaning up after fires, floods and other disasters. Not surprisingly, the Midwest flooding has drawn BMS to the University of Iowa in Iowa City, where 20 campus buildings and numerous athletic fields and facilities remain closed.
http://www.newsweek.com/id/143507

Segar: prenatal diet impacts offspring (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, June 27)
The environment's impact on us doesn't begin when we are born. It begins in the womb, and its effects may be felt decades after birth, according to new research. The term "fetal programming" describes this phenomenon. And unlike exposure to a virus or something that causes birth defects, its effect is subtle. It is something that will "influence the regulation of your body for your whole life. It may influence how fat or skinny you're going to be; it may influence your blood pressure," the development of diabetes and other disorders, said University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher Christopher Coe. Aside from stress, the mother's diet has a significant impact on the later development of a range of problems. JEFFREY SEGAR, a physician and professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa, found that when mice were fed a low-protein diet, the offspring developed an intolerance to glucose, which is often a precursor to diabetes.
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=766823

Mason among leaders helping to raise $3 million in flood relief (CNBC, June 27)
Leaders of a collaborative to raise private funds for flood and storm victims announced that they've secured pledges of nearly $3 million so far. Iowa's first lady Mari Culver was in Cedar Rapids on Thursday to help kick off the effort by the 2008 Iowa Disaster Collaborative. During the event, officials presented checks totaling $425,000 to eastern Iowa community-based organizations, and said that an additional $2.5 million in pledges had been secured. Also joining the effort are University of Iowa President SALLY MASON, Rockwell Collins Inc. Chief Executive Clay Jones, John Deere Foundation president Amy Nimmber and Aegon USA Chief Executive Pat Baird. CNBC is based in Englewood Cliffs, N.J.
http://www.cnbc.com/id/25414011/for/cnbc

UI students volunteered to help protect buildings (USA Today, June 27)
A post in a reader-driven opinion blog notes that hundreds of volunteers, many of them UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students, showed up to protect primarily university buildings and small businesses from the flood.
http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2008/06/unselfish-iowan.html

Noonan discusses 'trailing spouse' study (CNN, June 26)
It's common for couples to place more emphasis on the man's career, according to a 2007 study of more than 9,000 married men and women ages 25-59. The researchers, from the University of Iowa and the University of California-Davis, also found that when couples relocate, the husband tends to get a salary boost -- $3,000 on average. But the wife loses $750. "When couples migrate, they are [typically] doing it for the benefit of the husband's career, and so the wife is what we call the 'trailing spouse,'" says study author MARY NOONAN, associate professor of sociology at the UI. "She may have to take a job in the new location that is a less-than-ideal match for her skills [or] qualifications."
http://www.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/worklife/06/26/lw.men.v.women.career/

Noonan: traditional gender roles linger in marriages (Huffington Post, June 26)
Researchers from the University of Iowa and the University of California-Davis found that when couples relocate, the husband tends to get a salary boost -- $3,000 on average -- but the wife loses $750. MARY NOONAN, the UI sociologist who co-authored the study, said while it may not be true for every relationship, more often than not, "men and women are taught to play very different roles within marriage. Women are socialized to play a homemaking role within the family, whereas men are encouraged to focus on their careers and breadwinning."
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/06/26/his-or-hers-whose-job-is_n_109356.html

Guckert discusses disaster preparation (Chronicle of Higher Ed, June 26)
The Chronicle recently caught a moment with DONALD J. GUCKERT, associate vice president and director of facilities management at the University of Iowa, as he worked to dry out his campus and get things running again. He had a few thoughts for Chronicle readers about preparing for disasters. "We tend to think about the campus in terms of buildings, but it is the utility system that has left us with the greatest challenges," he said.
http://chronicle.com/blogs/architecture/2219/u-of-iowa-administrator-asks-how-vulnerable-are-your-utilities

Prineas lands contract for children's book series (Publishers Weekly, June 26)
SARAH PRINEAS
has a young reader of the children's magazine Cricket to thank for the impetus that led to her very splashy debut -- a three-book contract, two starred reviews for the first volume, and 13 foreign rights sales. Prineas, who has taught at the University of Iowa where she holds a part-time job coordinating scholarships, recently published "The Magic Thief," a middle-grade fantasy about the guttersnipe, Conn, whose talents as a pickpocket lead to an apprenticeship with a powerful wizard in a city desperately in need of new magic.
http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA6571854.html

Porter: mortgage fees are frequently questionable (USA Today, June 26)
A November research study by KATHERINE PORTER, a University of Iowa law professor, found mortgage and servicing companies "frequently do not comply with applicable law." Fees charged to borrowers "are often poorly identified, making it impossible to verify if such charges are legally permissible or accurate," concluded the report, which analyzed 1,700 recent Chapter 13 bankruptcy cases.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/banking/2008-06-25-mortgage-services-countrywide-lawsuit_N.htm?csp=N008

UI study: handshakes matter in job interviews (The Herald-Dispatch, June 26)
GREG STEWART
, who teaches at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, conducted a study on the importance of a good handshake in the workplace which will be published in September's Journal of Applied Psychology. Stewart says the prospective employee with the best handshake is more likely to get the job. The HERALD-DISPATCH is based in Huntington, W.Va.
http://www.herald-dispatch.com/business/x2102938137/A-firm-greeting-leaves-a-strong-first-impression

Summer classes resume, several buildings still closed (The Peninsula, June 25)
Summer classes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA resumed yesterday with more than 10,000 students picking their way around more than 20 buildings or other facilities that remained closed from flooding along the Iowa River. Officials said the disruptions could continue into the autumn when the campus swells to more than 30,000 students. A major riverside dormitory housing more than 1,000 students will not be opened for the fall term, they said. THE PENINSULA is based in Qatar.
http://www.thepeninsulaqatar.com/Display_news.asp?section=World_News&subsection=United+Kingdom+%26+Europe&month=June2008&file=World_News2008062513647.xml

UI students study culture in China (Chinadaily.com, June 25)
Twenty-four students from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA started their weeklong orientation course on Chinese culture, environment, economy, media and ethnic minorities at Tsinghua University on Monday. UI student Emily Doolittle was interviewed about learning to write in Chinese.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/olympics/2008-06/25/content_6794239.htm

Louisiana company provided flood barriers to UI (Hammond Star, June 25)
A story about a Louisiana company providing barriers to hold back floodwater in the Midwest notes that the first of the barriers were shipped to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. More than 5,000 feet of barrier wall was set up to protect the campus from rising waters, and students constructed a levee made of sand bags.
http://www.hammondstar.com/articles/2008/06/25/top_stories/9258.txt

Weber discusses damage to UI campus (Metropolis Magazine, June 23)
A story about architecture landmarks in Iowa being flooded notes damage at the University of Iowa. Hardest hit was their Art Campus, which houses Steven Holl's award-winning Art Building West, and several buildings designed by Max Abramovitz, the architect perhaps best known for Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center in New York City. "Hancher auditorium has taken on several feet of water," said LARRY WEBER, professor of hydroscience and civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa. Weber oversees the college's world-renowned water research center. "Everyone has shed a tear over the art campus."
http://www.metropolismag.com/cda/story.php?artid=3439

UI students express support for McCain (Inside Higher Ed, June 25)
In the weeks following Hillary Clinton's concession this month, rumors have been buzzing that disappointed supporters of the vanquished Democrat may cross party lines to support John McCain -- and in a few instances they have. In a letter last week to members Students for Hillary at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the group's co-chairs, Cody Eliff and Nicole Dziuban, expressed their support for the Republican senator from Arizona. The letter cites reasons such as the unfair treatment of Clinton by the media and by the Obama campaign, as well as Obama being "unqualified" to be president.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2008/06/25/campaign

UI Flood Relief Fund noted (Daily Herald, June 25)
At the end of a report on Midwest flooding, the UI Flood Relief Fund is listed among other relief funds. Gifts to this fund will be used at University of Iowa PRESIDENT SALLY MASON'S discretion to address areas of greatest need on campus.
http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=211892

UI Olympic volunteers start training (Shenzhen Daily, June 24)
The first lesson William Heathershaw learned in Beijing as an Olympic volunteer was how to use chopsticks. On Monday, Beijing started to train the first group of overseas volunteers in media operations for the Olympics with a weeklong course in Chinese culture at Qinghua University. Twenty-four students, including Heathershaw, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, will learn about China's history, culture, environment, economy, media and ethnic minorities and tour the city. The publication is based in China.
http://paper.sznews.com/szdaily/20080625/ca2899096.htm

