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November 2007

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UI student comments on Oprah endorsement (New York Times, Nov. 30)
The impact of Oprah Winfrey's endorsement of Barack Obama is yet to be measured. Kate Anderson, a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, said she loves watching Oprah and that she and her mother "religiously read everything she has to say" in her magazine. She said she likes Obama and while the endorsement is not the only reason, it is part of the reason. "I think what Oprah stands for to me is a sense of moving forward and hope, which I think is what Obama has come to stand for," she said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/02/fashion/02oprah.html

IEM shows shift to 'rest of the field' (Scripps News, Nov. 30)
There's some interesting wagering in the presidential contest, based on an Electronic Trading Market being conducted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The graphs show Rudy Giuliani as the odds-on favorite, leading Mitt Romney. But in recent weeks there has been a surge in betting on the "Rest of Field" pick, coinciding with former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee's rise in the polls. On the Democratic side, a vast majority of money remains on Hillary Clinton. But after stagnating over the summer, Barack Obama has started to regain some betting interest.
http://www.scrippsnews.com/node/28715

Squire comments on Bill Clinton impact (Washington Post/Reuters, Nov. 30)
Former President Bill Clinton raised eyebrows when he said he had always been against the Iraq War. "It reminds people of two things that Senator Clinton would rather have them forget: One is sort of the Clintons' veracity, and it just raises the question of who was in favor of the Iraq war," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a visiting University of Iowa political scientist.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/11/30/AR2007113001565.html

Noonan characterizes couples research (Live Science, Nov. 30)
When working couples move, the husband's career often gets a boost and the wife's career suffers. A new study suggests what's behind that typical outcome. Couples tend to put more emphasis on the man's career, even if the wife works full-time and is college-educated. "This is bad news for people who are interested in men and women having equal success in the labor force," said MARY NOONAN, associate professor of sociology at the University of Iowa. "Even for highly educated married women with prestigious occupations, employment still suffers when they move, while the husbands' careers benefit. These women likely share the role of breadwinner, earning a significant part of the family income, but their career is still seen as secondary within the dynamic of the couple."
http://www.livescience.com/health/071130-spouse-move.html

Stringer took UI to Final Four (BET.com, Nov. 30)
A feature about C. Vivian Stringer notes that she coached the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA women's basketball team to the Final Four.
http://www.bet.com/News/POY07SportsCVivianStringer.htm

UI partner in new web tool (Diverse Issues in Higher Education, Nov. 30)
A partnership between the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities has launched College Portrait, a new comprehensive Web resource to help prospective college students and their families compare and contrast U.S. public colleges and universities. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is one of the participating schools.
http://diverseeducation.com/artman/publish/article_10286.shtml

Gronbeck, Redlawsk note youth impact in caucus (Dallas Morning News, Nov. 30)
With the Iowa caucuses less than 40 days away, presidential candidates from both parties are aggressively courting the state's young voters. Yet a big youth turnout seems unlikely Jan. 3, when the state becomes the first in the nation to vote. Because the parties moved the date of the caucuses up, most college students in Iowa will be away on holiday break. In 2004, young people accounted for 21 percent of eligible voters in Iowa, said BRUCE GRONBECK, a professor at the University of Iowa. Gronbeck said campaigns are doing more to cater directly to students by using Web sites like Facebook, MySpace and YouTube. "It's part of the notion that if you can get a young person into your social network, you can get them into your political network as well," he said. A University of Iowa poll in October showed that 41 percent of Democrats younger than 45 supported Barack Obama. "We've gotten clear indication that Obama's support comes disproportionately from younger people," said DAVID REDLAWSK, an associate professor who conducted the poll. "They make up the largest portion of his base, and he's doing best among that group." The article also appeared in the KANSAS CITY STAR and MIAMI HERALD.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/politics/national/stories/DN-iowayouth_30nat.ART.State.Edition1.3713c6e.html

Squire comments on GOP sparring (News and Observer, Nov. 30)
At Wednesday's CNN/YouTube debate, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani accused former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney of running a "sanctuary mansion" because Romney had illegal immigrants doing yard work at his home. Rarely has the level of personal nastiness among Republican contenders -- beyond simple policy disagreements -- risen so early and been conducted so openly by the candidates themselves and their campaigns. "Clearly, the candidates are beginning to more directly attack each other," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a visiting political scientist at the University of Iowa. "Certainly between Giuliani and Romney it's getting personal." The newspaper is based in Raleigh, N.C.
http://www.newsobserver.com/nation_world/story/802424.html

Iraq war issue cited in UI Hawkeye Poll (The Nation, Nov. 30)
Polls show that the war is still the No. 1 issue for Iowa Democrats, leading healthcare and the economy by a comfortable margin. A number of polls from May through October showed Hillary Clinton to be the favorite among that broad sector of Democratic voters who may not be political junkies but who still cite the war as their top issue. In an Oct. 29 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HAWKEYE POLL, for example, Clinton leads Barack Obama by 2 points overall but by 15 among voters whose top priority is ending the war. David Goodner, a senior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a member of its antiwar committee, commented about a anti-war protest at Clinton's campaign office in Des Moines: "We did this because Hillary voted for the war in Iraq and refuses to apologize for it, because her rhetoric...is not only imprecise but also contradicts her public comments that she won't withdraw all the troops before 2013, because she voted for pro-war with Iran measures...and for her general hawkish foreign policy stances."
http://www.thenation.com/doc/20071217/berman

Campaigns use student contact information (Chronicle, Nov. 30)
Political campaigns are going after students through contact information that public colleges are required to release. Third-party requests for students' contact information are in line with most state open-records laws. Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, the federal law that governs student records, college officials do not need a student's consent to release directory information. Most institutions charge an hourly rate to third parties, including student groups, to recoup the costs of providing databases of directory information. Colleges typically set a minimum charge of one hour's worth of work, and many campus officials say the work usually does not exceed that. As a result, at institutions like Oregon, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and Ohio State University, lists of tens of thousands of students and their phone numbers or e-mail addresses would probably cost less than $100 per request. Ohio State and Iowa, like Oregon, have received a handful of requests from political campaigns for student-contact information.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v54/i14/14a00103.htm

Wing to serve as panelist at Presidential Forum (Reuters, Nov. 30)
ADRIEN K. WING
, a professor of law at University of Iowa, will be among the panelists for the Iowa Brown and Black Presidential Forum Saturday, Dec. 1 in Des Moines, where all candidates have the opportunity to answer essential concerns of African-Americans and Latinos. The two-hour forum will be moderated by Michele Norris, host of National Public Radio's "All Things Considered," and Ray Suarez, senior correspondent for PBS's "The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer." It will begin at 7 p.m. at North High School 501 Holcomb Ave. in Des Moines. It will be one of the last debates before Iowa voters head to caucus on Jan. 3. HDNet's live coverage begins at 6:30 p.m.; Mediacom will broadcast the debate on its Connections Channel.
http://www.reuters.com/article/pressRelease/idUS57025+29-Nov-2007+BW20071129

UI student comments on Oprah endorsement (New York Times, Nov. 30)
The impact of Oprah Winfrey's endorsement of Barack Obama is yet to be measured. Kate Anderson, a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, said she loves watching Oprah and that she and her mother "religiously read everything she has to say" in her magazine. She said she likes Obama and while the endorsement is not the only reason, it is part of the reason. "I think what Oprah stands for to me is a sense of moving forward and hope, which I think is what Obama has come to stand for," she said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/02/fashion/02oprah.html

IEM shows shift to 'rest of the field' (Scripps News, Nov. 30)
There's some interesting wagering in the presidential contest, based on an Electronic Trading Market being conducted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The graphs show Rudy Giuliani as the odds-on favorite, leading Mitt Romney. But in recent weeks there has been a surge in betting on the "Rest of Field" pick, coinciding with former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee's rise in the polls. On the Democratic side, a vast majority of money remains on Hillary Clinton. But after stagnating over the summer, Barack Obama has started to regain some betting interest.
http://www.scrippsnews.com/node/28715

Squire comments on Bill Clinton impact (Washington Post/Reuters, Nov. 30)
Former President Bill Clinton raised eyebrows when he said he had always been against the Iraq War. "It reminds people of two things that Senator Clinton would rather have them forget: One is sort of the Clintons' veracity, and it just raises the question of who was in favor of the Iraq war," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a visiting University of Iowa political scientist.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/11/30/AR2007113001565.html

Noonan characterizes couples research (Live Science, Nov. 30)
When working couples move, the husband's career often gets a boost and the wife's career suffers. A new study suggests what's behind that typical outcome. Couples tend to put more emphasis on the man's career, even if the wife works full-time and is college-educated. "This is bad news for people who are interested in men and women having equal success in the labor force," said MARY NOONAN, associate professor of sociology at the University of Iowa. "Even for highly educated married women with prestigious occupations, employment still suffers when they move, while the husbands' careers benefit. These women likely share the role of breadwinner, earning a significant part of the family income, but their career is still seen as secondary within the dynamic of the couple."
http://www.livescience.com/health/071130-spouse-move.html

Stringer took UI to Final Four (BET.com, Nov. 30)
A feature about C. Vivian Stringer notes that she coached the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA women's basketball team to the Final Four.
http://www.bet.com/News/POY07SportsCVivianStringer.htm

UI partner in new web tool (Diverse Issues in Higher Education, Nov. 30)
A partnership between the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities has launched College Portrait, a new comprehensive Web resource to help prospective college students and their families compare and contrast U.S. public colleges and universities. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is one of the participating schools.
http://diverseeducation.com/artman/publish/article_10286.shtml

Ferentz salary cited in story on Paterno (Chronicle, Nov. 29)
After five years of legal wrangling, the secret of Joe Paterno's salary has been revealed. Penn State's longtime football coach earns $512,664 in salary this year, according to the state's pension board. A USA Today survey last year found seven football coaches in Penn State's conference, the Big Ten, whose annual salaries turn out to be higher than his. KIRK FERENTZ, for example, makes $2.84-million at the University of Iowa.
http://chronicle.com/news/article/3521/penn-states-paterno-makes-512664

Columnist notes UI experience (North East Reporter, Nov. 29)
In a column about prejudice impacting the peace process, the writer recalls that he met first an African-American schoolmate while attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S JOURNALISM SCHOOL. The newspaper is published in Maryland.
http://news.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?pnpID=808&NewsID=857393&CategoryID=8827&show=localnews&om=1

UI alumna, Milwaukee news anchor profiled (Milwaukee Magazine, December 2007)
A profile of Kathy Mykelby, anchor at WISN-TV in Milwaukee, notes that she is an alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and, as a student, helped to develop the communications studies curriculum.
http://www.milwaukeemagazine.com/currentIssue/full_feature_story.asp?NewMessageID=17518

UI education professor developed ACT (The Oregonian, Nov. 29)
While increasing numbers of colleges adopted the SAT, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA education professor (Everett Franklin Lindquist) questioned whether an IQ test should be used to determine college admission. Instead, he believed that college entrance exams should evaluate a student's mastery of the curriculum taught in most high schools. So, based on achievement tests previously given to Iowa public school students, he set out in 1959 to christen a new exam with a different three-letter name: the ACT. And it, too, quickly picked up its share of college supporters.
http://www.oregonlive.com/living/oregonian/ben_kaplan/index.ssf?/base/living/1196198716153250.xml&coll=7

Art alumna makes costumes for Joffrey Ballet (Daily Herald, Nov. 29)
Deb Schoell of Arlington Heights, Ill. stays nearly as busy as the twirling ballerinas she outfits for the Barrington Youth Dance Ensemble's production of "The Nutcracker." Schoell heads up the wardrobe department designing costumes, sewing them, and making last-minute alterations. The experience helped land her a part-time job this year in the wardrobe department of the Joffrey Ballet. She draws on her training as an art major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, as well as her background in theater, and working at the Hancher Auditorium on the university's Iowa City campus.
http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=85447&src=9

Maravetz: no 'quid pro quo' with drug companies (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 29)
The relationship between medical schools and the private sector -- mainly drug and medical device companies -- tests the ethics not only of students, but also of veteran medical school faculty members. Medical colleges fear that cozy relationships between faculty members and industry can lead to endorsement of medications and devices for financial rather than medical reasons. At the same time, industry and medical schools typically must work together. Drug companies generally produce medications, and medical schools study whether they work and how they should be used. As is the case at UNMC and Creighton, University of Iowa College of Medicine physicians and researchers must disclose their relationships with industry. STEVE MARAVETZ, an associate dean in the UI Carver College of Medicine, said there can be no "quid pro quo." That is, a faculty member may show no bias in favor of a pharmaceutical company that, for example, sponsors a continuing education program at which the professor speaks, Maravetz said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2798&u_sid=10196299

Porter study urged investigation of questionable fees (L.A. Times, Nov. 29)
Countrywide Financial Corp. is the target of a multistate federal investigation aimed at determining whether the Calabasas-based lender has been levying unjustified fees on consumers going through bankruptcy. Michael A. Frank, a Miami-based attorney contends that mortgage lenders commonly overcharge borrowers in bankruptcy. "It's not just Countrywide. It's everybody," he said. Mortgage lenders and servicers "make their money on these little junk fees." Frank said borrowers in bankruptcy were strapped and ill-equipped to fight deep-pocket lenders over questionable charges. A recent study of more than 1,700 foreclosures by KATHERINE M. PORTER of the University of Iowa came to the same conclusion. Questionable and unsubstantiated charges are commonly levied against troubled borrowers, Porter said in her study, which urged regulators to investigate further.
http://www.latimes.com/wireless/avantgo/la-fi-countrywide29nov29,0,7308246.story

