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UI in the News

March 2007

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Thyne: Education Can Prevent Civil Wars (The Futurist, March-April, 2007)
Civil wars have caused more than 16 million deaths since 1945, but investing in the education of young children help put an end to such destructive conflict, writes University of Iowa Researcher CLAYTON THYNE in the journal "International Studies Quarterly." This item is not available online.

Callaghan Comments On Orthopedics Careers (Orthopedics Today, March 2007)
Dr. JOHN J. CALLAGHAN,  a professor in the departments of orthopedic surgery and biomedical engineering in the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, participated in an online roundtable discussion about the advantages and difficulties in being an orthopedic academician.
http://www.orthosupersite.com/default.asp?page=view&rid=21063

Alumnus Is Western Michigan Finalist (News Gazette, March 31)
Avijit Ghosh, who received a bachelor's degree from Calcutta University, a postgraduate degree in business from Xavier Institute and a master's and doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is one of four finalists for the presidency of Western Michigan University. The News Gazette is published in Champaign, Ill.
http://www.news-gazette.com/news/local/2007/03/31/dean_named_finalist_for_presidency_at

Gunter Comments On Drug Misuse (Medical News Today, March 31)
Amphetamine misuse is a significant problem nationwide, and understanding who misuses these drugs could help primary care providers ask questions to improve screening for substance use, said TRACY GUNTER, assistant professor of psychiatry in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine at the University of Iowa. "Methamphetamine and certain synthetic stimulants are purported to be 'super drugs' in that the effects are more intense and long-lasting than those produced by cocaine. Stimulants can cause a severe addictive disorder that is very hard, but not impossible, to treat," Gunter said. "The more we know about who is likely to try meth, the more we can do to screen for substance abuse just as many primary caregivers currently screen for tobacco, alcohol or marijuana abuse." The findings of Gunter and her colleagues were published in the September 2006 issue of the journal Substance Use and Misuse. Medical News Today originates in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=66496

Kramer Studies Alcohol Craving (Medical News Today, March 30)
JOHN KRAMER
of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine is co-author of a new study that helps identify the craving experienced by alcoholics. The study identified a protein gene sequence that contributes to whether an individual craves alcohol. Medical News Today originates in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=66240

WMU Finalist Was At UI For 23 Years (Kalamazoo Gazette, March 30)
Before joining Bowling Green State University seven years ago, John William Folkins spent 23 years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he held two senior-level posts in academic affairs, including associate provost for undergraduate education, and where he chaired the speech pathology and audiology department for nine years. Folkins is now a finalist for the presidency of Western Michigan University.
http://www.mlive.com/news/kzgazette/index.ssf?/base/news-22/117526830625520.xml&coll=7

Singer-Songwriter Is UI Alumnus (NWI Times, March 30)
Paleo, a singer-songwriter now nearing the end of a yearlong performance tour, was born David Andrew Strackany. In 2004, Paleo received degrees in art and English from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. In the fall of 2005, he released his debut disc, "Misery, Missouri." NWI Times is published in Indiana.
http://nwitimes.com/articles/2007/03/30/entertainment/entertainment/doc0e3e72eb41d70662862572ab0076a44b.txt

Market To Predict Likelihood Of Avian Flu (Chicago Tribune, March 30)
Starting next month experts from around the globe will be asked to place bets on the flu. University of Iowa economists and physicians have organized a so-called global avian flu market -- not so someone can collect a big payout, but rather to see if it is possible to forecast the spread of the influenza virus using the same market tools that predict the future prices of corn, soybeans and pork bellies. Many specialists, including ornithologists, biochemists, epidemiologists, veterinarians and community physicians who normally do not collaborate have knowledge pertaining to the bird flu problem, said DR. PHILIP POLGREEN, an assistant professor of medicine in the UI Carver College of Medicine. The trick is getting them to share information frequently and promptly. "Markets are very good at sharing information," Polgreen said. "We've seen this in tracking seasonal flu in Iowa."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0703300069mar30,0,1306985.story?track=rss

Robillard Quoted In Story About Medical Careers (CBS News, March 30)
JEAN ROBILLARD, dean of the University of Iowa's Carver College of Medicine, is quoted in a story about careers in medicine. The story focuses on the demand for "hospitalists," or doctors who specialize in coordinating patient care, but notes that anesthesiology and critical care are also showing a spike in interest. "You work hard, but there are fixed hours and reimbursement is good," Robillard said. The story first appeared in U.S.NEWS & WORLD REPORT.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/03/29/grad_schools/main2625243.shtml

UI Breakthrough Could Lead to Cheaper PCs (Chemical Science, March 29)
A breakthrough in the understanding of the magnetic properties of organic semiconductors could lead to cheaper tablet PCs. In 2004 a group of researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA discovered a strange magnetic effect in films of an organic semiconductor, but the cause of the phenomenon was a mystery. Now the researchers have taken a step forward in understanding why the effect happens. UI physics and astronomy faculty member MARKUS WOHLGENANNT, who led the research, said, "What is particularly nice about our discovery is that is has an immediate potential application in organic LED pen-input displays. These interactive displays will have functions similar to existing personal digital assistants and tablet PCs, where a person uses a magnetic pen to input handwritten data or activate desktop icons. The major advantage of our technology compared to existing technologies is that the light-emitting pixels and the magnetic pen sensors are one and the same element, leading to a significant cost reduction." Chemical Science is general-readership magazine published by the Royal Society of Chemistry in the UK.
http://www.rsc.org/Publishing/ChemScience/Volume/2007/04/Organic_magnetoresistance.asp

UI Cochlear Implant Research Is Analyzed (ScienceAlert, March 29)
Analysis of University of Iowa data indicates that profoundly deaf people can benefit from cochlear implants in both ears. The data was collected from more than 180 patients (including about 40 with implants in both ears) in the COCHLEAR IMPLANT PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the largest-scale subjective assessment of cochlear implants to be undertaken so far. ScienceAlert originates in Australia and New Zealand.
http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20073003-14690.html

New Gallery Named For UI Alumnus (Fergus Falls Daily Journal, March 29)
Charles Beck, who earned a Master of Fine Arts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has been honored by the dedication of a new gallery bearing his name. The Charles Beck Gallery is a newly constructed addition to the campus of Minnesota State Community and Technical College in Fergus Falls. Beck will present a retrospective exhibit of his work in the gallery through August. The recently established Charles Beck Endowment, through the Fergus Area College Foundation, provides visual arts scholarships and support to expand the permanent collection by purchasing works from artists throughout central Minnesota and beyond.
http://www.fergusfallsjournal.com/news/2007/mar/29/college-ensures-artistic-legacy-lives/

UI Alumnus Receives Congressional Gold Medal (MainLineLife.com, March 29)
A story about Tuskegee Airman Luther H. Smith receiving the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor notes that after being injured in his final mission, Smith went on to complete his engineering studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and then worked as an aerospace engineer with General Electric Co. for 37 years. MainLineLife.com is a news organization that covers suburban Philadelphia.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=18142761&BRD=1597&PAG=461&dept_id=188818&

Researchers Use Hypnosis To Ease Pain (WTVF-TV, March 29)
About half of the 50 million Americans suffering from chronic pain don't benefit from standard treatment. That's why doctors are searching for other ways to stop the ache. University of Iowa researchers are using hypnosis to ease pain. Research shows the technique may actually change the way the brain processes pain. "Hypnosis is effective probably in the range 65 to 70 percent," said SEBASTIAN SCHULZ-STUBNER, M.D., Ph.D., an anesthesiologist with the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. The TV station serves Nashville, Tenn.
http://www.newschannel5.com/Global/story.asp?S=5577590&nav=menu374_2_8

Cities See Rise In Black Muslims (North County Times, March 29)
Following what appears to be a trend in cities nationwide, religious leaders in Pittsburgh say there has been a rise in black conversions to Sunni Islam since the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks. No national surveys have been taken to confirm the increase, but Islamic religious leaders in Chicago, Cleveland and Detroit have also reported growth, said Lawrence Mamiya, a professor of religion and Africana studies at New York's Vassar College. RICHARD TURNER, coordinator of the African-American studies program at the University of Iowa and an expert on Islam among blacks, said since Sept. 11, Muslims have been attempting to "disseminate positive information about the religion, so the obvious outcome of that would be more conversions." The newspaper is based in California.
http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2007/03/29/faith/19_07_313_22_07.txt

UI Buys Internet Site Names (USA Today, March 29)
According to The Des Moines Register, University of Iowa has bought Internet names for seven sites that could be used to impugn football coach Kirk Ferentz, basketball coaches Steve Alford and Lisa Bluder and athletics director Gary Barta. "It's kind of a sad commentary that we needed to do this," associate athletics director RICK KLATT told the newspaper. "But it struck me last fall that this was probably the prudent thing to do on behalf of our staff, so I went ahead and purchased a handful of sites." Despite Klatt's efforts, Iowa was unable to secure firestevealford.com. It already had been bought and is in operation. The embattled coach left for New Mexico on Friday.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/2007-03-29-web_N.htm?csp=34

Edwards Weathers Test After Wife's Health Crisis (New York Times, March 28)
A statewide poll conducted by University of Iowa political scientists CAROLINE TOLBERT and DAVID REDLAWSK is the first indication of how Elizabeth Edwards' health crisis and the propriety of John Edwards' ongoing campaign is affecting the opinions of voters in Iowa. Their poll was taken from March 19 to 25, with Elizabeth Edwards' health revelation on March 22 at the midpoint. Half of the respondents were questioned before the announcement and half after. Among those respondents deemed likely Democratic Party caucus-goers in the pre-announcement group, John Edwards led the Democratic candidate field by drawing 30 percent, compared to 24 percent for New York Democratic Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton and 22 percent for Illinois Sen. Barack Obama. Among the post-announcement group, Edwards had 36 percent support -- an uptick of six percentage points -- to 33 percent for Clinton, the front-runner in nationwide Democratic candidate preference polls, whose support in the second group was nine points higher than in the first. Obama ran third among those interviewed in the second half of the poll with 14 percent, an 8-point drop-off compared with first-half respondents. Tolbert said she was surprised by what they found. "We thought that it would have a negative effect," Tolbert said of the news about Elizabeth Edwards' health. The article originally appeared in CONGRESSIONAL QUARTERLY.
http://www.nytimes.com/cq/2007/03/28/cq_2485.html

UI Shootings Inspired Movie (University Business, March 28)
On Nov. 1, 1991, outraged that his doctoral thesis had been passed over for an academic prize, a young physicist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA named Gang Lu opened fire at a physics department meeting. He killed five people and paralyzed another before taking his own life. The shootings devastated Iowa City and shocked a nation not normally used to thinking of physics as a life-and-death pursuit. Now they have been transformed into a celluloid nightmare for the rest of us. At the Sundance Film Festival in January, "Dark Matter," a fictional account inspired by the shootings, won the Alfred P. Sloan Prize for the best feature film dealing with science or technology.
http://www.universitybusiness.com/newssummary.aspx?news=yes&postid=2391

Movie Based On UI Shootings (International Herald Tribune, March 28)
On Nov. 1, 1991, outraged that his doctoral thesis had been passed over for an academic prize, a young physicist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA named Gang Lu opened fire at a physics department meeting. He killed five people and paralyzed another before taking his own life. The shootings devastated Iowa City and shocked a nation not used to thinking of physics as a life-and-death pursuit. Now they have been transformed into a celluloid nightmare. At the Sundance Film Festival in January, "Dark Matter," a fictional account inspired by the shootings, won the Alfred P. Sloan Prize for the best feature film dealing with science or technology -- "not a genre that attracts a lot of people to work on," in the words of Brian Greene, a physicist, mathematician and author from Columbia University who was on the panel of judges.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/03/27/news/dark.php

Plame Scraps Florida Visit As Legal Issues Persist (Gainsville Sun, March 28)
Outed CIA officer Valerie Plame has canceled her April 11 visit to the University of Florida. Plame, whose identity was revealed in a 2003 syndicated column by Robert Novak, canceled because she's still sorting out legal issues related to her upcoming book, according to Accent, the student-run speakers bureau that invited Plame. Plame also canceled a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA this week, due to "pending legal issues," according to a statement by the university's lecture committee. The Gainsville Sun is published in Florida.
http://www.gainesville.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070328/LOCAL/703280332/-1/news

Journalers Say Writing Salves Ailments (Lansing State Journal, March 28)
Longtime journalers say getting thoughts down on paper, the computer screen or even a handy cocktail napkin has the power to heal and pinpoint one's life purpose. The promotion of expressive writing on shows such as "Oprah" has led bookstores to stock dozens of journals tailor-made for any conceivable chronicle: addiction recovery, weight loss, relationships or gratitude. The journaler's testimony about the healing properties of writing can sound fantastical and magical -- "it changed my life" is common -- but it is buttressed by research. A 2002 study in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine found that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who journaled about their emotions and tried to understand stressful events saw improvements in their relationships, personal strength, spirituality and appreciation for life.
http://www.lsj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070328/LIFE/703280314/1079/life

Director Heads To Palestinian Territories (Guardian Unlimited, March 28)
A Chinese director banned from making movies in his home country is now planning a film about a Palestinian who is abandoned by his wife after being imprisoned for 10 years in an Israeli jail. Lou Ye, whose film Summer Palace was feted at Cannes last year but earned him and producer Nai An a five-year ban from making movies in China, is currently raising money to make The Last Hour. The project is based on a play written by Palestinian writer Mazen Saadeh. Saadeh, who also works as a documentary-maker, is adapting the play for screen. Lou and Saadeh first came into contact when they both attended a workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last year. The Guardian Unlimited is published in the United Kingdom.
http://film.guardian.co.uk/news/story/0,,2044564,00.html

