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May 2007

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UI Student Helped With River Clean-Up (Delta Sky Magazine, May 2007)
The book, "From the Bottom Up: One Man's Crusade to Clean America's Rivers" by Chad Pregracke with Jeff Barrow, is Pregracke's memoir of building an organization to clean up rivers. In a except from the book it's noted that one of the members of a Mississippi River clean-up crew was Woodson Spring, a twenty-one-year-old native of Burlington, Iowa, who wanted to work for a few weeks before classes started at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.delta-sky.com/2007_05/GreenScene/index.html1

NGI/Dermacia Creates 'Biobank' In Iowa (Popular Science, May 2007)
A California-based maker of skin-care products, Dermacia, has developed technology that it claims will give donors an unprecedented degree of control over their cells. Dermacia, through its subsidiary company National Genecular Institute (NGI), recently sealed a deal with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to create a $76-million "biobank" called BioTrust and other research laboratories. NGI will use the bank's samples for developing its own products but will also sell samples to researchers worldwide. The company hopes that its 100-acre, partially underground facility, due to open in 2009, will be a model for future biobanks. "It's being built to withstand bomb blasts and tornadoes," says Tannin Fuja, NGI's chief scientific officer. According to Fuja, BioTrust's automated process will enable donors to control how their tissue is used and to reap greater benefits from donation.
http://www.popsci.com/popsci/science/63c1b82be2eb2110vgnvcm1000004eecbccdrcrd.html

Obama Unveils Health Care Plan (Chicago Sun-Times, May 31)
Polling shows that what people care most about is that health care should be affordable, says Robert Blendon, professor of health policy and political analysis at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, a veteran of the health-care wars of the 1990s. Perhaps that's why Democratic presidential candidate Barrack Obama emphasized that the premiums people pay for health insurance would be cheaper when he unveiled his plan Tuesday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.suntimes.com/news/sweet/408249,CST-EDT-sweet31.article

Carmichael Studies Asian Dust Impact On Climate (Science Daily, May 31)
How do manmade pollution and mineral dust from Asian deserts travel across the Pacific? How do these dust and pollution plumes affect clouds, precipitation and, ultimately, our climate? Those are some of the questions that an international team of researchers, including GREGORY R. CARMICHAEL, a University of Iowa engineering professor, hope to illuminate following their recent completion of a study called the Pacific Dust Experiment, or PACDEX. Gregory says PACDEX will greatly expand scientists' knowledge of the impact of Asian dust and pollution on the resulting phenomenon called "global dimming," as well as cloud formation, weather and climate change.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070531093159.htm

Squire Comments On Tancredo Immigration Stance (Chicago Tribune, May 31)
The longer the problem of illegal immigration lingers, the easier it will be for Republican presidential candidate Tom Tancredo of Colorado to serve as a GOP spoiler as his hard-line stance attracts voters feeling overwhelmed by their changing social landscape, said University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE. "Here in Iowa, things have changed dramatically in the last two decades and it's probably caught a lot of Iowans by surprise," Squire said. "Tancredo talking in a way to suggest that some of these changes can be slowed down or even reversed, for some people, may be comforting."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-tancredomay31,1,4016441.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Obama Unveils Health Care Plan At UI (New York Times, May 30)
U.S. Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., proposed a major overhaul of the nation's health care system on Tuesday aimed at covering the nearly 45 million uninsured Americans and reducing premium costs for everyone else. Obama described his plan to an audience at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, invoking the memory of Medicare and arguing that the time had come to finish the work of Harry Truman and Lyndon Johnson. "It is simply not right that the skyrocketing profits of the drug and insurance industries are paid for by the skyrocketing premiums that come from the pockets of the American people," he said. Versions of the story also appeared on many other media Web sites, including the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, the LOS ANGELES TIMES, CNN.com, NPR.org and NEWSDAY, with an ASSOCIATED PRESS version appearing in the ARIZONA DAILY STAR, the DENVER POST, the INDIANAPOLIS STAR, the PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS and other newspapers.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/30/us/politics/30obama.html?ex=1181188800&en=620246dbc73b38f7&ei=5040&partner=MOREOVERFEATURES

Porter Discusses Home Equity Loans (Yahoo! Canada, May 30)
An article discussing the advantages and disadvantages of home equity loans notes that one disadvantage is that borrowers take on risk. "People need to be clear with themselves about the risks," says KATIE PORTER, associate professor of law at the University of Iowa and mortgage bankruptcy researcher. "Be very aware that your home and all the payments you have made toward it are the collateral. With unsecured credit, the interest rates are higher because it is the lender who is assuming the bulk of the risk. Securing your loan with your house as collateral means that you are assuming the bulk of the risk." The article originally appeared in BANKRATE.
http://ca.biz.yahoo.com/brn/070530/21984.html?.v=1#1

Obama Speaks About Health Care (KXRI-TV, May 30)
Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama has unveiled a plan to provide millions of Americans with health care and more affordable medical insurance, financed by tax increases on the wealthy. Bemoaning a health care "cost crisis," Obama said it was unacceptable that 47 million people are uninsured while others are struggling to pay their medical bills. He said the time is ripe for reforming the health care system despite an inability to do so in the past, most notably when rival Hillary Rodham Clinton pursued major changes during her husband's presidency. "We can do this," Obama said in a speech in Iowa City at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S medical school. "The climate is far different than it was the last time we tried this in the early 90s." The TV station is based in Reno, Nev.
http://www.foxreno.com/news/13413181/detail.html

Obama Rolls Out Health Care Plan At UI (New York Sun, May 30)
Sen. Barrack Obama rolled out a health care plan yesterday that he said would drive down spiraling insurance costs and offer coverage to the 47 million Americans who lack it. "We can do this," Mr. Obama told a crowd at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S medical school in Iowa City, according to the Associated Press. "The climate is far different than it was the last time we tried this in the early '90s." In a photo accompanying the story, Obama talks with Dr. Mark Anderson, director of cardiology at the UI, while touring a cardiology research lab.
http://www.nysun.com/article/55497?page_no=2

Immigration An Issue In Tancredo Campaign (Chicago Tribune, May 30)
Rep. Tom Tancredo's (R-Colo.) Republican presidential bid is widely regarded as a long shot, the reaction he has received so far in Iowa shows his campaign can't be entirely dismissed, political analysts say. He hasn't left much of a footprint in Congress, and yet, driven by an anti-illegal immigrant wind, he now audaciously has become a single-issue candidate for president, focusing on illegal immigration. The longer the problem of illegal immigration lingers, the easier it will be for Tancredo to serve as a spoiler in the Republican race as his hard-line stance attracts voters feeling overwhelmed by their changing social landscape, said University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE. "Here in Iowa, things have changed dramatically in the last two decades and it's probably caught a lot of Iowans by surprise," Squire said. "There is a concern among some Iowans that somehow the country is sort of losing a grip on its identity and that things are changing more quickly than people can handle.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-070530tancredo,1,7719662.story?track=rss

Squire Comments On Romney Campaign (Politico.com, May 30)
Thanks to his previous nine visits (to go with 13 in 2006), a steady stream of television and radio commercials and assiduous contact of Republican voters through the mail and over the phone, Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney arrives in Iowa a front-runner Two recent surveys show him ahead among likely caucus-goers and others show him bunched up with Sen. John McCain and former Mayor Rudy Giuliani atop the heap. His challenge now is to continue that climb, but not lose any of the considerable support he's already picked up. Perhaps even more important, pointed out University of Iowa professor PEVERILLE SQUIRE, Romney also must try to make his message stick before opponents start going on the air to challenge it. "He has to inoculate himself against claims that he's a flip-flopper," said Squire. "The more time he spends here and more time he presents himself as a conservative, the more likely caucus-goers are to be a little more skeptical of the claims [of opponents]."
http://www.politico.com/blogs/jonathanmartin/0507/Romney_races_to_define_himself_before_others_can.html

Former UI President Rawlings To Lead Commission (Buffalo News, May 30)
Making New York's public and private colleges better serve students -- and the state's economy -- is among the charges a new state commission will address as Gov. Eliot L. Spitzer seeks to make New York's higher-education system more competitive with other states. The commission will look at a broad array of issues to help colleges focus on ways to provide more degree programs targeted at helping regional and statewide economic development goals, keep more New York students enrolled in the state, and improve the academic offerings of the State University of New York system. HUNTER RAWLINGS, president emeritus of both Cornell University and the University of Iowa, will head the new Commission on Higher Education.
http://www.buffalonews.com/home/story/87045.html

Obama Details Health Care Proposal (Time, May 29)
Taking on one of the nation's most urgent and politically fraught domestic challenges, Obama unveiled a detailed health care proposal that he claims would come close to providing health coverage for the 45 million Americans who now lack it, while reducing health care costs of the typical American family by as much as $2,500 a year. "Rising costs have caused many more businesses to back reform," he said in a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, "and in states from Massachusetts to California, Democratic and Republican governors and legislatures have been way ahead of Washington in passing increasingly bolder initiatives to cover the uninsured and cut costs."
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1626105,00.htm

Obama Outlines Universal Health Care Plan (Bloomberg, May 29)
Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama today announced a plan providing universal health care in the United States by 2012, to be paid for chiefly by employers and through tax increases on wealthy Americans. Obama, 45, an Illinois senator, would increase preventive screening, institute an electronic health records system, allow Medicare to bulk-buy prescription drugs, and provide reinsurance for catastrophic coverage -- steps Obama said could save as much as $100 billion a year in health-care costs. For those who couldn't afford coverage, Obama would offer subsidized health insurance, expand government Medicaid and children's plans and overhaul the insurance market, he told supporters at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=a5FINBWWfSDc&refer=home

Obama Talks At UI (Wall Street Journal, May 29)
Democratic presidential hopeful Senator Barack Obama, D-Ill., greeted supporters before a speech about his health care plan Tuesday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. Obama offered a sweeping plan that called on government, businesses, and consumers to share its cost. He said his plan could save the average consumer $2,500 a year and bring health care to all.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118040533992416788-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Arguments Begin In Case Involving Former UI Athlete (KTBS-TV, May 29)
A former Southern California sheriff's deputy failed to follow protocol and made an unprovoked decision when he shot an unarmed Barksdale Air Force Base airman who was a passenger in a car whose driver fled from police, the prosecutor said Tuesday in the opening day of testimony in the deputy's criminal trial. A civilian standing across the street videotaped the shooting of Airman Elio Carrion, a military police officer at Barksdale who was home on leave after returning from Iraq. Former Deputy Ivory Webb, who played football at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is charged in San Bernardino, Calif., with attempted voluntary manslaughter and assault with a firearm. The TV station is based in Shreveport, La.
http://www.ktbs.com/viewnews.cfm?news_id=2035&zone_id=12&title=Prosecutor%20says%20Barksdale%20airman%20did%20not%20pose%20threat%20when%20he%20was%20shot