Porter discovered questionable fees in foreclosures (New York Times, Nov. 28)
The federal agency monitoring the bankruptcy courts has subpoenaed Countrywide Financial, the nation's largest mortgage lender and loan servicer, to determine whether the company's conduct in two foreclosures in southern Florida represented abuses of the bankruptcy system. Questionable or non-itemized charges levied on imperiled borrowers by lenders and loan servicers are an industry-wide problem, consumer advocates contend. A recent study of more than 1,700 foreclosure cases by KATHERINE M. PORTER, an associate professor of law at the University of Iowa, showed that questionable fees had been added to almost half of the loans she examined. This story appeared on the Web sites of several news organizations, including THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA HERALD TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/28/business/28lend.html?_r=1&adxnnl=1&oref=slogin&adxnnlx=1196348601-v9ok1vOSqKdrcIm5mifcjA

Porter foreclosure research noted (CNN, Nov. 28)
A recent study of more than 1,700 foreclosure cases by University of Iowa law professor KATHERINE PORTER showed that questionable fees had been added to almost half of the loans she examined, the paper reported. The paper said that Porter found a lender, which it did not identify, had claimed that a borrower owed more than $1 million when in fact the true balance was only $60,000.
http://money.cnn.com/2007/11/28/news/companies/countrywide_foreclosure/index.htm?section=money_mostpopular

Squire discusses Bill Clinton's Iraq remark (USA Today, Nov. 28)
It was a partial clause in a sentence uttered in Muscatine, Iowa. But Bill Clinton's assertion Monday that he'd opposed the Iraq war "from the beginning" triggered outbursts across the political spectrum. From the left, the right and the media establishment, the judgment was the former president had committed a gaffe that could hurt his wife's presidential bid. University of Iowa political scientist PEVERILL SQUIRE said Clinton's remark may revive concern about his wife's vote to authorize war. "It's undoubtedly a distraction," he said.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2007-11-28-bill-clinton_N.htm

Fischer comments on lightning discovery (Science Magazine, Nov. 28)
In the Nov. 29 issue of Nature, space physicist Christopher Russell of the University of California, Los Angeles, and his colleagues report that Venus Express detected bursts of 100-hertz magnetic radiation lasting 0.25 to 0.5 seconds and occurring at least half as often as lightning on Earth. "They were pretty much as we'd predicted," says Russell. "Lightning is occurring beneath the spacecraft about 25 percent of the time." "That is one possibility," says a more skeptical space physicist, GEORG FISCHER of the University of Iowa in Iowa City. As was the case with the Pioneer Venus data, he says, these signals might instead be generated by processes involving the charged particles and magnetic fields draped around the planet. For his part, Fischer has struck out in finding lightning on Titan, Saturn's moon. In a paper published online Nov. 28 in Geophysical Research Letters, he and colleagues report that Cassini has failed to detect lightning's radio emissions during the spacecraft's first 35 flybys of the moon.
http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2007/1128/2

Schnoor: constraints, costs of ethanol too great (Hartford Courant, Nov. 28)
In an article touting the record 14 million acres of corn just harvested in Iowa, a University of Iowa expert discusses the environmental costs and constraints that come with this ethanol-making potential. Although foreign oil is getting more expensive, ethanol -- made from corn -- isn't cheap. It's easier to harrumph over $100-a-barrel oil than to speak up against the huge federal subsidies and tax breaks for makers of ethanol. Consider that more a third of Iowa's land surface was plowed for corn. Consumers pay for it through a federal tax break of 51 cents a gallon to ethanol producers as well as cash subsidies that go to corn growers. President Bush's goal of producing 35 billion gallons of biofuels by 2017 is ambitious beyond reality. As environmental engineering professor JERRY SCHNOOR of the University of Iowa says, "The environment constraints are just too great. It's too much nutrients, too much soil loss, too much pesticides. We don't have the land."
http://www.courant.com/news/opinion/editorials/hc-ethanolnov28,0,5815939.story

UI expert weighs in on Vikings' Petersen returning to field (Salon, Nov. 27)
In the daily sports column by King Kaufman about the possible return of Vikings running back Adrian Petersen only two weeks after sustaining a knee injury, the following passage appears: Dr. NED AMENDOLA, the director of the University of Iowa Sports Medicine Center, agreed that the team's record shouldn't be part of the decision about when an injured athlete should return. "The decision to let an athlete return to play should be based on what's best for the athlete, and therefore it doesn't matter if they're not going anywhere for the season or if it's the Super Bowl," he said. "The importance of the game would be trumped by any significant risk to the athlete that would jeopardize his function following that game."
http://www.salon.com/sports/col/kaufman/2007/11/27/tuesday/

Runner's high may have beneficial heart effects (Indianapolis Star, Nov. 27)
That runner's high might be more than a flush of good feeling. It might actually be good for you. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found that endorphins, morphine-like chemicals, released during exertion that produces that high, may also protect the heart.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071127/LIVING01/711270313/1007/LIVING

Moisture-sensing genes identified by UI experts (UPI, Nov. 27)
U.S. researchers have identified the first genes found to be involved in hygrosensation, or moisture sensing. The discovery by scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine also revealed a "two-sensor" system in fruit flies that might allow the flies to detect subtle changes in humidity, an ability critical for reproductive behavior and geographic distribution in many animals, including insects, reptiles and birds. This UPI story also appeared in DAILY INDIA.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Science/2007/11/27/first_moisture-sensing_genes_identified/4466/

Barta: no word from Michigan about Ferentz (Sports Illustrated, Nov. 27)
University of Iowa athletic director GARY BARTA said he hasn't heard from the University of Michigan about speaking with Iowa football coach KIRK FERENTZ. Barta also said Ferentz hasn't asked him for permission to speak to the school about its head coaching vacancy. Barta says the only talks he's had with Ferentz are about the future and the 2008 season. This AP story also appeared on CNN.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/football/ncaa/11/27/michigan.ferentz.ap/index.html

UI Poll: Hispanics a new force in Iowa (Denver Post, Nov. 27)
The influx of Latinos to Marshalltown, with its large meatpacking plant, and elsewhere across Iowa has changed the political dynamics in what was one of the most homogeneous states in America. Democrats are trying to woo Latino voters. Between 15,000 and 18,000 Hispanics are registered to vote in Iowa and are eligible to attend the state's primary caucuses. They could make up a pivotal bloc in the Democratic caucuses, which drew 124,000 voters in 2004. The partisan divide over immigration was underscored in a recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll of likely caucus-goers. The survey found that two-thirds of Republicans rated immigration as either the most important or a highly important issue. Only about one-third of Democrats ranked the issue so high.
http://www.denverpost.com/politics/ci_7565635

Squire: national ticket is selling point for Edwards (Press-Gazette, Nov. 27)
You wouldn't know it from his campaign speeches, but John Edwards has a credential no other presidential candidate can claim: He is the only one, from either party, who has ever been on a national ticket. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor, said Edwards' current campaign could try to use his experience on the national ticket as a selling point. "It does seem to be tucked way in the background," Squire said. "It has not been part of his pitch, and really hasn't been part of the conversation at all. It's a little bit surprising." The Press-Gazette is published in Green Bay, Wisc.
http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071127/GPG0101/711270632/1207/GPGnews

Story outlines Obermann Center seminar (Bark, November-December 2007)
In the fall of 2005, TERESA MANGUM, a noted English professor and activist at the University of Iowa, co-hosted a semester-long seminar, "Articulating the Animal." She and JANE DESMOND invited several of the researchers doing the most interesting work in various departments to collaborate on a weekly exchange of ideas about animal life at the UI's Obermann Center for Advanced Studies. In the individual classes, these researchers used their work to foster a fresh dialogue with students about animals and humans and how they interact. Among Mangum's colleagues was a bench scientist who used animals in his psychology lab; a theater director interested in equestrian theory; a museum director with a penchant for paintings of cows; the head of the Rhetoric Department, who was fascinated with bonobo language; and Desmond herself, an American Studies professor interested in the way animals extend human bodily capabilities. Bark is "the modern dog culture magazine."
http://thebark.com/ezine/features_specialFeatures/Canines_Higher_Education.html

Gronbeck: Oprah, Obama are perfect match (New York Daily News, Nov. 27)
A story about the endorsement of Barack Obama by talk show host Oprah Winfrey notes the usually limited impact of celebrity endorsements on political campaigns. "Most of the time celebrities only help draw crowds to events, and they don't do much to affect actual voting decisions, but Oprah might be an exception," said University of Iowa communications studies Prof. BRUCE GRONBECK. "It's as perfect a match between a celebrity and a campaign that probably I've ever seen."
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/2007/11/27/2007-11-27_oprah_winfrey_will_hit_the_campaign_trai.html

Gronbeck analyzes Oprah, Obama (Toronto Star, Nov. 27)
She can move books. We'll soon learn if Oprah Winfrey can move votes. America's daytime diva will join Illinois Senator Barack Obama on the hustings next month in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina, three early-voting states critical to his bid to upend New York Senator Hillary Clinton for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination. Historically, high-profile endorsements -- political or celebrity -- have proved far more effective at drawing crowds than actually influencing races, but Winfrey may prove to be the exception. "That's the fascinating thing," said University of Iowa political scientist BRUCE GRONBECK. "She could transcend this. She has a very loyal and attached following and is a phenomenal match for him because of her message of self-improvement and empowerment and taking control of your world and making a positive change."
http://www.thestar.com/News/article/280173

Immigration story cites UI poll (Carlsbad Current Argus, Nov. 27)
A story about Hispanic voters in Iowa and the issue of illegal immigration notes the partisan divide over immigration was underscored in a recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll of likely caucus-goers. The survey found that two-thirds of Republicans rated immigration as either the most important or a highly important issue. Only about one-third of Democrats ranked the issue so high. The poll, however, found Republicans far from united about how to deal with the issue. The Current Argus is published in New Mexico.
http://www.currentargus.com/ci_7565635

UI traffic study delayed (Raleigh News & Observer, Nov. 27)
Privacy and security concerns have delayed the start of a six-state study that will recruit 450 North Carolina drivers to test-drive a system for taxing motorists by the mile instead of by the gallon. Volunteers will have their cars outfitted with GPS navigation gear that counts the miles they drive in each city, county and state. They will receive make-believe bills showing how much they might owe if they paid local, state and federal taxes based on monthly mileage. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which is coordinating the $16.5 million study, had hoped to get rolling this fall. But the Federal Highway Administration delayed the start so it could make sure that the driving histories of test participants would stay secret. That review is expected to wrap up in the next few weeks. The News & Observer is published in North Carolina.
http://www.newsobserver.com/news/story/795088.html

UI doctor seeks to reduce premature births (Ft. Myers News-Press, Nov. 26)
Across the country, research projects and public health campaigns are in full throttle to reduce premature births. At the University of Iowa, Dr. SARAH ENGLAND is delving into physiological changes in the womb. England is studying ion channels, pathways that allow the body to conduct currents of electricity across the cell membrane. They regulate how "excitable" the uterus is -- how likely it is to go into contractions. But the uterus appears to relax when potassium ions leave the cells through potassium channels, a common type of ion channel. The News Press is published in Florida.
http://www.news-press.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071126/HEALTH/71125022/1013/LIFESTYLES

Giuliani, Clinton lead on IEM (Rocky Mountain News, Nov. 26)
A story about the Iowa Electronic Markets at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA notes that Rudy Giuliani and Hillary Clinton continue to lead the markets for their respective parties' nominations.
http://blogs.rockymountainnews.com/denver/sprengelmeyer/archives/2007/11/down_the_stretch_they_come.html

Squire surprised by Edwards' campaign (USA Today, Nov. 26)
You wouldn't know it from his campaign speeches, but John Edwards has a credential that no other presidential candidate can claim: He is the only one, from either party, who has ever been on a national ticket. Iowans can still spot an occasional "Kerry/Edwards" bumper sticker left over from 2004. But odds are they'll never hear Edwards mention his stint as the Democratic vice presidential candidate who ran with Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry. In a recent interview, Edwards waved off questions about whether he'd learned anything from the experience of helping run a national campaign that nearly defeated George W. Bush and Dick Cheney. University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE is skeptical of the theory that Edwards/Kerry would have stood a better chance of winning than Kerry/Edwards. Edwards had only been in the Senate since 1998, he had never held any other public office, and he had little name recognition nationally, Squire said. By contrast, Kerry had been in the Senate since 1985, and he was fairly well known before he ran for president. Squire said Edwards' current campaign could try to use his experience on the national ticket as a selling point. The candidate could talk about things he learned to do or not do in a presidential campaign, the professor said. "It does seem to be tucked way in the background," Squire said. "It has not been part of his pitch, and really hasn't been part of the conversation at all. It's a little bit surprising."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2007-11-26-edwards-kerry_N.htm