UI flood damage described (USA Today, June 24)
In a summary of flood recovery actions, it's noted that 20 buildings took on water at the University of Iowa, including the main arts building, a 1,000-bed dormitory and the main library. University spokesman STEVE PARROTT said funding for recovery will come from FEMA, insurance companies and possibly the Legislature. He said summer classes have resumed, but some buildings -- including those that house the arts, theater and music programs -- won't be ready for the fall semester.
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/floods/2008-06-24-flood_N.htm

UI scientists test sludge left by flood (ABC News, June 24)
For Michele Kolsrud of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, rebuilding her home seems like a far-away goal. She can't even stand being inside it for long. "We're only supposed to stay here for half an hour at a time," Kolsrud told ABC News. "So even with masks, we're getting that smell. It's just, it's bad." As in hundreds of other homes, a layer of toxic sludge has covered everything, brought into the houses after floodwaters ran through gas stations, paint stores, sewage plants and farms that house fertilizer and pesticides. Its pungent smell is the least of homeowners' problems. "We found some elevated levels of bacteria, e-coli, and some industrial chemicals, some motor oil and diesel fuel," said MICHAEL WICHMAN, associate director of environmental health at the University of Iowa, where the sludge was tested.
http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Weather/story?id=5232520&page=1

Summer classes resume at UI (Reuters, June 24)
In a roundup of flood-related news, it's noted that summer classes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA resumed on Monday with more than 10,000 students picking their way around more than 20 buildings or other facilities that remained closed from flooding along the Iowa River. Officials said the disruptions could continue into the autumn when the campus swells to more than 30,000 students. Among other things, a major riverside dormitory housing more than 1,000 students will not be opened for the fall term.
http://www.reuters.com/article/companyNewsAndPR/idUSN2434324520080624

Olympics volunteers learn Chinese calligraphy (China Daily, June 24)
"It's just like drawing a picture, " Emily Doolittle said as she was trying to write Chinese characters at a calligraphy class here on Tuesday. Doolittle is one of the 24 students from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who started their weeklong orientation course on Chinese culture, environment, economy, media and ethnic minorities at Tsinghua University as of Monday. "I once took a Chinese calligraphy class in my university two years ago. It was really hard to figure out how to write Chinese characters," Doolittle said.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/olympics/2008-06/25/content_6794239.htm

White discusses flooding impact on art museum (Wall Street Journal, June 24)
PAM WHITE, director of the University of Iowa Art Museum, discusses how the Art Museum quickly evacuated 80 percent of its collection in the hours before the building was flooded by the Iowa River.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121426220436798255.html?mod=opinion_journal_leisure_art

Still no flood damage estimates available (Chronicle of Higher Ed., June 24)
After touring the flooded and partially reopened University of Iowa campus on Monday, two leaders of the state's Board of Regents said they were saddened by the devastation but thankful for the thousands of volunteers who had helped prevent an even worse catastrophe. The university had hoped to have a damage estimate on Monday, but after wading into the buildings that are accessible and the subterranean tunnels that contain water pipes, electric lines, and fiber-optics cables, officials decided it was too early. "As we got deeper and deeper into our tunnels and started to look at our infrastructure, we got more and more worried about things we were seeing," said SALLY K. MASON, the university's president.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2008/06/3525n.htm

Andrew Ho comments on increased test scores (New York Times, June 24)
Reading and math scores for New York students in grades three through eight showed extraordinary gains across the state since last year, with particularly striking leaps in the large urban areas, including New York City. But ANDREW D. HO, an assistant professor of educational statistics at the University of Iowa who has researched state and federal tests, said that while there was no question that students had improved substantially on New York's exams, such gains were not mirrored in the national tests. "They are on the order of what you might see in a 25-year trend on the national assessment," Mr. Ho said. "Even the most pro-testing regime would have to admit there is a small component of inflation at the very least here."
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/24/education/24scores.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=%22university+of+iowa%22&st=nyt&oref=slogin

Mayflower Hall closed for fall semester (Chicago Tribune, June 24)
Students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA won't be calling the Mayflower home this fall. The school's largest residence hall, which houses nearly 20 percent of the university's 5,500 dorm beds, is among 20 flood-damaged buildings on campus.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-universityfloodin,0,3440391.story

Sidel discusses impact of anti-terrorism laws (DePers, June 24)
UI law professor MARK SIDEL discusses the impact of counterterrorism law and policy on civil society and the nonprofit sector. DePers is based in The Netherlands. The interview is in Dutch.
http://www.depers.nl/buitenland/214380/Strijd-tegen-terreur-belemmert-werk-van-hulporganisaties.html

UI moves art collection in advance of flooding (Bloomberg, June 23)
A story about flooding in the Midwest notes that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA moved the collection of its art museum to Chicago for safekeeping.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aOqe91k33An4&refer=home

UI study on women and Medical Leave Act cited (New York Times, June 23)
A story about a campaign appearance by Barack Obama before a group of women noted that a recent study by a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor found that women who use the Medical Leave Act often suffer lower wages and salary over time.
http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/23/obama-faces-the-tough-economic-questions/

Classes resume at UI (KAAL-TV, June 23)
Summer classes resumed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Monday after they were suspended for a week due to flooding. KAAL is based in Austin-Albert Lea, Minn.
http://KAALtv.com/article/stories/S486542.shtml?cat=10218

UI study finds resistant bacteria in pork (Health and Age, June 23)
A story about increasing numbers of viruses that are found in pork notes that researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found antibiotic resistant bacteria in almost half of pigs tested.
http://www.healthandage.com/public/news-home/15283/There-May-Be-Bugs-in-Your-Bacon.html

UI Library flood among topics of conversation (History News Network, June 23)
A story about the recent 14th Berkshire Conference on the History of Women held at the University of Minnesota notes that among the topics of conversation were the Midwestern floods and the efforts to save many books from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Library.
http://hnn.us/articles/51452.html

Sinn and McCray collaborated in measles research (Medical News Today, June 23)
PARTRICK SINN
and PAUL MCCRAY of University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine collaborated on groundbreaking research identifying how the measles virus spreads - research that may rewrite the textbooks. Variations of this story are appearing worldwide.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/112342.php

Study by Schmidt and Rynes is cited (Vanguard, June 23)
If a company rehabilitates a stretch of road in a prominent part of town, has its name emblazoned all over it and invites the world press to cover the commissioning, will this truly qualify to be called Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) or more appropriately, an extension of the company's advertising campaign?" FRANK SCHMIDT and SARA RYNES of the University of Iowa, in their landmark 2004 publication: Corporate Social and Financial Performance: A Meta-analysis, established that a correlation exists between CSR and Corporate Financial Performance. Vanguard originates in Nigeria.
http://www.vanguardngr.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=10825&Itemid=0

Ho studies test-score trends (New York Sun, June 23)
New York Mayor Bloomberg will announce that state test scores are up across the city, by double digits at some schools. But a cloud is already gathering, as education experts are raising the possibility that these gains and others across the country could suggest score inflation and not real learning gains. A study by a pscyhometrician and professor at the University of Iowa, ANDREW HO, found that two-thirds of state tests are publishing higher gains than a national test.
http://www.nysun.com/new-york/mayor-sees-a-test-scores-triumph/80476/

Prineas has a flying start as a writer (Publishers Weekly, June 23)
SARAH PRINEAS
has a very splashy writing debut -- a three-book contract, two starred reviews for the "The Magic Thief," and 13 foreign rights sales. She has taught at the University of Iowa, where she holds a part-time job coordinating scholarships.
http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA6571854.html

Lewis-Beck forecasts election (Eureka!, June 23)
Anticipating what is likely to be one of the most interesting elections in modern history, University at Buffalo professor of political science James E. Campbell and MICHAEL S. LEWIS-BECK, professor of political science at the University of Iowa, have assembled the insights of prominent election forecasters in a special issue of the International Journal of Forecasting published this month. Eureka! originates in Canada.
http://esciencenews.com/articles/2008/06/23/election.forecasters.preparing.historic.election

MADD founder was UI alumna (Chicago Tribune, June 23)
Carol Brierly Golin, who held a journalism degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was the founder of Mothers Against Drunk Driving.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-hed-golin-23-jun23,0,553040.story

UI Olympic volunteers begin training (Xinhua, June 23)
Beijing started to train the first group of 292 overseas volunteers in media operations for the Olympics with a week-long course on Chinese culture at Tsinghua University. Twenty-four students from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will learn about China's history, culture, environment, economy, media and ethnic minorities and tour the city.
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-06/23/content_8424797.htm