Buckwalter Study Shows Patients Quit Jobs After Neck, Head Cancer Treatment (SpiritIndia, May 29)
After treatment, 38.1 percent of patients with head and neck cancer who were employed at the time of cancer diagnosis reported discontinuing work because of their cancer and treatment, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. "Although most cancer survivors who are of working age who want to return to work are able to do so, cancer survivors experience significantly more work-related problems owing to missed work days than the general population, and the economic consequences for those who are disabled following cancer treatment are a substantial societal burden," note the authors, who include ANDREA E. BUCKWALTER of the University of Iowa.
http://www.spiritindia.com/health-care-news-articles-10046.html

Brokaw Attended UI (The Observer, May 29)
A review of "The Greatest Generation" notes that the book's author, Tom Brokaw, attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Observer is published in Dunkirk, New York.
http://observertoday.com/Sports/articles.asp?articleID=12919

Obama Will Unveil Health Plan At UI (Bloomberg, May 29)
In a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama is set today to announce a plan providing universal health care in the U.S. by 2012, to be paid for chiefly by employers and through tax increases on wealthy Americans.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=a5FINBWWfSDc&refer=politics

Obama Announces Health Plan At UI (Politico.com, May 29)
A story analyzing Barack Obama's health care proposal notes that he announced the plan in a speech today at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0507/4229.html

Caldwell Champions Health Of Black Men (Roanoke Times, May 29)
Indianapolis Colts quarterback coach Jim Caldwell will speak in support of a Virginia community health outreach program for black men. Caldwell joined the Colts six years ago, but his coaching career began as a graduate assistant at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he received his degree in English.
http://www.roanoke.com/columnists/flowerswb/wb/xp-118653

Twin Cities Students Participate In UI Driving Study (WCCO-TV, May 28)
Twin Cities students will be part of the Drive Cam study conducted by the University of Minnesota and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. They will have a camera in their car for the next six months, and their parents will get video clips and a report card every week. WCCO is based in Minnesota.
http://wcco.com/topstories/local_story_148214717.html

UI Collaborates On Neuropathology Research (News-Medical.net, May 28)
Temple University, Johns Hopkins University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and New York University Medical School have been funded through the National Institutes of Health to study neurodegenerative diseases through research on insects. The researchers have published some of their early findings in prestigious journals, including the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=25659

UI Press Anthologized Johnson's Work (Monsters & Critics, May 28)
In an extensive interview, African-American writer Charles R. Johnson notes that his work was included in "Humor Me: An Anthology of Humor By Writers of Color" published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS in 2002.
http://books.monstersandcritics.com/features/article_1308738.php/The_M%26C_Interview_1_Charles_Johnson_6_07?page=4

Holl Designed New UI Art Building (Chicago Tribune, May 27)
A review of the new addition to the Nelston-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City notes that it was designed by architect Steven Holl, who also recently designed a new building for the School of Art and Art History at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/travel/chi-0527_kansas_jumpmay27,0,5830524.story?coll=chi-homepagetravel-hed

Kaldjian Study Shows Doctors Slow to Admit Mistakes (Nashua Telegraph, May 27)
Researchers at the University of Iowa found that 97 percent of doctors in a recent survey said they would disclose a hypothetical medical error that resulted in minor medical harm, and 93 percent said they would disclose an error even if it had caused disability or death. But only 41 percent said they had actually disclosed a minor medical error they made, and just 5 percent said they had revealed a major error during their career. Moreover, 19 percent said they had made a minor medical error but not disclosed it; 4 percent said they had made a major error and not disclosed it. What's striking is that this seems to suggest about half the doctors think they have never made even a minor medical mistake. "It seems fair to assume that all of us have made at least a minor error, if not a major error, sometime in our careers," said Dr. LAURIS KALDJIAN, an associate professor of internal medicine at the university's medical college and director of its Program in Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities. "Most doctors recognize that they're fallible, but they still strive for perfection," Kaldjian said. "The idea persists that the physician rides into the clinic on the white horse. To come in as the healer and then realize that you have harmed is a difficult thing to accept, let alone to admit." The Telegraph is published in New Hampshire. The same story was published on the Web site of the ALBEQUERQUE TRIBUNE.
http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070527/HEALTH/205270361

A story on the same topic was published in
(NEWSRX, May 26)
:
http://www.newsrx.com/articles/577982.html

Another story on the same topic was published in THE PENINSULA, published in Qatar (May 24):
http://www.thepeninsulaqatar.com/Display_news.asp?section=World_News&subsection=Rest+of+the+World&month=May2007&file=World_News2007052411859.xml

Cox Brings On-The-Job Experience To Class (Asbury Park Press, May 27)
A story about adjunct professors notes they often bring real-world experience into the classroom. PATTY COX is that kind of real world example for University of Iowa graduate nursing students. She supervises the students at the Iowa Health Clinic in Ankeny. The nursing students, who need clinical experience to graduate, work with Cox, who is also an adjunct instructor with the U of I College of Nursing. "I see it as a chance for me to give back my time and talent to the profession," she said. The Press is published in New Jersey.
http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070528/BUSINESS/705280310/1003

Columnist Compares Stock Options Backdating, Flying DeLorean (Appleton Post-Crescent, May 26)
A columnist compares stock options backdating to Marty McFly's trips through time in a time machine built out of an old DeLorean in the "Back to the Future" movies. The practice of backdating options was uncovered by ERIK LIE, a Norwegian professor of finance at the University of Iowa. Lie scrutinized 8,000 companies and discovered that 29 percent of them, more than 2,000 corporations, experienced a jump in the price of their stock after awarding options. Lie estimates that the odds of such jumps are "at least one in a billion." One of the companies Lie examined was Apple, which led to SEC charges against two executives. The Post-Crescent is published in Wisconsin.
http://www.postcrescent.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070526/APC0701/705260494/1888

UI Study Finds Journaling Reduces Stress (Wilmington News Journal, May 26)
Longtime journalers say getting thoughts down on paper, the computer screen or even a handy cocktail napkin has the power to heal and pinpoint one's life purpose. The promotion of expressive writing on shows such as "Oprah," has led bookstores to stock dozens of journals tailor-made for any conceivable chronicle: addiction recovery, weight loss, relationships or gratitude. The journaler's testimony about the healing properties of writing can sound fantastical and magical -- "it changed my life" is common -- but it is buttressed by research, including a 2002 study in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine that found UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who journaled about their emotions and tried to understand stressful events saw improvements in their relationships, personal strength, spirituality and appreciation for life. The News Journal is published in Delaware.
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070526/LIFE/705260311/1005/LIFE

UI Professors Sign Petition Criticizing ISU Professor (Christian Post, May 26)
A story about Iowa State University's decision not to grant tenure to professor Guillermo Gonzalez notes that more than 400 faculty members at Iowa State, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa have signed a petition condemning his presentation of intelligent design as science.
http://www.christianpost.com/article/20070526/27637_A_Career-Killing_Theory.htm

Cyphert Comments On Proposed Cut's Impact On UI Hospital (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 25)
Teaching hospitals and other medical-education programs could lose at least $1.8-billion under regulatory changes proposed this week by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The department, which for 40 years has provided states with matching grants for graduate medical education through the Medicaid program, has proposed pulling the plug on those grants. That would save the federal government $1.78-billion between 2008 and 2012, according to a notice published in Wednesday's Federal Register. The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics would probably lose $3.9-million a year in federal money and potentially more if the state cuts its share, said STACEY T. CYPHERT, the system's senior assistant director. The system trains about 500 medical residents and 199 fellows. "It would be a challenge for us to figure out how to make up that loss," which represents about 23 percent of its Medicaid support for graduate medical education, Cyphert said.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2007/05/2007052504n.htm

Retired UI Professor Comments On Standardized Testing (Miami Herald, May 25)
Like it or not, high-stakes testing will remain a way of life in Florida -- and across the nation. Under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, states have to give third- through eighth-graders annual standardized tests that measure their mastery of reading, math and science standards. The test also must be given once in high school. But the resulting boom in those tests has stretched what is still a small industry, said H.D. HOOVER, former director of the Iowa Basic Skills Testing Program and a retired professor from the University of Iowa. "There was no chance for the testing industry to build up the manpower capabilities that No Child Left Behind requires," he said.
http://www.miamiherald.com/460/story/117991.html

Professor Speaks Before Commission (Northwest Florida Daily News, May 25)
U.S. troops returning from war with debilitating mental conditions, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), are not always getting the care they need, a panel of experts told a presidential commission Thursday. DR. NANCY ANDREASEN, a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine told the commission that the Department of Veterans Affairs currently looks for symptoms of PTSD using a psychological test that was developed to look for schizophrenia. The Daily News is based in Fort Walton Beach, Fla. This Associated Press Story also appeared in the SACRACREMENTO BEE.
http://www.nwfdailynews.com/article/6242

UI Professor Referenced In Tax Study (The Wall Street Journal, May 25)
Hundreds of companies could be on the hook to the Internal Revenue Service and other authorities for tens of billions of dollars in back taxes due to transactions they believe could be challenged, newly required regulatory disclosures show. A new rule, known as FIN 48, forces companies to better disclose how much they have set aside, or reserved for financial-reporting purposes, to pay governments in case tax-saving transactions are successfully challenged by taxing authorities. A coming study by four accounting professors -- Jennifer Blouin of the University of Pennsylvania, CRISTI GLEASON of the University of Iowa, and the University of Texas' Lillian Mills and Stephanie Sikes -- examined the newly disclosed tax liabilities at 100 large companies and compared those with their book assets.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118005869184314270-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22university+of+iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Tenured Faculty, People Of Color Noted (BlackPressUSA.com, May 25)
Despite 30 years of affirmative action and hard work, the ranks of faculty of color in higher education remain frustratingly small. In 2003 (the most recent year for which data are available), the Chronicle of Higher Education reported that less than 12 percent of full professors in America were people of color: six percent Asian, three percent African American, two percent Hispanic, and 0.3 percent Native American. For female faculty of color, the numbers are even more dismal. The University of Minnesota reported that four percent of its full-time tenured faculty were people of color that year, the same percentage as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Purdue University and the University of Chicago.
http://www.blackpressusa.com/news/Article.asp?SID=3&Title=National+News&NewsID=13251