Pearl Not Interested In Iowa (The Columbia Daily Herald, March 28)
Bruce Pearl says he's happy at Tennessee and won't consider leaving now. The men's basketball coach was contacted Tuesday by Iowa athletic director GARY BARTA, who got clearance the night before from Tennessee athletic director Mike Hamilton to talk to Pearl, a former Iowa assistant. Pearl told Barta he was not leaving Tennessee, and then he wanted fans to know. "I'm putting it out there just as fast as I can because I don't want it to be a concern of our fans, and I want to demonstrate my loyalty and my commitment to this program. I appreciate very much being here, so I don't want them to worry about me going anywhere," Pearl told The Associated Press on Tuesday. "This is where I want to be. I want to be here as long as they'll be happy with me here." The newspaper is published in Columbia, Tenn. Associated Press Sports Writer Luke Meredith in Des Moines contributed to this story. Versions of this story were also published in commercialappeal.com, an online Memphis publication, The Chatanoogan, ESPN.com and SI.com, among others.
http://www.columbiadailyherald.com/articles/2007/03/28/sports/5pearl.txt

Baseball Player Co-Founded Project 3000 (Miami Herald, March 27)
In September, Chicago Cubs first baseman Derrek Lee, and Boston Celtics CEO and owner Wyc Grousbeck founded Project 3000, which is a cause to help find a cure for Lebers Congenital Amaurosis, a disease that leads to blindness. Project 3000 is in conjunction with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, which is working on a cure. "There are 3,000 people with LCA," said Lee, who plans to pay for the diagnosis of each. "The more they test, the more they can learn about it, and we are going to do everything we can do to find a cure." http://www.miamiherald.com/588/story/54071.html

Gurnett Investigates Saturn's Rotation Measurements (CaribJournal, March 27)
NASA and European Space Agency scientists have found Saturn's moon Enceladus affects Saturn's magnetic field, making it rotate slower than the planet. That phenomenon, said astronomers, makes it nearly impossible to measure the length of the Saturn day. "No one could have predicted the little moon Enceladus would have such an influence on the radio technique that has been used for years to determine the length of the Saturn day," said DON GURNETT of the University of Iowa, principal investigator of the radio-plasma wave science experiment onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini spacecraft. The Carib Journal is a U.S.-based news source for all islands of the Caribbean region.
http://caribjournal.com/2007/03/27/saturns-rotation-measurements-are-wrong/

McLeod: Guest Judges On AI For Publicity (Baltimore Sun, March 27)
A story about celebrity coaches/judges on "American Idol" notes that some music experts have been less than impressed by the suggestions that contestants have received. "These celebrity coaches are on the show because they want to push their latest record, or bolster their fans' memory of them," says KEMBREW MCLEOD, a music critic and communications professor at the University of Iowa. "I can't imagine that each singer gets more than 15 minutes with each celebrity, so the advice they're given isn't very deep."
http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/bal-to.idol27mar27,0,244883.story?track=rss

Koenigs Studies Emotional Response To Moral Dilemmas (Financial Express, March 27)
It is the hoariest dilemma in undergraduate moral-philosophy classes: how do you pick the lesser of two evils? Often the problem is posed as the runaway-railway-wagon paradox. Given a choice between deliberately pushing someone in front of the wagon, in order to slow it down sufficiently for five people further down the line to escape, and allowing the five to die that the one may live, what should you do? Conversely, given a choice of throwing a set of points so that the wagon will go down a line where it will kill only one person, as opposed to five down the other line, what should you do? On the face of things, the outcomes are identical in both situations. Either one person dies or five do. But, whereas most people have no difficulty choosing which is better in the second case (to kill one rather than five), the first usually causes paroxysms of guilt. Moral philosophers have spent years discussing this paradox. It has, however, taken a team of neuroscientists, led by MICHAEL KOENIGS of the University of Iowa and Liane Young of Harvard University, to come up with at least part of the real answer. The Financial Express is published in India.
http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=159083

Astros Broadcaster Hamilton Hosts UI Mates (Houston Chronicle, March 27)
The Houston Astros' Hall of Fame broadcaster Milo Hamilton hosted 12 of his UNIVERSITY OF IOWA classmates from the 1950s on Monday at Osceola County Stadium. Jeff Liebermann, of the University of Iowa Foundation, and former Des Moines Register sportswriter Buck Turnbull were also in attendance. Second-year Astros radio voice Brett Dolan, an Iowa graduate, visited with Liebermann.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/bb/4663792.html

Tuskegee Airman Graduated From UI (Delco Times, March 27)
A story about a ceremony today honoring the Tuskegee Airmen of World War II notes that one of them, Luther Smith, earned his degree in mechanical engineering from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA after he had recuperated from injuries received when his plane was shot down by the Germans. The Times is published in Pennsylvania.
http://www.delcotimes.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=18130108&BRD=1675&PAG=461&dept_id=18171&rfi=6

Sundance Award-Winning Movie Based On UI Shootings (New York Times, March 27)
On Nov. 1, 1991, outraged that his doctoral thesis had been passed over for an academic prize, a young physicist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA named Gang Lu opened fire at a physics department meeting. He killed five people and paralyzed another before taking his own life. The shootings devastated Iowa City and shocked a nation not normally used to thinking of physics as a life-and-death pursuit. Now they have been transformed into a celluloid nightmare for the rest of us. At the Sundance Film Festival in January, "Dark Matter," a fictional account inspired by the shootings, won the Alfred P. Sloan Prize for the best feature film dealing with science or technology. Professors and graduates say the movie, which stars Aidan Quinn and Meryl Streep, provides an accurate view into the pressure-packed life of graduate students studying science.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/27/science/27dark.html?ex=1175659200&en=163289dc9f2f976b&ei=5040&partner=MOREOVERFEATURES

A sidebar to this story also refers to the shootings:
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/27/science/27murd.html?ex=1175659200&en=47b264eb2c82c6e5&ei=5040&partner=MOREOVERFEATURES

Final Freedman Book Published (Inside Higher Ed, March 27)
An essay is excerpted from the book "Finding The Words," the autobiography of James O. Freedman, who was president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before leaving to become president of Dartmouth University. The book, Freedman's last before he died of cancer last year, has just been published by Princeton University Press.
http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2007/03/27/freedman

Wilson Speaks At UI (WQAD-TV, March 27)
Former Ambassador Joe Wilson said in a lecture at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Monday night that that the U.S. needs to rely more on diplomacy to win the Iraq war and prevent more bloodshed. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6283370&nav=1sW7ItKc

Gurnett: Moon Makes Measuring Saturn's Day Difficult (The Register, March 26)
The problem for those trying to determine the length of a day on Saturn lies in the technique traditionally used to discover how fast a gas giant is rotating. The radio technique measures the rotation of the planet by taking its radio pulse rate -- the rhythm of natural radio signals from the planet. If something is slowing the planet's magnetic field, this won't work. But this is exactly the problem facing scientists right now: the moon Enceladus is weighing down the gas giant's magnetic field to such an extent that the planet's field is being slowed down. This makes the radio technique as useful as a chocolate fireguard. "No one could have predicted that the little moon Enceladus would have such an influence on the radio technique that has been used for years to determine the length of the Saturn day," said Dr. DON GURNETT of the University of Iowa, principal investigator on the radio and plasma wave science experiment on NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The Register is based in the United Kingdom.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/03/26/saturn_rotation/

UI Studying Crocodile Fossils (USA Today, March 26)
Fossils of the "Crook County Croc," discovered in the Oregon desert, are being studied for two years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The six- to eight-foot long crocodile, Thalattosuchia, lived more than 160 million years ago during the Jurassic era. Remarkably, the croc had a fish tail (although its exact shape remains in contention), which along with the needle teeth found in the skull must have made it swift predator at sea. http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/columnist/vergano/2007-03-25-crocodile-fossil_N.htm

Weiger Performance Praised (Peoria Journal Star, March 26)
After covering Saturday's Peoria Symphony Orchestra concert, critic Gary Panetta wrote that a "highlight consisted of guest soloists Marcia Henry Liebenow, the symphony's concert master, and MARK WEIGER, an oboe player and professor at the University of Iowa." The paper is based in Illinois.
http://www.pjstar.com/stories/032607/MUS_BCOC1N3E.026.php

Hall of Fame Athlete Has Iowa Doctorate (Reno Gazette-Journal, March 26)
Alex Boyd is one of 19 black athletes in the University of Nevada's Hall of Fame, but he is a pro in something other than sports. He earned a doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1981, and has been an academic administrator in Chicago. "That's what really helped me," he said. "When everything else is in place, the doctorate is something that can help you move to the next level."
http://news.rgj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070326/NEWS10/703260334/1016/NEWS

Erik Lie Comments On Steve Jobs Future (San Francisco Chronicle, March 25)
Will Steve Jobs lose his job in the stock-option backdating scandal? Companies routinely backdated the exercise price to a date before an earnings report, and less frequently, before a product introduction, said ERIK LIE, a professor at the University of Iowa's business school, who has reviewed other companies caught in the stock-options scandal. Unlike other companies being investigated, Apple's stock was not at its lowest when Steve Jobs was given options. Then again, some companies "didn't pick the lowest price because it'd look too suspicious every time," Lie said. "I believe a lot of decision-makers are clever about this. They don't want to be too greedy."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/03/25/BUGBROQASG1.DTL

Columnist Comments On UI Website Buys (Ft. Wayne Journal Gazette, March 25)
Sport columnist Ben Smith writes about the University of Iowa's decision to buy the domain names for Websites that could be used to post information critical about Hawkeye coaches and athletics staff. Among those the sites target are football coach KIRK FERENTZ, women's basketball coach LISA BLUDER, athletic director GARY BARTA and now-former men's basketball coach STEVE ALFORD. "We're simply attempting to protect an institutional staff member from today's environment," RICK KLATT, associate athletics director of external affairs, told Randy Peterson of the Des Moines Register. Other columnists have also written about the situation, including those writing for the DAILY CAMERA in Boulder, Colo., and the LA DAILY NEWS in California.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/16971011.htm

Holstein Was Role Model For Actress (Sacramento Bee, March 25)
Sacramento Theatre Company actress Saffron Henke, a native of Iowa City, was asked who was her role model: "I have two: Rabbi JAY HOLSTEIN, a religion professor at the University of Iowa who took my breath away with his charisma, stage presence and passion. And Sandy McCallum, an great actor at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival who recently retired. He was a great mentor and support to me while I was at OSF, and I deeply admire him for his unexpected acts of kindness and generosity."
http://www.sacbee.com/155/story/142677.html

Dixon Advised Former Student (Morning Call, March 25)
It was 1985, and Donald Spieth was questioning his career. Sure, he was satisfied as conductor and music director of the four-year-old Lehigh Valley Chamber Orchestra. Yet he wondered about wandering through greener pastures. Spieth asked for advice from his University of Iowa mentor, JAMES DIXON, a fellow conductor and brass player who helped convince Spieth he should lead orchestras for a living. Dixon, a protege of Dimitri Mitropoulos, the late music director of the New York Philharmonic, told his protege to do what he had done: stay put. The Morning Call is published in Pennsylvania.
http://www.mcall.com/features/arts/all-spiethmar25,0,1008450.story

Crockett Coached At, Graduated From UI (Tallahassee Democrat, March 25)
Olympic volleyball star Rita Buck-Crockett, after two decades as a star athlete, became the coach at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she also finished her college degree. She now is owner-proprietor of two business enterprises with dreams of a third. She operates the North Florida Volleyball Academy as well as Rita Crockett Camps and Clinics. Her dream, though, is the establishment of a Tallahassee sports facility to be the training home for more sports and a broad spectrum of young people.
http://www.tallahassee.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070325/BUSINESS/703250318/1003

UI Experience Changed Sheronick's Path (Journal & Courier, March 25)
When he was a teenager, Yousif Sheronick wanted to be the next Neil Peart. He had an 11-piece drum kit with double kick drums, double floor toms and cymbals everywhere. Sheronick had awhile to reach the status of Rush's legendary drummer, but he was on his way. However, Sheronick's "bigger is better" theory on drumming came to a crashing halt when he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He witnessed a jazz instructor perform on a small three-piece kit, and Sheronick's musical path made a U-turn. The Journal & Courier is published in Indiana.
http://www.jconline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070325/ENT06/703250316

Neurologist Cited In Hoarding Article (The Sydney Morning Herald, March 24)
An article that challenges the theory that people with messy desks are more creative than those with tidy desks cites STEVEN ANDERSON, a University of Iowa neurologist. He explained in an article in Scientific American Mind last week that the urge to hoard is innate in humans and housed in a highly primitive part of the brain. In the harsh era preceding the advent of the 24-hour convenience store, its job was to protect us from starvation. This inner squirrel is still present in contemporary humans, it's just that it's more active in some than others.
http://www.smh.com.au/news/employment-news/garbage-collectors/2007/03/23/1174597833074.html

Stanford Honored For Dental Research (Medical News Today, March 24)
At the Opening Ceremonies of the 85th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), the 2007 Research in Prosthodontics and Implants Award was presented to Dr. CLARK M. STANFORD, Centennial Fund Professor for Clinical and Translational Research in the Dows Institute for Dental Research and in the Department of Prosthodontics, College of Dentistry, University of Iowa, and Professor, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery in the UI College of Medicine. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=65821

Diehl's Book Cited On NPR (Morning Edition, March 24)
The report begins, "The first class that HUSTON DIEHL taught was a group of fourth-graders at Morton Elementary School in Louisa County, Va. It was 1970, in the waning days of officially sanctioned segregation -- of separate and, as Diehl would learn, decidedly unequal schooling. Diehl, now a professor of English at the University of Iowa, describes her experiences teaching in the rural South in a new book, 'Dream Not of Other Worlds: Teaching in a Segregated Elementary School, 1970.'" The report interviewed Diehl and Matilda Beauford, who was one of her students.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=9074320