Fischer praises amateur astronomer (Herald Sun, June 22)
Former miner Trevor Barry scanned the night sky with his backyard telescope and became a star. The passionate amateur astronomer caught the instant attention of NASA when he observed and photographed an extremely rare celestial event, a raging electrical storm on Saturn. GEORGE FISCHER, from the University of Iowa, who works with the Cassini probe said, "His picture of a lightning storm raging over Saturn is unique." The Herald Sun is published in Australia
http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,23901831-2862,00.html

Houge paper is cited (New York Daily News, June 22)
Financial columnist writes about the Russell Index:" Professors Jie Cai of Drexel University and TODD HOUGE of the University of Iowa have written an interesting paper showing stocks taken out of the index significantly outperform those put into the index."
http://www.nydailynews.com/money/2008/06/21/2008-06-21_perils_of_index_funds_.html

UI Press book is lauded (Charlotte Observer, June 21)
Book columnist Pam Kelly writes, "A well-told memoir distills wisdom from memories, helping readers see their own lives and society in new ways. Melissa Delbridge's "Family Bible," (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS) is a fine example." The Charlotte Observer is published in North Carolina.
http://www.charlotte.com/living/columnists/pam_kelley/story/675761.html

UI experts warn of health risks after flood (UPI, June 21)
Experts warn Iowans affected by the recent flooding that they may be in more danger from mold and contaminated water than they were when rivers were surging. Professors from the University of Iowa discussed the impact of the disaster on physical and mental health at a news conference Friday. "From a public health standpoint, we will be in a much more dangerous place," JAMES MERCHANT, dean of the College of Public Health, said. WAYNE SANDERSON, a professor of occupational and environmental health, said that mold can continue to be a problem long after a flood. KATHLEEN STALEY of the University Counseling Service said that depression may also hit in the period after a flood.
http://www.upi.com/Top_News/2008/06/21/Iowans_warned_of_post-flood_health_risks/UPI-46521214097636/

Meschery attended the UI (Sierra Sun, June 21)
Retiring from the NBA in 1971, after a 10-year career, Tom Meschery earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1974 to pursue a career in teaching and writing. He has published poetry, fiction and nonfiction, and taught for many years in Reno. The Sierra Sun is published in California.
http://www.sierrasun.com/article/20080621/NEWS/957901473/1051

Redlawsk studies voters' choices (Science News, June 20)
Political scientists are developing new methods to understand how voters make decisions. DAVID REDLAWSK of the University of Iowa and his collaborators use computers to model campaigns and track how people actually decide whom to vote for in mock elections.
http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/33352/title/Simpleminded_Voters

McGehee comments on the DriveCam (Southern Maryland Newspapers, June 20)
Young Maryland drivers will soon be joined by an ever-present DriveCam, which documents their driving decisions and problems. ''It shows exactly what occurred so kids can't explain it away," said DANIEL MCGEHEE, a researcher at the University of Iowa, who studied the use of the DriveCam.
http://www.somdnews.com/stories/06202008/indytop180556_32166.shtml

Hagle comments on flood impact on politics (Washington Post, June 19)
Flooding in Iowa made political campaigning grind to a halt. "People have more important things to worry about, like getting their business and home taken care of," said University of Iowa associate professor of political science TIM HAGLE.
http://blog.washingtonpost.com/the-trail/2008/06/19/politics_takes_hiatus_in_flood.html

Guckert describes flood preparations (NPR, June 19)
The Iowa River has crested, but that doesn't mean Iowa City is out of danger. DON GUCKERT, who is in charge of facilities, says that after the devastating floods of 1993, the university built up levees high enough for water levels you might see once every 100 years - but not for a flood you see every 500 years. There's no stopping water this high. "We, in preparation for this flood, elevated equipment a few feet off the ground, and it's appearing that might be the difference," Guckert says. "We're very anxious about getting back in there and seeing was that enough to save that equipment."
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91562360

Porter assesses housing crisis (Reuters, June 19)
The U.S. housing crisis has done deep and lasting economic injury to Rust Belt cities of the Midwest, which will take longer to recover than former Sun Belt boomtowns of the South and West. "I expect the hardest hit places to be those such as Ohio and Michigan where the foreclosure crisis was driven by serious, if not permanent, economic downturns, " said KATHERINE PORTER, associate professor at the University of Iowa College of Law.
http://www.reuters.com/article/reutersEdge/idUSN1852718920080618

UI sets up flood relief fund (Chicago Daily Herald, June 19)
Gifts to the UI Flood Relief Fund -- www.givetoiowa.org/floodfund -- will be used at University of Iowa President SALLY MASON's discretion to address areas of greatest need on campus.
http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=209617&src=110

UI Press book feted in Ireland (Galway Advertiser, June 19)
"Poems from Guantanamo-The Detainees Speak," published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, will be feted in an Irish event sponsored by Amnesty International.
http://www.galwayadvertiser.ie/content/index.php?aid=12418

UI sends sandbags downriver (US News, June 18)
Now that the height of the flooding has passed, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is sending 250,000 dry sandbags to southeast Iowa to prepare for the rising river levels that just surged through the campus over the weekend.
http://www.usnews.com/blogs/paper-trail/2008/6/18/university-of-iowa-sends-sandbags-downriver.html

Klinefelters smash stereotypes (CBS Sportline, June 18)
Emily and Katy Klinefelter, 24 and 20 years old, shatter every preconceived notion of what a female fighter should be. They are two beautiful Jewish women from the state of Iowa who attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, receiving straight A's while dominating the amateur boxing scene for the past several years. Both speak fluent Spanish and Katy also speaks Portuguese. Emily, who graduated in 2006 with a 4.0 GPA, was the valedictorian of her class and is now pursuing her master's in accounting.
http://cbs.sportsline.com/mmaboxing/story/10870120/rss

Andrejevic comments on reality TV (Forbes, June 18)
University of Iowa's MARK ANDREJEVIC, author of "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched," says Lauren Conrad of "The Hills" is representative of the future of television, where advertising and entertainment are one and the same. "Conrad is an avatar of synergy," he explains. "Her show promotes the clothing line and magazines, and her magazine covers promote the show."
http://www.forbes.com/media/2008/06/18/television-lauren-conrad-biz-media-cx_lr_0618hills.html

Retired math professor started book club (Times Herald, June 18)
A feature describes how retired University of Iowa math professor MARILYN ZWENG founded and led a reading club for a dozen years. The Times Herald is published in Port Huron, Mich. http://www.thetimesherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080618/NEWS01/806180301&referrer=FRONTPAGECAROUSEL

Lubovitch attended the UI (iBerkshires.com, June 18)
Choreographer Lar Lubovitch, who discovered his destiny in dance while a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is kicking off the 40th anniversary of his company at Jacob's Pillow.
http://www.iberkshires.com/story/27472/Lar-Lubovitch-Kicks-Off-40th-Anniversary-Tour-at-Jacob-s-Pillow.html

Damage at Tech Lab will be assessed (Photonics, June 18)
It will be months before the full extent of flood damage sustained by the Iowa Advanced Technology Laboratories is known. The facility remains closed, with water from the nearby Iowa River in its ground floor labs. "No damage has been assessed yet, but there are specific pieces of equipment we are worried about," JORDAN COHEN, interim vice president of research, said. "It depends on how high off the ground these critical components were."
http://www.photonics.com/content/news/2008/June/18/92117.aspx

Gordon discusses UI floods with radio host brother (The Story, June 17)
When the University of Iowa was engulfed by floodwaters, host Dick Gordon immediately thought of his brother, COLIN GORDON, who teaches there. Colin recently found himself hoisting sand bags to protect university buildings. He tells Dick what it's been like living through floods and tornadoes over the last few years. The Story is produced and distributed by American Public Media. This is an audio file. The interview begins at approximately 37 minutes.
http://thestory.org/archive/?