Porter finds questionable mortgage practices (Deseret News, Nov.26)
As record numbers of homeowners default on their mortgages, questionable practices among lenders are coming to light in bankruptcy courts, leading some legal specialists to contend that companies instigating foreclosures may be taking advantage of imperiled borrowers. Because there is little oversight of foreclosure practices and the fees that are charged, bankruptcy specialists fear that some consumers may be losing their homes unnecessarily, or that mortgage servicers, who collect loan payments, are profiting from foreclosures. Bankruptcy specialists say lenders and loan servicers often do not comply with even the most basic legal requirements, like correctly computing the amount a borrower owes on a foreclosed loan or providing proof of holding the mortgage note in question. "Regulators need to look beyond their current, myopic focus on loan origination and consider how servicers' calculation and collection practices leave families vulnerable to foreclosure," said KATHERINE M. PORTER, associate professor of law at the University of Iowa. The Deseret News is published in Utah.
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,695230714,00.html

Sparks promotes one-child fertilization (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 26)
A story about a push in the medical profession to promote single-child in vitro fertilization notes that at the University of Iowa, avoiding twins is a crusade. For the last three years, Iowa's clinic has given candidates for single-embryo transfer no alternative (except to drive many miles to the state's only other IVF clinic). Iowa starts "educating" patients the day they walk in. They get a one-page comparison of the risks of twins. They discuss financial and psychological issues. They're told they will use a single, five-day-old embryo only if they're lucky enough to "qualify." As Iowa's lab director, AMY SPARKS, explained: "We present it as, 'Congratulations! Your chances of pregnancy are so good that you only need one embryo.'"
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-112607-fertility,0,897045.story

Obesity concerns cancel UI corn contest (The Age, Nov. 26)
A story questioning the propriety of competitive eating contests notes that the University of Iowa cancelled its annual corn eating contest earlier this year after PHILIP JONES, the university's vice president of student services, viewed it as an act of gluttony. "It was something I thought was reasonable based on the data and stories I've seen about obesity and the proportion of people who are overweight," Jones said. "I don't know . . . if it is dangerous, but it was a symbolic gesture to get people to address changes in our lifestyle." The Age is published in Melbourne, Australia.
http://www.theage.com.au/news/diet/competitive-eating-hard-to-swallow/2007/11/23/1195753273018.html

Gronbeck comments on Obama (The Guardian, Nov. 25)
America is waking up to the fact that Barack Obama's tougher tactics and some critical missteps by the Clinton campaign have left the Democratic field open again. "It is back to being Obama or Hillary. It has tightened up in the last few weeks," said BRUCE GRONBECK of the University of Iowa. The Guardian is published in the UK.
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/world/story/0,,2216612,00.html

Gronbeck comments on Democratic caucuses (New York Daily News, Nov. 24)
For Democrats seeking the White House, it's all about knocking Hillary Clinton off stride in Iowa. "For the first caucus, the object of the game has to be to perform better than expected," says BRUCE GRONBECK, professor of communications studies at the University of Iowa. "And of course for her, the expectations are especially high because of how she's doing in polls around the country."
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/2007/11/24/2007-11-24_iowa_best_shot_for_democrats_to_chill_hi.html

Lewis-Beck comments on economy (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 23)
President Bush risks his credibility on the economy by presenting a picture that does not mesh with people's experiences. Critics say that Bush is cherry picking economic statistics to find those that allow him to present an upbeat report. Unemployment continues to hover below 5 percent, "but the quality of the jobs people have is deteriorating, the income gap is increasing, and there is more job insecurity," said MICHAEL S. LEWIS-BECK, a political economist at the University of Iowa. At the same time, he said, inflation is low, but "is starting to heat up."
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/opinion/la-na-bushecon23nov23,0,5792842.story?coll=la-news-comment

UI rejected public health name change (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Nov. 23)
University of Minnesota Medical School leaders are interested in selling the school's name in return for a big-time donation. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA earlier this year decided against renaming its college of public health for Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield after faculty and others objected to tying the school's name to the company in exchange for $15 million. Five years earlier, Iowa renamed its medical school the Carver College of Medicine following a $90 million donation from benefactor Roy Carver and his estate.
http://www.twincities.com/ci_7536467?source=rss&nclick_check=1

Black comments on holiday shopping (New York Times, Nov. 23)
For many people, the real joy of the holiday season comes from shopping, whether it's getting to the store at 4 a.m. for the best bargains or finding that impossible-to-find holiday toy. The pleasure you feel from every shopping victory is real. Shopping, like any new or exciting experience, activates the brain's reward center, triggering the release of dopamine. That's the same brain chemical released by drug use, gambling and other addictive behaviors. "Most people report that shopping is fun and exciting, and they like seeing new products in the stores," said University of Iowa psychiatry professor DONALD BLACK, who earlier this year wrote a review article about shopping addiction. "The reality is that shopping is America's No. 1 pastime and most people shop because it's enjoyable to them.''
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/11/23/when-shopping-puts-the-happy-in-your-holidays/

Schnoor comments on corn's future (Washington Post, Nov. 22)
Can the government's goals for ethanol fuel be realized? "The president's goal is to have 35 billion gallons of biofuels by 2017, and we're currently at 6 billion gallons. That would mean a huge increase in land for corn," says JERRY SCHNOOR, a University of Iowa professor of civil and environmental engineering. "The environmental constraints are just too great. It's too much nutrients, too much soil loss, too much pesticides. We don't have the land."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/11/22/AR2007112201442_pf.html

Sculptor attended UI (San Jose Mercury News, Nov. 22)
A feature about sculptor David Middlebrook notes that he received a Master of Fine Arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.mercurynews.com/valley/ci_7533693?nclick_check=1

Lubovitch discovered dance at the UI (Vancouver Sun, Nov. 22)
A feature about prominent choreographer Lar Lubovitch says that he discovered his destiny as a dancer and choreographer when he was a fine arts student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.canada.com/cityguides/vancouver/story.html?id=3fa076de-d035-43f5-a913-23fdfc15058c&k=42954

Redlawsk comments on immigration poll (Houston Chronicle, Nov. 22)
The partisan divide over immigration was underscored in a recent University of Iowa poll of likely caucus-goers. The survey found that two-thirds of Republicans rated immigration as either the most important or a highly important issue. Only about one-third of Democrats ranked the issue so high. The poll, however, found Republicans far from united about how to deal with the issue. Though 30 percent of GOP voters supported the deportation of illegal immigrants, 51 percent preferred allowing them to become citizens if they met certain conditions, such as paying back taxes and learning English. About two-thirds of Democrats backed that option, known as "earned citizenship." DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa professor who conducted the survey, said there is less incentive for Democrats to talk about immigration because their core supporters are more interested in other issues such as the Iraq war and health care.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/chronicle/5322009.html

UI alumnus wins art award (Register-Guard, Nov. 22)
David Attoe, an oil painter with a Master of Fine Arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is a winner of a 2008 Contemporary Northwest Art Award. His work will be featured at the Portland Art Museum. The Register-Guard is published in Eugene, Ore.
http://www.registerguard.com/csp/cms/sites/dt.cms.support.viewStory.cls?cid=25839&sid=1&fid=1

School uses Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (News-Reporter, Nov. 22)
The motto for this school year at Washington Wilkes Middle School is "Standards-based Learning: New Year, A New Way...with New Results." In order to maintain a high standard of academic excellence, WWMS has administered the Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS) this week. The test was designed by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as part of a program to develop a series of nationally accepted standardized achievement tests and is based on more than 70 years of ongoing research. The News-Reporter is published in Georgia.
http://www.news-reporter.com/news/2007/1122/News/029.html

Oregon experiment precedes UI research (Portland Examiner, Nov. 22)
A yearlong Oregon test of gadgets installed in volunteers' cars has concluded that it's feasible to pay for American roads and bridges by charging drivers for each mile they travel rather than each gallon they burn. The work in Oregon is expected to lay the groundwork for more research. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA plans a federally financed test in which volunteers would drive leased cars rather than their private vehicles.
http://www.examiner.com/a-1062583~Oregon_experiment_tries_out_the_idea_of_per_mile_road_taxes.html

UI poll cited (CNN, Nov. 21)
In some polls, immigration ranks behind only the Iraq war and the economy as Iowa voters' top issue. A recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll found that 58 percent of Republican voters consider the issue very important.
http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/11/21/gop.immigration/index.html

UI Press book reviewed (Hastings Star-Gazette, Nov. 21)
Critic Dave Wood discusses "After the Bell," a nonfiction collection from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The Hastings Star-Gazette is published in Minnesota.
http://www.hastingsstargazette.com/articles/index.cfm?id=18846&section=Entertainment&property_id=26&freebie_check&CFID=69426084&CFTOKEN=23881952&jsessionid=8830df5d2fc4742b272c

Covington comments on Huckabee's campaign (Washington Post, Nov. 21)
A Washington Post-ABC poll conducted over five nights in Iowa ending Sunday shows Huckabee's support in the state tripling since July -- bringing him within striking distance of Mitt Romney's well-heeled operation. Sixty-eight percent of Huckabee's support comes from self-identified evangelical Protestants. Political experts have been perplexed that the evangelical community hasn't rallied sooner and in greater force for Huckabee. "My sense is that the rank and file on the religious right are waiting for cues from identifiable leaders like James Dobson or Tony Perkins," says CARY COVINGTON, associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa. The article also appeared on the Web site of CBS NEWS.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/11/20/AR2007112002302_pf.html

Early caucus date could affect student turnout (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 21)
The Iowa caucuses are being held Jan. 3, the middle of winter break at universities. But the early caucus date could shift voter dynamics, adding young voices at their hometown caucuses across the state while diminishing the turnout at college precincts. Or, it could mean even fewer college students will take part in the electoral process. More than 5,000 University of Iowa students are Illinois residents, a pool of potential Barack Obama supporters who must return to campus to vote. Hawkeyes for Obama is setting up carpools between Illinois and Iowa City, and trying to find couches for students to crash on after the caucus. Caitlin Ross, a sophomore from Rockford, Ill., plans to drive her mom's champagne-colored seven-seat Honda minivan back to campus on Jan. 3, packed with other Obama supporters. But political observers, recalling previous presidential campaigns where the youth vote was touted but failed to materialize, remain wary. "Jan. 3 is just going to be tough," said TIM HAGLE, associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa and faculty advisor to the campus Republican club. "We won't know till caucus night how it shakes out."
http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-na-collegevote21nov21,1,7556540,full.story?coll=la-politics-campaign

Jones shares views corn eating contest (Forbes.com, Nov. 21)
As Americans stuff themselves with turkey on Thursday, professional eaters will take center stage in a nationally televised competition, gobbling 20-pound birds in eight minutes. While some shudder at the sight of contestants racing to devour food at a time when a third of Americans are obese, competitors just shrug. Others have had their fill of such events. This fall, the University of Iowa canceled its annual corn-eating contest, held the week of the Iowa-Iowa State football game. Many saw the contest as a fun nod to the state's hallmark crop, but PHILLIP JONES, Iowa's vice president of student services, viewed it as an act of gluttony. "It was something I thought was reasonable based on the data and stories I've seen about obesity and the proportion of people who are overweight," Jones said. "I don't know ... if it is dangerous, but it was a symbolic gesture to get people to address changes in our lifestyle." The ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared on the Web sites of CNN, the BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS-DEMOCRAT, SANTA BARBARA (Calif.) News, and several other media outlets.
http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2007/11/21/ap4362565.html

Giuliani intern noted in photo (Greater Milwaukee Today, Nov. 20)
In a photo accompanying an article about visiting Iowa during caucus season, Jessie Appleby, a senior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and an intern in Rudy Giuliani's campaign office, is shown outside the campaign's office in Iowa City. Giuliani's office is located right next door to the Hillary Clinton campaign office and around the corner from Barack Obama's office in downtown Iowa City.
http://www.gmtoday.com/news/travel/travel_midwest/topstory10.asp

Company licensed UI macular degeneration work (Hartford Courant, Nov. 20)
In 2005, David Scheer and a group of researchers founded Optherion Inc., dedicated to developing products to diagnose and treat age-related macular degeneration. In 2005, several researchers discovered that a gene, known as the Factor H gene, is associated with the onset of macular degeneration. Their work, which appeared in several academic journals, drew Scheer's attention as a basis upon which to develop a company. It also drew his and others' dollars. "We felt this was something we wanted to move on quickly," said Scheer, who licensed the technology from researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Yale University. Optherion recently moved its corporate headquarters and research laboratory to New Haven, Conn. It also has a laboratory and office at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Connecticut.
http://www.courant.com/business/hc-cornershop1121.artnov21,0,7290807.story?page=1

UI Hawkeye Poll noted (American Prospect, Nov. 20)
Among Iowa's likely Democratic caucus-goers, immigration barely ranks among the top 10 issues, according to a poll by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which found that only 2.4 percent of caucus-goers claimed immigration as their top issue. In that same University of Iowa poll, 85 percent of likely Democratic caucus-goers said that a candidate's position on immigration was "important" or "very important" to them.
http://www.prospect.org/cs/articles?article=the_struggle_to_shift_the_immigration_narrative

UI's in-vitro fertilization policies touted  (Philadelphia Inquirer, Nov. 20)
Fertility doctors are under pressure to reduce the number of twins produced by in-vitro fertilization (IVF) because dual births are riskier and costlier than singles. Doctors used to routinely put three to six embryos in the womb in hopes that one would grow. A growing body of international research shows that for nearly a third of attempts, just one high-quality embryo is enough, although the patient may need two or three tries. Anuja Dokras, the new associate medical director at  the University of Pennsylvania's IVF clinic., was recruited from the University of Iowa, where avoiding twins is a crusade. For the last three years, Iowa's clinic has given candidates for single-embryo transfer no alternative (except to drive many miles to the state's only other IVF clinic). "The thinking was, 'If the success rate is the same with one or two embryos, why take the extra risk of twins?'" Dokras said. As Iowa's lab director, AMY SPARKS, explained: "We present it as, 'Congratulations! Your chances of pregnancy are so good that you only need one embryo.' "
http://www.philly.com/philly/news/local/20071120_A_push_for_single_births.html