UI Hygienic Lab Promotes Flu Testing (eMaxHealth, March 24)
The UI Hygienic Laboratory is assisting clinical laboratories throughout Iowa that perform rapid influenza testing to prepare for their role in a pandemic influenza outbreak with a two-part influenza surveillance and biosafety program. "The laboratories taking part in this important training are considered sentinel labs because they are among the first to receive specimens for testing, which means that they also are on the front lines of any epidemics," said UHL Interim Director CHRIS ATCHISON. "It is critical that we supply these scientists with the latest training on how to prepare for an outbreak and handle specimens on a routine basis as well as during an outbreak." TRISHA KREMAN, a microbiologist, and SANDY JIRSA, supervisor of virology, helped develop the program and have been traveling throughout Iowa to deliver it onsite to laboratories.
http://www.emaxhealth.com/90/10482.html

Redlawsk Comments On Edwards' Announcement (New York Times, March 24)
Will the announcement of John Edwards' wife's cancer affect the campaign? DAVID REDLAWSK, an associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, said he thought the passions stirred by the decision to continue in the race could have a continuing impact, strengthening support for the Edwards campaign among some people, eroding it among others. "It was a very emotional feeling to watch this," said Redlawsk, who has worked for Democrats and Republicans but backed Mr. Edwards in the 2004 Iowa Caucuses. "You could see the connection these two have to each other, John and Elizabeth," he said. "For me it went to my core."
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/24/us/politics/24illness.html?_r=1

Rego Comments On Customer Service (Motley Fool, March 24)
Are we modern consumers too demanding? Or is good customer service hard to find these days? It's definitely not in our imaginations, agrees Professor LOPO REGO, an assistant professor in the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business. Rego, who studies customer service and satisfaction, says, "All measures of customer service and customer satisfaction have declined significantly, especially in the past 10 years."
http://www.fool.com/personal-finance/shopping/2007/03/24/right-customer-service-wrongs.aspx

Columnist Weighs In On UI Domain Purchases (Post-Crescent, March 24)
Columnist Mike Woods wrote. "News: The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, in an effort to be proactive when it comes to Web sites that rip college coaches, have purchased seven domain names, including firekirkferentz.com, in order to keep them off the market. Views: Give the school credit for trying to curb these cesspools of mean-spirited misinformation fueled by the uninformed and overly intoxicated. That said, I hope they have a lot of money." The Post-Crescent is published in Appleton, Wis.
http://www.postcrescent.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070324/APC02/703240662/1892/APCsports

Lowe Promotes Smoking Cessation (eMaxHealth, March 23)
"Research tells us that smokers know they shouldn't smoke because of the health aspects," said JOHN LOWE, professor and head of community and behavioral health in the University of Iowa College of Public Health. "We need to focus smoking cessation efforts on improving the quality of their lives. Although physical addiction is an important issue to overcome, people can also use the nicotine replacement aids while they are overcoming the biggest problem, which is psychological addiction," said Lowe, who also is a member of the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the UI.
http://www.emaxhealth.com/58/10455.html

Astronaut Will Take UI Art Into Space (Post-Bulletin, March 23)
A little piece of Iowa will go into space this fall. Peggy Whitson, a NASA astronaut originally from Mount Ayr, is scheduled to launch from Russia in October on a Soyuz to the International Space Station, where she is expected to spend six months. Among her belongings will be a 12-by-18-inch piece of hand-made paper carrying words of advice and encouragement from students in the University of Iowa's Women in Science and Engineering program. CHRIS BRUS, director of the women in science program, said the offer came from Whitson's mother, Beth Whitson, last fall. The paper will be certified as having been in space by NASA and framed at the UI when it returns. The Post-Bulletin originates in Austin, Minn.
http://www.postbulletin.com/newsmanager/templates/localnews_story.asp?a=288517&z=2

Breder, Mendieta Discussed (Art.net, March 23)
An article on "The Contemporary and the Historical" discusses HANS BREDER and his influence on Ana Mendieta. Donald Kuspit wrote, "Mendieta was Breder's student at the University of Iowa and became his lover. They worked together for some 10 years. Indeed, he taught her virtually all she knew."
http://www.artnet.com/Magazine/features/kuspit/kuspit4-14-05.asp

UI Research Finds Cleft Palate Mutations (News Rx, March 23)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
researchers and collaborators have identified new genetic mutations that likely cause the common form of cleft lip and palate. The results could eventually help clinicians predict a family's risk of having more children with the condition. News Rx is an Internet site for medical news.
http://www.newsrx.com/newsletters/Genomics-and-Genetics-Weekly/2007-03-23/19032320079JW.html

Turner Comments On Black Muslims (Times Leader, March 23)
Following what appears to be a trend in cities nationwide, religious leaders in Pittsburgh say there has been a rise in black conversions to Sunni Islam since the Sept. 11 terror attacks. No national surveys have been taken to confirm the increase, but Islamic religious leaders in Chicago, Cleveland and Detroit have also reported growth. RICHARD TURNER, coordinator of the African-American studies program and an expert on Islam among blacks at the University of Iowa, said since Sept. 11, Muslims have been attempting to "disseminate positive information about the religion, so the obvious outcome of that would be more conversions." The Times Leader is based in northwestern Pennsylvania. The Associated Press story appeared on the Web sites of MSNBC and other news organizations.
http://www.timesleader.com/mld/timesleader/news/state/16959148.htm

UI Research: Brain Damage Can Affect Moral Judgment (EMax Health, March 23)
In the current issue of the journal Nature, researchers from the California Institute of Technology, Harvard University, the University of Iowa, and the University of Southern California report that experimental tests on patients with prefrontal cortex damage reveal for the first time that emotions play an important role in feelings about what is right and wrong. According to RALPH ADOLPHS, who holds joint appointments at Caltech and the UI Department of Neurology where the patients were tested, the results are important because they transfer the study of moral judgments from the realm of philosophical speculation to the realm of the experimental laboratory. "The idea that emotions play a part in moral judgments is not new, but our study gives a stronger conclusion because it involves data from lesion subjects," says Adolphs.
http://www.emaxhealth.com/85/10426.html

Story Explains Iowa Electronic Markets (MSNBC, March 22)
The longest-running online market for political prognostication is up and running -- and there are already a couple of front-runners.  For now, it's Obama and Giuliani. The idea behind the Iowa Electronic Markets is relatively simple, if unorthodox: You trade contracts in the various candidates or parties as if they were offerings on a commodities market, at prices ranging from zero to $1. After the election, each contract pays off $1 if you predicted the correct outcome -- and nothing for the losers. "We like to say this is not rocket science, it's just a case of putting your money where your mouth is," said GEORGE NEUMANN, an economics professor at the University of Iowa and one of the market's inventors.
http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2007/03/22/98973.aspx

Neurology Of Morality Explored By UI Researchers (The Economist, March 22)
Moral philosophers have spent years discussing the lesser of two evils. It has, however, taken a team of neuroscientists, led by Michael Koenigs, formerly of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and Liane Young of Harvard University, to come up with at least part of the real answer.
http://economist.com/science/displaystory.cfm?story_id=8881470

UI Participates In Study (Fox News, March 22)
Scientists may have pinpointed the area in the brain where morality and emotions clash in dicey situations. The area is the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPC), report the researchers. Patients with damage to this region of the brain were quick to choose seemingly immoral choices when faced with life and death situations. The study has implications for the origins of human nature, and what happens emotions are taken out of decision making. Michael Koenigs, Ph.D., of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, worked on the study while on staff in the neurology division of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. The story also appeared at MedicineNet.com
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,260420,00.html?sPage=fnc.health/neurology

Crocodile Fossils Will Be Studied At UI (National Geographic, March 22)
The fossil remains of a crocodile-like reptile called Thalattosuchia have been discovered in rocks in the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon-about 5,000 miles from where it most likely died. The newfound fossils will go to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for further study before going on display at an Oregon museum.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/03/070322-crocodile.html

Philibert Mental Health Research Cited (Jewish Exponent, March 22)
Available blood tests for panic disorder and other mental-health conditions are potentially around the corner, according to results from a new study initiated by the University of Iowa. The findings, based on analysis of genetic information in immature white blood cells, just appeared in the online version of the American Journal of Medical Genetics. "The ability to test for panic disorder is a quantum leap in psychiatry," said the study's lead author, ROBERT PHILIBERT, M.D., Ph.D., professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa's Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.
http://www.jewishexponent.com/article/12484/

UI Basketball Players: Alford Headed for New Mexico (USA Today, March 22)
The court of public opinion played a part in STEVE ALFORD resigning as the Iowa men's basketball coach Thursday to accept the same job Friday at New Mexico. "Around here, he was getting a bunch of slander and everything," Iowa junior center Seth Gorney said after Alford announced his decision to the team late Thursday afternoon in the Carver-Hawkeye Arena locker room. "It boggled my mind. If they don't know him, then why would they want to judge him? I don't think it's fair." Alford will be announced as Ritchie McKay's replacement at a press conference today (Friday, March 23) in Albuquerque.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/mensbasketball/2007-03-22-alford-new-mexico_N.htm

UI Research: Day Length Hard To Measure In Saturn (Post Chronicle, March 22)
NASA and European Space Agency scientists have found Saturn's moon Enceladus affects Saturn's magnetic field, making it rotate slower than the planet. That phenomenon, said astronomers, makes it nearly impossible to measure the length of the Saturn day. "No one could have predicted the little moon Enceladus would have such an influence on the radio technique that has been used for years to determine the length of the Saturn day," said DON GURNETT of the University of Iowa, principal investigator of the radio-plasma wave science experiment onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini spacecraft. The Post Chronicle is based in St. Joseph, Mo. The story also appeared on RedOrbit.com and the Web sites of other news organizations.
http://www.postchronicle.com/news/science/article_21270649.shtml

Story Explains Iowa Electronic Markets (MSNBC, March 22)
The longest-running online market for political prognostication is up and running -- and there are already a couple of front-runners. For now, it's Obama and Giuliani. The idea behind the Iowa Electronic Markets is relatively simple, if unorthodox: You trade contracts in the various candidates or parties as if they were offerings on a commodities market, at prices ranging from zero to $1. After the election, each contract pays off $1 if you predicted the correct outcome -- and nothing for the losers. "We like to say this is not rocket science, it's just a case of putting your money where your mouth is," said GEORGE NEUMANN, an economics professor at the University of Iowa and one of the market's inventors.
http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2007/03/22/98973.aspx

Study Examines Brain Injury And Moral Choices (New York Times, March 22)
Damage to an area of the brain behind the forehead, inches behind the eyes, transforms the way people make moral judgments in life-or-death situations, scientists reported Thursday. In a new study, people with this rare injury expressed increased willingness to kill or harm another person if doing so would save others' lives. The findings are the most direct evidence that humans' native revulsion to hurting others relies on a part of neural anatomy, one that evolved before the higher brain regions responsible for analysis and planning. The researchers, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and other institutions, had people with the injury respond to moral challenges. In one, they had to decide whether to divert a runaway boxcar that was about to kill a group of five workmen. To save the workers they would have to flip a switch, sending the car hurtling into another man, who would be killed. They favored flipping the switch, just as the group without injuries did. A third group, with brain damage that did not affect the ventromedial cortex, made the same decision. The story also appeared in the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE; a similar story appeared in SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/22/science/22brain.htm

Study Shows Empathy Is Hard-Wired Into The Mind (Los Angeles Times, March 22)
Damage to the part of the brain that controls social emotions changes the way people respond to thorny moral problems, demonstrating the role of empathy and other feelings in life-or-death decisions. Asked to resolve hypothetical dilemmas -- such as tossing a person from a bridge into the path of a trolley to save five others -- people with damage to their ventromedial prefrontal cortex tended to sacrifice one life to save many, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal Nature. People with intact brains were far less likely to kill or harm someone when confronted with the same scenarios. Researchers from USC, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Harvard University and Caltech posed 50 hypothetical scenarios to six people whose ventromedial prefrontal cortices were damaged by strokes or tumors. Their responses were compared to those given by 12 people without brain damage and 12 others with damage in brain areas that regulate other emotions, such as fear. Researchers found no difference among groups in their responses to scenarios with no moral content, such as turning a tractor left to harvest turnips.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-sci-empathy22mar22,1,4026811.story?coll=la-news-a_section

Neuroscientists Trace Moral Choices (The Daily Telegraph, March 22)
We are unable to distinguish right from wrong if we rely on pure logic alone, according to a study that shows how morality is based on feelings. Neuroscientists traced abnormal moral choices -- notably cold-blooded "utilitarian" judgments, in which one person's life is sacrificed for the greater good -- to damaged emotional circuits, revealing how, in these cases, moral judgment fails without feelings. The discovery was made by researchers at the University of Southern California, Harvard University, Caltech and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA after studying six people with damage to the VMPC who behaved in a matter-of-fact way when considering difficult choices. The newspaper is based in Great Britain.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/03/22/nmoral22.xml

Brain Region Is Key To Moral Choices (Bloomberg, March 22)
Scientists have discovered a region of the brain that may be key to making decisions that involve moral or emotional factors. Damage to the region makes people more likely to make some decisions without regard to their own feelings or those of others, said researchers led by MICHAEL KOENIGS, a University of Iowa neuroscientist in Iowa City. The area, called the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, is located toward the front and center of the brain, in a region long known to align actions with thoughts and objectives. When posed with moral dilemmas, such as whether to sacrifice one person's life to save a group, people who have damage in that section consistently opted for a "utilitarian" response, even though it might require them to inflict harm, the study said.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601082&sid=aE.cHM.8Vwm8&refer=canada

Author Attended Writers' Workshop (Los Angeles Weekly, March 21)
Peruvian-born author Daniel Alarcón new book "Lost City Radio" is the culmination of nearly eight years of research and writing that establishes Alarcón as a major new literary talent, says the writer of this profile, which notes Alarcón attended the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa.
http://www.laweekly.com/general/features/between-the-lost-and-the-found/15928/