Journal founder attended UI (Chicago Tribune, June 17)
Curt Johnson, who held a master's degree in American civilization from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, published the literary journal December for more than 40 years, publishing some of the earliest works of Raymond Carver, Joyce Carol Oates and other prominent writers.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/obituaries/chi-hed-johnson-17-jun17,0,6717130.story

UI mobilizes to help other cities (Chicago Tribune, June 18)
With 10,500 students enrolled for the summer, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials say the school won't close because of the floods, but some professors may decide to meet on Saturdays or extend weekday classes by several minutes to make up for lost time.  The university on Tuesday afternoon asked for volunteers to help load 250,000 sandbags onto trucks so they could head to points south toward other soon-to-be flooded cities.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-floods-universityjun18,0,624821.story

UI flood continues to be the big story (Kansas City Star, June 18)
The Iowa River flood on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus continues to dominate the news, including this widely published story from the Associated Press.
http://www.kansascity.com/637/story/668306.html

Hall assesses flood health risks (ABC, June 18)
Public health threats rise to the surface during a flood like the one in the Midwest with animal waste runoff from farms and overflowing city sewer lines. But people are usually smart enough to avoid what can make them sick, experts say. For example, the 1993 floods in the same region produced no illnesses from contaminated water despite the worries of floating waste, said NANCY HALL, a public health microbiologist at the University of Iowa's University Hygienic Laboratory. This story was circulated by AP.
http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=5187712

UI volunteer effort was inspiring (Wall Street Journal, June 17)
Columnist Michael Judge wrote, "Among the thousands of stories of neighbor helping neighbor, volunteers sandbagging night and day to protect property that belongs to others, perhaps the most inspiring was the effort made to save the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and its classrooms, libraries and museums. Last week and through the weekend, hundreds of volunteers gathered on campus to reinforce the in some places 10-feet high sandbag walls erected to hold back the Iowa River. Students, teachers and townspeople formed a human chain to relay books from the basement and lower floors of the UI Main Library to higher floors, moving thousands of titles, one-of-a-kind dissertations and rare books out of harm's way."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121366270962479269.html?mod=rss_opinion_main

UI assesses damage (Washington Post, June 17)
Officials at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are now assessing flood damage. This AP story has appeared in hundreds of media, and many other flood stories are appearing nationally and internationally.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/17/AR2008061700383.html

UI saved books and art (National Post, June 16)

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials moved paintings, books and documents out of harm's way as record flooding in parts of the U.S. Midwest partly submerged the campus in Iowa City. That National Post is published in Canada. This story was syndicated by Reuters. http://www.nationalpost.com/todays_paper/story.html?id=590247

UI flooding is chronicled (CNN, June 16)
Dozens of stories about the flooding on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus are running nationally and internationally.
http://us.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/06/15/iowa.flooding/index.html

Mason focuses on what can be saved (AP, June 16)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESIDENT SALLY MASON toured the flood-ravaged UI campus and said, "I'm focused on what we can save. We'll deal with this when we get past the crisis. We're not past the crisis yet."
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/MIDWEST_FLOODING?SITE=VASTR&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT
<http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2008/06/13/national/a103436D76.DTL&tsp=1

Robinson teaches at UI (Idaho State Journal, June 16)
Reading groups in Idaho are focusing on “Housekeeping” by Marilynne Robinson who “teaches at the prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.”
http://www.journalnet.com/articles/2008/06/16/news/breaking/news04.txt

UI alumna takes students on South African adventure (Kansas City Star, June 15)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumna Cindy Noll is accompanying eight-grade students on a science adventure to a West Nile Virus conference in South Africa, thanks to funding from friends she knew at the UI.
http://www.kansascity.com/115/story/665412.html

This is ‘our Katrina’ (Chicago Tribune, June 15)
Hundreds of volunteers at the University of Iowa packed thousands of sandbags Saturday before giving up the fight. University officials said a dozen buildings were flooded --some with 4 feet of standing water -- and nine more are at risk. "The hard part is waiting," said UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESIDENT SALLY MASON. "We all felt good being involved … doing physical things. It's much harder to sit back, wait and watch." "This is our version of Katrina," said Johnson County Emergency Management spokesman Mike Sullivan. "This is the worst flooding we've ever seen." This story was distributed on the Tribune’s syndication service.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-flooding_for_final_jun15,0,2715069.story?track=rss

Eric Lie comments on Broadcom cases (Orange County Register, June 13)
Broadcom’s CEO has been indicted not only on securities fraud, but also drug-distribution charges. "It goes hand in hand. If they do one unethical thing, they do another," said ERIK LIE, a University of Iowa business professor whose research first revealed the type of stock option backdating that prompted a federal investigation of Broadcom.
http://www.ocregister.com/ocregister/money/article_2067859.php

UI faces flooding (Los Angeles Times, June 13)
The Cedar River was expected to crest today, but new downpours could mean the crest might not come until at least Sunday, officials said. The storms were even more intense around nearby Iowa City, where the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA faces the threat of devastating flooding."Our predictions of a 100-year flood, or greater, are really coming to pass," Iowa City Mayor Regenia Bailey said. The article also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-flooding13-2008jun13,0,5216610.story?track=rss

Houston broadcaster graduated from UI (Houston Chronicle, June 13)
In a story about Houston Astros announcer Milo Hamilton, it's noted that there were dinners held in Hamilton's honor sponsored by his alma mater, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and by Leadership Houston. There are plans to name a portion of Hamilton Street in downtown Houston as Milo Hamilton Way.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/5834568.html

Football players among  sand-bagging volunteers (USA Today, June 13)
Day after drenching day, Iowans now at the center of the storm have pitched in to help hold off the rushing waters, which have closed hundreds of state and county roads. The Iowa National Guard has mobilized an army of 1,700 sand-bagging volunteers. Among them: UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football players who filled and loaded sandbags at a maintenance center in Coralville.
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/storms/2008-06-11-floods_N.htm?csp=34

Wrestling museum items lost in flood (USA Today, June 12)
There is no price tag officials with the Dan Gable International Wrestling Institute and Museum can put on memorabilia swallowed by flood waters from the Cedar River this week. The primary museum exhibits are safe for now, but the memorabilia in the basement and the carpet on the main floor is a total loss. The museum is named for Gable, the 1972 Olympic champion, national champion at Iowa State and national championship coach at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/2008-06-11-gable-memorabilia_N.htm

Peterson comments on political satire (Washington Post, June 12)
Can satirists affect our perceptions of the candidates? RUSSELL L. PETERSON, an American studies professor at the University of Iowa, believes comics who refute satire's power are purposefully insincere. "But they have a good reason for being disingenuous," adds the author of "Strange Bedfellows: How Late-Night Comedy Turns Democracy Into a Joke." "Their comic license depends on them denying that."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/11/AR2008061103898.html?nav=rss_print/style

Freund was candidate for UI presidency (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, June 12)
Deborah Freund, a distinguished professor of public administration and former provost at Syracuse University in New York, is a finalist for president of Georgia State University. She also has been a candidate for other college presidencies, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/printedition/2008/06/12/gsu.html

UI takes proactive approach to flooding (U.S. News and World Report, June 12)
With the threat of flooding looming, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has taken a proactive approach in its efforts to avoid epic flooding similar to the 1993 disaster that cost the country $15 billion in damages. So far, the worst flooding in Iowa City is just north of campus, and school officials have deployed faculty and student volunteers to create sandbag and concrete barriers along the Iowa River in the northern part of campus. "It's truckload after truckload of sandbags," said a university groundskeeper. "Dump trucks, cement trucks, you name it. We're working quickly."  The story appeared in a blog.
http://www.usnews.com/blogs/paper-trail/2008/6/11/iowa-braces-for-floods.html

UI study: CEOs overconfident in negotiating skills (WebIndia 123.com, June 12)
A new study on CEOs has found that many of them are overconfident about their own negotiating skills and overlook the element of luck in successful mergers, acquisitions, and other deals. Authored by MATTHEW T. BILLETT and YIMING QIAN of the University of Iowa, the study, entitled "Are Overconfident CEOs Born or Made? Evidence of Self-Attribution Bias from Frequent Acquirers," discusses how behavioral biases control how CEOs make important managerial decisions. The authors said that one of the most important decisions top managers have to make is whether they want to go ahead with mergers and acquisitions.
http://news.webindia123.com/news/articles/Entertainment/20080612/972275.html

MacDonald provides commentary on public housing (Miami Herald, June 12)
Miami-Dade has an estimated 100,000 residents on a waiting list for Section Eight housing vouchers. They know, by now, that "waiting list" means forever. Public housing expert HEATHER MACDONALD of the University of Iowa said Wednesday that private-public housing deals can work in communities with a tradition of tough oversight from governing boards and local government.
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/columnists/fred_grimm/story/567101.html