UI Press work to be read (New York Times, Nov. 20)
The siblings Vanessa, Lynn and Corin Redgrave have joined the journalists, military officials, entertainers and academics participating in "A Question of Impeachment," a series of evenings, presented by the Culture Project, exploring the case for the impeachment of President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney. "The Redgraves: Poems From Guantánamo," which will take place on Dec. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at the Culture Project theater at 55 Mercer Street in SoHo, includes recitations from "Guantánamo: The Detainees Speak" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2007), a collection of poems written by detainees.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/20/theater/20arts-THEFAMILYRED_BRF.html?_r=1&ex=1353301200&en=bb9819d1fa0c5bea&ei=5088

Regents question Mason about sexual assault (University Business, Nov. 20)
The University of Iowa's handling of allegations of the sexual assault of a female student raises questions about whether university policies are adequate and whether they were followed, according to a letter sent by the president of the Board of Regents to U of I President SALLY MASON.
http://www.universitybusiness.com/newssummary.aspx?news=yes&postid=14750

Edwards compares Iraq costs, UI tuition (Washington Post, Nov. 20)
A story about recent campaign appearances by Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards notes the candidate says the war in Iraq will cost every U.S. family $37,000 in the next decade, which is the cost of tuition for four years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story also appeared on the Web sites of the SPOKANE SPOKESMAN REVIEW, LUBBOCK (Tex.) ONLINE and the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/11/19/AR2007111901390.html

UI tests toys for lead in investigation (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 20)
The Illinois attorney general's office on Monday opened an inquiry into numerous toys identified in a Tribune investigation as containing high levels of lead. The toys were tested by the Tribune at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-lead20nov20,1,7756147.story

'Runner's high' may reduce heart attack damage (CBSNews.com, Nov. 19)
Opioids, the body's chemicals that create the "runner's high," may help save the heart from heart attack damage. So say University of Iowa scientists who studied runner's high in rats. "We have known for a long time that exercise is great for the heart. This study helps us better understand why," ERIC DICKSON says.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/11/19/health/webmd/main3521310.shtml

Gray: New cold virus is a concern (Money Times, Nov. 19)
A killer virus is spreading fast in America and has already been registered in four major cities. The virus is an adenovirus type 14 or Ad14. This is a new strain of an old virus and different to the one that spread in 1955. It has so far has been reported in Oregon, Washington, New York City and Texas. 10 deaths have been registered out of the 140 cases registered. The virus is unusual in that it can cause very severe illness in healthy young adults with no other medical condition. "I think this Ad14 strain is a matter of concern," said GREGORY C. GRAY, director of the Center of Emerging Infections Diseases at the University of Iowa. "Something makes this unique. The question is what makes it cause outbreaks of severe disease. It's a bit of a mystery." The Money Times is published in India.
http://www.themoneytimes.com/articles/20071119/virulent_virus_spreads_fast_in_us-id-1013398.html

Barron: No need for UI to offer discounts (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 19)
A story about the University of Nebraska-Omaha's attempt to lure Iowans by offering in-state tuition rates to students in several western Iowa counties notes that many states offer reciprocity tuition to students of bordering states. The Iowa Board of Regents, which governs Iowa's public universities, has thus far declined any major reciprocity pacts, mainly because the Iowa system doesn't need deals to lure students from other states, officials said. "We certainly reach across state borders. We just don't discount to do so," said MICHAEL BARRON, director of admissions at the University of Iowa.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/services/newspaper/printedition/monday/chi-recruit_mw_19nov19,0,1419153.story

Whaley questions hazing (Diverse Issues in Higher Education, Nov. 19)
A story about Black Greek organizations and hazing notes that separating the pledging process from hazing has become increasingly difficult and almost impossible. "Can't we have a pledge process without hazing?" asked Dr. DEBORAH WHALEY, an assistant professor in the department of American Studies at the University of Iowa.
http://diverseeducation.com/artman/publish/article_10216.shtml

Alumna campaigns for Edwards in New Hampshire (Concord Monitor, Nov. 19)
A story about campaign volunteers in New Hampshire notes that one John Edwards supporter is Kelly Drake, who works for a political consulting firm in Seattle, where, she says, the presidential buzz is nearly nonexistent. Not like in New Hampshire, where it's equal to a hive of hornets. She's attending the Young Democrats of America's quarterly meeting in Manchester. She went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, located in the state of the first caucus. She's a political junky, so there she was during her free time, far from home, working the phone for Edwards.
http://www.concordmonitor.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071119/FRONTPAGE/711190307

UI poll cited on immigration (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 19)
Immigration could be a tricky problem for Democrats in the 2008 elections. A November UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll shows just 2.4 percent of Iowa Democrats consider immigration as the issue "most important" to determining their vote, but 85 percent said a candidate's position on immigration is important or very important to them.
http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB119543645830297550-PyaWJfKCm0uY1q6SsDdrCyEtmQg_20071218.html?mod=tff_main_tff_top

Stegner attended Writers' Workshop (Deseret News, Nov. 18)
"The Selected Letters of Wallace Stegner" is reviewed. Stegner, the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, was an Iowa native and attended graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,695228336,00.html

UI tested toys for lead (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 17)
Tribune reporters used hand-held devices to check the lead levels in toys imported from China. "The rising anxiety over lead-tainted toys played out a few weeks ago at Toys Et Cetera in Hyde Park, where a menacing-looking plastic Godzilla greeted shoppers. Yellow paint on the 14-inch-tall monster showed a high lead content in a read-out from a hand-held scanner operated by a Tribune reporter. A more scientific follow-up test at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY found that the paint on the Godzilla's back contained 4,500 parts per million of lead, more than seven times the federal and state legal limit of 600 parts per million."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-leadmain-story,0,7756666.story?coll=chi_breaking_500

Lee comments on driver distraction (Axcess News, Nov. 16)
Driver distraction is one of the leading causes of traffic accidents. JOHN LEE, a professor of mechanical and industrial engineering at the University of Iowa, said that the major challenge is the fast development of technology. But Lee added that technology can also be used to provide solutions to the distraction problem. "New technology such as the use of cameras and monitors can enable cars to assess whether a driver is distracted and then guide his attention back to the road," Lee said. Axcess News originates in Kentucky. This story came from the Scripps Howard wire.
http://axcessnews.com/index.php/articles/show/id/13099

Redlawsk says Iowans serious about caucuses (Dallas Morning News, Nov. 16)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry recently campaigned in Iowa on behalf of the Rudy Giuliani presidential campaign, which hopes the governor's conservative credentials will reassure voters uneasy about the former New York mayor's liberal record on social issues. Iowa holds its presidential caucus Jan. 3, and voters here are serious about their first-in-the-nation nominating contest. "This is an unusual group in American politics," said University of Iowa political scientist DAVID REDLAWSK. "Iowa caucus-goers are far more aware and involved in politics than pretty much anywhere else." The article also appeared on the website of WFAA-TV in Dallas.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/111607dntexperry.2a5a7c6.html

Romney stresses private-sector background (MSNBC.com, Nov. 16) Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney hopes his private-sector background will help propel him to the Republican nomination and ultimately the presidency at a time when public dissatisfaction with US politicians is at record levels and pessimism about the economy is mounting. "The campaign theme is his record of stepping into difficult management situations and turning them into successes," says CARY COVINGTON, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "He did it with the Salt Lake City Olympics. He did it as governor of Massachusetts. The implication is that he'll do it again as president." The article originally appeared in the FINANCIAL TIMES.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21823014/

Gray comments on killer colds (eMedicine Health, Nov. 15)
A virulent new form of an old cold virus is spreading in the United States, causing severe pneumonia and death even in healthy adults. Adenovirus expert GREGORY C. GRAY, director of the Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases at the University of Iowa, says particularly virulent strains of adenovirus pop up from time to time. "I think this Ad14 strain is a matter of concern. Something makes this unique. The question is what makes it cause outbreaks of severe disease. It's a bit of a mystery." This article originated on WebMD.
http://www.emedicinehealth.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=85280

IEM used to track Clinton after negative news (Chicago Sun-Times, Nov. 15)
Sun-Times columnist Jennifer Hunter wanted to see if anything had happened to Sen. Hillary Clinton's place in the Democratic presidential race after the negative reviews of her debate performance in Philadelphia on Oct. 30 and the revelation, last week, that her campaign planted a question during a campaign stop in Iowa. Instead of polls, Hunter looked at the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, which as Salon.com notes are "consistently better at forecasting winners than pre-election polls." The IEM treats presidential candidates as if they are hog futures. And they use real money. In the 2004 presidential race, IEM investors spent $400,000 betting on the outcome. On Oct. 28, just before the Philly debate, Clinton's IEM price per share closed at 71.3 cents. Post-debate, on Nov. 1, Clinton shares closed at 71 cents.
http://www.suntimes.com/news/hunter/651893,CST-NWS-hunter15.article

Gronbeck predicts tight Republican race (Boston Globe, Nov. 15)
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, despite heavy spending and intensive campaigning, finds himself in a tightening race in Iowa with former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, forcing Romney to aggressively confront an opponent with far less money and organizational backing who was far back in the polls a few weeks ago. A University of Iowa professor, BRUCE GRONBECK, predicted a tight race between Huckabee and Romney, "and then you get to the question of who comes out on a cold January night," he said. On that score, Gronbeck gave the advantage to Romney's fundraising and vast network of backers. "That could be the difference," Gronbeck said. The article also appeared in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2007/11/15/huckabee_surges_in_iowa_poll/

UI foreclosure study noted (New York Times, Nov. 15)
A federal judge in Ohio has ruled against a longstanding foreclosure practice, potentially creating an obstacle for lenders trying to reclaim properties from troubled borrowers and raising questions about the legal standing of investors in mortgage securities pools. Lawyers who represent troubled borrowers complain that trustees overseeing home loan pools often do not produce proof, usually in the form of a mortgage note, that their investors own a foreclosed property. And a recent study of 1,733 foreclosures by KATHERINE M. PORTER, an associate professor of law at the University of Iowa, found that 40 percent of the creditors foreclosing on borrowers did not show proof of ownership. Such proof gives a creditor standing to foreclose against a borrower and is required by law.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/15/business/15lend.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Squire: bandwagon effect has merit in politics (National Post, Nov. 15)
New polls in three early-voting states -- Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina -- have Rudy Giuliani trailing Mitt Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, sometimes by significant margins. Mr. Giuliani's lukewarm appeal in those key states, which will hold primary or caucus elections early in January, is significant because winners there historically carry that strength into later nomination contests. "If Romney sweeps Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina, he will be almost impossible to stop," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "The idea of a bandwagon effect -- that voters just tuning into a race will go with the likely nominee -- has some merit to it. It will be hard for candidates who have not done well in the early events to make the case that they are the stronger potential nominee." The NATIONAL POST is a newspaper based in Ontario.
http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/news/world/story.html?id=ae019f0a-f928-42d7-9ff8-add19f3b4fb9

Porter's foreclosure research cited (The Ledger, Nov. 15)
A recent study of 1,733 foreclosures by KATHERINE M. PORTER, an associate professor of law at the University of Iowa, found that 40 percent of the creditors foreclosing on borrowers did not show proof of ownership. Such proof gives a creditor standing to foreclose against a borrower and is required by law. THE LEDGER is based in Lakeland, Fla.
http://www.theledger.com/article/20071115/ZNYT01/711150629/-1/ZNYT

UI study: exercise impacts heart strength (Lake Wylie Pilot, Nov. 15)
A study out last week from researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that the opioids produced by exercise appear to have a direct impact on strengthening the heart. The study compared rats that exercised versus couch potato rats, and found that the exercising animals sustained much less damage from a heart attack than did the sedentary rodents. But they found that this benefit was erased when they blocked opioid receptors in the active animals. The Iowa researchers suspect that exercise boosts expression of several opioid system genes in heart muscle and changes in other genes that are linked to inflammation and cell death in the heart. THE LAKE WYLIE PILOT is a weekly newspaper in South Carolina.
http://www.lakewyliepilot.com/24hour/healthscience/story/3741063p-13214330c.html

UI football players questioned in sexual assault case (USA Today, Nov. 14)
Three UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football players are being questioned in connection with an alleged sexual assault, university police said Wednesday. No arrests have been made, police said, and the identities of the players are being withheld. The alleged assault occurred in a campus residence hall during the early morning hours of Oct. 14, according to a report filed with university police by the alleged victim on Nov. 7.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/football/bigten/2007-11-14-iowa-assault_N.htm

Gronbeck comments on student behavior (RealClearPolitics, Nov. 14)
Actually getting younger participants to caucuses is a task susceptible to several hurdles. The circumstances surrounding caucus night are major barriers: Iowans who have long caucused themselves will invariably point out, when asked about the experience, that the weather is likely to be miserably cold, and that attendees must spend hours in a room with people they barely know and proudly voice their opinions on politics. "That's not normal college student behavior," University of Iowa political scientist BRUCE GRONBECK said with a laugh. REALCLEARPOLITICS.COM is an independent political Web site.
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2007/11/youth_vote_may_bring_iowa_surp.html