UI Professor Comments On Important Cave Discovery (Chicago Tribune, May 25)
Millions of years before dinosaurs roamed the earth, a river slowly washed sediment into a limestone cave in what is now Kendall County (Ill.). Four years ago, a University of Illinois at Chicago class stumbled upon that cave during a field trip to a quarry. Students found plant spores, scorpion parts and needles from a coniferous tree that may be the oldest ever found on the continent. Tucked into a cave, that material was protected from compression and the decomposing effects of oxygen. It's not the first cave deposit like this to be discovered, but others are "not this big and this good," said PHILIP HECKEL, a professor in the University of Iowa's department of geoscience who specializes in the Pennsylvanian period. "It is very significant and what's interesting is there's so much of it," Heckel said. "We almost never see that kind of terrestrial habitat."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/nearwest/chi-kane_nh_525may25,1,3448420.story?ctrack=2&cset=true

Faculty Member To Lead Writer's Workshop In Michigan (Daily Globe, May 25)
The Porcupine Mountains Folk School will host an eight-day Writers' Workshop retreat at the Kaug Wudjoo Lodge on the shores of Lake Superior from September 14 through 21. CAROL LAUHON, online faculty member of the University of Iowa writing programs, will lead the workshop. The Daily Globe is based in Ironwood, Mich.
http://www.ironwooddailyglobe.com/0524pork.htm

Trask: Drug's Side Effects Outweigh Anti-Cancer Benefit (Medical News Today, May 24)
Until recently, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin and celecoxib (sold as Celebrex), were being hailed as promising cancer prevention drugs. However, the latest studies have concluded that in most cases the adverse side effect of these drugs -- including risk of cardiovascular and kidney disease -- outweigh the potential benefit. However, certain NSAIDs may be better suited to treating cancer, in combination with standard therapies, rather than preventing it, according to new research by scientists at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. "The real debate comes down to use of these compounds in two settings: cancer prevention, which involves long-term use of a drug, and cancer treatment involving short-term, focused use of the drug," said DOUGLAS TRASK, UI associate professor of otolaryngology -- head and neck surgery. "Published studies show that heart and kidney problems occur with long-term use, especially when used for more than one year. While there appear to be cardiorenal effects of NSAIDs even with short-term use, these risks may be minor compared to the potential benefit to treat cancer more effectively."
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=71433

UI Study Casts Doubt On Herbal Supplements (Time Magazine, May 24)
Over the past decade, the use of herbal supplements has jumped 83%, going from $12.2 billion in U.S. sales in 1996 to a whopping $22.3 billion last year. What harm could they do? As it turns out, in some cases they can do a lot of harm, and a surprising number of people are putting themselves at risk by using herbal supplements without being informed about their actual benefits and potential dangers. A new study conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and published in the June issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings reveals just how widespread the problem has become.
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1625175,00.html

UI's Iowa Electronic Market Cited (Canadian Business Magazine, May 24)
Prediction markets are likely to offer better forecasts than opinion polls or experts. While Intrade.com and others have set up prediction markets mainly to make a profit for themselves, universities and other non-profit organizations have launched their own versions for research purposes. Notably, there is the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S Iowa Electronic Market, founded in 1988, which takes bets on U.S. elections, interest rates, tech stocks, influenza outbreaks, and hurricane strikes.
http://www.canadianbusiness.com/columnists/larry_macdonald/article.jsp?content=20070524_151021_5916

Obama Workers Solicit Early Support (Chicago Sun Times, May 24)
Workers in Barack Obama's presidential campaign are handing out as many "Join Obama For Iowa" cards as possible. As University of Iowa political scientist DAVID REDLAWSK has determined from studies, encouraging people to sign a card in support of a candidate "adds a level of psychological commitment," and "once people have made a commitment, they say to themselves, 'I like candidate X,' and they become immune to negative information about candidate X." In fact, his research has shown "a little bit of negative information about someone you like makes you like them more. It becomes a sort of 'get your back up' effect." Redlawsk says the Obama people have been the most aggressive in trying to get Iowans to sign a support card.
http://www.suntimes.com/news/hunter/399431,CST-NWS-hunter24.article

Project 3000 Seeks People With Rare Eye Disease (North County Times, May 24)
Chicago Cubs first baseman Derrek Lee's 4-year-old daughter, Jada, has Leber's Congenital Amaurosis, or LCA. Her right eyesight has severely diminished, and the rare disease could spread. Lee joined Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck, whose son has LCA, to form Project 3000. Along with University of Iowa researchers, their aim is to locate the roughly 3,000 people with LCA. "Since Project 3000 began, the number of requests for genetic testing for Leber's Congenital Amaurosis at the University of Iowa has tripled," said STEVE MARAVETZ, associate dean for communication and advancement at the school's college of medicine. "Since LCA affects a relatively small number of people, this increase isn't huge in terms of numbers, but it really indicates that Project 3000 is raising the awareness of the disease." The newspaper is based in Southern California.
http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2007/05/24/sports/paris/23_23_055_23_07.txt

Bechara Comments On Intuition (Business Day, May 24)
Processes adapted from psychology can help executives develop their strategic planning and decision-making capacities, and a growing body of research is pointing to a powerful resource many have overlooked -- their intuition. In our modern culture, which emphasizes the power of conscious, rational intellect, there is little understanding of the importance and capacity of human intuition. University of Iowa neurology professor ANTOINE BECHARA has argued that although many people treat intuition as a dirty word, it is actually a powerful natural resource that complements our rational decision-making processes. The publication is based in South Africa. http://www.businessday.co.za/articles/healthnews.aspx?ID=BD4A470088

Report Aims To Increase Doctors In Iowa (Post-Bulletin, May 24)
A report released Monday by the University of Iowa is aimed at increasing the number of doctors in Iowa and improving their distribution throughout the state. While the number of doctors in Iowa has increased more than 50 percent over the past 25 years, relocation and retirement is causing many doctors to leave the state, the report said. The ones that stay are often concentrated in larger cities, leaving rural areas grappling to find physicians. "The key is to find ways to increase retention among our physician population and be proactive in anticipating the specialties where future shortages might occur," said DR. PETER DENSEN, executive dean at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and chairman of the task force that produced the review. The newspaper serves the Rochester, Minn. area. http://www.postbulletin.com/newsmanager/templates/localnews_story.asp?a=295294&z=2

Group Seeks To Eradicate Clubfoot (United Press International, May 24)
CURE Clubfoot Worldwide, an effort to eradicate clubfoot, will focus on building treatment programs in developing countries, the Pennsylvania group says. As part of the initiative, CURE has announced a partnership with the International Ponseti Association, based at the University of Iowa, to standardize training and treatment protocols using the Ponseti Method, which is based on 50 years of medical research and development of treatment methods for clubfoot in children. DR. IGNATIO PONSETI and the medical team at the University of Iowa are the recognized worldwide clubfoot authorities.
http://www.upi.com/Consumer_Health_Daily/Briefing/2007/05/24/group_targets_clubfoot_globally/2929/

Redlawsk Comments On Thompson Gambling Questions (Winona Daily News, May 23)
A new report is resurrecting old questions about the handling of Wisconsin gambling projects by presidential candidate Tommy Thompson. According to DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political science professor, the report could hurt Thompson as he tries to appeal to religious conservatives, many of whom strongly oppose gambling. Thompson's campaign is focusing almost exclusively on trying to win the first-in-the-nation caucuses in Iowa. A new poll puts Thompson in fourth place among likely Republican caucus attendees. "You could see the potential for a double-whammy: People may see this as potentially corrupt and the group that Thompson needs to appeal to make some headway might be particularly attuned to this issue," Redlawsk said. The Winona Daily News is based in Minnesota. This Associated Press article also appeared in the EAGLE HERALD of Marinette/Menominee, Wis.
http://www.winonadailynews.com/articles/2007/05/23/wi/02thompson0523.txt

Alumna Is Nation's Eighth Female Sports Editor (Tampa Tribune, May 23)
Kim Pendery has become the eighth female sports editor in the country after being named the Tampa Tribune's senior editor for multimedia sports. Pendery, 51, earned a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1980.
http://www.tbo.com/sports/MGB6CZC512F.html

UI Cited In Story On Hog Lot Odor Problems (Carthage Press, May 23)
The Missouri Department of Natural Resources is looking at Microanalytics, a Round Rock, Texas, firm, as a first step in a process that could make the department more tech savvy and help it solve odor problems in Carthage and other state hot spots. Microanalytics, with 14 years in the odor business, is well equipped to discuss the odor issue. The company has worked with both the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Texas A&M, lending expertise to their research of feedlots. The paper is based in Missouri.
http://www.carthagepress.com/articles/2007/05/23/news/03dnr.txt

Gronbeck Compares Obama To McCarthy And McGovern (Huntington News, May 23)
Political writers often compare Sen. Barack Obama to the Kennedys -- either to another wartime "change" candidate, the slain Robert F. Kennedy of 1968, or his brother, the assassinated President John F. Kennedy. BRUCE GRONBECK, director of the Center for Media Studies and Political Culture at the University of Iowa, prefers to compare Obama to a pair of 1970s Democrats: Eugene McCarthy and George McGovern. "They both offered clear, value- and morality-based perspectives from which they hung their policies," and Obama is doing that now, Gronbeck says. The newspaper serves Huntington W.V. The article also appeared in the KITSAP SUN in Washington.
http://www.huntingtonnews.net/national/070523-shns-obama.html

Labor Negotiator To Retire (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, May 23)
Karen Patek, labor negotiator for the Minnesota Nurses Association for 40 years, will retire next February, at 65, as the union's senior staff specialist for labor relations. Patek came to work at the University of Minnesota hospital in 1964, with a nursing degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.startribune.com/cummins/story/1203010.html