Durham's research in sexualization of girls noted (Vancouver 24 Hours, June 12)
In this commentary about sexual images in a new Dairy Queen ad, the writer says that Professor GIGI DURHAM of the University of Iowa and author of "The Lolita Effect: The Media Sexualization of Young Girls and What We Can Do About It," did 13 years of research in the area of sexual images in the media, immersing herself in magazines, movies, TV shows, catalogs and Web sites aimed at girls ages eight to 12. Durham is deeply concerned that the media feeds small girls a steady diet of sexualized messages that say, "If you've got it, flaunt it," and that being "hot" makes a little girl powerful, and that children -- especially little girls -- are sexy."  The Web site is produced in Canada.
http://vancouver.24hrs.ca/Columnists/OhAndByTheWay/2008/06/02/5743361-sun.html

Redlawsk examines voter attitudes (RedOrbit.com, June 11)
The Pew Research Center found last month that 43 percent of those polled thought presidential candidate Barack Obama would be "not tough enough" on foreign policy, while 16 percent gave John McCain that label. The key motivation for this group, said DAVID REDLAWSK, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa, could rest on whether women value more Obama's promise of changes in the sluggish economy or McCain's image of strength and leadership.
http://www.redorbit.com/news/politics/1428002/obama_gaining_ground_among_women_poll_finds/index.html

UI prepares for flooding (USA Today, June 11)
Students piled sandbags along the Iowa River on Tuesday to spare their university campus from floods that threaten to be worse than the devastating flooding that struck the Plains states 15 years ago. Sandbag and concrete barriers along the Iowa River were all that stood between the water and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. "It's truckload after truckload of sandbags," university groundskeeper JOEL BISHOP said. "Dump trucks, cement trucks, you name it. We're working quickly." The article also appeared in the GREENVILLE (S.C.) NEWS.
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/storms/2008-06-10-weather_heat_N.htm?csp=34

Regents report says UI policy flawed (Chicago Tribune, June 11)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials were not at fault for an investigation of sexual abuse allegations that led to charges against two former Hawkeye football players, but a university policy that paved the way for the arrangement is flawed. Those are the views of the Iowa Board of Regents, which released a report on Tuesday in response to the case of Cedric Everson, 18, and Abe Satterfield, 19, who face charges of second-degree sexual abuse in connection with the case. Satterfield also faces an additional charge for third-degree sexual abuse. The report said Iowa should streamline its investigative divisions for sexual-abuse complaints into a single office. University officials also should notify campus police whenever a sexual assault is reported.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-regentssexassault,0,5747946.story

Deere manager spoke at Tippie commencement (The Salinas Californian, June 11)
On May 16, "Lead the Way with Excellence" was the topic of a commencement address for 168 recipients of a Masters of Business administration degree from the TIPPIE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS at the University of Iowa. Eric P. Hansotia, general manager of Deere Harvester, East Moline, Ill., emphasized the importance of leadership, saying, "Don't waste time mapping your career. Instead, get totally focused on driving excellence in your current role."
http://thecalifornian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080611/OPINION/806110316/1014

UI hospital study noted (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, June 10)
In a column it's noted that some 200 specialty hospitals have sprung up nationwide. Unlike general hospitals, doctors in specialty hospitals do a few things frequently and, therefore, expertly. Studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and from Medicare found much lower rates of complications in specialty hospitals than in general hospitals.
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=760561

UI expected to see flooding (Post-Bulletin, June 10)
Iowa City officials organized sandbagging over the weekend in hopes of protecting homes along the Iowa River, City Manager Michael Lombardo said. In addition to the 150 homes in the expected path of flood waters and other mobile homes nearby, areas near the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA also could see flooding, Lombardo said. "They're planning for the worst but hoping for the best," he said. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn.
http://www.postbulletin.com/newsmanager/templates/localnews_story.asp?z=2&a=346851

UI Press publishes photo book (myTelus.com, June 10)
He spent his entire savings of $12.50 on the 35 mm Argus AF camera in 1939 and for four years documented life in the small Iowa town of Ridgeway. But it wasn't until he was diagnosed with cancer more than 60 years later that Everett Kuntz actually printed the more than 2,000 snapshots -- church picnics, his mother husking corn, soda fountain scenes from the town's drugstore. Although Kuntz died in 2003 at age 82, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS has published dozens of his photos in a book, "Sunday Afternoon on the Porch." The Web site originates in Canada.
http://www.mytelus.com/ncp_news/article.en.do?pn=arts&articleID=2935479

UI study looks at injury/ankle braces (Men's Health, June 10)
In a list of way to prevent sports injuries, it's noted that a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found that those athletes who wore ankle braces were 61 percent more likely to be injured. Lesson: if you brace a bum wheel, it's still bum. Before you play hard, heal first.
http://www.menshealthsa.co.za/index.php?cat=1288&art_id=1847

New Toronto Stock Exchange CEO is UI alumnus (Toronto Globe and Mail, June 10)
A story about Thomas Kloet being named chief executive of the Toronto Stock Exchange notes that he earned a degree in commerce from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20080610.RTSX10//TPStory/Business

UI alumnus is new CEO of Toronto bourse (Toronto Star, June 10)Thomas Kloet, the first American to head the largest stock exchange in
Canada, is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web sites of numerous Canadian news organizations.
http://www.thestar.com/Business/Investing/article/440059

Erik Lie discovered corporate backdating (Law.com, June 10)
A story about the legal lessons to be learned from the corporate backdating scandal notes that the scandal itself was unearthed by ERIK LIE, a finance professor in the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business.
http://www.law.com/jsp/ihc/PubArticleIHC.jsp?id=1202422047961

UI is suspending classes because of flood (Omaha World Herald, June 10)
A story about flooding in cities throughout Iowa notes that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is sandbagging many of its buildings and suspending classes on its arts campus. Similar stories appeared on the Web sites of dozens of news organizations around the world.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2798&u_sid=10354312&u_rss=1&

Franken opponent Coleman is UI law alumnus (Minneapolis Star Tribune, June 10)
A story about comedian Al Franken challenging Norm Coleman for one of Minnesota's seats in the Senate notes that Coleman earned a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.startribune.com/politics/national/senate/19660899.html?location_refer=Opinion

Nisly comments on extract treatment (WLS-TV, June 9)
Heart experts are divided on whether Chinese red yeast rice extract should be suggested as a treatment option to heart patients who could not tolerate statin drugs, a standard course for treatment of heart patients with high cholesterol. "We do not have a reliable product at this time containing red rice yeast in the U.S. dietary supplement market," said Dr. NICOLE NISLY, director of the complementary medicine program at the University of Iowa. Nisly said that for this reason, she would never recommend that one of her patients try red yeast rice extract to lower cholesterol. WLS-TV is in Chicago.
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/health&id=6194861

Smith's team finds MRSA on farms (Portland Oregonian, June 9)
Federal food safety and public health agencies are being urged to begin checking meat sold across the country for the presence of MRSA, a potentially fatal bacteria. Scientists have found the infection in U.S. pigs and farm workers. TARA SMITH, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa Department of Epidemiology, and her graduate researchers found MRSA in more than 70 percent of the pigs they tested on farms in Iowa and Illinois. They also found the bacteria among livestock workers employed by those hog operations.
http://blog.oregonlive.com/nwheadlines/2008/06/potentially_fatal_bacteria_fou.html

Wemmie research might be epilepsy breakthrough (Science magazine, June 9)
For decades, researchers have suspected a link between brain acidity and seizures. JOHN WEMMIE, a psychiatrist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City and colleagues wondered if an ion channel called ASIC1a might play a role, as it is known to activate neurons by pumping calcium and sodium across the cell membrane when the brain becomes acidic. Wemmie's team compared normal mice with those that were genetically engineered to lack the channel. When they injected these knockouts and controls with chemicals that cause epilepsy-like seizures, the normal mice fared much better than the ones without ASIC1a. A compound called kainate produced serious whole-body convulsions in all seven knockout mice, whereas the six normal mice had only minor seizures in their heads and fore-limbs. A second group of knockouts injected with a different drug, PTZ, had longer seizures than control mice -- and those seizures were several times more likely to become deadly tonic-clonic whole-brain seizures (formerly known as "grand mal" seizures). In contrast, mice genetically engineered to have double the normal number of ASIC1a channels had shorter and less severe seizures than wild-type mice, the team reports online this week in Nature Neuroscience.
http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2008/609/3

Nisly comments on alternative therapies (WPVI-TV, June 9)
A story about alternative therapies notes that many people with high cholesterol are turning to a product with red yeast that's sold over the Internet and allegedly can reduce cholesterol levels. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released a warning to consumers in August 2007 not to buy or eat three specific red yeast rice products promoted and sold on Web sites. The FDA found that since these products contained the same active ingredient as a prescription medicine, they are unauthorized to be sold over-the-counter or online. "We do not have a reliable product at this time containing red rice yeast in the U.S. dietary supplement market," said Dr. NICOLE NISLY, director of the complementary medicine program at the University of Iowa. Nisly said that for this reason, she would never recommend that one of her patients try red yeast rice extract to lower cholesterol. WPVI is in Philadelphia.
http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?section=news/health&id=6190359