UI Study: Antidepressants Help Stroke Patients (Therapeutics Daily, March 21)
Antidepressants may boost brain function in people who have had a stroke. Impaired brain function is common -- and often permanent -- after a stroke, but a new study suggests that if the patient is treated with antidepressants, not only can cognitive ability improve, but also social capabilities. Scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Carver College of Medicine studied 47 stroke patients admitted to a rehabilitation center. Some were given the antidepressant Prozac, others an older treatment called nortriptyline and still others, an inactive placebo. Registration is required to view this story online.
http://www.therapeuticsdaily.com/news/article.cfm?contentValue=1282638&contentType=sentryarticle&channelID=30

Loss of UI Faculty Blamed On Poor Pay (University Business, March 21)
The loss of 48 faculty members at Iowa State University and 67 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last academic year is being blamed on low pay by university leaders. Gov. Chet Culver has promised that he will fully fund university salary requests, which university officials hope will help stem the loss. Stories on the same topic appeared on the Web sites of INSIDE HIGHER ED and THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION.
http://www.universitybusiness.com/newssummary.aspx?news=yes&postid=2336

Squire Comments On Brownback's Credentials (Kansas City Star, March 21)
A story about the presidential campaign of U.S. Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas notes that his main advantage, according to analysts, is his consistency on conservative issues. Said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor: "He doesn't have some of the questions about his credentials that others do." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the BOSTON GLOBE, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, WYOMING NEWS, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, FORBES, FOX NEWS, GUARDIAN (UK), HOWELL (Utah) TIMES AND TRANSCRIPT, CONTRA COSTA TIMES of California, WHDH-TV in Massachusetts and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/news/state/16943466.htm

UI Researchers Participate In Cancer Study (San Antonio Express News, March 21)
Slightly fewer than half of all patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer live five years from the moment the doctor delivers the bad news. But those who do survive two or three years out have a better chance of living another five. Doctors just weren't sure exactly how much better that chance was, until now. A San Antonio-led group of researchers has calculated those "conditional" survival rates -- the five-year survival odds beginning a year or more after diagnosis --for head and neck cancers (excluding brain cancer), which account for 3 percent to 5 percent of all cancers. Such information has been available for breast, lung, brain, prostate and gastrointestinal cancers, but not head and neck cancer. The researchers, who also include surgeons from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, hope to refine the information and make it more sophisticated, to determine, for example, how often a patient should be screened after treatment to see if cancer has returned.
http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/metro/stories/MYSA032107.01B.headandneck.347a9b4.html

Ancient Crocodile Remains Analyzed At UI (Salem News, March 21)
An ancient sea-going crocodile has surfaced from the rocks of Crook County in eastern Oregon. Its discovery by the North American Research Group, whose members were digging for Jurassic-age mollusks known as ammonites, is another confirmation that the Blue Mountains consist of rocks that traveled from somewhere in the Far East, says a retired University of Oregon geologist. The remains -- about 50 percent of a 6- to 8-foot reptile, including long, needlepoint teeth -- were found imbedded in Jurassic rock on private property in the Snowshoe Formation of the Izee Terrane south of Dayville, Ore. The remains are being analyzed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The News is published in Oregon.
http://www.salem-news.com/articles/march202007/ancientcrocodile_032007.php

UI Study Showed Benefits Of Journaling (The Tennessean, March 20)
Longtime journalers say getting thoughts down on paper, the computer screen or even a handy cocktail napkin has the power to heal and pinpoint one's life purpose. A 2002 study in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine found that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who journaled about their emotions and tried to understand stressful events saw improvements in their relationships, personal strength, spirituality and appreciation for life. The newspaper is based in Nashville, Tenn.
http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2007703200319

Slate to Publish IEM Data (Slate.com, March 20)
Slate, the daily online magazine, has launched a 2008 Political Futures Database, which utilizes data from three prediction markets to forecast the outcome of 2008 Presidential and Congressional races. One From Tuesday march 20 until Election Day 2008, Slate will publish hourly updates of the key data from the three prediction markets: the Iowa Electronic Markets at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, ntrade.com, and Casualobserver.net, beginning with the Republican and Democratic Presidential primary races and adding 2008 Congressional races.
http://specials.slate.com/futures/2008/

Andersen Comments On Male Eating Problems (Virginian Pilot, March 20)
In a story about the increasing number of men who suffer from eating disorders, psychiatrist ARNOLD ANDERSEN, director of the eating disorders program at the University of Iowa and a widely recognized expert on male eating problems, said he has treated teenagers who developed bulimia or anorexia after failing to make a sports team where weight is paramount, such as wrestling. The article, which also appeared in the JACKSON HOLE (Wyo.) STAR TRIBUNE, originally appeared in the WASHINGTON POST. The newspaper is based in Virginia.
http://content.hamptonroads.com/story.cfm?story=121382&ran=110482

UI Athletic Department Buys Domain Names (Chicago Tribune, March 20)
Iowa's athletic department has bought the domain FireKirkFerentz.com from Redshirted.com, which sells the fireyourcoach.com sites. Type in FireKirkFerentz.com (or KirkFerentzMustGo.com) and you're automatically redirected to HawkeyeSports.com. Same goes for FireLisaBluder.com (women's basketball coach) and FireGaryBarta.com (athletic director). Marketing chief RICK KLATT said the goal was to provide some protection for Iowa's highest-profile employees for only about $175 per year.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/technology/chi-0703200172mar20,1,1336920.story?coll=chi-techtopheds-hed

UI Buys Rights To Web Sites (WQAD-TV, March 20)
The University of Iowa has bought the rights to seven Web sites in an effort to stem negative Internet chatter about firing college coaches. The include FireKirkFerentz.com FireLisaBluder.com and FireGaryBarta.com. Logging on to the sites will now take browsers to HawkeyeSports.com. Associate Athletic Director RICK KLATT says it's a "sad commentary" the university needed to do this, but it was "the prudent thing to do." WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6252340

Loss Of Faculty Members Tied To Pay (WQAD-TV, March 20)
University leaders are blaming the loss of 48 faculty members at Iowa State University and 67 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last academic year on low pay. Iowa Gov. Chet Culver has promised that he will fully fund university salary requests, which school officials hope will help stem the loss. The Iowa Board of Regents has asked for a $40 million salary appropriation to go toward salary increases. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6248247&nav=menu132_2

UI Cited In Story On Business School Competition (Business Weekly, March 19)
Business schools are boosting their admissions criteria because of fierce competition. The story notes that at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, more than 2,000 declared business majors are waiting to join a program designed for 1,300.
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_12/b4026067.htm

Writers' Workshop Was Blueprint For Top Canandian Program, (CBC, March 19)
The creative writing program at the University of British Columbia -- modeled on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP -- has become a major force in Canadian literature.
http://www.cbc.ca/arts/books/storiedfranchise.html

Carmichael And Tang Study Chinese Pollution (Innovations Report, March 19)
Most of the atmosphere-warming soot transported at high altitudes over the West Coast in spring comes from Asia, a new study by the Scripps Institute and the University of Iowa estimates. That continent generates more than 75 percent of the high-flying contamination, which is a type of particulate pollution known as black carbon. Iowa's GREGORY CARMICHAEL and YOUHUA TANG collaborated in the study. Innovations Report originates in Germany.
http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/earth_sciences/report-80876.html

UI Instrument Measures Mars Water (infoZine, March 19)
New measurements of Mars' south polar region indicate extensive frozen water. The polar region contains enough frozen water to cover the whole planet in a liquid layer approximately 36 feet deep. The measurements were accomplished by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) instrument on the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter. MARSIS was developed jointly by the Italian Space Agency and NASA, under the scientific supervision of the University of Rome "La Sapienza," in partnership with JPL and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. infoZine originates in Kansas City. This story is appearing widely.
http://www.infozine.com/news/stories/op/storiesView/sid/21712/

UI Research May Defeat Drug-Resistant Bacteria (News-Medical.net, March 19)
A new antimicrobial approach can kill bacteria in laboratory experiments and eliminate life-threatening infections in mice by interfering with a key bacterial nutrient. Research by the University of Washington, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Cincinnati will be featured in the April 2 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. News-Medical.net originates in Australia. This story is appearing internationally.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=22629

Havens Comments On 'Grey's Anatomy' (Gannett News Service, March 19)
Not counting "American Idol," among viewers ages 18 to 49 "Grey's Anatomy" has been the top-rated series on TV. TIM HAVENS, a University of Iowa professor of communications, says "Grey's" shares a quality with a certain 1980s cop show. "It is the first medical drama primarily centered on women characters, and I think that's really unique and I think a lot of women respond to that," he says. "Back in the '80s, 'Cagney & Lacey' was the first female-centered cop show and that was really talked about because it was new and I think this gives something new to women."
http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070319/LIFE/703190330/1005

UI Research Studied No-Fault Divorce (Journal Chretien, March 18)
An editorial opposing no-fault divorce notes that divorces initiated by women climbed to more than 70 percent when no-fault divorce was introduced, according to MARGARET BRINIG of the University of Iowa and Douglas Allen of Simon Fraser University. After analyzing 21 variables, Brinig and Allen concluded that "who gets the children is by far the most important component in deciding who files for divorce." Journal Chretien originates in France.
http://www.spcm.org/Journal/spip.php?article7505

Smiley Discusses New Novel (Star-Ledger, March 18)
Jane Smiley, a graduate and former faculty member of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, says of her new novel, "Ten Days in the Hills": "In 2002, I was reading 'The Decameron' for my nonfiction book, 'Thirteen Ways of Looking at the Novel.' I read 'The Decameron' at the same time as the anthrax scare. Our press was full of panic over a dozen anthrax cases. In Florence in the 14th century, 50 to 70 percent of the city was dying of the plague. Plagues were on my mind. The action in the novel had to be in a house far way from the center of things, as in 'The Decameron.'" The Star-Ledger is published in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/starledger/stories/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/1174196535270380.xml&coll=1

Amos Addresses Stress (Psychiatric Times, March 18)
Introducing a special report on "stress," Dr. JAMES AMOS, a clinical associate professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, writes "let's try to find the middle ground between the impulse to say there is no such thing as "stress" and the tendency to describe many explicit addressable issues under the monolithic term 'stress.'" Psychiatric Times originates in New York.
http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=189500563

Weiger Performs Bach In Peoria (Peoria Journal Star, March 18)
A dialogue with the devil, music that feeds the soul, an introspective look into what it means to be human -- these are a few of the things University of Iowa oboist MARK WEIGER hears in Bach's Concerto for Oboe and Violin, which he will play with the Peoria Symphony Orchestra. "The Bach piece feeds the soul," he said recently. "It absolutely does. It covers everything the oboe was meant to do, what it could do, matching the human voice, being a personal statement."
http://www.pjstar.com/stories/031807/CLA_BCL9UMP6.026.php

Woodrell Attended Writers' Workshop (News-Leader, March 18)
Daniel Woodrell came back to the Ozarks seeking a quiet, laid-back place where he could concentrate on the only true passion he's ever had: writing. His eighth novel, "Winter's Bone," is nominated for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for fiction this year, and one of his previous books was the basis for the 1999 film "Ride With the Devil." He enrolled at Kansas University at age 23 and studied creative writing. Then he applied, at the last minute, to the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa, where he realized that if he was going to write, he was going to go all out. No teaching. No day job. No other professional focus. "I was a kamikaze writer, really," he says. "I'd thrown everything away to be a writer." The News-Leader is published in Springfield, Mo.
http://www.news-leader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070318/ENTERTAINMENT/703180323/1005

Laroche Comments On Snack Trap (Washington Times, March 18)
To thousands of today's parents, life is now about Lunchables and Happy Meals, slices of pizza and candy kept around for bribes. Adults living with children consume more fat -- the equivalent of a 6-inch pepperoni pizza every week -- than adults who do not live with children, say doctors at the University of Iowa. "The study looked at adults with kids and adults living without kids," says Dr. HELENA LAROCHE, a University of Iowa physician and the lead author of the study. "We found that the adults with kids were eating more fat. The study doesn't tell us why they are consuming more fat, but it hints at it. A lot of parents are eating convenience food. Whether they buy it for the kids to eat or the kids are bringing it into the house, it may be a combination of factors."
http://washingtontimes.com/familytimes/20070318-121749-7036r.htm

Muslim Student Comments On Perceptions (Austin American-Statesman, March 17)
KAREEM SALAMA is described as a Muslim, a University of Iowa law student, and a country western singer. In the story, he acknowledges that "the vast majority of us (Muslims) don't fit the image of people have in their head." "Although, I understand why people have that image in their head," he added.
http://www.statesman.com/life/content/life/stories/faith/03/17/17flynn.html

Interest High In UI Presidential Search (WQAD-TV, March 17)
Some lawmakers say they'll attend a meeting next week of the University of Iowa president search committee. The search committee's chairman, DAVID JOHNSEN, who is dean of the university's College of Dentistry, says there are about 120 candidates to sort through. The committee is leading the search for a successor to David Skorton, who left the University of Iowa in June for the Cornell University presidency. WQAD is located in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6241703&nav=1sW7

Weller Cited On Technical Analysis (American Chronicle, March 17)
Technical analysis, also known as "charting" -- following the cyclical, geometric patterns of stock prices -- has been part of financial practice for many decades, but its practical value is beginning to be taken more seriously. PAUL WELLER of the Finance Department of the University of Iowa says, "trading rules are picking up patterns in the data not accounted for by standard statistical models." The American Chronicle originates in California.
http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/viewArticle.asp?articleID=22268

Antidepressant May Aid Post-Stoke Mentation (Reuters, March 16)
Impaired cognitive function is common and often permanent following stroke. However, new study findings suggest that treatment with antidepressants may help stroke sufferers recover brain function and improve psychological and social capacities. Dr. SERGIO PARADISO and associates at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City studied 47 stroke patients being admitted to a rehabilitation center. The only factor having a significant, independent effect on executive function was antidepressant treatment. These findings, the authors conclude, suggest that antidepressant medication may have a role after stroke, regardless of whether or not the individual shows signs of depression.
http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUSWRI67887420070316