Redlawsk: race in Iowa 'extremely fluid' (Nov. 14, Financial Times)
DAVID REDLAWSK
, political scientist at the University of Iowa, says the race in Iowa remains "extremely fluid", with all three main candidates still in contention. "A lot of caucus-goers do not make their decision until the last couple of weeks," he says, referring to Iowa's unique caucus voting system.
http://www.ftd.de/karriere_management/business_english/:Business%20English%20Edwards%20Iowa/279073.html

Book blends sports fiction, research (Journal Gazette/Times-Courier, Nov. 14)
Sports fiction and real world research are combined in the book "Second Wind," by retired Eastern Illinois University physiology professor Max Ferguson. The first two-thirds of "Second Wind" tell the fictional story of two young men, John and Mike, growing up and running track together in Charleston. The last third recounts Ferguson's research into the second wind that eases runners' breathing when they were previously exhausted. Much of the research in the book occurred when Ferguson was on leave in 1966 and taking a gross anatomy course at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, his home state. He is pictured on the book's cover with University of Iowa track star Larry Wieczorek. He also conducted research with athletes at Eastern. The newspaper serves Matroon and Charleston, Ill.
http://www.jg-tc.com/articles/2007/11/14/features/doc473a73caebf8c003748108.txt

UI study examined foreclosure fees (KSHB-TV, Nov. 14)
Homeowners facing foreclosure are being warned that some companies are preying on borrowers facing financial distress. According to a new study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, questionable fees and claims were added to half of the foreclosure cases they examined. One lender claimed that the borrower owed $1 million when they actually owed $60,000. The TV station is based in Kansas City, Mo.
http://www.nbcactionnews.com/content/dwym/story.aspx?content_id=93293a97-20db-4cdf-8d65-b048c35d1fd2

UI Press book noted (Pierce County Herald, Nov. 14)
In a book review column, "Tied to the Great Packing Machine," by Wilson J. Warren (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, no price), is noted. It's a scholarly treatise on how slaughterhouses large and small had an impact on the Midwest, as slaughtering techniques came and left.
http://www.piercecountyherald.com/articles/index.cfm?id=6171&section=Entertainment&property_id=11&freebie_check&CFID=66849321&CFTOKEN=10877977&jsessionid=8830b337e84b576a2873

UI band director to speak at festival (Hillsboro Argus, Nov. 14)
The first-ever Western Oregon Winds (WOW) Festival will be held at Pacific University on Saturday, Nov. 17. Internationally known conductors and adjudicators will come to Pacific for an all-day intensive workshop designed to take the top bands at four local colleges to the next level of performance. Among the clinicians will be MYRON WELCH, director of bands at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Oregon.
http://www.oregonlive.com/living/argus/index.ssf?/base/lifestyle/119498160551260.xml&coll=6

UI Press short story collection reviewed (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 14)
Lee Montgomery's short story collection, "Whose World Is This?" is reviewed in this article. The book was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/chi-1114reader_90nov14,0,5478825.story

UI to offer incentive for Friday classes (University Business, Nov. 13)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will offer an incentive to faculty who schedule classes on Friday in hopes of keeping students out of bars on Thursday nights. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is implementing a program that would pay departments $20 per student per switched class. The move is in response to research that shows Friday classes cut down on binge drinking. University Business, published in Norwalk, Conn., is a publication for presidents and other senior officers at two- and four-year colleges and universities throughout the United States.
http://www.universitybusiness.com/newssummary.aspx?news=yes&postid=14711

UI student queries Texas governor (QuickDFW.com, Nov. 13)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry sought to sell Iowa Republicans on Rudy Giuliani on Monday, saying he's confident the former New York mayor would appoint Supreme Court judges to overturn legalized abortion. Stopping by Giuliani campaign headquarters in Iowa City, Mr. Perry fielded questions on a wide range of issues, including abortion, immigration, tax cuts and terrorism. Kasondra St. Antoine, a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, had a question of her own. "Are those boots special?" she asked, pointing to Mr. Perry's black cowhide boots decorated with gold lamé and a Texas flag. "I can't explain the gold lamé, but I can explain the flag," the governor said, pulling up his pant leg to expose his right boot. QuickDFW.com is the online version of a free weekly newspaper published by the DALLAS MORNING NEWS.
http://www.quickdfw.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/texassouthwest/stories/DN-perry_13nat.ART.State.Edition2.42063e3.html

Gronbeck comments on Tancredo ad (MSNBC.com, Nov. 13)
On Monday Rep. Tom Tancredo unveiled a new television ad that shows a hooded man slip into a peaceful shopping mall, set down a black backpack -- not far from where children are playing -- and then, boom! Interspersed with images of a bloody body and the destruction of recent terrorist attacks in London, Spain and Russia, it argues that this could be "the price we pay for spineless politicians who refuse to defend our border against those who come to kill." But one Iowa political analyst called it such a "brute" appeal for fear that it's not likely to help Tancredo's long-shot campaign here in the nation's first presidential caucus state. Neither will the ad prompt any other candidates to respond, as Tancredo told reporters Monday was his real goal, the analyst said. "This is just blatant, raw fear images, and they've never worked in the United States, period," said BRUCE GRONBECK, a communications professor from the University of Iowa who teaches a course on politics in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21771304/

Johnson named dean of Virginia Tech College of Medicine (NBC 29, Nov. 13)
Dr. Cynda Ann Johnson will serve as dean of Carilion Clinic and Virginia Tech's joint College of Medicine in Roanoke. Dr. Johnson was dean and professor of Family Medicine at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University. She most recently served as ECU's senior associate vice chancellor for clinical and translational research. She served as chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. NBC 29 is based in Charlottesville, Va.
http://www.nbc29.com/Global/story.asp?S=7351880&nav=menu496_2_8

UI to battle 'Thirsty Thursdays' (Chronicle of Higher Ed, Nov. 12)
Students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who party all night Thursday won't be sleeping all day Friday anymore, at least not if the university has its way. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has decided to pay departments for switching classes to Friday, reports the Iowa City Press-Citizen. Departments that move at least two classes to Friday will get $20 for each student who enrolls in a switched class. The incentive program is designed to cut down on the number of students who load up on classes earlier in the week and then get loaded on Thursday night. The article appeared in the online Chronicle's News Blog section.
http://chronicle.com/news/article/3414/u-of-iowa-battles-thirsty-thursdays-with-scholarly-fridays

Obama's appeal to Republicans (South Florida Sun Sentinel, Nov. 13)
A story about Black Republicans crossing party lines to vote for Barack Obama notes that in a University of Iowa poll conducted in late summer, Republican voters were asked to name their preference for president. Obama came in third, behind Mitt Romney and Rudy Giuliani. "I don't want to make too much of it," DAVID REDLAWSK, the Iowa professor who commissioned the poll told Salon.com. "But I do think that the message Obama is putting out . . . is the most likely to reach across party lines."
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/southflorida/sfl-flrndobama1113nbnov13,0,3799149.story?track=rss

Texas governor meets with UI student (Austin American Statesman, Nov. 13)
Did you hear the one about the Texan who went to Iowa to persuade Midwesterners to vote for a guy from New York? Here's what happened at the second event of Gov. Rick Perry's first day of solo campaigning for GOP presidential candidate Rudy Giuliani. "Are those boots special?" Kasondra St. Antoine, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA freshman and Giuliani volunteer, asked as she gazed at the gubernatorial footwear. "I can't explain the gold lamé," Perry said, referring to the fancy flourishes on his boots, "but I can explain the flag and the state" outline.
http://www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/nation/11/13/1113perryiowa.html

Muslim country singer was UI law student (New York Times, Nov. 13)
Ask Kareem Salama, billed as the first Muslim country-western singer, what makes his music "country," and he grins for about half a beat before answering, "Probably my accent." It is a full-bore Southern drawl, rooted in his rural Oklahoma childhood, and startling to those who don't expect an Arabic name to come intertwined with such a distinct down-home voice. But the question hanging over Mr. Salama's nascent career is whether he can find acceptance for both parts of his identity. After all, country is generally not known for the diversity of its stars, or its aficionados. Country has a flag-waving contingent, which torched Dixie Chicks albums after the singer Natalie Maines criticized President Bush; the singer Toby Keith's star rose after he released a post-9/11 song about kicking someone in the rear end because "it's the American way." Will they be able to get beyond Mr. Salama's name to his songs? Salama started his country music recording career when he was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/13/arts/music/13croo.html?_r=1&ex=1352696400&en=628d59bc938afb79&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss&oref=slogin

Redlawsk: Huckabee has a shot in Iowa (McClatchy News Service, Nov. 12)
A story about the presidential campaign of former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee notes that he has been rising in recent Republican presidential polls. "The trick for Huckabee is getting people who might be supportive of him to believe that he has a shot," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political scientist and pollster. "It wouldn't surprise me to see it as a Romney/Huckabee race in Iowa."
http://www.mcclatchydc.com/226/story/21260.html

SEC files more backdating charges (CFO, Nov. 12)
Increases in backdating and insider-trading cases have kept Securities and Exchange Commission enforcers busier this year. The SEC has filed 14 percent more enforcement cases in its most recent fiscal year, according to Bloomberg. The commission brought 656 cases accusing companies of violating securities laws through September 30, nearly 100 more than in 2006. At the same time, however, the SEC seems to be letting more companies once suspected of backdating off the hook. As CFO.com reported last week, the commission has actually been whittling down its list of possible backdating cases by giving companies no-action letters. Earlier this month, at least four companies revealed that the commission had dropped their informal inquiries into their past stock-option granting practices. Some of them, such as NVIDIA Corp., had restated their financials to make up for options whose grant and award dates didn't match. The SEC letters were received as much as a year after the probes were opened. Since University of Iowa professor ERIK LIE uncovered the issue in 2005, more than 200 companies have undertaken internal investigations into their historical stock option granting process or were the subject of a federal investigation. However, it's more likely today that fewer than 120 of such investigations are still ongoing. CFO Magazine, part of the Economist Group, is published in Boston.
http://www.cfo.com/article.cfm/10126552/c_10123501?f=home_todayinfinance

UI poll cited (Real Clear Politics, Nov. 12)
A story about the unpredictable nature of the Iowa caucuses notes that in a recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HAWKEYE POLL, 16 percent of those polled supported Democrats who would not receive the minimum 15 percent of the vote to be considered viable and will need to support a second candidate. Real Clear Politics is an independent political Web page headquartered in Chicago.
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/horseraceblog/2007/11/unpredictable_iowa.html

UI student Nakhasi attracts top Democrats (ABC News, Nov. 12)
Twenty-year-old Atul Nakhasi's bedroom is messy, like most other college students his age. But in addition to an unmade bed, and laundry strewn around the room, Nakhasi's clutter includes handwritten notes from Bill Clinton, business cards of major political campaign directors, and personally autographed books from Joe Biden and Barack Obama. Nakhasi is the president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Democrats, an organization he has been rebuilding over the last three years, from a crumbling club that attracted eight students per meeting, to a campus powerhouse, hosting events of thousands and attracting media from across the country.
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=3851664&page=1

Housing prices gave Bowlsby sticker shock in move to Stanford (New York Times, Nov. 11)
A story about high housing prices in Palo Alto, Calif., and Stanford University's attempt to help its coaches buy homes there, notes that when Bob Bowlsby came to Stanford from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last year, he said he could afford to take the job only because it included a housing stipend. His house outside Iowa City was 7,000 square feet on 25 acres and included a pool. "Suffice to say, it was a shock to our system," Bowlsby said of when he and his wife went house hunting in Palo Alto.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/10/sports/ncaafootball/10stanford.html

UI foreclosure study cited (WCBD/NBC, Nov. 12)
Homeowners facing foreclosure are being warned that some companies are preying on borrowers facing financial distress. According to a new study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, questionable fees and claims were added to half of the foreclosure cases they examined. WCBD is located in South Carolina.
http://www.wcbd.com/midatlantic/cbd/news.apx.-content-articles-CBD-2007-11-12-0009.html

UI collaborated in genetic research (Medical News Today, Nov. 12)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS collaborated in research that has identified a defective gene that affects vascular smooth-muscle cells in people who suffer from hereditary thoracic aortic disease, which can kill victims with little warning in the prime of their lives. Medical News Today originates in Mexico.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/88423.php

Covington comments on caucus impact (National Post, Nov. 12)
The Iowa caucus can make or break presidential candidates, but Hillary Clinton is better positioned. "If Hillary Clinton wins Iowa and then goes on to win in New Hampshire, it seems pretty sure she will win the nomination," said CARY COVINGTON of the University of Iowa. "If she comes second or third in Iowa, she can absorb that, and still compete." The National Post is published in Canada.
http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/news/world/story.html?id=7c896f12-f27b-43f1-9d39-e6f383091f97

UI student responds to caucus date (USA Today, Nov. 12)
The Iowa caucuses have been moved to Jan. 3, when virtually all Iowa colleges are on winter break, but candidates are making an effort to increase student participation. Catherine Chargo, 20, a senior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who originally supported Obama, says, "Originally I was on his bandwagon because everyone else was." She's now "on the fence" between Edwards and Obama.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2007-11-11-youth-vote_N.htm