UI Study Examines Medical Errors (Reuters Canada, May 23)
Physicians may say it's important to disclose medical errors to patients, yet many do not when errors occur in their own practice, according to a new report. "Our goal was to learn more about clinicians' attitudes, but also what they actually have and have not done," lead author DR. LAURIS C. KALDJIAN, from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, said in a statement. The team surveyed 538 attending physicians, residents, and medical students from academic centers in the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and Northeastern regions of the United States. According to the report, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, 97 percent of respondents said they would disclose a hypothetical error resulting in minor harm to a patient. Ninety-three percent said they would disclose an error causing major harm. In real life, however, 41 percent of respondents said they had disclosed an actual minor error to a patient and just 5 percent had told a patient of an actual major error.
http://ca.today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=topNews&storyID=2007-05-23T200836Z_01_HAR363134_RTRIDST_0_NEWS-DOCTORS-ERRORS-COL.XML

Redlawsk Notes Thompson Gambling Questions (Green Bay Press-Gazette, May 23)
A new report is resurrecting old questions about the handling of Wisconsin gambling projects by presidential candidate Tommy Thompson. DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political science professor, said the report could hurt Thompson as he tries to appeal to religious conservatives, many of whom strongly oppose gambling. Thompson's campaign is focusing almost exclusively on trying to win the first-in-the-nation caucuses in Iowa. A new poll puts Thompson in fourth place among likely Republican caucus attendees. "You could see the potential for a double-whammy: People may see this as potentially corrupt and the group that Thompson needs to appeal to make some headway might be particularly attuned to this issue," Redlawsk said. The Press-Gazette is based in Wisconsin. The article also appeared in the SHAWANO LEADER and JANESVILLE GAZETTE in Wisconsin.
http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070523/GPG0101/70523028/1207/GPGnews

Manderscheid Named Dean At Nebraska (Daily Nebraksan, May 22)
University of Nebraska-Lincoln officials announced that a new dean was appointed for the College of Arts and Sciences on Tuesday. DAVID MANDERSCHEID, chairman of the mathematics department at the University of Iowa, accepted his appointment as dean, which is pending approval from the University of Nebraska Board of Regents, according to a news release. Manderscheid will succeed Richard Hoffmann, who has served as dean since 2001. The newspaper is based in Lincoln, Neb.
http://media.www.dailynebraskan.com/media/storage/paper857/news/2007/05/22/News/Unl-Announces.New.Dean.For.College.Of.Arts.And.Sciences-2906451.shtml

Charges Reduced In Crash That Killed UI Students (Omaha World-Herald, May 22)
A vial of blood from the suspect in a double motor-vehicle homicide case sat for a month in a refrigerator in the Pottawattamie County Sheriff's Office among employee lunches. That oversight forced prosecutors to reduce the charges in a March 2006 collision on Interstate 80 that killed UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students Mark McCloy, 21, of Carmel, Ind., and Brooke Walton, 19, of Cedar Falls, Iowa, and seriously injured three other students.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2798&u_sid=2388686

Redlawsk: Bay State Ties Help, Hurt Romney (Hartford Courant, May 22)
Mitt Romney is the latest prominent New Englander to run for the White House, and it's obvious he's finding that hailing from the bluest of America's blue states is both a burden and a blessing. It also can be a liability in the Midwest, where New England politicians often are viewed as being too liberal. "Being from Massachusetts is a potential problem," said DAVID REDLAWSK, co-director of the Social Science Research Center at the University of Iowa. The same story appeared on the Web site of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.courant.com/news/politics/hc-romney0522.artmay22,0,2565312.story?&track=rss

Gronbeck: Obama Campaign Like McCarthy, McGovern (Rocky Mountain News, May 22)
BRUCE GRONBECK
, director of the Center for Media Studies and Political Culture at the University of Iowa, prefers to compare Obama to a pair of 1970s Democrats: Eugene McCarthy and George McGovern. "They both offered clear, value- and morality-based perspectives from which they hung their policies," and Obama is doing that now, Gronbeck says.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/elections/article/0,2808,DRMN_24736_5548569,00.html

Squire: Register Poll Shows Romney's Work Pays Off (ABC News, May 21)
A few weeks ago, former Republican Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts was in danger of falling into the second tier of Republican presidential candidates. In state and national polls, Romney was running behind a pair of men who weren't even in the race, and his stellar first-quarter fundraising numbers were already a distant memory. That all changed over the weekend, and Romney has only a poll to thank. A Des Moines Register poll released Monday pegged Romney as getting the support of 30 percent of likely Iowa caucus-goers, with Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., grabbing 18 percent and former mayor Rudolph Giuliani getting 17 percent. It comes at a good time for Romney," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "This suggests that the amount of time he's put in the state, the amount of advertising he's run on television, has had some impact."
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=3197402&page=1&CMP=OTC-RSSFeeds0312

UI Hopes To Increase Number Of Doctors In Iowa (WQAD-TV, May 21)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has released a report aimed at increasing the number of doctors in Iowa and improving their distribution throughout the state. The report says the supply of doctors has increased more than 50% over the past quarter century in Iowa. However, many of those physicians are relocating out of state while others are retiring. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6546891&nav=1sW7

Lie's Research Uncovered Stock Options Backdating Scandal (Bloomberg, May 21)
A story about a stock options backdating scandal at Marvell Technology Group notes that the backdating practice was discovered in research conducted by ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601101&sid=a7Cs20wMjtH0&refer=japan

UI, Cubs Star Partner To Fight Rare Eye Disease (ESPN, May 21)
Leber's Congenital Amaurosis reached out and tapped Derrek Lee's shoulder on Sept. 14, 2006, when he received a phone call from his wife telling him their 3-year-old daughter, Jada, was feeling discomfort in her right eye. Lee singled in four at-bats in a Chicago Cubs win over the Dodgers, then rushed off to the hospital for an update from the doctors. When the test results came back the next day, Derrek and Christina Lee received the type of news every parent dreads: Jada was afflicted with LCA, a rare, inherited retinal disease typically found in children, and had suffered a substantial loss of vision in her right eye. . . . Barely two weeks after Jada's diagnosis, Lee was standing before a podium to announce he's in this fight as more than an innocent bystander. Lee and Boston Celtics owner and CEO Wyc Grousbeck, whose teenage son also suffers from LCA, banded together to form Project 3000 in an effort to eradicate the disease. The immediate goal of the project, which works in conjunction with researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is to identify the estimated 3,000 LCA sufferers in the United States so they can undergo genetic testing. The total cost of the screenings is about $3 million, but it will take far more to fund clinical trials and additional research. Lee, who leads the National League with a .394 batting average, is an established star for one of baseball's marquee franchises, so he's in a rare position to make his voice heard.
http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/columns/story?columnist=crasnick_jerry&id=2877228

Manning Studies Legislatures (Mankato Free Press, May 21)
An editorial promoting a nonpartisan legislature cites a study of the Minnesota legislature by UI political science faculty member ERIC MANNING showing that legislators elected on nonpartisan ballots often voted more for their districts and their own preferences versus party mandates than those elected on partisan ballots. Manning concluded: "Parties do have appreciable effect on the voting behavior of the legislators ... Without a strong party caucus system, the legislators are free to vote as they want or how their district wants them to vote." The Mankato Free Press is published in Minnesota.
http://www.mankatofreepress.com/editorials/local_story_141001335.html

Stock-Option Headaches Continue (East Bay Business Journal, May 21)
The stock-option backdating scandal continues to cause headaches for corporations. A study by two professors, one from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and another from Indiana University, said 29 percent of companies, mostly technology-based, used backdating between 1995 and 2002. The East Bay Business Journal is published in California.
http://eastbay.bizjournals.com/eastbay/othercities/atlanta/stories/2007/05/21/story17.html?b=1179720000^1464711

UI Studies Blood Pressure Monitor (Chicago Sun-Times, May 21)
Blood pressure normally drops between 10 percent and 20 percent in sleep. A new study has found that if the decrease is outside that range the patient faces a higher risk of heart attacks, strokes and kidney problems. A 24-hour monitoring device can measure blood pressure while a patient sleeps. The patient wears the battery-operated device on the hip and a blood pressure cuff on the arm. The device periodically inflates the cuff and takes a blood pressure reading. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found that only 20 percent of patients found the device uncomfortable.
http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/394557,CST-NWS-blood21.article

UI Study: Hay Fever Treatment Worse Than Alcohol For Drivers (Motorcycle News, May 20)
A study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has revealed that drivers under the influence of antihistamines can be more impaired than drunk drivers. Motorcycle News is published in Great Britain.
http://www.motorcyclenews.com/MCN/News/newsresults/mcn/2007/May/may15-20/may2007hayfevertreatmentsworsethandrinkfordrivers/?R=EPI-91379

Wilder Attended UI (Scotsman.com, May 20)
An article on Gene Wilder, on the occasion of the publication of his first novel, mentions that he studied theater at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://living.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=769052007

UI Studies Power Of Incumbency (Times-Reporter, May 20)
Getting elected to a first term greatly increases the chances of winning again. Since 1914, challengers have unseated U.S. House incumbents only about 4 percent of the time compared to 25 percent of challengers in U.S. Senate races winning in the same time period, according to a recent study by researchers with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Arizona and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The Times-Reporter is published in Delaware.
http://www.timesreporter.com/index.php?ID=68152&r=0

Squire Comments On Dodd Candidacy (Republican American, May 20)
U.S. Sen. Christopher Dodd's presidential campaign fundraising has been a disappointment, according to this article. PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa, said it "puts Dodd in the also-ran column." Squire thought Dodd would have a sizable fund considering "his wealth of connections within the Democratic establishment, the insurance industry of Connecticut" and his chairmanship of the Senate Banking Committee. The Republican American is published in Connecticut.
http://www.rep-am.com/story.php?id=24321

Warren Describes Pacifier's Dental Effects (San Diego Union-Tribune, May 19)
Aside from concerns about social and language development, pacifiers can have real implications for children's teeth. JOHN WARREN, a professor of dentistry at the University of Iowa, has studied the impact for more than a decade, tracking the jaw development of some 700 kids from birth to their 13th birthday. He said the longer a pacifier is used, the more likely it is that a child will need braces. Whereas a child who doesn't use a pacifier might have only a 10 percent to 20 percent chance of needing braces, a child who has sucked on a pacifier for several years will most likely need the service of an orthodontist. "The risk goes up with usage," he said.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/features/20070519-9999-lz1c19plug.html

Sindt Warns Against UV Damage (Medical News Today, May 19)
Short-term ultraviolet damage to the eyes may be hard to detect, but over the long term the sun can cause irreversible harm, says CHRISTINE W. SINDT, assistant professor of clinical ophthalmology at the University of Iowa. She recommends UV-absorbing sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat, beginning in childhood. UV blocking contact lenses provide the best protection. Medical News Today originates in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=71478