Black Comments On Compulsive Buying (eMaxHealth.com, March 16)
Compulsive buying disorder has been around for decades, if not centuries, and often leads to financial difficulties and severe family and personal distress. "People do tend to trivialize this condition, and say it doesn't exist, that it's a minor behavioral problem or that it doesn't affect many people," said DONALD BLACK, M.D., professor of psychiatry in the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. "But this is a distinct, definable syndrome that affects many people and causes a lot of problems." Black, who first began researching compulsive buying in the early 1990s, published a review article on compulsive buying in the February 2007 issue of CNS Spectrums (the International Journal of Neuropsychiatric Medicine). In the article, he notes that examples of excessive spending have been well documented throughout modern history as in the cases of Marie Antoinette, Mary Todd Lincoln, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Princess Diana.
http://www.emaxhealth.com/37/10262.html

Helgeson Returns To Art (ThisWeek, March 16)
Photographer and landscape painter Scott Helgeson was halfway through a Master of Fine Arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA when he switched to business administration, a more acceptable choice to his family. Many years later, after a life-threatening illness led him to reassess his priorities, he has quit his "real job" and returned to art. "There's always been a longing to do the real creative stuff," said Helgeson, 52, who suffered a liver infection that spread through his body. "When I went in the hospital and left there, I decided I should probably do what I love doing, and do as much as I can." ThisWeek originates in Minnesota.
http://www.thisweek-online.com/2007/March/16DCpainter.html

Hygienic Lab Helps Set New Sanitation Standards (RTO Online, March 16)
The National Sanitation Foundation International (NSF) has developed a new protocol that will test and certify residential clothes washers to make sure they effectively sanitize laundry. The protocol was developed by a panel of experts including representatives from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silliker Laboratories, Stilwell Consulting, American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists and the Centre for Research on Environmental Microbiology. RTO Online covers the rent-to-own industry. The story is appearing in other appliance industry publications.
http://www.rtoonline.com/Content/Article/Mar07/WasherSanitizingProtocal031607.asp

Hovenkamp Comments On Microsoft (Financial Express, March 16)
On March 1 the competition division of the European Commission rolled out the heavy artillery against Microsoft. The company's sin: non-compliance with the Commission's earlier mandate that it make certain "interoperability information" available to vendors of work group server operating system products, so that they could develop and distribute these products" in competition with Microsoft's own. The reference to "interoperability" seems to mirror the identical language in the 2002 Consent Decree that ended the long standing battle between the U.S. Department of Justice and Microsoft. Microsoft's critics, such as HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa, denounced the DOJ consent decree as a sell out. The Financial Express originates in Bangladesh.
http://www.financialexpress-bd.com/index3.asp?cnd=3/17/2007&section_id=13&newsid=55660&spcl=no

Erik Lie Submits Affidavit In Canadian Case (Toronto Star, March 16)
An Ontario pension fund seeking to sue Research In Motion Ltd.'s audit committee on behalf of the company in a so-called derivative action added RIM's co-chief executives and its former chief financial officer to the proposed action. In addition, the Ironworkers submitted a supplemental affidavit from ERIK LIE in support of its case. Lie is an associate finance professor at the University of Iowa and one of the first academics to identify the stock-option-backdating trend.
http://www.thestar.com/Business/article/192497

Erik Lie Questions RIM Options Timing (Toronto Globe And Mail, March 16)
A stock options expert says the pattern of option grants at Research In Motion (RIM) Ltd. does not appear to be the result of an accidental misunderstanding of accounting rules, as the company's chief executive officer has suggested. In an affidavit filed yesterday in the Ontario Superior Court, University of Iowa professor ERIK LIE said his analysis of the dates selected by RIM to grant options shows they appeared to have "intentionally been set to coincide with particularly low prices."
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20070316.RRIM16/TPStory/Business

Jones Comments On Student Drinking (CNN, March 16)
University of Iowa administrator PHILLIP JONES appeared in the second segment of a two-part report on student drinking on "Lou Dobbs Tonight."
http://edition.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0703/16/ldt.01.html

Squire: Iowa 'Make Or Break' In Races (Christian Science Monitor, March 16)
The field of hopefuls is big in 2008, so Iowans may actually need the extra time to vet everyone. Moreover, come January, their caucus votes, are expected to hold even more sway over the nomination process than usual. With the presidential primary calendar becoming front-loaded with big states like California, candidates who don't perform well in Iowa and New Hampshire will have a harder time catching up to the early front-runners. "If you don't do well in Iowa, it will be hard to sustain your campaign much farther. For almost every candidate, Iowa will be make or break," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "We're seeing a lot of activity from the candidates and a surprising amount of attention from potential caucus-goers."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0316/p01s01-uspo.html?page=1

Jones Quoted In Story On Binge Drinking (Lou Dobbs Tonight, CNN, March 15)
A new study finds an inexcusable culture of acceptance on American campuses for alcohol and drug abuse. The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse reports 3.8 million college students binge drink and/or use drugs. PHILLIP JONES, vice president of student services at the University of Iowa, is quoted in the article.
http://edition.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0703/15/ldt.01.html

Lie Stock Option Work Cited In Court Case (Wall Street Journal, March 15)
An Ontario pension fund seeking to sue Research In Motion Ltd.'s (RIM) audit committee on behalf of the company in a so-called derivative action added RIM's co-chief executives and its former chief financial officer to the proposed action. The Ironworkers Ontario Pension Fund also named RIM director, Douglas Fregin, in the amended action filed in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice March 14. In addition, the Ironworkers submitted a supplemental affidavit from ERIK LIE in support of its case. Lie is an associate finance professor at the University of Iowa and one of the first academics to identify the stock-option-backdating trend.
http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20070315-716892.html?mod=tel-cts

Lie Comments On Research In Motion Case (CTV, March 15)
A stock options expert says the pattern of option grants at Research In Motion (RIM) Ltd. does not appear to be the result of an accidental misunderstanding of accounting rules, as the company's chief executive officer has suggested. In an affidavit filed Thursday in the Ontario Superior Court, University of Iowa professor ERIK LIE said his analysis of the dates selected by RIM to grant options shows they appeared to have "intentionally been set to coincide with particularly low prices." CTV is based in Canada.
http://ctv2.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20070315.wriiim0315/business/Business/businessBN/ctv-business

Obesity Surgery Complication Studied (Napa Valley Register, March 15)
Doctors warn that a few obesity surgery patients have developed a serious neurological condition, with symptoms of confusion and poor coordination, linked to a lack of vitamin B1. Wernicke encephalopathy, which is caused by a thiamine deficiency, is normally associated with severe alcoholism or chronic malnutrition. Sonal Singh, an instructor in internal medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, and ABHAY KUMAR of the University of Iowa co-authored a study for which they searched obesity surgery case histories dating back to the 1980s, locating 32 cases of Wernicke encephalopathy. They looked at symptoms and risk factors. Their findings are published in this week's issue of the journal Neurology. This story also appeared on the Web sites of the CONTRA COSTA TIMES of California, THE DENVER (Colo.) DAILY NEWS, THE SENTINEL of Carlisle, Pa., THE STAR TRIBUNE of Casper, Wyo., THE SUN NEWS of Myrtle Beach, S.C., the OMAHA WORLD HERALD, the WASHINGTON POST, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE and many other media outlets.
http://www.islandpacket.com/24hour/healthscience/story/3576415p-12825633c.html

Baylor Official Recalls Being 'Matched' To UI (KUHF Radio, March 15)
Baylor College of Medicine Senior Vice President and Dean of Clinical Affairs Dr. Jay Stein says he remembers his own match day 46 years ago. "The truth is that your life is much more affected by where you do your residency training than by where you go to medical school. So I was at University of Tennessee, and I got my little slip and it said I'm going to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and, so that changed my whole life. Three weeks after I got there I met my wife-to-be and so it's everything." KUHF is a public radio station based in Houston, Texas.
http://kuhf.convio.net/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=19668&news_iv_ctrl=1521

Cubs' Dempster Will Donate To 'Project 3000' (MLB.com, March 15)
For every game Chicago Cubs closer Ryan Dempster saves this season, he hopes to be able to save someone's eyesight. Dempster is making a $50,000 donation to teammate Derrek Lee's Project 3000 and will contribute $1,000 for every save in 2007. The mission of Project 3000 is to find a cure for Lebers Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), which has affected Lee's daughter, Jada, and resulted in a loss of vision in one eye. Project 3000 was created by Lee and Boston Celtics CEO and co-owner Wyc Grousbeck in September 2006. Their goal is to find every man, woman and child affected with LCA in the United States, which is believed to be about 3,000 people. The program, in conjunction with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, is hoping to find a cure.
http://chicago.cubs.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20070314&content_id=1842830&vkey=spt2007news&fext=.jsp&c_id=chc

UI Students Take Advantage Of Break Travel Packages (The Monitor, March 15)
Two UI students are mentioned in a story about Inertia Tours' spring break travel packages to South Padre Island in Texas. RIKI PRZYTULI, 21, and LINDSAY CHESS, 19, also found out about Inertia online. The students from the University of Iowa traveled with a group of friends to South Padre. "They had a plan," Chess said of the travel company. "There was something going on every night that we could count on." The Monitor is based in southern Texas.
http://www.themonitor.com/onset?db=monitortx&id=774&template=article.html

Candidates' Family Issues Are Fair Game (Christian Science Monitor, March 15)
For any candidate with personal issues they would rather not discuss, the early start to the presidential campaign is bad news. The press is constantly on the lookout for new angles, and tabloid fodder is often too hard to resist. "Journalists get very, very tired of hearing the issue speeches over and over again," says BRUCE GRONBECK, a professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa. Covering candidates' divorces and marriages and children "fits into the great American political culture, where the personal is political." The article also appeared in the DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania and the ISLAND PACKET in South Carolina.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0315/p01s01-uspo.htm

Firefighters Union Assails Giuliani (Atlanta Journal Constitution, March 15)
Harold Schaitberger, general president of the International Association of Fire Fighters, is a man on a mission to derail GOP front-runner Rudy Giuliani's presidential campaign by puncturing what he sees as the myth of the former New York mayor as a Sept. 11, 2001, hero. Some firefighters believe Giuliani left them ill-equipped to respond to the 9/11 attacks and turned his back on first responders' remains in the rubble. Schaitberger ascribes nefarious motives for Giuliani's November 2001 decision, later partly reversed, to end the search for remains. It was not coincidental, he said, that Giuliani's decision came "within two days after retrieving the gold and the assets of the Bank of Nova Scotia" from the debris. The bank had a vault under one of the towers. In Iowa, where GOP caucus voters will be among the first to pass judgment on Giuliani, anything that questions his hero status is potentially problematic, according to University of Iowa political scientist PEVERILL SQUIRE. "For the most part, his image here is really built around his response to 9/11," Squire said. "It's hard to go up against firefighters," Squire noted. "That's not a battle that any politician wants to fight."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=3848748bcc75f87580ebb1f41d0a8d38&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=a38f9fd264694e0eea10f6d1e89e7651

Kayle Dance Piece Performed In Arizona (Tucson Weekly, March 15)
Douglas Nielsen, a modern-dance professor at the University of Arizona School of Dance, re-introduces himself to the community Friday and Saturday, March 16 and 17, in "Works of Art," a modern-dance concert staged by NEW ARTiculations Dance Theatre at the Pima Community College Center for the Arts.  JENNIFER KAYLE, an assistant professor of dance at the University of Iowa, provides a guest piece "Beauty Head," also performed by the NEW ART dancers. The publication is based in Arizona.
http://www.tucsonweekly.com/gbase/Arts/Content?oid=oid:93661

Artist Exhibits Landscapes (Long Beach Press-Telegram, March 15)
Roderick Briggs chose to become an artist for a rather unusual reason. "I was forced to take an art class at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA," Briggs says. "I wasn't very good at it. I didn't have any techniques or anything, but I was very good in the classroom. When it came to art, I couldn't do it very well, and it became the most challenging thing." Briggs' perception of art changed when he witnessed a display of works by Pablo Picasso that were shown at the University of Iowa. It might have taken a while for his desire to paint to kick in, but his life, before and since, has been filled with numerous creative outlets, including paintings of Long Beach landscapes. Some of these are on display at Gallery 33 East in Long Beach in an exhibit, titled "Roderick Briggs Paints Long Beach." The newspaper is based in California.
http://www.presstelegram.com/entertainment/ci_5436347

UI Study Showed Benefits Of Journaling (Asbury Park Press, March 15)
Longtime journalers say getting thoughts down on paper, the computer screen or even a handy cocktail napkin has the power to heal and pinpoint one's life purpose. A 2002 study in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine found that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who journaled about their emotions and tried to understand stressful events saw improvements in their relationships, personal strength, spirituality and appreciation for life. The newspaper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070315/LIFE/703150436

Iowan Teaches Jazz In Montreal (Toronto Star, March 15)
Kevin Dean was raised on an Iowa farm, but now he's an essential part of the jazz education fabric in Canada -- as an associate professor of jazz studies at Montreal's McGill University for the past 23 years and as a high-caliber player of trumpet.  The region around Mason City, Iowa isn't known as a jazz hotspot, but Dean's grandparents were musical, playing piano and singing. His father plays bass and sax and an uncle was a professional classical trumpeter. Dean discovered jazz through recordings by the likes of Count Basie and Oscar Peterson, but also followed his uncle's fortunes in New York. "I always imagined taking up a glamorous city lifestyle there, but in the 1960s there were no jazz lessons to be had, only classical music under old-fashioned taskmasters," says Dean. Likewise, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he graduated with a bachelor of music, didn't offer anything in the way of jazz.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=3848748bcc75f87580ebb1f41d0a8d38&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=abf371d14eea6f983e6c046dadca6bf5