UI studied ethanol impact (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 12)
Support for corn ethanol is ebbing in Congress, according to this review: "Last month, the National Academy of Sciences reported on the impact of ethanol production on water supplies. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor chaired the report committee, so Big Corn might have hoped for a home-court advantage. But NAS reported that, 'in some areas of the country, water resources are already significantly stressed . . . Increased biofuels production will likely add pressure to the water management challenges the nation already faces as biofuels drive changing agricultural practices, increased corn production, and growth in the number of biorefineries.'"
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB119482533176389532.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

'Lost' star attended the UI (Monaco Review, Nov. 11)
A feature about "Lost" star Terry O'Quinn, who plays the character John Locke, notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before heading to New York to pursue an acting career.
http://monacorevue.com/people/iv1071112.php

UI poll cited (Bloomberg, Nov. 11)
An analysis of the presidential race noted that a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll last month put Democrat Hillary Clinton's support among likely voters at 29 percent, 2 percentage points ahead of Barack Obama. Former North Carolina Sen. John Edwards was third with 20 percent.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=aoy7fLeDy9AA&refer=home

Covington says race will stay close (AFP, Nov. 11)
Time is running short for Barack Obama to catch 2008 White House rival Hillary Clinton. The Iowa race is very close, virtually a dead heat, and CARY COVINGTON, political science professor at the University of Iowa, said that "absent some major mistake from the Clinton campaign" that is the way it will stay. AFP originates in France.
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5h6FMoErM-6beCxeCAb6-zE5mROgg

Azlan taught at the UI (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 11)
Reza Azlan, author of "No God But God" and CBS analyst on Islam, was teaching at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA when the terrorist attacks on the United States occurred Sept. 11, 2001.
http://calibre.mworld.com/m/m.w?lp=GetStory&id=279979871

Jeyaretnam attended International Writing Program (Straits Times, Nov. 11)
A feature about author Philip Jeyaretnam, co-chairman of the steering committee for the Singapore Writers Festival, notes that he participated in the 1992 INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on a Fulbright Fellowship.
http://www.straitstimes.com/Lifestyle/Read/Story/STIStory_175535.html

Editorial cites Porter study (Las Vegas Sun, Nov. 11)
An editorial is critical of excess fees charged to bankrupt citizens facing foreclosure. "KATHERINE PORTER, a University of Iowa associate law professor who presented an analysis of more than 1,700 consumer bankruptcy cases to the trustee office, recently told The New York Times that most overcharges are about $200."
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/editorials/2007/nov/10/566626181.html

Brockmeier attended the UI (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Nov. 11)
A feature about Kevin Brockmeier, author of "A Brief History of the Dead," notes that he attended graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, "known for its writers' workshop."
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/Style/207397/

Clinton candidacy attracts female support (Detroit Free Press, Nov. 11)
Women often outnumber men two to one at Hillary Clinton rallies. Will Clinton's gender help her, hurt her, or make no difference? In Iowa, the first state to vote in January, the U.S. senator from New York now gets the support of 33 percent of women and 22.5 percent of men, according to a survey of likely Democratic caucus attendees by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071111/NEWS07/711110683/1009

UI poll cited (The Herald, Nov. 11)
Columnist David Sirota writes, "The media's version of the Iowa presidential caucuses is a story of five candidates and two rivalries... But the numbers suggest the most compelling story is about two underdog candidates and one demographic: former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R), former Sen. John Edwards (D) and the middle class. Huckabee gained 11 points in the latest UNIVERSITY OF IOWA survey, pulling himself into a statistical tie for second place with Giuliani, despite Giuliani's national fame and huge fundraising totals. Similarly, Edwards remains within striking distance of first place in Iowa despite his rivals spending 300 times what he's spent on television ads as of the end of September." The Herald is published in Washington state.
http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20071111/OPINION04/711110026

Covington assesses Huckabee (The Guardian, Nov. 10)
Mike Huckabee, a long-shot Republican contender for the 2008 White House, has burst into the leading pack of the race for his party's nomination. "Huckabee is the ticking time bomb of the party," said Professor CARY COVINGTON, a politics expert at the University of Iowa. 'Religious voters are soon going to realize that he is the candidate who best fits their profile and get behind him. People on the religious right often have a harsh image. Huckabee shares their values, but is positive and optimistic. He softens them." The Guardian is published in the UK.
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/world/story/0,,2209106,00.html

Edwards speaks at the UI (Boston Globe, Nov. 9)
Former North Carolina senator John Edward spoke Monday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he said Hillary Clinton "is voting like a hawk in Washington and talking like a dove in Iowa and New Hampshire."
http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2007/11/10/edwards_on_the_outside/

Squire comments on Obama (Boston Globe, Nov. 9)
Barack Obama is struggling to overtake Hillary Clinton as the Iowa Democratic caucuses approach. "He's an attractive, smart candidate, but I don't think people have figured out yet why they should vote for him," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political analyst and visiting professor. The story originated with Reuters.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2007/11/09/obama_tries_to_convert_promise_to_support_in_iowa/

Porter interviewed on CNN (CNN, Nov. 9)
The University of Iowa's KATHERINE PORTER was interviewed on Lou Dobbs Tonight about her recent study finding excess fees in mortgage foreclosures: "Poor mortgage servicing can be the difference between a family being able to climb their way out of trouble and save their house and being tipped over to the brink and surrendering their house in a very painful and expensive foreclosure. One of the most chilling findings in my study was that mortgage servicing is not just a one bad apple story. All of the major mortgage servicers have the same, consistent problems. And there's no way for a consumer to really avoid being trapped in this potential risk for being overcharged."
http://edition.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0711/09/ldt.01.html

Porter finds questionable foreclosure fees (St. Petersburg Times, Nov. 9)
Leave it to the biggest names in the mortgage business to find a way to make money on the misery of those suffering through foreclosure. As the country faces the prospect of 2 million families losing their homes in the next few years, lenders and mortgage servicers are socking these borrowers with all sorts of vague and unwarranted fees. A study of foreclosures done by KATHERINE PORTER, an associate professor of law at the University of Iowa, found that almost half the loans she examined had questionable fees tacked on to what the borrower owed. The newspaper is based in St. Petersburg, Fla.
http://www.sptimes.com/2007/11/09/Opinion/Lenders_add_insult_to.shtml

UI researcher: opioids may help prevent heart attacks (Health24.com, Nov. 9)
Endorphins and other morphine-like substances known as opioids, which are released during exercise, don't just make you feel good -- they may also protect you from heart attacks, according to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA (UI) researchers. It has long been known that the so-called "runner's high" is caused by natural opioids that are released during exercise. HEALTH24.COM is the leading health Health24 is South Africa's leading health and lifestyle Web site in Cape Town, South Africa.
http://www.health24.com/news/Heart_Cardiovascular/1-958,42896.asp

UI professor comments on Maryland tax climate (Gazette.Net, Nov. 9)
As lawmakers in Annapolis continue this week to consider various tax increases on businesses to help close a $1.5 billion budget deficit, some corporate executives say that Maryland already taxes companies more heavily than most other states. However, Maryland has improved its business tax climate in the past year, according to a study released last month by the Tax Foundation, another Washington think tank. The state ranked 24th for 2008, up four places from a year ago. Studies such as the Tax Foundation's carry political biases, said PETER FISHER, a professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa who conducted a study of his own on the business climate studies released in 2005. GAZETTE.NET has a corporate office in Gaithersburg, Md. and publishes newspapers in more than 50 communities in Maryland.
http://www.gazette.net/stories/110907/businew05443_32367.shtml

UI tries to curb drinking (Lawrence Journal-World News, Nov. 8)
At several bars in town, the best drink specials aren't confined to Friday and Saturday. They start Thursday. Walk through the Kansas University campus on a Friday and you'll quickly realize why. "Thursdays are the new Fridays," said Keegan Miller, a KU senior. "I have class at 11 tomorrow, and that's pushing it," he said last Thursday night. That attitude, the U.S. Surgeon General said in a report issued earlier this year, is in large part the fault of colleges and universities that don't schedule classes on Fridays. A recent study from the University of Missouri backs up that claim. But at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, as well as at smaller schools along the eastern seaboard, university administrators are trying to take back Fridays with more mandatory classes being offered.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2007/nov/08/worries_persist_lack_classes_day_5_boosts_drinking/?city_local

UI experts: awareness promotes healthy arteries (Philippine Star, Nov. 8)
Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), stroke, and coronary heart disease have one thing in common: they are caused by blocked arteries impairing the circulation. Cilostazol, an anti-platelet agent (used to prevent blood clots), is one of the treatments prescribed by doctors for PAD and for the reduction in the risk of stroke. According to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Healthcare, it is important that public awareness regarding blocked arteries prevention is well disseminated. Aside from this, patients must practice constant physician check-ups and compliance with medications.
http://www.philstar.com/index.php?Science%20and%20Technology&p=49&type=2&sec=36&aid=200711076

Student: age group matters in elections (Public Radio International, Nov. 6)
More than a billion dollars will be spent by candidates in pursuit of the 2008 U.S. presidency. "Your Billion Dollar President" looks at what it takes to get elected and what the candidates' spending, marketing and campaigning say about the quality of our democracy. Co-hosted by John Hockenberry and Adaora Udoji, "Your Billion Dollar President" is the first in a series of monthly election specials from "The Morning Show." In a segment on young voters, John challenges his nephew, Nick, a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, to prove that his age group matters in this election.
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/pri/news.newsmain?action=article&ARTICLE_ID=1177878&sectionID=2

IWP anniversary lauded (Words Without Borders, November 2007)
A series of features begins, "We salute the Iowa INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM as it celebrates forty years of hosting international writers in residence. Each fall the world comes to Iowa, as writers from around the globe converge to write, talk, and soak up literary culture." Words Without Borders originates in New York.
http://www.wordswithoutborders.org/

UI freshman is diagnosed with cancer (Northwest Herald, Nov. 8)
Eric Esterle of Algonquin, Ill., was surrounded by contradictions as he waited for surgery to remove a lump in his throat at Children's Memorial Hospital. On the one hand, Eric, 18, seems too young and healthy to be suffering from the rare form of cancer (psammomatous melanotic schwannoma) that he first was diagnosed with nearly a year ago. And, because he technically was diagnosed as a child, at age 17, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA freshman continues his treatment at Children's Memorial. The newspaper serves McHenry County, Ill.
http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2007/11/08/news/local/doc4732a5367e93c299863550.txt

UI sees decline in foreign grad students (Post-Bulletin, Nov. 8)
The number of foreign graduate students at the University of Iowa is in steady decline, a trend that bucks national figures. Since 2004, Iowa has lost about 14 percent of its international graduate and professional student body, according to the school's Office of International Students and Scholars. This year, there are 1,564 such students -- 258 fewer than in 2004. School officials aren't sure of any specific reason for the decline. "People still want to blame something that is history," said SCOTT KING, director of the Office of International Students and Scholars. "Tightening of Visas (after Sept. 11) had an immediate effect, but that was quickly corrected." The newspaper is based in Rochester, Minn.
http://www.postbulletin.com/newsmanager/templates/localnews_story.asp?z=2&a=314783

Redlawsk: Democratic presidential race is 'very tight' (The Politico, Nov. 8)
Among Democratic presidential contenders, Sen. John Edwards closely follows Sen. Barack Obama in Iowa, according to most polls. Both follow Hillary Clinton by fewer than 10 percent among Democratic voters surveyed in Iowa, in a race UI political science associate professor DAVID REDLAWSK characterized as "very tight." Redlawsk said Edwards' and other candidates' repeated criticism of Hillary Clinton is to be expected as contenders try to distinguish themselves from the front-runner.
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1107/6756.html

Covington comments on Huckabee's rise in the polls (Yahoo! News, Nov. 8)
Mike Huckabee, a witty former Arkansas governor, has powered into second place in the polls in Iowa, some 65 days before the state's crucial caucuses. "The religious right vote in the Iowa caucuses is a substantial bloc, and if you secure that support you are a serious player," said CARY COVINGTON, a political science professor at the University of Iowa.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20071108/pl_afp/usvote2008republicanshuckabee_071108141300

Poet's book is reviewed (Washington City Paper, Nov. 7)
In this review of "Deed," published last month by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, it's said that poet Rod Smith "balances lyric depth and ridiculous humor." Interspersing musings on society, assumed voices, and absurd punch lines, his 10th book of poetry creates its own experimental logic."
http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/display.php?id=34033

Lie speaks about options backdating (CFO.com, Nov. 7)
Electronic Arts, the video-game creator, announced Tuesday that the Securities and Exchange Commission dropped its probe into the company's stock-option backdating practices and would not take any action. Several executives have faced severe fallout from backdating scandals during the last several years. Those found guilty of the practice -- which involves manipulating the award dates of stock options -- have paid a heavy price. Speaking at a convention in Boston last month, ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa professor credited with uncovering the backdating issue, said more than 2,000 companies manipulated stock-option grants. "We only see the tip of the iceberg," Lie said. CFO.com is an online publication for financial professionals.
http://www.cfo.com/article.cfm/10097937/c_10093335?f=home_todayinfinance

Dodd moves his family to Iowa (Miami Herald, Nov. 7)
Sen. Chris Dodd's long-shot Democratic presidential campaign has a new look: It's the Little House on the Prairie. The Connecticut senator, in what's either a desperate grab for attention or a clever way of ingratiating himself among Iowans, has moved his family of four to a three-bedroom, three-bath house in west Des Moines. It's worth trying, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a visiting professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "He needs to do something to make a splash," Squire said. "But I'm not sure this alone will turn the tide."
http://www.miamiherald.com/campaign08/story/299420.html