UI research finds pathway to shut down seizures (Huliq, June 9)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Veterans Affairs Iowa City Health Care System have uncovered a brain pathway that shuts down seizures. The multidisciplinary team of scientists pieced together information from clinical observations made in the first half of the 20th century with knowledge from modern genetics and molecular biology to show that an acid-activated ion channel in the brain reacts to a drop in pH (increased acid) in a way that shuts down seizure activity. . . . (I)t was the modern discovery of an acid-activated ion channel (ASIC1a) in the brain that provided the key to the UI discovery, which is reported in Nature Neuroscience Advance Online Publication on June 8. "We found that ASIC1a does not seem to play a role in how a seizure starts, but as the seizure continues and the pH is reduced, ASIC1a appears to play a role in stopping additional seizure activity," said Adam Ziemann, a student in the Medical Scientist Training Program at the UI and co-lead author of the study. The same story appeared on the Web site of BIOSPACE.
http://www.huliq.com/61474/study-identifies-brain-pathway-shuts-down-seizures

UI research can help reduce epileptic seizures (The Herald Sun, June 9)
Researchers in the United States said they had found the key to a decades-old riddle over epileptic fits, helping to advance the quest for new treatments for this disabling condition. Experiments in the last century found that by breathing carbon dioxide (CO2), an epileptic patient boosted acid levels in the brain and could terminate a fit, although the molecular switch for achieving this was veiled in mystery. In experiments on mice, scientists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Veterans Affairs Iowa City Health Care System, reporting in a specialist journal, believe they have found the switch. A channel known as ASIC1a, located on the surface of brain cells, opens up in response to higher acid levels and admits charged atoms known as ions. This in turn activates other brain cells that block the seizures, the investigators believe. The Herald Sun is published in Australia.
http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,23833533-23109,00.html

Durham studies sexualization of young women (Louisiana Weekly, June 9)
A story about the sexualization of young women and girls notes that companies engage in that kind of marketing because it sells products. "A lot of very sexual products are being marketed to very young kids," said University of Iowa journalism professor GIGI DURHAM. "I'm criticizing the unhealthy and damaging representations of girls' sexuality, and how the media present girls' sexuality in a way that's tied to their profit motives," she says. "The body ideals presented in the media are virtually impossible to attain, but girls don't always realize that, and they'll buy an awful lot of products to try to achieve those bodies. There's endless consumerism built around that." The Louisiana Weekly covers that state's African-American community.
http://www.louisianaweekly.com/weekly/news/articlegate.pl?20080609c

UI study links obesity, dementia (South Florida Sun Sentinel, June 9)
Obesity appears to increase a person's chances of cognitive decline in old age -- but so, paradoxically, does weighing too little for one's height. People who maintain a healthy weight have a lower risk of dementia compared with those who are underweight or obese, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, published in the journal Obesity Reviews last month. The Sun Sentinel is published in Ft. Lauderdale.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/health/la-he-explain9-2008jun09,0,4668207.story

UI flooding is big news (Metro Canada, June 9)
The flooding on the University of Iowa campus has been covered in multiple wire stories, running in hundreds of publications worldwide.
http://www.metronews.ca/halifax/world/article/66043

UI psychiatrists study compulsive buying (Emirates Business, June 9)
As many as one in 12 people suffer from compulsive buying, according to psychiatrists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, although it is mainly found in developed countries with market-based economies.
http://www.business24-7.ae/Articles/2008/6/Pages/06092008_f33188045b804c7ca750f7e47d6fecf3.aspx

UI researchers solve epilepsy mystery (Agence France-Presse, June 9)
UI researchers have found the key to a decades-old riddle about epileptic fits. Experiments in the last century found that by breathing carbon dioxide an epileptic patient boosted acid levels in the brain and could terminate a fit, although the molecular switch for achieving this was veiled in mystery. In experiments on mice, scientists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Veterans Affairs Iowa City Health Care System believe they have found the switch. This French news agency story is appearing worldwide, and other versions of the news are also appearing.
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5jlQh_qaW1A_yrGQXnRkLlhe_jOJg

Hamilton is distinguished alumnus (Houston Chronicle, June 9)
Hall of Fame broadcaster Milo Hamilton missed the Astros-Cardinals series to be in Iowa City to receive the Distinguished Alumni Award from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/bb/5826437.html

Smith's team finds MRSA on farms (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 8)
Federal food safety and public health agencies are being urged to begin checking meat sold across the country for the presence of MRSA, a potentially fatal bacteria. Scientists have found the infection in U.S. pigs and farm workers. TARA SMITH, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa Department of Epidemiology, and her graduate researchers found MRSA in more than 70 percent of the pigs they tested on farms in Iowa and Illinois. They also found the bacteria among livestock workers employed by those hog operations.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/366301_pigmrsa09.html?source=mypi

Story features UI Press book (660news.com, June 8)
An associated press article tells the story behind "Sunday Afternoon on the Porch," a new book from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. 660news is a radio station Web site in Calgary, Canada.
http://www.660news.com/news/entertainment/article.jsp?content=e060804A

UI Press book is reviewed (Chronicle of Higher Ed, June 8)
Dale Salwak's "Teaching Life: Letters From a Life in Literature," published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS is reviewed.
http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2008/06/2008060901c/careers.html

Whelan writes column (New York Post, June 8)
CHRISTINE B. WHELAN
, a visiting assistant professor of Sociology at the University of Iowa and the author of "Why Smart Men Marry Smart Women," wrote a column headlined, "Save the Males."
http://www.nypost.com/seven/06082008/postopinion/postopbooks/save_the_males_114474.htm

Sittenfeld benefited from UI stature (Omaha World Herald, June 8)
Author Curtis Sittenfeld can attest to the importance of a prestigious literary calling card. She attended the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. That program has long been associated with such luminaries as Flannery O'Connor and Raymond Carver. "Having the Iowa workshop on my résumé helped when I was starting out with my first novel," she said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1219&u_sid=10352694&u_rss=1&

Le attended Writers' Workshop (NY Times Book Review, June 8)
A review of Nam Le's "The Boat" begins, "In the opening story of Nam Le's first collection, we find a writer named Nam, who is on a tight deadline during his 'last year at the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.'"
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/08/books/review/Kunzru-t.html?_r=1&8bu&emc=bua2&oref=slogin

UI connection helps writer enjoy book tour (Wall Street Journal, June 6)
Author Jason L. Riley describes in a first-person column how he learned to enjoy book tours while doing a guest reading at Prairie Lights in Iowa City. He writes, "Despite my trepidation. Despite my fear of no-show audiences and moronic Q&A sessions. Despite my inability to fake warmth and wit in person, I had agreed to do a reading at Prairie Lights Books in Iowa City. It was arranged by a friend and former Wall Street Journal colleague now teaching at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. And she assured me that Tom, a local banker, and Katherine, a pillar of Iowa City civic life, would make the trip worthwhile."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121271162905650591.html?mod=rss_opinion_main

IEM: traders bet Obama beats McCain in U.S. election (Yahoo/Reuters, June 5)
Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama will beat Republican John McCain in the November U.S. presidential election, prediction market traders were betting on Wednesday. Traders on the Dublin-based Intrade prediction market gave Obama a 61 percent chance of winning the November 4 election, versus a 35 percent chance for McCain. Traders on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS gave the Democrat an almost 62 percent chance of winning, versus a 39 percent chance for the Republican.
http://au.news.yahoo.com/080605/15/175lx.html

Durham quoted in article on sex-mad culture (New Pittsburgh Courier, June 5)
College-age women often come to professor Gail Dines in tears after she lectures about how popular culture has become poisoned with a hyper-sexuality that demands women offer themselves to any man who asks. The young women feel isolated and alone because they refuse to degrade themselves in exchange for male companionship, said the professor of sociology and women's studies at Wheelock College in Boston and founder of the Stop Porn Culture movement. It's time to end a corporate-driven effort to promote "slut culture" in the United States, Dines said. "A lot of very sexual products are being marketed to very young kids," said University of Iowa journalism professor GIGI DURHAM.
http://newpittsburghcourieronline.com/articlelive/articles/40887/1/Americas-sex-mad-culture-Corporate-drive-for-profits-damaging-to-girls-women/Page1.html