NYC Law Firms Recruit More Heavily From UI Law School (Bloomberg, May 18)
A story about an increase in the amount of work being performed by New York City law firms is forcing top-tier law firms to recruit new hires at law schools outside their usual Ivy League base. Much of their attention is on top-rated Midwest law schools, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601014&sid=aW3NkGBWCvLw&refer=funds

UI Hosted Medicine/Writing Conference (Manchester Journal, May 18)
"The Examined Life: Writing and the Art of Medicine," a national conference that focused on the links between the science of medicine and the art of writing, was co-sponsored by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The Manchester Journal is published in Vermont.
http://www.manchesterjournal.com/community/ci_5927468

Regents Seek PR Firm To Trumpet Successes (Omaha World-Herald, May 18)
The Board of Regents, State of Iowa wants to hire a firm to handle its marketing and public relations. The decision comes amid a tumultuous presidential search at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that has been criticized by faculty and students. Regents say the marketing firm's job would be to promote the board's successes to the public, not downplay negative publicity from the presidential search. "This is not image building for the Board of Regents," said Gary Steinke, the regents' executive director. "Taxpayers spend a lot of money at these universities, and we want to say, 'Here's what you're getting for it.'"
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2798&u_sid=2385936

Cycle Maker Suing Over UI Raffle (Omaha World-Herald, May 18)
A Nebraska motorcycle maker is suing over a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA raffle, claiming it didn't raise enough money to cover the cost of the chopper that was the prize. David and Julie Prochello, owners of Pooch's Custom and Theme Cycles, of Dakota City, Neb., filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court. They accuse the Iowa Board of Regents and others of breach of contract and negligent misrepresentation.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2798&u_sid=2385859

UI Studies Show Anti-inflammatory Drugs Kill Cancer Cells (UPI, May 17)
While studies have proved that anti-inflammatory drugs do not prevent cancer, research at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA shows they may help kill it. Researchers there conducted two studies to determine whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, NSAIDs, and other painkillers had anti-cancer activity. They found the Cox-2 inhibitor pain drug celecoxib (Celebrex) worked the best, destroying 60 percent of the cells in its cultures, while sulindac sulfide (Clinoril sulfide) also appeared effective at eradicating the cancer cells. However, none of the other NSAIDs tested had anti-cancer activity.
http://www.upi.com/Health_Business/Briefing/2007/05/17/celebrexs_new_role_in_killing_cancer/5730/

Pascoe Writes About Death Of Relic Collector (New York Times, May 17)
In this opinion piece, JUDITH PASCOE, a professor of English at the University of Iowa, writes about the death of John K. Lattimer, who'd been a Columbia University professor and a collector of military (and some macabre) relics, including Napoleon's genitalia.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/17/opinion/17pascoe.html?ex=1337054400&en=56c11b231bf281a6&ei=5088

Moore Teaches At Drum Camp (Clarion Ledger, May 17)
Hinds Community College's Raymond Campus is the host site for a two-day drum camp, July 11-12, also sponsored by Mississippi Music Inc. and Yamaha. The Sounds of Summer '07" drum camp will feature as guest clinician DAN MOORE, associate professor of music at the University of Iowa. He is the second full-time professor of percussion in the history of UI's music program. The newspaper is based in Mississippi.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070516/NEWS/70516024

Scientists Study Impact Of Particles On Climate (Christian Science Monitor, May 17)
Vast clouds of dust, soot, and other tiny particles called aerosols migrate over the Pacific from eastern Asia to North America. Now a team of American, Chinese, Japanese, and South Korean scientists is in the midst of a two-month effort to conduct the most detailed study yet of this region's air-pollution plumes. To feel more confident about how climate and future weather-forecasting models handle these particles, "we need to understand and observe the interactions of the relevant aerosols in cloud systems," says GREG CHARMICHAEL, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Iowa.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0517/p14s01-sten.html?page=1

Obama's UI Visit Noted (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 16)
When John Kerry sought the Democratic nomination in the last presidential election, his biggest Iowa crowd before the state caucuses was about 1,500 people. At a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA rally last month, Barack Obama drew 10,000, many of them students. The Illinois senator's candidacy has helped spark a surge in campus activism that he has moved quickly to harness, establishing 300 college chapters and working with students to organize many of his largest rallies. Three days before the event at the University of Iowa in Iowa City on April 22, Obama held a conference call with the heads of campus chapters. "I'm going to be counting on you to be the backbone of this campaign," he told the students. http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/opinion/315790_obama16.html

Polls Shows Tie Among Republican Presidential Candidates (Business Journal Phoenix, May 16)
Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney has made gains on Arizona Sen. John McCain and former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani in some key presidential primary states, even as he launches a new grassroots campaign and fundraising effort in Arizona and other states. The RealClearPolitics.com Web site shows a virtual tie among Romney, McCain and Giuliani in some recent polls in New Hampshire and Iowa, including ones by Zogby International and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Arizona. The article also appeared in the SAN ANTONIO BUSINESS JOURNAL  in Texas.
http://phoenix.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/2007/05/14/daily32.html

Squire Comments On Tancredo's Showing In Republican Debate (Rocky Mountain News, May 16)
During the Republican presidential candidate debate on Tuesday, May 15 at the University of South Carolina's, U.S. Rep. Tom Tancredo of Colorado, had a louder say than in the previous debate - and got several laughs. University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE said Tancredo looked "much more comfortable" Tuesday. "His problem, however, is that the stage is very crowded, and even a good performance can get lost," Squire said. The newspaper is based in Colorado.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/elections/article/0,2808,DRMN_24736_5539373,00.html

Squire Comments On Tancredo's Showing In Republican Debate (Rocky Mountain News, May 16)
After watching the Republican presidential candidate debate on Fox News Monday, May 14, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA political science professors David Redlawsk, Peverill Squire and Bruce Gronbeck offered the Rocky Mountain News detailed critiques of the 10 GOP candidates.
http://blogs.rockymountainnews.com/denver/sprengelmeyer/archives/2007/05/gop_debate_the_hawkeye_view.html#more

UI Dentists Examine Children In Hawaii (Honolulu Star Bulletin, May 16)
When former Big Island school Vice Principal Elaine Himadi suggested University of Iowa dental students do volunteer work with Big Island children, she didn't have to explain the need. "They already knew about it," she said. Children's dental health in Hawaii is known to be "among the worst" in the nation, said University of Iowa dentist Dr. BRYCE GOEBEL. Hawaii is known as the only state entirely without water fluoridation for teeth protection. This week, four dentists getting advanced degrees in children's dentistry, plus RICHARD BURKE, chief professor of children's dentistry at the Iowa university, are volunteering in two dental vans. The story also appeared on the Web site of WEST HAWAII TODAY.
http://starbulletin.com/2007/05/16/news/story10.html

UI Pink Locker Rooms Discussed (247gay.com, May 16)
An article on the connotations of color describes the controversy caused by the pink visitors' locker rooms in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Kinnick Stadium.
http://www.247gay.com/article.cfm?section=73&id=14682

Cloyd Judged Government Publications (Library Journal, May 15)
Librarian BRETT CLOYD of the University of Iowa was an international judge in selecting the year's outstanding government publications.
http://libraryjournal.com/article/CA6440589.html

Holl Designed UI's Art Building West (Bloomberg News, May 15)
A story about the opening of a new wing at the Nelson-Atkins Art Museum in Kansas City notes that the architect, Steven Holl, also designed Art Building West at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601088&sid=azeRdUwB7nJU&refer=muse

Arkansas Considers Smoking Ban Like UI's (Arkansas Democrat Gazette, May 15)
A story about a campus-wide smoking ban at the University of Arkansas notes that similar bans are being considered at other universities, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Democrat Gazette is published in Little Rock.
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/190246/

Paulsen: Subtle Signs Can Predict Huntington's (Science Daily, May 15)
Subtle signs can help doctors predict that a person will develop Huntington's disease in the next few years, according to a study published in the May 15, 2007, issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Huntington's disease is a genetic disorder that affects movement, thinking, and some aspects of personality. There is no treatment or cure for the disease. "These results will help us understand how and who will develop Huntington's, which is important information as potential treatments are developed," said study author JANE S. PAULSEN, Ph.D., of the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City. "Ideally, treatments will target at-risk people at or before the earliest stages of the disease, before they have any problems with thinking or movement." The same story was published on the Web sites of the DAILY INDIA.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070514174300.htm

UI Study Shows Supplement Users Unaware Of Risks (Medical News Today, May 15)
Sales of herbal dietary supplements have skyrocketed by 100 percent in the United States during the last 10 years, but most people don't consider evidence-based indications before using them, according to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The same story was published on the Web site of eMedicineHealth.com.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=70490&nfid=mnf

UI Virtual Soldier Receives $1.5 million Grant From Auto Consortium (Auto Spectator, May 15)
The United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) recently joined the Virtual Soldier Research program partnership at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a $1.5 million contract for manufacturing ergonomics research. At the UI, a team of 35 researchers is advancing state-of-the-art performance in computerized human modeling and simulation. Their work with USCAR will be aimed at helping the U.S. automakers use computer representations of people, called "digital humans," to design safer and more ergonomically acceptable manufacturing plants.
http://www.autospectator.com/modules/news/article.php?storyid=9590

Jones: Voting Machine Companies Will Comply With California Regs (Tri-Valley Herald, May 14)
California requires all vendors of automatic voting machines to submit their software for a security test, which only one company has agreed to do so far. However, analysts say that most companies will comply eventually. "Any vendor who said no to a state as big as California would be shooting themselves in the foot," said DOUGLAS JONES, a voting-system tester in Iowa and computer-science professor at the University of Iowa. "You can walk away from little states -- they've done it in Iowa -- but you can't do that with the big states. To walk away from them is basically to admit inadequacy.' The Herald is published in California. The same story was published in several other Bay Area newspapers.
http://www.insidebayarea.com/trivalleyherald/localnews/ci_5896196

Squire Comments On Perceptions Of Bush (Austin American-Statesman, May 14)
How is President Bush viewed, and how does that reflect on his home state? In Iowa, where Bush scored his first big win in the 2000 presidential campaign, University of Iowa political scientist PEVERILL SQUIRE said there is a Texas-related "sense that President Bush follows his convictions without giving much thought to the consequences. There is this notion of running off half-cocked." The Austin American-Statesman is published in Texas.
http://www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/nation/05/14/14bushtexas.html