Edwards' daughter is on the campaign trail (Boston Globe, Nov. 7)
When Sen. John Edwards ran in the 2004 election, his daughter Cate Edwards was a senior at Princeton University and spent little time campaigning so she wouldn't miss out on her final year. Three years later, she is a second-year law student, and this time she is trying to do it all. This fall, Edwards, 25, scheduled her three classes -- advocacy; evidence; and child, family, and state law -- in the middle of the week, leaving Mondays and Fridays free for campaign trips. In late September, she left campus for a weekend in Iowa, visiting with Hawkeye fans at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City for a homecoming tailgate party and crisscrossing the state to talk to students in other college towns.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2007/11/07/cate_edwards_makes_her_case/

Squire: Edwards more aggressive than in '04 (ABC News, Nov. 7)
PEVERILL SQUIRE
, a University of Iowa visiting political science professor who closely tracks politics in Iowa, said presidential candidate John Edwards has a reservoir of good will in the state but wondered whether Edwards has turned too sharply away from the "happy warrior" attitude he displayed in 2004. "The last time around he was very upbeat, very engaging and this time around he's been a bit more aggressive and has taken a much harder line both in terms of his opponents and his need for policy changes," said Squire.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory?id=3831526

Clinton lead slim in Hawkeye Poll (Fox News, Nov. 7)
With less than two months until the Iowa caucuses, Hillary Clinton is charging through the early-voting state of Iowa in an attempt to widen a lead that was recently imperiled when her Democratic opponents stepped up their game of hardball against her following last week's candidate debate. The frontrunner's worries that opponents Barack Obama and John Edwards could outflank her in the heartland have set her to hiring 100 new staff in Iowa and possibly doubling that army by caucus night on Jan. 3. In Iowa, an American Research Group poll taken between Oct. 26 and 29 of 600 likely voters put Clinton 10 points ahead of Obama, with 32 percent support. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll taken a week earlier only gave her a two-point lead.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,308876,00.html

UI students rallied against bar proposal (Inside Higher Ed, Nov. 7)
An election measure on the 2007 ballot with the most student interest was in Iowa City, where UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students rallied against a proposal to prohibit anyone under the age of 21 from bars after 10 p.m. Proponents said that the measure would cut down on illegal drinking by students who are 19 and 20. Bar owners and students objected.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/11/07/elections

Redlawsk comments on '04 mudslinging (Campaigns & Elections, Nov. 6)
Sen. Hillary Clinton seemed to be pulling away in national polls, and last week's debate was the opportunity for her opponents to make a move to stop her, now or never. Clinton's opponents went on the offensive and began what many perceive as the first signs of negative campaigning. One fear is that if Democrats go too negative, Iowa voters may punish them. Part of what gives Iowans such a reputation is the late, rapid fall from grace experienced by 2004 candidates Howard Dean and Dick Gephardt. The two then-frontrunners lunged for each other's throats in the last weeks of the caucus campaign, and were rewarded with distant third- and fourth-place finishes, respectively. University of Iowa professor DAVID REDLAWSK said people shouldn't overstate the lessons of '04, however. He argued that most telling was that Gephardt never had the organization or deep support pre-caucus polls seemed to indicate, and that Dean's organization and caucus campaign model were flawed from the start. "I think that the negativity was a factor, but I wouldn't say [Dean and Gephardt] lost because of it. I would say it was a contributing factor," Redlawsk said.
http://campaignsandelections.com/IA/articles/?ID=901

Porter: some lenders abuse bankruptcy process (Marketplace, Nov. 6)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
associate professor Katherine Porter has found that many homeowners in foreclosure who file for bankruptcy protection still face fees from mortgage companies that often have no documented merit. "What I found is that bankruptcy, which we conceive of as a refuge for homeowners in trouble, is actually the locus of significant misbehavior by mortgage companies," Porter said. "Instead of helping people save their homes in bankruptcy, some lenders are actually abusing the bankruptcy process to harm consumers and threaten their chance to save their houses." Marketplace is a radio program produced by American Public Media.
http://marketplace.publicradio.org/display/web/2007/11/06/foreclosure_fees_q/

Redlawsk: negativity can help, hurt campaigns (Bloomberg, Nov. 6)
After starting the year as the leading candidate in Iowa, John Edwards, 54, has fallen to third place behind New York Sen. Clinton and Illinois Sen. Barack Obama, according to the most recent survey by the University of Iowa. With the Iowa caucuses less than two months away, Democratic candidates have stepped up their attacks on Clinton, who tops polls nationally and is vying for the lead in Iowa. Leading the charge has been Edwards, who needs a strong Iowa showing to boost his campaign. University of Iowa political scientist DAVID REDLAWSK said candidates must tread a fine line when ratcheting up criticism of their opponents, as they try to balance appearing negative with publicizing positions taken by their opponents, which might be unpopular with voters. "We know people say they don't like it, but we also know people are wired to pay attention to negativity," he said. "The real question is which thing has the bigger impact."
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=a0r.Iu3zJ6Ho&refer=home

UI considered selling mural (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 6)
After a few high-profile decisions by some college officials in the past year to sell various pieces of donated art, other institutions continue to ponder how to best leverage their art assets. The (Cedar Rapids) Gazette reported today that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials considered selling Jackson Pollock's "Mural" earlier this year. They would have used the proceeds to invest in other pieces of art to diversify the collection, the newspaper said, but decided against it after the museum advisory board opposed the idea.
http://chronicle.com/blogs/facevalue/index.php?id=954

Berg, business students discuss Iowa Electronic Markets (PBS, Nov. 6)
JOYCE BERG
, a professor in the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business, explained the Iowa Electronic Markets on PBS' "Nightly Business Report." Michelle Collins, a UI senior in business, and Chuck Mersch, an MBA candidate at the UI, discussed what they're learning from the IEM.
http://www.pbs.org/nbr/site/onair/transcripts/071106e/

Credit card arrangements under scrutiny (East Bay Business Times, Nov. 6)
Iowa's three major state universities' credit-card marketing arrangements with Bank of America are under scrutiny, reports the Charlotte Business Journal. Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller has recommended an end to agreements between the schools, their alumni associations and California's largest bank to market credit cards that generate hundreds of thousands of dollars for the alumni groups. "Respectfully, I'd say the better practice would not to be involved at all," Miller said during recent Iowa Senate hearings on the matter. BofA and other credit-card issuers have been under fire for marketing on college campuses, which critics say adds to mounting student debt. The scrutiny in Iowa follows recent disclosures by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa regarding their relationships with BofA. The EAST BAY BUSINESS TIMES is based in Pleasanton, Calif.
http://eastbay.bizjournals.com/eastbay/othercities/sanfrancisco/stories/2007/11/05/daily10.html?b=1194238800^1546242

UI software helps ease pain (Winnipeg Free Press, Nov. 6)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
researchers have developed a system to help children cope with pain during medical procedures. Web-based software advises nurses on the best way to distract children from the painful procedures. The software was created after analyzing data from a study in which parents were observed distracting their children while they underwent procedures. Video data was collected from 542 kids having an IV inserted. The study helped the researchers determine how children cope with pain and what distractions worked best to keep their minds off the pain.
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/subscriber/health/story/4071752p-4673183c.html

Porter studies questionable mortgage practices (New York Times, Nov. 6)
As record numbers of homeowners default on their mortgages, questionable practices among lenders are coming to light in bankruptcy courts, leading some legal specialists to contend that companies instigating foreclosures may be taking advantage of imperiled borrowers. Bankruptcy specialists say lenders and loan servicers often do not comply with even the most basic legal requirements, like correctly computing the amount a borrower owes on a foreclosed loan or providing proof of holding the mortgage note in question. "Regulators need to look beyond their current, myopic focus on loan origination and consider how servicers' calculation and collection practices leave families vulnerable to foreclosure," said KATHERINE M. PORTER, associate professor of law at the University of Iowa. In an analysis of foreclosures in Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the program intended to help troubled borrowers save their homes, Ms. Porter found that questionable fees had been added to almost half of the loans she examined, and many of the charges were identified only vaguely. Most of the fees were less than $200 each, but collectively they could raise millions of dollars for loan servicers at a time when the other side of the business, mortgage origination, has faltered. The same story was published on the Web site of the BOSTON GLOBE, LAKELAND (Fla.) LEDGER, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN STATESMAN and numerous other publications.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/06/business/06mortgage.html?ex=1352091600&en=849c5eee4633ac20&ei=5124&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink

Study shows benefits of journals (Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin, Nov. 6)
Longtime journalers say getting thoughts down on paper, the computer screen or even a handy cocktail napkin has the power to heal and pinpoint one's life purpose. The promotion of expressive writing on shows such as "Oprah" has led bookstores to stock dozens of journals tailor-made for any conceivable chronicle: addiction recovery, weight loss, relationships or gratitude. The journaler's testimony about the healing properties of writing can sound fantastical and magical -- "it changed my life" is common -- but it is buttressed by research. A 2002 study in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine found that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who journaled about their emotions and tried to understand stressful events saw improvements in their relationships, personal strength, spirituality and appreciation for life. The Press & Sun-Bulletin is published in New York.
http://www.pressconnects.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071106/LIFESTYLE/711060322/1004/LIFESTYLE

Ziebold on overuse of antibiotics (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Nov. 6)
A type of bacterial infection that used to be found exclusively in hospitals and other health care settings is now increasingly common in the community. Called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, the infection does not respond to antibiotics of the beta-lactam family, including methicillin and penicillin, but health experts emphasize there are antibiotics that are usually effective against this bug. There have been some deaths linked to the MRSA germ. Last month, a high school student in southern Virginia reportedly died from a MRSA-related infection, but health officials note that the vast majority of MRSA skin infections are mild and responsive to treatment. Further, while there are antibiotics that are effective, medicine is not always the best initial treatment. "It is very clear that the overuse of antibiotics drives resistance [to these medicines]," says Dr. CHRISTINE ZIEBOLD, an expert on pediatric infectious disease at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital. The hospital is a member of the Children's Miracle Network, which is taking steps to educate the public about MRSA infections. Ziebold says they often heal on their own with no intervention. In other cases, the infection will clear up after a health care provider has simply drained and cleaned the abscess. "For community-acquired MRSA, there are many options," she stresses.
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/health/stories/2007/11/05/staph_1107bh.htm

Playwright received UI short fiction award (Broadway World, Nov. 6)
A story about the opening of the play "Acts of Love" at the Kirk Theatre in New York notes that the playwright, Kathryn Chetkovich, received the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's John Simmon's Award for her short-story collection, "Friendly Fire."
http://broadwayworld.com/viewcolumn.cfm?colid=22745

Indian playwright invited to UI's IWP (The Telegraph, Nov. 5)
Not many people know him, but Vijay Nair has done the steel city proud. Nair, a former student of DBMS English School and XLRI, has carved a niche for himself in the world of theatre and writing after having an equally successful stint as a management guru. Born and brought up in Jamshedpur, Nair made the city proud when he was recently invited by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in USA to attend a three-month writers' residency programme. At least 30 authors from across the globe are participating in the seminar, which started in mid-October and will continue till mid-December. The main objective of the International Writing Program is to bring writers from around the globe and create a platform for the development of literature. Since 1967, over 1,000 participants from more than 120 countries have attended the event. The Telegraph is published in Calcutta, India.
http://www.telegraphindia.com/1071106/asp/jharkhand/story_8517115.asp

Edwards criticizes Clinton in speech at UI (National Journal, Nov. 5)
John Edwards used his Iran strategy speech in Iowa City today to attack Hillary Clinton (again) for her vote declaring the Iranian Revolutionary Guard a terrorist organization. After apologizing for his 2002 vote authorizing the Iraq war and railing against the Bush administration for its "preventive war doctrine," Edwards turned to Clinton's stance on Iraq. "With less than 60 days to go before the caucus, Sen. Clinton still has not given specific answers to specific questions," he told the crowd at Richey Ballroom at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Versions of this story appeared on the Web sites of numerous news organizations.
http://hotlineblog.nationaljournal.com/archives/2007/11/dueling_iowa_ad.html

James comments on universal health care (Nightly Business Report, Nov. 5)
In a story about health care reform proposals, both Democratic and Republican candidates are counting on better prevention and management of chronic diseases to hold down health care costs. At the University of Iowa, Dr. PAUL JAMES worries that in a system which rewards specialization, there aren't enough frontline health care workers to deliver the primary care the politicians are counting on. "They all want to provide universal access and if not universal access, the choice for every individual to purchase that. But with increasing access, one would logically think costs are going to go up. If everyone gets access to more expensive care, then how are we going to rein in costs?" Nightly Business Report is aired on PBS. This item is a transcript of a broadcast news item.
http://www.pbs.org/nbr/site/onair/transcripts/071105d/

Obama catching Clinton in UI poll (Washington Times, Nov. 5)
A story about the race for the Democratic nomination for president notes that Barack Obama is closing in on Hillary Clinton for the lead in the Iowa caucuses, according to a recent poll by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.washingtontimes.com/article/20071105/NATION/111050021/1002/NATION

Polisky attended the UI (Crane's Chicago Business, Nov. 5)
A feature about Mike Polisky, president and general manager of the Chicago Rush basketball team, notes that he has a journalism degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He oversees a $5.5 million budget and 30-person front office.
http://chicagobusiness.com/cgi-bin/mag/article.pl?rssFeed=magazing&post_date=2007-11-03&article_id=28790&seenIt=1