Obesity Surgery Complication Is Studied (New York Times, March 14)
Doctors warn that a few obesity surgery patients have developed a serious neurological condition, with symptoms of confusion and poor coordination, linked to a lack of vitamin B1. Wernicke encephalopathy, which is caused by a thiamine deficiency, is normally associated with severe alcoholism or chronic malnutrition. However, researchers say it can also occur within a few months of obesity surgery if patients stop taking prescribed vitamin supplements or if they vomit frequently, preventing vitamins from being absorbed. Patients who show symptoms "need to seek help immediately and get injections of thiamine as early as possible," said study author Sonal Singh, an instructor in internal medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. "For doctors, the message is that they should keep this in their minds when they see these patients." Singh and co-author ABHAY KUMAR of the University of Iowa searched obesity surgery case histories dating back to the 1980s and located 32 cases of Wernicke encephalopathy. They looked at symptoms and risk factors. Their findings are published in this week's issue of the journal Neurology. The researchers called for more study to determine how often the condition affects bariatric patients and to determine the best treatment for it. The ASSOCIATED PRESS version of the story appeared on several Web sites, including CBS NEWS, the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, CONTRACOSTATIMES (Calif.) , SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, and many others.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Diet-Surgery-Complication.html

Student Gives Obama Campaign Advice (Chicago Sun-Times, March 14)
When Presidential candidate Barrack Obama campaigned in Iowa, Patrick Rynard of Drake University passed Obama a binder of suggestions about how to woo the student vote. Rynard, president of the College Democrats of Iowa, gave several bits of advice, including: "Avoid colleges where apathy rules. Stick to places such as Iowa State, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Drake, where students are politically engaged."
http://www.suntimes.com/news/hunter/295655,CST-NWS-hunter14.article

Tax Breaks Proposed To Keep Iowa Graduates In State (Post-Bulletin, March 14)
A group of representatives in the Iowa House hope a combination of tax breaks for businesses and reduced debts for new college graduates can help keep young professionals in Iowa. The Iowa Advantage Fund would give tax incentives to businesses that agreed to pay off the college debt of new employees who graduated from Iowa colleges and universities. Companion legislation in the Senate is expected to be introduced by Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City. JAY CHRISTENSEN-SZALANSKI, a professor at Iowa, developed the Advantage Fund concept. Ironically, he first floated the proposal when running against Bolkcom in a state Senate race. That Bolkcom is now willing to support the legislation, Christensen-Szalanski said, is a reflection of the broad support that exists for legislation that could keep young professionals in Iowa. "To my knowledge there's no other state that offers this," Christensen-Szalanski said. "It's a nice little partnership." The newspaper is based in Rochester, Minn.
http://news.postbulletin.com/newsmanager/templates/localnews_story.asp?a=287432&z=2

Mom Fights NCAA Academic Rules (University Business, March 13)
Michael Bowers had been actively recruited for his football prowess, but he battled a learning disability in high school. He was not likely to meet NCAA freshman eligibility rules because of his special-education classes. Last month, a federal appeals court revived Bowers' 1997 lawsuit against the NCAA, saying Bowers might have been discriminated against under the Americans with Disabilities Act. But the long-sought victory is bittersweet for Kathleen Bowers. Michael, her only child, died of a drug overdose in June 2002. She plans to pursue the suit, which her son initiated as a teenager, even though the NCAA nine years ago changed its procedures to better accommodate the learning disabled. The defendants include Temple University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which argue that they stopped recruiting Michael Bowers over his football, not his academic, abilities.
http://www.universitybusiness.com/newssummary.aspx?news=yes&postid=2280

Playwright Explores Sense of Loss (Louisville Courier-Journal, March 13)
Sherry Kramer writes acerbic farces and satires. In her new autobiographical play, "When Something Wonderful Ends," she dares to say that our government is no longer a democracy -- it's "a petro-regime." The unexpected death of Kramer's mother of a cerebral hemorrhage at age 72, followed soon after by the deaths of thousands in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, inspired Kramer to think about loss, personally and politically. The result is a one-woman play opening tonight in the Humana Festival of New American Plays at Actors Theatre of Louisville. Kramer, 53, is a Wellesley College graduate with two master's degrees from the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper based in Louisville, Ky.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070313/SCENE05/703130356

Friends Build Basketball Shot Computer (USA Today, March 13)
Eighteen months ago, there were three guys who met at church, lived in the same Silicon Valley neighborhood and played basketball in one of their driveways. While playing, they talked shop and basketball, as guys sometimes do. This led them to think up an invention, as Silicon Valley guys sometimes do. They made a seeing computer to teach basketball players to shoot better. It analyzes the arc of a ball as it travels from hand to hoop, then it tells the player how to change the arc so the shot has a better chance of going in. Now, their invention is being quietly tested by the NBA's Dallas Mavericks and Golden State Warriors, as well as teams at Stanford University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and two high school teams.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/2003-02-06-noah-basketball-_x.htm

IEM Conducted Hurricane Futures Market (South Florida Sun Sentinel, March 13)
Starting Monday, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange began offering contracts covering the arrival of the first three hurricanes in Florida and four other coastal regions during the 2007 hurricane season. These contracts, which are an extension of the CME's existing weather contract market, provide insurance firms, oil companies, utilities and others an opportunity to cover risks not protected by traditional insurance policies. In 2005, the Iowa Electronic Markets at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science opened a small hurricane futures market limited to academics. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/business/local/sfl-zfutures13mar13,0,3359888.story?coll=sfla-business-headlines

Andersen Comments On Male Eating Disorders (Washington Post, March 13)
In a story about the increasing number of men who suffer from eating disorders, psychiatrist ARNOLD ANDERSEN, director of the eating disorders program at the University of Iowa and a widely recognized expert on male eating problems, said he has treated teenagers who developed bulimia or anorexia after failing to make a sports team where weight is paramount, such as wrestling.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/09/AR2007030901870.html

Baldus Finds Discrimination In Jury Selection (Louisville Courier-Journal, March 13)
Lawyers appear to be contributing to Jefferson County's problems with the lack of African-Americans on juries. A Courier-Journal analysis of jury data collected by judges between September and February indicates that race may be playing a role in jury selection -- something the U.S. Supreme Court has forbidden. The newspaper analyzed how blacks and whites are being removed from juries, then showed its findings to leading experts on statistics and race bias in jury selection. University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS, who has consulted for courts on racial issues, said the data suggests "systemic racial discrimination" in how Jefferson County prosecutors and defense attorneys are choosing jurors. The Courier-Journal is published in Kentucky.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070312/NEWS01/703130315

Illinois Loses College Students To UI (St. Louis Post Dispatch, March 13)
Illinois is losing an alarming number of its students to colleges and universities in neighboring states -- and the result is a decline in talent and potential tax revenue, according to an Illinois State University study released Friday. The state lost a net of 66,000 college students from 1992 to 2002, with those leaving the state far exceeding the influx of out-of-state students. Last year, Illinois ranked No. 2 in the nation in terms of students leaving, and 47th when it came to gaining students from other states, according to the study. The top three schools in terms of Illinois freshman enrollment were the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Purdue University and Indiana University, Bloomington.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/education/story/0078F40391AD57588625729D000E0282?OpenDocument

Singh Study Shows Neurological Problems After Weight Loss Surgery (Scientific American, March 13)
Some obese people who have weight-loss surgery, particularly younger women, develop a neurological condition most often seen in severe alcoholics and linked to a vitamin deficiency, researchers said on Monday. A study in the journal Neurology described the cases of 27 women and five men who developed the condition, Wernicke encephalopathy, after bariatric surgery. Nearly all had experienced frequent vomiting in the weeks after surgery. Two patients died. Wernicke encephalopathy can develop when the body does not get enough vitamin B1, also known as thiamine. It affects the brain and nervous system, with symptoms including double vision, eye movement abnormalities, unsteady walking, memory loss and hallucinations. Lead researcher Dr. Sonal Singh of Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, said it was unclear how common the condition was in people who have had surgery for obesity. Singh and co-author Dr. ABHAY KUMAR of the University of Iowa combed through scientific literature for reported cases of the condition in people after bariatric surgery to figure out its timing, risk factors and symptoms. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the WASHINGTON POST, SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, MSNBC, ABC NEWS, CNN, THE AUSTRALIAN, WEBMD and CBC NEWS.
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa003&articleID=0A9F1E65F58217963050CE14588E84F8

A different story on the same topic appeared on the Web site of MEDPAGE TODAY:

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Neurology/GeneralNeurology/tb/5236

Columnist Cites Erik Lie For Finding Stock Backdating Scandal (Appleton Post Crescent, March 13)
A columnist calling for new rules to prevent corporate scandals like stock options backdating points out that this scandal seems to have been more widespread then the accounting and reporting scandals that brought down companies like Enron and most companies who used backdating or other manipulations probably will never be unmasked. ERIK LIE believes that. He is a University of Iowa finance professor who testified about the practice last year before the U.S. Senate Banking Committee. He estimated, in a co-authored report, that 23 percent of U.S. companies did some backdating between 1996 and 2002. The Post Crescent is published in Wisconsin.
http://www.postcrescent.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070313/APC0701/703130513/1888

Writer Cites NIH Grants To UI (Lawrence Journal World, March 12)
An op-ed piece about improving the research environment at the Kansas University Medical Center points out that Midwestern institutions the hospital aspires to emulate include the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA where in 2005 the department of internal medicine generated 30 percent ($44,306,810) of the National Institutes of Health research done in the School of Medicine, an amount equal to the total awarded to all of KUMC. The Journal World is published in Kansas.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2007/mar/13/kumc_doctor_supports_mo_affiliation_plans/?opinion

Sidel Cheered By Patriot Act Opposition (The Forum, March 12)
MARK SIDEL
admits that some of the antiterrorism initiatives proposed by the federal government since Sept. 11, 2001, sadden him. However, he prefers to look at the positive. Many plans have been blocked or amended thanks to a broad coalition of American citizens concerned about civil liberties, said Sidel, a University of Iowa law professor and researcher. This scrutiny, criticism and opposition prove that America's democratic society is alive and well, and has prevented laws "from going too far," he said. Sidel spoke Sunday evening during the 12th annual James E. Leahy Freedom Lecture at Concordia College in Moorhead. The Forum is published in Fargo, N.D. and Moorhead, Minn.
http://www.in-forum.com/archive/index.cfm?page=archive_article&id=340587&forumcomm_check_return

UI Expert Quoted In Top Library Fine Article (Recordnet.com, March 12)
To have a library fine of $1,505 - the amount Amy N. Smith owes the Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library - requires an uncommon appetite for books or videos, and also a forgetful, crooked or oblivious state of mind. The database that includes Smith's fine and others changes when someone pays or builds debt. But the day it was produced last month, 32,185 different people owed a total of $626,196. That is a "heck of a lot of money," said JENNIFER BUREK PIERCE, a University of Iowa professor who has written about fines. "Denton (Texas) had $80,000, and I was sort of impressed. This online newspaper is located in Stockton, Calif.
http://www.recordnet.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070312/A_NEWS/703120318

State Grapples With Engineering Shortage (Red Orbit, March 12)
A story about Project Lead the Way says the four-year curriculum for high school students is designed to increase the quality and quantity of engineers and engineer technologists who graduate from engineering schools. Project Lead the Way involves partnerships among high schools, higher education institutions and the private sector. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University provide training for schools wanting to offer Project Lead the Way curriculum, and businesses provide resources and expertise for teachers.
http://www.redorbit.com/news/education/866323/state_grapples_with_engineer_shortage/index.html

Athlete's Kin Hope To Alter NCAA Behavior (Philadelphia Daily News, March 12)
A story about Michael Bowers, a promising high school football player with a learning disability, says that recruiters stopped calling because he was not likely to meet NCAA freshman eligibility rules because of his special-education classes. Last month, a federal appeals court in Philadelphia revived Bowers' 1997 lawsuit against the NCAA, saying the freshman rules may have violated the Americans with Disabilities Act. But the long-sought victory is bittersweet for Kathleen Bowers. Michael, her only child, died of a drug overdose in June 2002. She plans to pursue the suit, which her son had initiated as a teenager, even though the NCAA changed its procedures nine years ago to better accommodate the learning disabled. The defendants include Temple University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which argue that they stopped recruiting Michael Bowers over his football ability, not his academic ability. This article originated with the Associated Press and also ran in THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE; on SAUKVALLEY.COM, serving Dixon, Sterling and Rock Falls in Northwestern Illinois; in the LUDINGTON DAILY NEWS in Ludington, Mich., the CONTRACOSTATIMES.COM in Walnut Creek, Calif., THE TIMES LEADER in northeastern Pennsylvania, and many other outlets.
http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/news/local/16885381.htm?source=rss&channel=philly_local

Writers' Workshop Participant Cited (The Philippine STAR, March 11)
A columnist writing about serial triumphs notched by Filipino poets on the international stage says it all started late last year with Marc Gaba -- now back teaching at UP Diliman after a couple of years at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP -- winning the ninth Boston Review poetry contest. The publication is produced for the Filipino global community and is produced in Mandaluyong City, M.M. Philippines.
http://www.philstar.com/philstar/LIFESTYLE200703120503.htm

Russo Helped ID Migraine 'Promoting' Protein (All Headline News, March 11)
University of Iowa researchers reveal that they have identified a protein that promotes migraine headaches. The study finds that too much of a small protein named RAMP1 appears to turn up the volume of a nerve cell receptor's response to a neuropeptide, thought to cause migraines. University of Iowa scientist ANDREW RUSSO, who was linked with the study, said: "Two of my daughters have had migraines, so I know how debilitating they can be. A major motivation behind our research is to find cures. However, this finding is just a step on the path toward finding a cure."
http://www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7006709535