Love And Cain Departure Noted (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 14)
JEAN C. LOVE
and PATRICIA A. CAIN, longtime partners and law professors at the University of Iowa, are leaving behind one much-publicized joint appointment for another at the law school at Santa Clara University, a Catholic institution in California. In 1991 the couple made national news when they were recruited as a pair to join Iowa's law faculty. Before that, Love taught at the University of California at Davis and Cain at the University of Texas at Austin. Cain, vice provost at Iowa, and Love have made a special effort to educate their students about the legal issues facing gays and lesbians.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i37/37a00702.htm

UI Collaborated On Bipolar Research (Medical News Today, May 13)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was a collaborator in research conducted by scientists at the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in a major project called the NIMH Genetics Initiative. The research found that the likelihood of developing bipolar disorder depends in part on the combined, small effects of variations in many different genes in the brain, none of which is powerful enough to cause the disease by itself. However, targeting the enzyme produced by one of these genes could lead to development of new, more effective medications.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=70277&nfid=mnf

Bardia Explains Herbal Supplement Research (Fox News, May 13)
About two-thirds of people taking herbal supplements to treat a health condition don't check scientific guidelines, say University of Iowa researchers. "Physicians, pharmacists, and other health professionals should proactively educate consumers and advocate for public health policies that would disseminate evidence-based information regarding the appropriate use of herbs," says researcher ADITYA BARDIA.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,271976,00.html

Gronbeck Comments On Federal Investigations (Fox News, May 13)
In the past month, the FBI raided businesses owned by two members of Congress, forcing the Republican representatives to step down from key committee assignments and join a growing number of lawmakers targeted and even jailed by aggressive federal investigations. "The whole notion of raiding government officials is probably a comparatively new type of battle" in the Justice Department's response to possible legislative branch corruption, said BRUCE GRONBECK of the University of Iowa.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,271975,00.html

UI Researches Medical Errors (News-Medical.net, May 13)
When it comes to disclosing medical errors to patients, there is a gap between physicians' attitudes and their real-world experiences admitting such errors, according to a University of Iowa study. "Our goal was to learn more about clinicians' attitudes but also what they actually have, and have not, done," said the study's lead author LAURIS KALDJIAN, associate professor of internal medicine in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and director of the college's Program in Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities. "We were interested in what factors or beliefs might be motivating physicians who are more likely to disclose errors to their patients."
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=25064

Williams Attended UI (San Francisco Chronicle, May 13)
A review of Tennessee Williams' notebooks mentions that the playwright graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/05/13/RVG4CPKFFL1.DTL&type=books

Oppenheimer Was First UI Russian Chair (The Observer, May 13)
Max Oppenheimer Jr., who spoke at SUNY Fredonia's commencement, is still working, learning and writing only two months short of his 90th birthday. His fluency in languages made him an asset to the military in World War II, and an asset to the CIA during the Cold War. In 1961, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA invited him to serve as professor and chairman of its first Department of Russian. The Observer is published in New York.
http://observertoday.com/community/articles.asp?articleID=12473

Erik Lie's Research Launched Backdating Scandal (The Argus, May 13)
Stock options helped fuel the dot-com boom, but the business "drug of choice" proved to have problematic side effects. ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, did a detailed research study of proxy statements for every company on the Standard & Poor's 500. Lie found a correlation between when stock prices fell and stock option grant dates, leading him to conclude that backdating was indeed often an intentional quest for financial gain. He said a pattern emerged in the data whereby stock prices were lower right before stock option grant dates and higher afterward, leading Lie - and the SEC, which used his data - to conclude manipulation of dates. Lie's work kicked off the government investigations. The Argus is published in California.
http://www.insidebayarea.com/argus/oped/ci_5887386

UI Collaborates On New Cancer Research (Medical News Today, May 13)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will collaborate with several other medical centers in the United States and Europe to develop a new radiation therapy technique for cancer treatment, with a $10 million grant from the National Cancer Institute. Medical News Today originates in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=70274

Gronbeck Comments On D.C. Madam Scandal (Guardian, May 12)
The D.C. Madam scandal is, at its heart, about hypocrisy, this story asserts: It is about the Washington movers and shakers sweating out the prospect of Jeane Palfrey's court case. It is about the public face of a city whose political denizens exhort others to standards they clearly fail to meet themselves. "We think of ourselves as faithful to our Puritan founders, but the U.S. regularly loses its innocence with scandals like this," says BRUCE GRONBECK, an expert on political scandal at the University of Iowa. The Guardian is published in the UK.
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/world/story/0,,2078409,00.html

Black Characterizes Compulsive Shopping (Sydney Morning Herald, May 12)
Compulsive shopping tends to run in families, and these families are filled with mood and substance use disorders, said Professor DONALD BLACK from the University of Iowa. In a recent issue of World Psychiatry, he said compulsive shoppers have frequent urges or preoccupations with either having a specific item, or with the act of shopping. When the sale is made there is a "rush" and sense of relief. But feelings of guilt or disappointment soon follow and many sufferers hide or give away their purchases. "Some writers have criticized attempts to categorize CBD as an illness, which they see as part of a trend to 'medicalize' behavioral problems or sell more drugs but symptoms such as irresistible urges, frequent spending, preoccupation, remorse, and financial disaster suggest a discrete psychiatric disorder," Black said. The Sydney Morning Herald is published in Australia.
http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/cbd-a-shoppers-nightmare/2007/05/12/1178899158951.html

Redlawsk Studied Voting Choices (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 12)
How do voters choose their candidates? How do they process all the political information that they are bombarded with so they can make intelligent choices during elections like next week's primaries? No one knows everything about how voters think and act, but Richard R. Lau and University of Iowa faculty member DAVID REDLAWSK wrote "How Voters Decide: Information Processing in Election Campaigns." The article is an interview with Lau.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/opinion/columnists/steigerwald/s_507255.html

Andreasen Advocates Revised PTSD Standards (Medical News Today, May 11)
A combined panel from the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council released a report on Tuesday stating that the Department of Veterans Affairs needs to revise its standards for evaluating post-traumatic stress disorder. NANCY ANDREASEN, chair of the committee that released the report and head of the psychiatry department at University of Iowa's Carver College of Medicine, said, "As the increasing number of claims to the VA shows, PTSD has become a very significant public health problem. Comprehensive revision is needed." Medical News Today originates in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=70429

NADS Used To Study Driving Simulation Alternatives (OSN Supersite, May 11)
Bruce Drum and colleagues compared clinical vision tests to visual performance in simulated night driving at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR (NADS). The driving test with cataract patients was designed to evaluate the distance at which subjects could identify road signs and obstacles, according to the study. The findings indicated that contrast sensitivity and stray light tests may be viable alternatives to night driving simulations. OSN Supersite summarizes news from a variety of ophthalmology journals.
http://www.osnsupersite.com/view.asp?rID=21845

UI Students Warned About Music Sharing (Houston Chronicle, May 11)
Hundreds of people who use university Internet servers may soon receive letters warning of lawsuits that allege they illegally shared music online. The Washington, D.C.-based Recording Industry Association of America, which represents major record companies, has asked 13 universities -- including Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- to pass along warning letters to about 400 people accused of illegal file sharing.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/fn/4796465.html

Bell Comments On Poet's Works (Newport News Times, May 11)
Acclaimed poet Vern Rutsala's work is praised for its accessibility: "Singular as his poems may be, one never doubts that the author is one of us. In his methods, he has never abandoned the idea of a poetry accessible to a great audience," says poet MARVIN BELL. "Some poets are poets only when it suits them," said Bell, who met Rutsala in the 1950s when both were graduate students at the University of Iowa, "but Vern is a poet every day. He has an eye for the extraordinary in the routine, which is to say the gist of human reality." The News Times is published in Oregon.
http://www.newportnewstimes.com/articles/2007/05/11/community/community01.txt

Rocha Assesses Richardson Ads (Scripps News, May 11)
Comic ads are designed to convey New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson's experience and his sense of humor to Iowans, said University of Iowa political science professor RENE ROCHA. "They are instrumental in establishing a biographical reference for Richardson, who remains relatively unknown among the general public and among Iowans," he said. "So to the extent they are successful in conveying that, they could be beneficial to the campaign." However, Richardson now has to take his credentials and turn them into votes, Rocha said. "Success in Iowa has always been about building a grass-roots organization."
http://www.scrippsnews.com/node/22576

Heckel Lauds Cave Discovery (Chicago Tribune, May 11)
Illinois students recently discovered a cave that is a treasure trove of exceptionally well-preserved life from 310 million years ago. It's not the first cave deposit like this to be discovered, but others are "not this big and this good," said PHILIP HECKEL, a professor in the University of Iowa's department of geoscience who specializes in the Pennsylvanian period. "It is very significant and what's interesting is there's so much of it," Heckel said. "We almost never see that kind of terrestrial habitat."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/west/chi-0705110019may11,1,2824821.story?coll=chi-newslocalwest-hed

Hygienic Lab Wins South Dakota Contract (Sioux Falls Argus Leader, May 11)
South Dakota has awarded the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB the contract to perform newborn screening laboratory tests on the more than 11,000 babies born in South Dakota each year.
http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070511/NEWS/705110332/1001

UI Research Study Cited In Article On Morality, Brain Wiring (The Wall Street Journal, May 11)
Most of us feel a rush of righteous certainty in the face of a moral challenge, an intuitive sense of right or wrong hard to ignore yet difficult to articulate. A provocative medical experiment conducted recently by neuroscientists at Harvard, Caltech and the University of Southern California strongly suggests these impulsive convictions come not from conscious principles but from the brain trying to make its emotional judgment felt. Not everyone reasons through moral conundrums in the same way. Decisions hinge on family values, cultural heritage, legal traditions and religious beliefs -- or on the kind of brain you can bring to bear on the problem. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS, the researchers singled out six middle-age men and women who had injured the same neural network in the prefrontal cortex.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB117884235401499300.html?mod=world_news_featured_articles

Polumbaum Explores Cutting Through The Red Tape (China Daily, May 11)
JUDY POLUMBAUM
, a professor of journalism at the University of Iowa, writes about how in everyday parlance, "bureaucracy" is not a pretty word. To most people, bureaucratic means the opposite of efficient, and a bureaucrat is someone who gums up the works. She cites the scholar best known for systematic analysis of bureaucracy, German sociologist Max Weber (1864-1920), who emphasized the progressive nature of the phenomenon.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/opinion/2007-05/11/content_870280.htm