UI poll cited (Washington Times, Nov. 5)
Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois was breathing down Hillary Clinton's neck last week in a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll that showed her barely ahead, 29 percent to 27 percent.
http://washingtontimes.com/article/20071105/NATION/111050021/1001

Film director attended UI (Star Press, Nov. 5)
John Fillwalk, director of the film "Idylls" at the Harvest Moon Film Festival, has master's degrees in intermedia and video art from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Star Press is published in Muncie, Ind.
http://www.thestarpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071104/LIFESTYLE/711040327/1024

UI poll shows Obama leading among young (PC World, Nov. 5)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll released last Monday found Obama holds an overwhelming lead over Clinton among Iowa voters under 45: 41 percent to 19 percent. But fewer than half of Obama's supporters said they are likely to caucus, the poll found. This story was distributed by Reuters.
http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,139129-c,currentevents/article.html

Dobyns attended UI (Inquirer and Mirror, Nov. 5)
A feature about writer Stephen Dobyns notes that he attended "the prominent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate writing program" and later taught at the UI. The Inquirer and Mirror is published in Nantucket, Mass.
http://www.ack.net/Poetryslam101906.html

Redlawsk comments on Huckabee (USA Today, Nov. 4)
As the 2008 presidential race heads toward the first nominating contests, Mike Huckabee is getting more news coverage, moving up in polls, and even drawing some attacks from other Republicans. But he lags in fundraising. DAVID REDLAWSK, co-director of the Hawkeye Poll, said candidates don't have to be "incredibly rich" to succeed in Iowa, but they need to have a staff to "get people out to caucuses." Redlawsk added that Huckabee does have something his Republican opponents don't: "a strong base of evangelical Christians."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2007-11-04-Huckabee_N.htm

UI fans pack Chicago bar (Cincinnati Enquirer, Nov. 4)
A feature about the Wrigley Field area in Chicago notes that every Saturday in the fall Merkle's Bar & Grill on Clark Street is packed with UNIVERSITY OF IOWA grads who watch the Hawkeyes play football on a half-dozen big screen TVs.
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071104/LIFE09/711040322/1052/LIFE

UI alumnus wins literary award (Seacoast, Nov. 4)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumnus Theodore Weesner recently received the New Hampshire Literary Award for Lifetime Achievement from the New Hampshire Writers' Project. Seacoast is the online presence for six newspapers in Maine and New Hampshire owned by parent company Ottaway Newspapers, a division of Dow Jones.
http://www.seacoastonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071104/ENTERTAIN/711040310

UI environmental research cited (Las Vegas Review Journal, Nov. 4)
A story suggests that to improve indoor air quality, reduce noise and save energy, homeowners should replace old windows with triple-pane wood windows that feature the blind or shade protected between panes of glass. The advice is credited to ongoing research by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH.
http://www.lvrj.com/real_estate/11006381.html

Mead and Rhodes perform in S.C. (BlueRidgeNow.com, Nov. 4)
University of Iowa music faculty members MAURITA MURPHY MEAD and SHARI RHODES will perform a recital of Brazilian choro in Greenville, S.C. The Web site is the online presence of the Times-News in Hendersonville, N.C.
http://www.blueridgenow.com/article/20071104/NEWS/711040351/1018/SERVICES03/NEWS/_Brazilian_Choro_Recital_to_be_held

Redlawsk comments on Edwards' slide (Detroit Free Press, Nov. 4)
The University of Iowa Hawkeye Poll, taken Oct. 17-24, put Clinton at 28.9 percent, with 26.6 percent for Obama, with Sen. John Edwards at 20 percent. DAVID REDLAWSK, director of the poll, said a high turnout by Edwards' loyalists at the caucuses could help overcome his deficit. "If we only look at caucus-goers who are almost certain to attend, we find that Edwards makes up the gap with Obama, and Clinton moves clearly ahead," he said.
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071104/NEWS07/711040665/1009

UI elder abuse study cited (Wisconsin State Journal, Nov. 4)
A feature on elder abuse notes that a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study in 2003 found states with mandatory reporting and tracking of elder abuse have far higher investigation rates, and concluded mandatory laws should simply require "any person" to report.
http://www.madison.com/wsj/topstories/index.php?ntid=254292&ntpid=1

Iowa Electronic Markets continue tradition (New York Times, Nov. 4)
Betting on presidential elections was once open and commonplace in the United States. While markets in most major cities took wagers on election outcomes, New York's curb exchange was the largest, with a betting handle around 200 times that of today's Iowa Electronic Markets, a modern version created at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1988.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/04/nyregion/thecity/04bets.html?ref=thecity

'Gossip Girl' producer attended UI (The West Australian, Nov. 4)
Stephanie Savage, producer of teen dramas including the new "Gossip Girl," says, "I originally was a Ph.D. student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and I was writing my dissertation on star scandals at the end of the studio era," she said. "I came out to L.A. to do research for my dissertation and ended up working at Drew Barrymore's company. So I never finished my dissertation and haven't gotten back to the academic world but that was my first training. I couldn't have predicted it at the time but it worked out well." Savage has worked on films including "Never Been Kissed" and "Donnie Darko."
http://www.thewest.com.au/aapstory.aspx?StoryName=433481

UI poll shows Huckabee surge (The Politico, Nov. 3)
The latest poll from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney strengthening his lead among Republicans and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee cracking into the top tier.
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1107/6683.html

Tiffin woman donates to UI milk bank (UPI, Nov. 3)
An Iowa woman, faced with a stockpile of breast milk, has created a stir by taking out a newspaper ad to try to sell it. Her freezer is full of milk she pumped and her 4-month-old daughter refuses to drink from a bottle, Martha Heller of Tiffin said. Heller also donates to the Mother's Milk Bank of Iowa, based at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Quirks/2007/11/03/jockstrip_the_world_as_we_know_it/4154/

Squire comments on caucus impact (Toronto Star, Nov. 3)
The Iowa caucuses may have unprecedented impact on the presidential races. "I think this state will become more important than ever," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political analyst and visiting professor at the University of Iowa. "There will be so much attention paid to this vote, and the hype will be so immense, that it will be very difficult to recover from a poor effort."
http://www.thestar.com/News/article/273173

UI poll cited (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 3)
A new UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll puts Republican Mike Huckabee, the former Arkansas governor, into a virtual tie for second place with Rudy Giuliani.
http://www.startribune.com/587/story/1527131.html

Republicans liked Obama in August Hawkeye Poll (Time, Nov. 2)
On Monday, the Barack Obama campaign announced that more than 300 Iowa and New Hampshire Republicans had decided to cross party lines to support Obama. At Obama events in Oklahoma, Kentucky, Virginia and Georgia, a good 20 percent of audiences routinely raise their hands when emcees ask for Republicans in the crowd. A "Republicans for Obama" website has 11 state chapters with 146 members. An August UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll even found Obama running third in the state among Republican candidates, behind Mitt Romney and Rudy Giuliani but ahead of both Fred Thompson and John McCain. And a national Gallup poll this month also found that nearly as many Republicans like Obama -- 39 percent -- than the 43 percent that dislike him.
http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,1680192,00.html?imw=Y

Scientist attended UI (Amador Ledger-Dispatch, Nov. 2)
A feature about research scientist Clint Taylor notes that he received a doctorate in chemistry from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Amador Ledger-Dispatch is published in California.
http://www.ledger-dispatch.com/life/lifeview.asp?c=228753&topStory=1

UI playwright's script premieres (Columbus Dispatch, Nov. 2)
A play titled "then after water," by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PLAYWRIGHTS WORKSHOP student Jennifer Fawcett, will have its world premiere at the Available Light theater in Ohio. "It's a poetic, lyrical piece that moves back and forth in space and time with the characters, and explores the long-term effects of grief and how we reconstruct events in our memory," Fawcett said. "It's a very human thing to want to figure out what happened and what went wrong, even if there's nothing we can do about it."
http://www.columbusdispatch.com/live/content/life/stories/2007/11/02/2_AVAILABLE_LIGHT_PLAY.ART0_ART_11-02-07_E6_SO8BHCA.html?sid=101

UI built Mars transmitter (North Texas e-News, Nov. 2)
The radar system on the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter has uncovered new details about some of the most mysterious deposits on Mars: the Medusae Fossae Formation. It has provided the first direct measurement of the depth and electrical properties of these materials, providing new clues about their origin. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA built the transmitter for the instrument.
http://www.ntxe-news.com/artman/publish/article_41433.shtml

UI poll cited in story on Clinton's war opposition (New York Sun, Nov. 2)
Sen. Hillary Clinton is describing her opposition to the war in Iraq as an extension of Eugene McCarthy's position in the 1960s movement against the war in Vietnam. Clinton's comments came at an energy-charged rally yesterday at her alma mater, Wellesley College. Clinton, who was scheduled to speak later in the day at the University of New Hampshire, is striving to capture the votes of young and highly educated voters, two groups present at Wellesley's Alumnae Hall. "But college-educated and professional women...have been a greater puzzle for her," wrote Ronald Brownstein in National Journal last week. In a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll Barack Obama led Clinton 41 percent to 19 percent among voters 18 to 44.
http://www.nysun.com/article/65736

UI milk bank donor takes out ad to sell breast milk (MSNBC, Nov. 1)
A woman who doesn't want her breast milk to go to waste has taken out a newspaper ad in hopes of selling it. Martha Heller, 22, of Tiffin, Iowa, took out the ad in The Gazette, offering 100 ounces of her breast milk for $200 or the best offer. Heller said her freezer is overflowing with breast milk that she has pumped since August. Her 4-month-old daughter won't drink from a bottle and the supply is piling up. Heller now donates to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S Mother's Milk Bank, but the 100 ounces of milk she wants to sell was pumped before going through the screening process for the bank and cannot be donated. This AP story also appeared in THE POST STAR in Glens Falls, N.Y., THE NEWS & OBSERVER in Raleigh, N.C., the DETROIT FREE PRESS and at least 30 other media outlets.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21587571/

UI, ISU winter breaks to impact caucus turnout (Kansas City Star, Nov. 1)
The Century Foundation blasted the Iowa caucuses and its earlier start, saying it's not representative of the country; has low turnout (4.7 percent in '04, compared to 30 percent in New Hampshire); takes too much time, and limits ballot access. The report also noted that between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University, 20,000 voters won't participate because of winter break this school year.
http://www.kansascity.com/news/nation/story/343387.html

UI research cited in article on women's progress (New Straits Times, Nov. 1)
Malaysia's Women, Family and Community Development Minister Datuk Seri Shahrizat Abdul Jalil recently told the 14th Malaysian Law Conference 2007 Shahrizat that her dream is to one day see a woman appointed chief justice of Malaysia. In her talk, Shahrizat defined gender equality as "an equal sharing of power, opportunities and access to, as well as, control over resources that will lead to the equal sharing of results between men and women, boys and girls." In arguing against basing appointments on gender, a columnist cites a two-year study by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers that found that women have more power at home. NEW STRAITS TIMES, published in Wilayah Persekutuan, Malaysia, is the oldest English language newspaper in the region.
http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/NST/Thursday/Columns/20071101071629/Article/index_html

Guide notes law school tuition discounts (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 30)
Many recent law-school graduates who don't work at big firms are struggling to pay off student loans in an increasingly tough job market. The "Official Guide to ABA-Approved Law Schools," available online at officialguide.lsac.org, has a mountain of searchable statistics, reported by each of the nearly 200 ABA-accredited schools, including what percentage of students get aid or tuition discounts. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, for example, 22 percent of students in the 2005-06 academic year didn't pay any tuition. (Most schools make some scholarships contingent upon the student's staying above a certain class rank.)
http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB119370191229675648.html

Gronbeck discusses Clinton's debate performance (Rocky Mountain News, Nov. 1)
It's no secret why there's an invisible "Kick me" sign on Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's back. For the moment, she's running away with the national polls in the Democratic presidential contest, and it's getting much later than some folks in 49 states might think. So rivals like Sen. Barack Obama and former Sen. John Edwards stepped up their attacks during a televised debate on Tuesday night -- questioning her candor, attacking her votes for the Iraq war and a new resolution pressuring Iran, wondering aloud whether she can really beat Republicans. BRUCE GRONBECK, a communication studies professor from the University of Iowa, said the attacks rattled Clinton a bit on the immigration question. But otherwise, "She just made everybody look like second-run candidates. She set up her campaign as the campaign that's issue-centered, policy-centered."
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_5736484,00.html

Lie research prompted investigations (The American Lawyer, Nov. 1)
The Justice Department launched several stock options backdating investigations in 2006, but such cases were not the result of corporate fraud or task force enterprise. They were prompted, as even the department acknowledges, by the 2005 backdating study conducted by University of Iowa associate professor ERIK LIE and subsequent investigations by The Wall Street Journal. "We read about [Comverse Technology Inc.'s options backdating] in the Journal, and realized this was an issue we should be focused on," says Michael Asaro, the former Eastern District of New York Assistant U.S. Attorney, who handled the prosecution of three former Comverse executives. The American Lawyer is a monthly journal, published in New York and read by legal professionals and others.
http://www.law.com/jsp/ihc/PubArticleIHC.jsp?id=1193821429242

 

 

 

 

 

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