Antidepressants Help Stroke Patient Thinking (KVOA-TV, March 11)
Stroke survivors may get help "thinking outside the box" by taking an antidepressant. A new study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA reveals stroke patients who often have a decline in executive function -- mental abilities that enable us to respond appropriately to unfamiliar or complex situations -- got better after taking antidepressants for 12 weeks. Their report originated from an article in the British Journal of Psychiatry, 2007. KVOA-TV is based in Tucson, Ariz.
http://kvoa.com/Global/story.asp?S=6205708&nav=HMO9

Cameras Designed To Improve Teen Driving (Providence Journal, March 11)
There is a curve in the road near Alexander Mougin's house near Oxford, Iowa. The high-school senior used to like to take it hard and sharp, but that was before his car was fitted with a camera capable of recording his driving habits. Mougin, 18, has been participating in a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study to see whether the device and the data it provides can help improve teen driving. The camera, attached to the rear-view mirror, has one lens facing the road and another aimed at the driver. It runs constantly, and slips into recording mode if, for example, the car accelerates rapidly or brakes suddenly. It then preserves about 10 seconds before and after the event that triggered it.
http://www.projo.com/projocars/content/ca_teencam_03-11-07_VB4KIRN.1a81b84.html

Corporations More Socially Aware (South Florida Sun-Sentinel, March 11)
Altruism isn't prompting the shift to what many call "corporate social responsibility" or CSR. Executives call it a growing business imperative. The broadest research to date -- a 2003 analysis by professors from University of Redlands and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professors of dozens of earlier CSR studies -- found that social and financial performance reinforce each other. Responsible companies that excel socially generally excel financially and vice versa.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/business/local/sfl-sbcsr11mar11,0,466961.story?coll=sfla-business-front

UI Futures Market Success Noted (Philadelphia Inquirer, March 9)
In an editorial Sebastian Mallaby writes that four decades ago, a Chicago economist named Eugene Fama proclaimed that financial markets are efficient. The march of this thesis from the fringe to the mainstream is one of reason's sweetest triumphs. Despite periodic bouts of wantonly irrational investor behavior, most people now accept that financial markets - indeed, all markets in which people trade views about the future - are the least bad way of processing information. Today, markets are used to predict everything from influenza outbreaks to the sales of a new Harry Potter book. Amateur traders on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's political futures market predict elections more accurately than professional pollsters.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/editorial/16866230.htm?source=rss&channel=inquirer_editorial

Opinion Piece: Electronic Markets Accurate (Philadelphia Inquirer, March 9)
A member of the Washington Post editorial board says politicians have a special reason to respect the wisdom of markets: amateur traders on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's political futures market predict elections more accurately than professional pollsters.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/editorial/16866230.htm

Coleman Successfully Recruited To Detroit Area (Detroit Free Press, March 8)
A story about the difficulty of recruiting employers and executives to the Detroit area points out that one person successfully recruited was Mary Sue Coleman, who left the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to become president of the University of Michigan.
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070308/BUSINESS06/703080318&imw=Y

AMA To Place Anti-Alcohol Ads At UI (WBAY-TV, March 8)
Full-page ads are set to run in college newspapers March 9 calling on the NCAA to "stop the madness" by banning alcohol marketing from college sports. The ads are sponsored by the Chicago-based American Medical Association. They'll run in student newspapers at the University of Wisconsin, Chicago's DePaul University, Georgia Tech, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Indiana University and the University of Mississippi. WBAY is based in Green Bay, WI. The same story appeared on the Web sites of THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE, MSNBC, WALA-TV in Florida, WREX-TV in Illinois, WJBC-AM in Illinois, WMC-TV in Tennessee, WMAQ-TV in Illinois, WQAD-TV in Illinois, the MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, THE INTELLIGENCER in Pennsylvania, THE NEWS-SENTINEL in Indiana and THE BILOXI (Miss.) SUN-HERALD.
http://www.wbay.com/Global/story.asp?S=6198986

UI Student Film Kicks Off Film Fest (Arlington Heights Daily Herald, March 8)
A story about the Lake County Film Festival in Illinois says the event kicks off Friday with a showing of "Fate Twisted Simply," directed by Steve Coulter, a senior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Daily Herald is published in Illinois.
http://www.dailyherald.com/news/lakestory.asp?id=288713&cc=k&tc=&t=

Financial Aid Official Shares Tips In ACT Podcast (MacNewsWorld.com, March 8)
High school students are discovering that iPods and MP3 players can be used for more than downloading and listening to music. College prep has gone high tech. Students and parents can download tips on college financial aid from a pro in a podcast at the ACT Web site. Tips from CATHY WILCOX, senior associate director in the office of student financial aid at the University of Iowa, are available on the site. She explains how to file for financial aid and work with a college financial aid office.
http://www.macnewsworld.com/rsstory/56176.html

Story Features UI Vocal Music Alumna (Eugene Weekly, March 8)
A profile of Susan Werner, a Dubuque native who majored in vocal music at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, describes the singer-songwriter's new album, "The Gospel Truth," as gospel with "all of the joy, none of the Jesus." Eugene Weekly is based in Oregon.
http://eugeneweekly.com//2007/03/08/music.html#music3

Hovenkamp Quoted In Story About Drug Company Payoffs (Bloomberg, March 8)
Support is building in the new Democratic-controlled Congress for legislation to stop brand-name drugmakers from paying rivals to keep cheaper, generic alternatives off the market. In this story, HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust at the University of Iowa College of Law, comments about a 1984 law designed to encourage generic drugmakers to compete against brand-name companies.
http://www.bloomberg.co.uk/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=a5BrzmvDzSY0&refer=home

Drug Payoffs Face Opposition (Bloomberg, March 8)
Support is building in the new Democratic-controlled Congress for legislation to stop brand-name drugmakers from paying rivals to keep cheaper, generic alternatives off the market. Backed by the Federal Trade Commission, lawmakers want to override two federal appeals court rulings in 2005, which permitted the payoffs by Schering-Plough Corp. and AstraZeneca Plc. Under the Hatch-Waxman Act, the company that files the first Food and Drug Administration application to sell a generic drug gets the right to sell it exclusively for six months if it is approved. "The whole idea to pay the alleged infringer to stay out of the market is entirely the creation of this particular set of incentives that Hatch-Waxman created," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust law bergat the University of Iowa law school in Iowa City.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=a5BrzmvDzSY0&refer=politics

Former UI Professor Recalls Workshop, English Department (Salon.com, March 8)
Former University of Iowa English professor Tom Lutz said that for 15 years he taught an average of a semester a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the home of the famous WRITERS' WORKSHOP. "When I started, the writers were on the fourth floor and the critics on the third," Lutz writes. "I often had a Workshop student or two in my graduate courses, and I would bring the creative writing faculty in to meet my undergrads. By the time I left two years ago, that had long ceased. A durable and unbreachable wall had been erected between the writers and the scholars. They looked at each other not as allies in a common project, but as enemies. Now the Workshop has moved across campus and the divorce is final."
http://www.salon.com/books/feature/2007/03/08/reading/

Colleges Are Snuffing Out Smoking (The Telegraph, March 8)
Colleges are snuffing out smoking everywhere on campus, even in outdoor light-up spots, such as main quads and sidewalks. At least 43 campuses from California to New Jersey have gone smoke-free, a trend that is accelerating, according to Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights. At the University of Iowa, a committee of staff, faculty and students recommended in November the campus go smoke-free as early as July 2009. SUSAN JOHNSON, UI associate provost, said the school is preparing for an intense debate. "Our goal here is not to coerce individuals to give up smoking," she said. "Our goal is reduce the amount of secondhand smoke everybody is exposed to." The newspaper is based in Sterling, Ill. http://www.saukvalley.com/articles/2007/03/08/news/local/303007058778446.txt

Letter Writer Comments On Smokers Rights (USA Today, March 8)
In a letter following a story about how colleges are banning smoking everywhere on campus, even outdoors, Lucy Brown of Millington, Tenn. writes: "At the same time that cars drive across campus, University of Iowa Associate Provost SUSAN JOHNSON insists that outdoor, campuswide smoking bans are not an attempt at coercion, but rather intended to reduce the amount of secondhand smoke everybody is exposed to. Have anti-smoking zealots now convinced university administrators that secondhand smoke is dangerous even in the outdoors or even more dangerous than car fumes?"
http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2007/03/ban_smoking_at_.html

UI Student's Film Is Shown At Festival (Daily Herald, March 8)
The fourth annual Lake County Film Festival starts at Thursday, March 8, with a big party and a silent movie at Mickey Finn's in Libertyville. The movies start at 5 p.m. Friday, March 9, with a showing of "Fate Twisted Simply," directed by Fremd High School graduate Steve Coulter, now a senior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.dailyherald.com/news/lakestory.asp?id=288713&cc=l&tc=vol&t=Volo

Heimer Co-Authors Study On Violence Among Partners (McClatchy, March 7)
Criminal violence against intimate partners fell by nearly two-thirds in recent years and has reached a record low, according to preliminary government figures. The declines were greatest for nonfatal attacks, which fell by about 65 percent from 1993 to 2005, according to the federal Bureau of Justice Statistics. Homicides among intimate partners dropped by roughly a third. Nearly all that decline was among female victims, according to Janet Lauritsen, a criminologist at the University of Missouri-St. Louis who's analyzed the numbers by gender. She and co-author KAREN HEIMER, a sociology professor in the University of Iowa College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, reported the disproportionate drop in a paper delivered last month at the American Association for the Advancement of Science convention in San Francisco.
http://www.realcities.com/mld/krwashington/news/columnists/frank_greve/16853807.htm

Futures Markets Are Noted For Accuracy (Salt Lake Tribune, March 7)
In an editorial, Sabastian Mallaby, concludes that amateur traders on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's political futures market predict elections more accurately than professional pollsters. He writes about how four decades ago, a Chicago economist named Eugene Fama proclaimed that financial markets are efficient. The march of this thesis from the fringe to the mainstream is one of reason's sweetest triumphs. Despite periodic bouts of wantonly irrational investor behavior, most people now accept that financial markets -- indeed, all markets in which people trade views about the future -- are the least bad way of processing information. Today, markets are used to predict everything from influenza outbreaks to the sales of a new Harry Potter book. The editorial originally appeared in the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.sltrib.com/opinion/ci_5368492

Wing To Speak At Women's Conference (Seattle Times, March 7)
A law professor and an American Indian legislator will be featured speakers at Edmonds Community College's second annual Community College Women's Conference Saturday, March 17. The conference will include discussions of health, social-justice and business issues. Speakers include ADRIEN WING, a professor at the University of Iowa Law School and editor of the journal Critical Race Feminism, and Claudia Kauffman, the first Native American woman to serve in the Washington Legislature. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/snohomishcountynews/2003603949_eddige07n.html

Blood Test Could Be Used To Identify Panic Disorder (WEHT-TV, March 7)
It may be someday possible to use blood tests to check patients for panic disorder and other mental health conditions, new research suggests. "People with panic disorder often end up in the emergency room for heart tests when in fact they have panic disorder. This is just one of the reasons that it would be helpful to have a blood test for panic disorder," lead researcher DR. ROBERT PHILIBERT, professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, said in a prepared statement. His team published its study in the March 6 online issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics. The TV station is based in Evansville, Ind. The story also appeared on the Web sites of KOLD-TV in Arizona, the WASHINGTON POST and YAHOO! NEWS. http://www.abc25.com/Global/story.asp?S=6192417&nav=menu213_2_2

UI Student Launches Independents For Obama (Washington Times, March 7)
The 2008 road to the White House is filled with pitfalls for senators; specifically, their voting records -- a particularly acute problem for Democrats who approved the Iraq war. But Sen. Barack Obama has served in the Senate for only two years, and some analysts say the Illinois Democrat's lack of a voting record may uniquely benefit his presidential campaign. "He inspires hope that we can get past the days of bickering and fighting that [have] controlled the debate in Washington, and I think he has proven he can work across party lines," said Seth Tobey, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA law student who founded Independents for Obama.
http://www.washtimes.com/national/20070306-103631-1589r.htm

Writer: UI Political Futures Markets Very Accurate (China Post, March 7)
In an editorial, Sabastian Mallaby, concludes that amateur traders on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's political futures market predict elections more accurately than professional pollsters. He writes about how four decades ago, a Chicago economist named Eugene Fama proclaimed that financial markets are efficient. The march of this thesis from the fringe to the mainstream is one of reason's sweetest triumphs. Despite periodic bouts of wantonly irrational investor behavior, most people now accept that financial markets -- indeed, all markets in which people trade views about the future -- are the least bad way of processing information. Today, markets are used to predict everything from influenza outbreaks to the sales of a new Harry Potter book. The China Post is in Taiwan.
http://www.chinapost.com.tw/editorial/detail.asp?ID=104029&GRP=i

Cram Comments On Specialty Hospitals (Washington Post, March 6)
So-called specialty hospitals, which focus on one disease or condition and are often owned by the affiliated physicians, are an emerging trend in U.S. health care. And a new study finds that in regions where a cardiac-care specialty hospital opens, there is a significant increase in artery-opening procedures such as bypass surgery and angioplasty, even if neighboring general hospitals offer comparable heart care. What evidence there is indicates that "specialized hospitals are a mixed bag," said DR. PETER CRAM, assistant professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa. He led a study that found that "specialty hospitals do appear to be admitting a healthier body of patients overall but deliver a very good quality of care." This article also appeared in Health Finder and EurekAlert.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/06/AR2007030601162.html

Genetic Test In Development May Predict Drug Addiction (Red Orbit, March 6)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers say it is possible to develop tests to determine a person's genetic potential to become dependent on nicotine or marijuana. The study, published in the American Journal of Medical Genetics, said such tests would not dictate who would become substance-dependent or have behavioral problems, since genes are influenced by other genes and environmental factors. The source for this story was United Press International.
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/861585/genetic_test_may_predict_drug_addiction/index.html