Conroy Recognized For Supporting Literary Lodgings (WFAA, May 10)
In a travel news story, some of the best literary lodgings in the U.S. are explored. There has been a "working library" at the award-laden Arizona Inn since it was built in 1930 by Arizona's first congresswoman. Traveler and book lover Isabella Greenway began the collection that has expanded during successive generations of family ownership. Today, it is "wide-ranging and eclectic," her great-grandson Will Conroy says. "You can still pull out Proust or Hawthorne and discover an inscription to or by Isabella." But thanks to Will and his father, the late writer FRANK CONROY, collecting continues. Will has been "slowly but steadily filling the shelves with new fiction and poetry." WFAA Channel 8 is based in Dallas/Forth Worth, Texas.
http://www.wfaa.com/sharedcontent/dws/fea/travel/thisweek/stories/DN-libhotelbox_0506tra.State.Edition1.10803b1.html

UI Research Finds Doctors Reluctant To Disclose Errors (The Washington Times, May 10)
Doctors who say they would reveal a hypothetical medical error often do not do so in actual practice, say Iowa researchers. LAURIS KALDJIAN and colleagues at the University of Iowa's Carver College of Medicine wanted to explore what factors motivated physicians to disclose medical errors to their patients, so they sent out surveys to faculty physicians, residents and medical students at academic medical centers in the Midwestern and Eastern regions of the United States. A version of this story also appeared on the UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL Web site. The Washington Times is based in Washington, D.C.
http://www.washtimes.com/upi/20070510-051114-3442

UI Study Cites Therapeutic Value Of Journaling (The Ithaca Journal, May 10)
Longtime journalers say getting thoughts down on paper, the computer screen or even a handy cocktail napkin has the power to heal and pinpoint one's life purpose. The promotion of expressive writing on shows such as "Oprah" has led bookstores to stock dozens of journals tailor-made for any conceivable chronicle: addiction recovery, weight loss, relationships or gratitude. A 2002 study in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine found that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who journaled about their emotions and tried to understand stressful events saw improvements in their relationships, personal strength, spirituality and appreciation for life. The Ithaca Journal is published by Gannett News Service in Ithaca, N.Y.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070510/LIFESTYLE18/705100301/1024/LIFESTYLE

Andreasen: PTSD 'Significant Public Health Problem' (Fox News, May 9)
The surge in the number of veterans suffering post-traumatic stress disorder requires development of better tests to evaluate affected personnel and determine how best to compensate them, a panel of medical experts said Tuesday. "As the increasing number of claims to the VA shows, PTSD has become a very significant public health problem," said NANCY ANDREASEN, chair of the committee that prepared the report. "Our review of the current methods for evaluating PTSD disability claims and determining compensation indicates that a comprehensive revision is needed," said Andreasen, professor of psychiatry at Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa. Versions of the story also appeared on the Web sites of THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS, the DENVER POST, THE WASHINGTON TIMES, the LOS ANGELES TIMES, the ARIZONA DAILY STAR of Tucson, THE MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, THE BOSTON HERALD, CNN and several other news organizations.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,270678,00.html

A similar story appeared in THE WASHINGTON POST and THE SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/05/08/AR2007050801746.html

Rocha Comments On Richardson's New Ads (Albuquerque Tribune, May 9)
In a new campaign ad set to air in Iowa, presidential candidate Gov. Bill Richardson reacts to the question, "So what makes you think you can be president?" The new campaign ads feature the governor posing in a mock job interview, complete with a nervous expression on his face. The ads likely will convey Richardson's experience and his sense of humor to Iowans, said RENE ROCHA, University of Iowa political science professor. "They are instrumental in establishing a biographical reference for Richardson, who remains relatively unknown among the general public and among Iowans," Rocha said. "So, to the extent they are successful in conveying that, they could be beneficial to the campaign." The newspaper is based in New Mexico.
http://www.abqtrib.com/news/2007/may/09/guv-interviews-top-job-iowa-ads/

Campuses Review Incident Response (Christian Science Monitor, May 8)
Could technology -- specifically, emergency text messages via cellphones -- have saved some of the 33 lives lost last month at Virginia Tech? That question is burning across college campuses since the shootings, as schools from California to the Carolinas scramble to fine-tune their incident-response systems, in part, by tapping into the instant-message culture of today's college generation. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is accelerating plans to install a campuswide public-address system. The University of Minnesota in Minneapolis already has hundreds of cameras pointed to all corners of campus. Some colleges are incorporating video-scanning software that brings attention to unusual behavior, such as someone falling down. The story also appeared in TAIWAN NEWS.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0508/p03s01-ussc.html?page=

Story Compares Political Science Faculty Count (Lincoln Journal-Star, May 8)
A story about the financial shape of the University of Nebraska compares the number of full-time faculty in the political science departments of various institutions. University of Nebraska Political Science Department Chair John Comer said that over a 20-year period from 1986 to 2006, his department went from 20 full-time faculty members to 14. Next fall, it will have 15 full-time faculty. That compares to 20 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 24 at the University of Kansas and 40 at Texas A&M.
http://journalstar.com/articles/2007/05/08/news/politics/doc463fa9d31c15d380984804.txt

Lie Discusses Backdating Prosecutions (TechNews World, May 7)
Marvell Technology Group announced several changes to its leadership after an internal investigation found that stock options grants were routinely backdated, the company announced Monday. The firm indicated that more changes could be on the way. Like many technology companies caught up in options scandals, Marvell has been able to prevent any damage to its core business, University of Iowa business professor ERIK LIE told the E-Commerce Times. While investigators are not likely to back off because a company takes strong action on its own, the SEC and prosecutors have not shown a desire to aggressively tackle multiple options cases, he said. "It's more likely that regulators will make examples of some high-profile companies and send a message that going forward, better controls are needed," Lie noted.
http://www.technewsworld.com/story/57263.html

Gronbeck: Timing, Mood More Important Than Age (FOXNews, May 7)
Regardless of the age differential in the presidential race, timing and mood are everything, said BRUCE GRONBECK, politics professor at the University of Iowa. When Reagan beat President Jimmy Carter in 1980 it was after the country hit one of its lowest points in the century, Gronbeck said, and voters were ready for the older and more politically seasoned Republican. "When Reagan rolls in, the country is in double-digit inflation, the Iran crisis and a crisis of government" are plaguing the Carter administration, he said. "After the Carter legacy, the country was very much ready for wisdom and age." The election of Kennedy in 1960, Gronbeck said, marked an era of "of optimism and strength and vision," after eight years under President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who was 70 years old when he left office.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,270581,00.html

Old Capitol Restoration Wins National Recognition (WQAD-TV, May 7)
The restoration of the Old Capitol at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is getting some national recognition. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6480137

Story Reflects Experience At UI (The Southern Illinoisian, May 7)
Fiction writer Jacinda Townsend wrote about her experience at the University of Iowa in the short story "Kwanzaa on the Prairie," published in "Chicken Soup for the African American Woman's Soul." She obtained a Master of Fine Arts degree in 2001 from THE IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.southernillinoisan.com/articles/2007/05/07/top/20078169.txt

Berg Explains IEM (NY Newsday, May 7)
How did the crack squad of futures investors on the Iowa Electronic Markets feel about the first round of presidential debates? The University of Iowa's Internet-based teaching tool, in which participants can spend between $5 and $500 on share futures in candidates, has a strong track record of predicting political results. The market responds mostly to surprise events, said Iowa accounting professor JOYCE BERG. "If something happens at the debates that people weren't expecting, you'll see that show up in the market price," Berg said. "If all that happens in the debates is that candidates are confirming what traders are already thinking about them, you won't see any change in the price. I think what the [Republican] markets are starting to say is that they're actually thinking there's a pretty good chance it will be none of the above."
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/longisland/politics/ny-lilipa075202900may07,0,3088384.story?coll=ny-lipolitics-headlines

UI Turnout Shows Obama's Mojo (Bloomberg News, May 7)
When John Kerry sought the Democratic nomination in the last presidential election, his biggest Iowa crowd before the state caucuses was about 1,500 people. At a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA rally last month, Barack Obama drew 10,000 -- many of them students. The Illinois senator's candidacy has helped spark a surge in campus activism that he has moved quickly to harness, establishing 300 college chapters and working with students to organize many of his largest rallies.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=aJ4wSyFVOGx8&refer=us

UI Collaborates On Software Standards (Women's Digest, May 7)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Wisconsin at Madison are collaborating with a software vendor to create consistent medical terminology and codes for nurses.
http://www.womensdigest.net/departments/healfit/hf0106c.html

National Institutes Of Health Refunds Botanicals Study (MediLexicon, May 6)
A five-year study of botanicals, on which the University of Iowa is collaborating with other institutions, has received $4.4 million in continuation funding from the National Institutes of Health. The UI portion of the study is headed by WENDY MAURY, associate professor of microbiology.
http://www.medilexicon.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=69892

UI Did Not Accept Payments (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 6)
The Iowa Student Loan Liquidity Corporation, a private nonprofit lender that dominates the student-loan industry in Iowa, has paid colleges about $1.5 million over the last five years for processing students' applications for its loans, and critics say that money could influence financial-aid administrators to steer students to the organization's loans. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa have never accepted the reimbursements.
http://chronicle.com/news/article/2264/nonprofit-lender-in-iowa-paid-colleges-15-million-for-processing-its-loans

UI Researches Autism Mutation (News-Medical.net, May 6)
University of Iowa researchers have learned more about a genetic mutation that contributes to autism. The mutation occurred in sperm cells of a father who does not have autism, but passed the condition on to two of his children. THOMAS WASSINK, associate professor of psychiatry in the UI Carver College of Medicine, presented the findings May 3 at the annual International Meeting for Autism Research in Seattle. "Genes with the most compelling evidence of causing autism appear to be components of a specific kind of neuronal connection, or synapse, called the glutamate synapse," Wassink said. This story has appeared widely on medical news Web sites.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=24739

UI Driving Study Cited (The Oregonian, May 6)
Antihistamine pills are a popular treatment for allergies, but the pills make many people sleepy: A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study done on a driving simulator found that people who were legally drunk were still better drivers than those who took two Benadryl allergy pills.
http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/117834096257190.xml&coll=7