Patient killed in plane crash (Boston Globe, June 5)
A small-plane crash in Iowa City claimed the life of a Georgia toddler who was being flown home after medical treatment for clubfoot. Two-year-old Sydney Blanton, of Thomasville, Ga., was aboard the flight arranged by Angel Flight Central Inc., an organization that provides free travel for individuals in need of healthcare. Her grandfather, Alan Harden, also of Thomasville, confirmed yesterday that she died from injuries she sustained in the crash. Blanton was in Iowa City to be treated for clubfoot, a condition in which the foot is turned in sharply so that a person seems to be walking on an ankle. She had been undergoing treatment at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS for more than two years, Harden said. Doctors were treating her with a technique that uses foot manipulation and casting, not surgery, to correct the deformity. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared in several media outlets, including the ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, MIAMI HERALD, MSNBC, KABC-TV IN Los Angeles, KANSAS CITY STAR, and many others.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2008/06/05/2_year_old_patient_killed_in_plane_crash/?rss_id=Boston+Globe+--+Today%27s+paper+A+to+Z

Walder honored by Jewish publication (Chicago Jewish News, June 5)
The Chicago Jewish News named Joseph Walder, founder and CEO of Integrated DNA Technologies, as a Jewish Chicagoan of the Year. The firm, which has nearly 500 employees, is based in Coralville, Iowa, but its accounting and development offices are in Skokie, Ill. Walder taught in the biochemistry department of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagojewishnews.com/story.htm?sid=1&id=252051

Neumann, Berg discuss IEM performance during primary season (MSNBC, June 4)
Now that Barack Obama has locked up the Democratic presidential nomination, electronic market experts are looking back to see how futures markets performed during the primary season. GEORGE NEUMANN, finance professor at the University of Iowa and a member of the Iowa Electronic Markets board of governors, sizes up the performance of the markets from a different perspective: How soon did the investors settle on a consensus pick? "The thing that impressed me was how quickly the markets selected the eventual winners," he said. JOYCE BERG, IEM director and accounting professor, is also quoted in the story.
http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2008/06/04/1112551.aspx

Toddler aboard charity flight dies in Iowa City (WIBC-TV, June 4)
A small plane crash in Iowa City claimed the life of a Georgia toddler who was being flown home after medical treatment for clubfoot. Two-year-old Sydney Blanton, of Thomasville, Ga., was aboard the flight arranged by Angel Flight Central Inc., an organization that provides free travel for individuals in need of health care. Her grandfather, Alan Harden, also of Thomasville, confirmed Wednesday that she died from injuries she sustained in the crash. Blanton was in Iowa City to be treated for clubfoot, a condition in which the foot is turned in sharply so that a person seems to be walking on an ankle. She had been undergoing treatment at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS for more than two years, Harden said. The TV station is based in Indianapolis, Ind.
http://wibc.com/news/article.aspx?id=1432706

Girl identified in fatal plane crash (Bloomington Pantagraph, June 4)
Authorities on Wednesday identified the young girl who died after a Bloomington man's single-engine plane crashed Tuesday morning in eastern Iowa. Sydney Blanton, 2, who was headed home after being treated at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS for a club foot, was pronounced dead at the hospital at 6:12 p.m. Tuesday, about eight hours after the plane crashed, according to the Johnson County medical examiner's department. She had been hospitalized with her mother and pilot Lewis Martin of Bloomington after the crash about 10 a.m. near an airport in Iowa City. The newspaper serves Bloomington, Ill.
http://pantagraph.com/articles/2008/06/05/news/doc4845b540c2e37806297845.txt

Testing done for bacterium in pork (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 4)
TARA SMITH
, an assistant professor in the University of Iowa Department of Epidemiology, and her graduate researchers have done what apparently is the first testing of swine for MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) in the U.S. They swabbed the noses of 209 pigs from 10 farms in Iowa and Illinois and found MRSA in 70 percent of the porkers. At the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in Boston, Abby Harper, one of Smith's graduate assistants, presented the results of a study that she and Michael Male did on 20 workers at the Iowa swine farms. Harper reported that 45 percent of the workers carried the same MRSA bacterium as the pigs.
http://blog.seattlepi.nwsource.com/secretingredients/archives/140336.asp

Warrants to be unsealed in sexual assault case (KMTV-3, June 4)
A Johnson County judge has ordered that search warrants be unsealed in a sexual assault investigation involving two former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football players. Judge Amanda Potterfield ruled Wednesday that the six warrants will be unsealed July 8 because the investigation is likely over. Cedric Everson and Abe Satterfield have been charged with the sexual assault that allegedly occurred Oct. 14 at a campus dormitory. The TV station is based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.kmtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=8433654

Antidepressants could benefit stroke patients (Journal-Register, June 4)
Preventive use of antidepressants reduces the depression rate of stroke patients by more than half and could help them live years longer, a landmark study suggests. The research shows that treatment for depression for stroke victims who haven't displayed symptoms of depression can lead to significantly fewer becoming depressed within a year. Physical and cognitive recovery lag when a stroke patient is depressed, says ROBERT ROBINSON, the study leader and psychiatry department head at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. In view of the new findings, "I think every stroke patient who can tolerate an antidepressant should be given one to prevent depression," he says. The newspaper is based in Medina, N.Y.
http://www.journal-register.com/features/gnnlifestyle_story_156170730.html

IEM traders favor Obama in election (Boston Globe, June 4)
Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama will beat Republican John McCain in the November U.S. presidential election, prediction market traders were betting on Wednesday. Traders on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS gave the Democrat an almost 62 percent chance of winning, versus a 39 percent chance for the Republican. The article was distributed on the REUTERS newswire.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2008/06/04/traders_bet_obama_beats_mccain_in_election/?p1=Well_MostPop_Emailed7

Niebyl discusses 'drug drought' for pregnant women (USA Today, June 4)
Although 4 million American women give birth each year, almost no one is developing medications for complications of pregnancy, including conditions that threaten the lives of mothers and children. JENNIFER NIEBYL, head of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, says she understands the need to protect children from birth defects. But she says few drugs have been found to increase these risks. The real risks of developing drugs for pregnancy, Niebyl says, are financial. The market for drugs to treat conditions of pregnancy is relatively small. Relatively few women develop these conditions, and those who get sick need treatment for only a few weeks or months. This story also appeared on the Web site of Tampa Bay's 10 News.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2008-06-03-pregnant-drugs_N.htm

Writer taught literature at the UI (Idaho Statesman, June 4)
Daydreaming is part of the job for David Morrell. Not the kind of mental vacation to Tahiti we all take from time to time. Morrell's daydreams come from his subconscious, and he plays close attention to them. Paying attention to daydreams is one of the writing secrets Morrell divulges in his book "The Successful Novelist," and one he lives and swears by. Morrell is a former literature professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, creator of Rambo in the book "First Blood" and writer of the bestseller "Brotherhood of the Rose," which became a blockbuster NBC miniseries starring Robert Mitchum.
http://www.idahostatesman.com/life/story/398530.html

Former UI athlete turns himself in to face charges (Erie Times-News, June 3)
Erie's Abe Satterfield turned himself in to authorities this morning to face sexual assault charges. Satterfield, a 2006 Cathedral Prep graduate and Associated Press all-state player, is one of two former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football players facing sexual assault charges. Satterfield has been charged with second-degree and third-degree sex abuse. The TIMES-NEWS is based in Erie, Pa.
http://www.goerie.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080603/FOOTBALL03/873566979/-1/SPORTS1001

Robinson: treatments may ward off post-stroke depression (Sun Sentinel, June 3)

University of Iowa researchers have shown for the first time that an anti-depressant and a form of talk therapy each can prevent or delay the onset of depression in people who have had acute stroke. The findings appear in the May 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Previous studies on this type of prevention had not shown positive results; however, this new study, in contrast, was larger and double-blinded. The National Institute of Mental Health, part of the National Institutes of Health, funded the research. "Prevention has been a goal of psychiatry for a long time," said the study's principal investigator ROBERT G. ROBINSON, M.D., professor and head of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. "It is the first time a double-blinded randomized study has shown it is possible to prevent a psychiatric disorder in patients without previous illness." The Sun Sentinel is published in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/health/sfl-fljjpsstroke0603jjpnjun03,0,1036319.story

UI research on compulsive shopping noted (The Independent, June 3)
A story about behavioral disorders notes that as many as one in 12 have the disorder of compulsive shopping, according to psychiatrists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, although it is mainly found in developed countries with market-based economies. The Independent is published in Great Britain. The story also appeared on the Web site of the IRISH INDEPENDENT.
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-wellbeing/features/behavioural-problems-are-drugs-really-the-answer-838793.html