UI Tax Research Cited (Tulsa World, May 6)
University of Iowa economists PETER FISHER and ELAINE DITSLER report that about 96 percent of the revenue given up by a typical 20 percent tax cut for businesses is wasted on firms whose investment decisions are not affected by taxes. The research was cited in an article documenting that growth and prosperity are not tied to tax cuts. Instead, investment in education, quality of life projects and basic infrastructure spurs more growth and economic development than cutting taxes. Tulsa World is published in Oklahoma.
http://www.tulsaworld.com/opinion/article.aspx?articleID=070505_7_G6_Contr70410&breadcrumb=editorials

Ugandan Poet Attended International Writing Program (Sunday Vision, May 6)
In a profile of prominent Ugandan poet Okot p'Bitek, it is noted that he took part in the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM at the University of Iowa in 1969. Sunday Vision is published in Uganda.
http://www.sundayvision.co.ug/detail.php?mainNewsCategoryId=7&newsCategoryId=294&newsId=563585

Fisher's Research Cited (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, May 6)
Equity is among the issues raised in an analysis of state tax policy in Minnesota. The proliferation of state tax incentives has redistributed tax burdens away from businesses and on to taxpayers and in an increasingly regressive way. University of Iowa economist PETER FISHER showed that the effective state tax rate on new investment nationwide fell by 30 percent in the 1990s. Business tax shares of state revenues fell from a high of nearly 10 percent in 1980 to just under 5 percent by 2002. Yet state services to businesses have not perceptibly declined in this period.
http://www.startribune.com/562/story/1163978.html

UI Dental Grad Serves 'Forgotten Population' (KVOA-TV from AP, May 5)
Phillip Hendrix, who has a dental degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is focusing his career on a "forgotten population." He has a mobile practice for the elderly, the bedridden and people terrified of dentists' offices. "People I see truly need me," he explains. "Knowing that helps me get up every morning. There's nothing glamorous about it. The need is more than I can provide." KVOA originates in Tucson, Ariz.
http://kvoa.com/Global/story.asp?S=6473654

SEC Appoints Neuhauser (Mondovisione, May 5)
The SEC appointed PAUL M. NEUHAUSER of the University of Iowa College of Law to a May 7 panel on federal proxy rules and state corporation law. Mondovisione originates in the UK.
http://www.exchange-handbook.co.uk/index.cfm?section=news&action=detail&id=66800

UI Security Officers Not Armed (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 4)
A story about policies regarding armed campus police officers at colleges and universities across America notes that at Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa, policy dictates that police officers do not carry weapons in almost all cases. That policy was reaffirmed even after the Virginia Tech shootings.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i35/35a01801.htm

Welch Judges Band Contest (Northwest Arkansas Times, May 4)
MYRON WELCH
, band director at the University of Iowa, is a judge for a multi-state high-school band competition at Worlds of Fun in Kansas City.
http://www.nwanews.com/nwat/news/52718/

Lie Makes Time's 100 Most Influential List (The Indianapolis Star, May 4)
ERIK LIE
, finance professor, University of Iowa, is listed under the category of Builders and Titans in an article that lauds everyone from Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy to talk show host Oprah Winfrey on Time magazine's list of the 100 most influential people in the world. People from 27 countries were chosen for this year's list. The influence edition goes on sale today (May 4). Versions of this story also appeared in the ST. PETERSBURG TIMES, published in Tampa, Fla.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070504/NATIONWORLD/705040540/1224/SPORTS08

Kinnick Locker Rooms Cited (Chicago Sun Times, May 4)
It's called the Palace of Auburn Hills, but it's a safe bet visiting NBA teams didn't have any input in naming the home arena of the Detroit Pistons.

That's because the Palace's visiting dressing room is considered by many to be the worst in the league. "It's two small rooms separated by a bathroom in the middle," former Bulls center Bill Wennington said. "It's small and very crowded. And when the coach talks, everybody has to squeeze over on one side." At least, adds the article's writer, the visitors' dressing room isn't painted pink, as it is in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S Kinnick Stadium, where former Iowa football coach Hayden Fry believed the color would have a pacifying effect on visiting players.
http://www.suntimes.com/sports/basketball/bulls/370926,CST-SPT-locker04.article

Gronbeck Says Fast Format Hurt Tancredo (Rocky Mountain News, May 3)
There were huge cheers Thursday night each time U.S. Rep. Tom Tancredo's face was projected onto the wall of a quaint, downtown office here. There he was, big as life, up there with all the other big Republican faces who spoke during a rapid-fire presidential debate streaming over the Internet. Tancredo fans came from all across this conservative, western edge of Iowa -- and even from across the river in Omaha -- to cheer on their man. But by the time the debate had ended, most were dejected, thinking Tancredo got short shrift -- and less time to make his case nationally -- in a scattered, fast-moving format. BRUCE GRONBECK, director of the Center for Media Studies and Political Culture at the University of Iowa, said the fast-moving "track-meet" style of moderator Chris Matthews worked against Tancredo. "If you couldn't sprint through instant, one-word or one-sentence answers . . . you were left in the dust of the best sprinters," Gronbeck said. This story also ran on the Web site of MSNBC May 4.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/home/article/0,1299,DRMN_1_5519842,00.html

Alumnus At Home Abroad, Enjoys Asian Way Of Life (The Nation, May 3)
Brent Smith was born and raised in the West, but where he really feels comfortable is the East. After graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1990, he worked in Japan for 12 years. In 2001 he moved back to the United States and worked for Barbara Barry, a full-service residential interior-design company. In 2004 he set up his own consulting firm, The Brent Smith Group. Two years after that, he came back to the East at the invitation of Chanintr Sirisant, managing director of premium lifestyle furniture firm Habitat Thailand. Today, he is chief marketing officer of Habitat Thailand, which operates local shops for its UK parent. The Nation is produced by the Nation Multimedia Group located in Bangkok, Thailand.
http://www.nationmultimedia.com/2007/05/04/business/business_30033338.php

Couple Moved To Colorado After Hurricanes (Denver Post, May 2)
In a story featuring the Colorado home of Jonathan and Monica Sherman, it's noted that these sweethearts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA lived right in the heart of New Orleans, but moved to Colorado after hurricanes Katrina and Rita hit.
http://www.denverpost.com/lifestyles/ci_5801385

Pulitzer Prize Winner Profiled (Needham Times, May 2)
Mark Maremont, a special projects editor for the Wall Street Journal, was part of a team at the Wall Street Journal that won a Pulitzer Prize for public service. The team's stories exposed business executives who reaped millions of dollars by backdating stock options. The Journal allowed three reporters -- Charles Forelle, James Bandler, and Steve Stecklow -- to work on the project with Maremont for 18 months. Their work culminated in the investigation of 140 companies and the firing or resignation of 70 executives. Ten people have been criminally charged, so far. Executive compensation has sparked Maremont's interest for years. He heard about a University of Iowa professor (ERIK LIE) who was studying the backdating of stock options and dove into the story. The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.townonline.com/needham/homepage/x1288315958

UI Alumna Gives Career Advice (Cincinnati Enquirer, May 2)
It has been nearly two years since Jan Melsh graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She quickly jumped into the working world, taking her first "career job" with Target as a sales floor executive in Coralville. In November, she was promoted to the human resources department and took a job in Moline, Ill. In the past couple of years, Melsh, a Cedar Rapids native, has already learned a lot about making - and missing - smart career decisions. One regret: She didn't have mentors several months into her career, a time when their advice would have been especially helpful as she underwent rounds of interviews at work.
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070502/BIZ03/705020336/1001/BIZ

Library Conservator Comments On Absorbent Paper (USDA News, May 1)
University of Iowa Libraries conservator GARY FROST marvels at Zorbix's ability to absorb and release water, a feature he says makes the sheets easier to reuse than the aqueous poultices and blotters he has worked with. "The sheets play the same role more efficiently," he says. Frost foresees uses for Zorbix beyond those pertaining solely to library-disaster scenarios, like flooding. "I'm confident there's a wider market for it associated with the routine restoration of documents of all kinds." New applications are likely to arise, he adds, as conservators become even more familiar with the product's properties.
http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/may07/books0507.htm

Regents Discuss Security (KETV, May 1)
While little violent crime is reported at the schools, law enforcement officials said those numbers aren't relevant in discussing whether to arm campus police. Campus security became a priority after the April 16 massacre at Virginia Tech. According to FBI crime statistics for 2005, seven forcible rapes, two robberies and 18 aggravated assaults were reported to police on Iowa's three campuses. For every 10,000 students, fewer than five violent crimes are reported at Iowa State University; four at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; and about 1.5 at the University of Northern Iowa. KETV is based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.ketv.com/news/13236866/detail.html

Carver-Hawkeye Roof Featured (EDC Magazine, May 1)
The Carver-Hawkeye Arena at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Iowa City campus has been the site of many winning performances, including that of its roof. The 48-mil, mechanically attached Sarnafil roof had done its job admirably for 25 years, until an unusually severe storm damaged parts of the roof in the spring of 2006. The aging membrane continues to perform today in its new, recycled rendition as roofing walkway membranes. Environmental Design & Construction Magazine is a publication about high-performance building.
http://www.edcmag.com/Articles/Feature_Article/BNP_GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000000096519

UI Removes Obama Photo From Web Site (WSJV, May 1)
A photograph of Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama is no longer on a Web site at the University of Iowa. Officials say the photo was removed from the communication studies department after complaints that it seemed like an endorsement of the Illinois senator. University spokesman STEVE PARROTT says the photo showed Obama holding a graduate student's baby during a recent campaign visit to the campus in Iowa City. He says the university received two e-mail complaints last Friday. The photo was taken off Monday. Parrott says departments maintain their own sites, but the university will respond to complaints or concerns. WSJV is based in South Bend, Ind.
http://www.fox28.com/News/index.php?ID=17713

UConn Names Hunter's Replacement (Hartford Courant, May 1)
A story about the appointment of P. Christopher Earley as the dean of the University of Connecticut College of Business notes that he replaces WILLIAM C (CURT) HUNTER, who left last summer to become dean of the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business.
http://www.courant.com/business/hc-uconnbiz0501.artmay01,0,1339593.story?coll=hc-headlines-business

UI Golf Course Study Cited (Capital Times, May 1)
A story about using environmentally friendly methods to manage golf courses cites a 1996 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study that showed that golf course superintendents have much higher rates of brain cancer, prostate cancer and non-Hodgkins lymphoma than the general population. The Times is published in Madison, Wisc.
http://www.madison.com/tct/mad/topstories/index.php?ntid=131691&ntpid=0

 

 

 

 

 

 

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