Alumna steps down as Seattle museum director (Seattle Times, June 3)
A story about Mimi Gates' resignation as director of the Seattle Art Museum notes she earned her master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/thearts/2004453060_zart03sam.html

Berg: IEM investors not a random sample (American Conservative, June 2)
A story about prediction markets notes that the first political prediction market, the Iowa Electronic Markets, was started by a group of professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's business school. Joyce Berg, an accounting professor and IEM director, says that the people trading are nothing like a random sample of voters. "In 1988, everyone was from Iowa, and we only had 155 people in the voteshare market. Even now, when we have thousands of people in each market, we are not distributed among states by population. Our traders are overwhelmingly male. They have more education than the average voter. They have a higher income than the average voter. But the market mechanism is one where we don't need a random sample of voters, we need people with information."
http://www.amconmag.com/2008/2008_06_02/article4.html

Bloom's 'Postville' reviewed (Beloit Daily News, June 2)
A review of "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," by STEPHEN BLOOM, professor of journalism at the University of Iowa, notes that the book touches upon the complexities of culture in an entertaining way that takes the reader right into the synagogues of the Hasids and the farms of the Iowans. As Bloom continues his research, he feels that the Iowans seem bent on what others, including the Hasids, think of them. He attributes it to the camaraderie and neighborliness necessary in forming a farm community. With the Hasids' tie to the Holocaust, their culture is more focused on sticking together and defending their way of life from extinction.
http://www.beloitdailynews.com/articles/2008/06/02/community/comm01.txt

Hatch-blown glass helps UI chemistry students (Chicago Tribune, June 2)

PETE HATCH, who has worked as a scientific glassblower for more than 40 years and now helps graduate students and professors in the University of Iowa Department of Chemistry, is the subject of a feature story. Hatch mends broken or cracked glassware and creates custom glass pieces, including tubes, beakers, coils or a combination for projects.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-exchange-uiglassb,0,1786935.story

Orhan comments on bass innovation (Burlington Free Press, June 2)Burlington, Vt., resident Kevin Marvin, 52, has a patent pending for a change to one of the fundamental components of the bass, a large, centuries-old instrument that musicians stand beside when they pluck or run a bow across its four strings. The Marvin tailpiece, as his innovation is known, replaces the piece of wood that links the strings to the bottom of the instrument. Marvin substituted cables made of fishing leaders for the traditional ebony tailpiece. That allows for more vibration when the strings are plucked or played with a bow. "It is a great innovation," said VOLKAN ORHAN, a prize-winning bass player and professor of double bass at the University of Iowa. He applauded the improved sound. "I have three basses and I have them all set up with that." The Free Press is published in Vermont.
http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080601/NEWS01/80531024

Peterson book says political humor not funny (American Chronicle, June 2)
A review of "Strange Bedfellows" by University of Iowa professor RUSSELL L. PETERSON notes that many Americans gain the bulk of their political news from late-night comics. Subtitled How Late Night Comedy Turns Democracy Into a Joke, the book was published earlier this spring by the Princeton University Press. In it the author, a former political cartoonist, asks whether late-night comics are overstepping their bounds in poking fun at politicians and politics itself. If nothing else, Peterson's book demonstrates just how awful and unfunny the whole Leno/Letterman brand of "political humor" is. As Peterson points out, these comics and their writing staffs find one aspect of a politician's character -- George Bush Sr./wimp, Bill Clinton/horndog, George W. Bush/idiot -- and simply base simplistic "jokes" around that persona every night for a decade or more. The object is never to take any political stands, instead preferring to make fun of politics itself.
http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/63755

UI study: live longer by hanging out with young (The Telegraph, June 2)
Hanging out with younger, healthier people might help the elderly to live longer, suggests a study of fruit flies. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Drs. HONGYU RUAN and Prof. CHUN-FANG WU of the University of Iowa used the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to examine the molecular networks that govern the effects of social interactions on the ageing process. The authors grew a particular strain of mutant fly with greatly reduced lifespan and raised the flies in the same vial as normal fruit flies. What was striking was that the mutant flies that lived with normal flies survived nearly twice as long as mutants housed with other mutants. The Telegraph is published in Great Britain.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2008/06/02/sciold102.xml

UI's Killinger resigns from Washington Mutual (Bloomberg, June 2)

A story about the resignation of Kerry Killinger as CEO of Washington Mutual notes that he received his MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=aM4SW62mt.Cc&refer=news

CMBA graduates should heed the lessons of Killinger, others (LiveMint, June 2)
A columnist writing about the lessons that recent MBA graduates should learn from the banking industry's current woes notes that Washington Mutual's recently resigned CEO Kerry Killinger received his MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. LiveMint is a blog on the Wall Street Journal.
http://www.livemint.com/2008/06/02215026/MBA-grads-should-learn-from-US.html

Women lawyers are less likely to be promoted (Tehran Times/Reuters, June 2)
Women lawyers might have more opportunities to get into a law firm but they remain less likely to be promoted to partner, according to a U.S. study. Researchers from the University of Iowa found women who practiced in a firm for five or more years were 13 percent less likely than men to make partner -- even if their qualifications were equal and regardless of whether they had children. "Unfortunately, those who stay aren't making it to the top at the same rate as men," said MARY NOONAN, an associate professor of sociology who led the study. "We found no gender inequality at the first stage of their careers, but that final stage seems out of reach for a lot of women. And that hasn't changed at all over time."
http://www.tehrantimes.com/index_View.asp?code=170034

Rogers responds to weak dollar (Chicago Tribune, June 2)
Iowa college students are still heading overseas to study, but the weak dollar and climbing travel costs are putting a pinch in the plans. University of Iowa adviser JOHN ROGERS says he encourages people to consider alternative destinations and get off the beaten path.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-ia-studyingabroad,0,1133811.story

Durham's book is cited (24 Hours, June 2)
A column protesting a new Dairy Queen TV ad references UI professor M. GIGI DURHAM's "The Lolita Effect: The Media Sexualization of Young Girls and What We Can Do About It." 24 Hours originates in Vancouver, British Columbia.
http://vancouver.24hrs.ca/Columnists/OhAndByTheWay/2008/06/02/5743361-sun.html

Redlawsk comments on Clinton/Obama prospects (Bloomberg, June 2)
Hillary Clinton won the Democratic primary in Puerto Rico, but Barack Obama is on the verge of ensuring nomination. "It's pretty clear that once we get past the primaries, Obama will be very close to the new magic number," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "The pressure is on superdelegates to announce."
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aa32h.Rez7EA&refer=home

Bayton is quoted (New York Times, June 1)
In a column about deafness, Stanley Fish writes, "The story of the 'hearing world, writes DOUGLAS BAYNTON, associate professor of history and American Sign Language at the University of Iowa, is that deafness is an incapacity; but, he explains, what we are dealing with are 'physical differences,' and physical differences 'do not carry inherent meanings.'"
http://fish.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/01/norms-and-deviations-whos-to-say/

UI student wrote about marathons (Post-Crescent, June 1)
In a column about his attempts to qualify for the Boston Marathon, Joel Patenaude referenced an article in Running Times by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate student Aaron Ladd noting that in Wisconsin there are fewer than 2.3 marathoners per thousand residents.
http://www.postcrescent.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080601/APC06/806010529/1036/APC06

Iowa City Jazz Festival occurs on UI campus (Jazz Police, June 1)
The Iowa City Jazz Festival, whose main stage is on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus, is previewed. Jazz Police originates in the Twin Cities.
http://www.jazzpolice.com/content/view/7751/79/

Packer attended Writers' Workshop (San Francisco Chronicle, June 1)
A story about four writers in two generations of the Packer family explains that Ann Packer rediscovered her passion for writing during two years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/05/30/CMBCVQS2L.DTL

Nam Le book is reviewed (Hartford Courant, June 1)
"The Boat," by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP alumnus Nam Le, is reviewed. The paper is based in Connecticut.
http://www.courant.com/features/booksmags/hc-boat0601.artjun01,0,210661.story

Houge study pierces conventional wisdom (New York Times, June 1)
It is widely assumed that a stock's price will rise when it is added to a major stock-market index. As is often the case with conventional wisdom about the stock market, however, the truth is more complicated. In fact, a new study has found that over the long term, stocks that are dropped from an index generally outperform those that are added. The study's co-author is TODD HOUGE of the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/01/business/01stra.html?ref=business

 

 

 

 

 

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