UI Study: Genetic Mutations May Cause Cleft Lip (Science Daily, March 6)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers and collaborators have identified new genetic mutations that likely cause the common form of cleft lip and palate. UI researchers have discovered that mutations in FGF signaling pathway genes contribute to cleft lip and palate. The top figure shows the normal sequence for a region of the FGFR1 gene; the bottom figure shows a mutation in the same region for a person with cleft lip and palate. The results could eventually help clinicians predict a family's risk of having more children with the condition. The findings appear in the week of March 5 online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070305202710.htm

Former Lab Head Protests Termination (The Scientist, March 6)
The former director of Iowa's state public health laboratory, Mary Gilchrist, who was fired in a dispute with UNIVERSITY OF IOWA administrators over cutbacks to the size of a new lab, plans to continue her legal fight for reinstatement even after a judge last month refused her emergency request for protection as a whistleblower. Gilchrist's attorney, Pat Ingram, told The Scientist Gilchrist will pursue a full jury trial to reclaim her job in a case that has raised questions about the state lab's capacity to handle a major outbreak of disease. The Scientist is based in the United Kingdom.
http://www.the-scientist.com/news/home/52927/

Lie Glad His Work Has Had An Impact (Toronto Globe and Mail, March 6)
It's not often that a mild-mannered finance professor can prompt one of the most widespread investigations into allegations of corporate wrongdoing in U.S. history. But ERIK LIE at the University of Iowa has managed to do just that. The 38-year-old professor's research into the backdating of stock options has prompted the Securities and Exchange Commission to investigate stock option granting practices at roughly 140 companies. Some executives have been dismissed and a couple have even pleaded guilty to criminal charges. In addition to working with the SEC, Prof. Lie has testified before the U.S. Congress on the issue and acted as a consultant on several shareholder lawsuits, including one filed against Research In Motion Ltd. "At this point I am surprised," Prof. Lie said Monday from his office in Iowa City when asked about the reaction to his work. "I think any researcher is hoping that his or her research will have some impact. So, yeah, I am very happy to have seen that kind of an impact."
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20070305.wbackdating0305/BNStory/GlobeTQ

Philibert Developing Panic Disorder Test (Southwest Nebraska Daily News, March 6)
Blood tests for panic disorder and other mental health conditions are potentially around the corner, based on results from a University of Iowa study. The findings, which were based on analysis of genetic information in immature white blood cells, appear online March 6 in the American Journal of Medical Genetics. "The ability to test for panic disorder is a quantum leap in psychiatry," said the study's lead author, ROBERT PHILIBERT, M.D., Ph.D., professor of psychiatry in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. "Panic disorder will no longer be a purely descriptive diagnosis, but, as with cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome and other conditions, a diagnosis based on genetic information," he said. "In addition, the finding could help us better understand the pathways that initiate, promote and maintain panic disorder." The Daily News is published in McCook, Neb. The same story appeared on the Web sites of FIRSTSCIENCE (UK), PHYSORG.com, PSYCHCENTRAL.COM and EMAXHEALTH.COM.
http://www.swnebr.net/newspaper/cgi-bin/articles/articlearchiver.pl?159834

UI To Get Money For Regenerative Medicine Center (Columbus Telegram, March 6)
A story about the debate in the Nebraska legislature about a proposal to ban cloning notes that the state of Iowa recently eliminated an anti-cloning law and committed $12.5 million to build a regenerative medicine center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Telegram is published in Nebraska.
http://www.columbustelegram.com/articles/2007/03/05/news/news2cloneban.txt

Op-Ed Column Cites UI Markets (Sacramento Bee, March 6)
Columnist Sebastian Mallaby writes that despite periodic bouts of wantonly irrational investor behavior, most people now accept that financial markets -- indeed, all markets in which people trade views about the future -- are the least bad way of processing information. He said politicians have a special reason to respect the wisdom of markets. Amateur traders on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S political futures market predict elections more accurately than professional pollsters. The same story appeared on the Web site of the HARTFORD COURANT.
http://www.sacbee.com/110/story/132910.html

UI Study Shows Men Can Suffer Postpartum Depression (Asbury Park Press, March 6)
Postpartum depression has been recognized for more than a century as a problem affecting new mothers in the weeks and months after the birth of a child. Now, doctors and researchers are finding that fathers, too, can suffer that same stress and sadness. Postpartum depression once was thought to be caused by hormones released in a mother's body during and after pregnancy. But scientists now believe that other factors also contribute, including environment, family support systems, finances, the child's health, a history of depression and workplace pressures. Fathers are just as sensitive to those issues as mothers. Having a baby is "also stressful for men," says ROBIN COOK KOPELMAN, a psychiatrist with the Iowa Depression and Clinical Research Center at the University of Iowa, who is completing a study on postpartum depression in fathers as part of a larger study conducted by colleagues SCOTT STUART, professor of psychiatry, and MICHAEL O'HARA, professor of psychology.
http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070306/LIFE11/703060343/1006/NEWS02

Erik Lie’s Options Research Rocks Industry (Kitsap Sun, March 5)
It's not often that a mild-mannered finance professor can prompt one of the most widespread investigations into allegations of corporate wrongdoing in U.S. history. But ERIK LIE at the University of Iowa has managed to do just that. The 38-year-old professor's research into the backdating of stock options has prompted the Securities and Exchange Commission to investigate stock option granting practices at roughly 140 companies. Some executives have been dismissed and a couple has even pleaded guilty to criminal charges. In addition to working with the SEC, Prof. Lie has testified before Congress on the issue and acted as a consultant on several shareholder lawsuits. The publication is based in Bremerton, Wash., and Scripps Howard News Service also distributed the story.
http://www.kitsapsun.com/bsun/bu_business/article/0,2403,BSUN_19060_5398376,00.html

Riley Research May Lead To Cleft Palate Risk Test (Reuters, March 5)
Researchers studying the causes of facial clefts have identified a handful of new genetic mutations linked to these birth defects in a step that might help lead to a test to predict a family's risk. In a study published on Monday, researchers looked at DNA from 184 people from Iowa and the Philippines who had the common form of cleft lip and cleft palate, and compared it to the DNA of people without the condition. They found seven mutations related to genes associated with fetal facial development. The researchers said these mutations may account for 5 percent of cleft lip and palate cases that are not associated with other syndromes or birth defects. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, adds to the understanding of the causes of these birth defects and might help doctors predict a family's risk of having children with the condition, the researchers said. "It's a complex disease, so there are both genetic and environmental factors that are believed to play a role," said University of Iowa researcher BRIDGET RILEY.
http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUSN0529843620070305

Hovenkamp Is Critic Of Microsoft Deal (Financial Times, March 5)
A story about Microsoft's separate agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice and the European Union that requires the company to disclose information to make it easier for competitors to use Windows notes that among the critics to the Justice Department plan was HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of law.
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/c7da2e28-cb2c-11db-b436-000b5df10621.html

UI Gets Pentagon Grants (WQAD-TV, March 5)
Two state-run universities have been awarded federal money for defense research projects. According to the U.S. Department of Defense, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA won two projects and Iowa State University was awarded one. The exact amounts will be negotiated between defense officials and the research offices at the universities. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6181372&nav=1sW7

Proposed UI Smoking Ban Noted (The Coloradoan, March 5)
Colorado State is not among the 43 campuses from California to New Jersey that have gone smoke-free, although it does ban smoking in state-owned buildings. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a committee of staff, faculty and students recommended in November that the campus go smoke-free as early as July 2009. The Coloradoan is published in Fort Collins.
http://www.coloradoan.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070305/NEWS01/703050323/1002

UI Research: Antidepressants Benefit Stroke Victims (Health and Age, March 5)
A new study, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, shows that antidepressants help improve stroke survivors' thinking abilities. It is already known that antidepressants can help stroke survivors by improving their mood. Now researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA reveal that the benefits of antidepressants extend to cognitive functioning. The researchers now plan to look at any possible brain changes, through imagery, which may have been fostered by the antidepressant treatment. Health and Age originates in Switzerland. This story also appeared on other medical news sites worldwide.
http://www.healthandage.com/public/news-home/10446/Antidepressants-can-play-a-role-in-stroke-recovery.html

UI Prostate Cancer Research Published (Health News Today, March 5)
Men who get a "false-positive" prostate cancer result -- an abnormal screening test followed by a biopsy indicating no evidence of cancer -- appear more likely to worry about their subsequent risk of cancer and report more problems with sexual function compared to men with normal screening results, according to a University of Iowa study. "This study emphasizes the importance of doctors' discussing the pros and cons of prostate cancer screening with patients," said the study's lead author, DAVID KATZ, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine in the UI Carver College of Medicine, and of epidemiology in the UI College of Public Health. "Because screening affects a large number of men relative to those who are expected to benefit from treatment, even a small adverse effect of apparently false-positive results on cancer-related worry and quality of life could have a substantial impact on public health." Medical News Today originates in the UK. This story has appeared widely in medical-news publications.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=64443

Colangelo Comments On Prodigy (Press-Enterprise, March 5)
Nine-year-old Tyler Vollmer is taking a high-school honors biology class in Corona, Calif., and has also skipped three grades for his other classes. The prevailing view in schools is that students who skip grades will suffer from emotional problems and be socially awkward among older students, but studies do not back that up, University Of Iowa education professor NICHOLAS COLANGELO said. "The research says that these kids do adjust well, and typically things even get better for them," said Colangelo, director of the university's Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development. The Press-Enterprise is published in Riverside Country, Calif.
http://www.pe.com/localnews/inland/stories/PE_News_Local_D_genius05.406ddc8.html

Bechara Comments On Investment Behavior (Business Day, March 5)
Money magazine says that stunning investment insights are coming from one of the less likely fields of research: neuroscience. How the human brain works and why we react the way we do to various situations are critical for developing a better understanding of the common mistakes that typical investors make. "Regularly evaluating whether an outcome made you feel good or bad," says the University Of Iowa's ANTOINE BECHARA, "will help you learn from your behavior." Business Day originates in South Africa.
http://www.businessday.co.za/articles/markets.aspx?ID=BD4A402637

Op-Ed Column Cites UI Markets (Washington Post, March 5)
Columnist Sebastian Mallaby writes that despite periodic bouts of wantonly irrational investor behavior, most people now accept that financial markets -- indeed, all markets in which people trade views about the future -- are the least bad way of processing information. He said politicians have a special reason to respect the wisdom of markets. Amateur traders on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S political futures market predict elections more accurately than professional pollsters.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/04/AR2007030401048.html

UI Thumb-Sucking Research Cited (Los Angeles Times, March 5)
In a study published in Pediatric Dentistry, JOHN WARREN, an associate professor in the College of Dentistry at the University of Iowa, and his colleagues followed several hundred children from infancy into early childhood and evaluated the effects of nonnutritive sucking behaviors, like thumb sucking, on the teeth and jaws. They found that thumb sucking can push the front teeth forward, causing them to stick out too much in relation to the teeth in the lower jaw. It also can prevent the front teeth from coming together properly and can cause a misalignment of the upper and lower jaws. Although these problems can often be corrected with braces, experts agree that it is better to stop them from developing. "The best course of action is to prevent thumb sucking from ever becoming a habit," says Warren. "Even if that involves giving the child a pacifier."
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-themd5mar05,1,245049.column?coll=la-headlines-health

Artist Downsized House While Teaching At UI (American Profile, March 5)
Jay Shafer, founder of the Tumbleweed Tiny House Co., appears larger than life, standing on the front porch of his 100-square-foot home in Sebastopol, Calif. Shafer grew up in a 4,000-square-foot home in Mission Viejo, but downsized in 1997 while teaching art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City: "I was fed up with maintaining and paying for more space than I needed, so I built a 100-square-foot house to meet my needs rather than adjusting my needs to the space." American Profile originates in Tennessee.
http://www.americanprofile.com/article/20947.html

Grant Comments On Summitt's Cheerleading (Newsday, March 4)
Columnist John Jeansonne wrote, "College basketball's most distinguished women's coach donned a cheerleader outfit, led 24,000 fans in the school fight song and wound up (shakily; she is 54 years old) atop one of those rah-rah human pyramids on Tuesday -- at a men's game -- and it was cast as role reversal. That has to tell us something. It is one thing for Tennessee's Pat Summitt to drop decades of thoroughly businesslike demeanor for some nearly March madness as a return favor to Tennessee men's coach Bruce Pearl. But beyond that context -- Pearl had embraced the modern tradition of sophomoric fandom by painting his bare chest and rooting for Summitt's team Jan. 22 - was the hint that a woman's place in competitive sports might be coming full circle... 'What Pat did was out of character,' said CHRISTINE GRANT, professor of sports administration and former women's athletic director at the University of Iowa. 'I couldn't believe I was seeing that. But I chuckled and thought, 'Isn't that wonderful?' Bruce put on his little display for her and she did it to help him. That's what sports is. It's helping each other. It's teamwork. And it's fun.' Newsday originates in New York.
http://www.newsday.com/sports/basketball/ny-sphot045117751mar04,0,5847736.story?coll=ny-basketball-headlines

Gaffney Comments On Online Steroid Sales (USA Today, March 3)
Police and federal law enforcement officials are trying a new tactic in the war on performance-enhancing drug use. Instead of pursuing and arresting the usual array of street smugglers, hangers-on and entourage-based dealers, the new plan targets Internet pharmacies that can guide buyers through the maze of compliant, prescription-writing physicians with a few clicks of a mouse. But GARY GAFFNEY, an associate professor of child psychology and behavior at the University of Iowa and founder of the blog Steroid Nation, says focusing on suppliers rather than users won't work: "The effects of knocking out an online pharmacy is only temporary; a new guy is going to pop up. We've seen that when players get caught, they go scot-free and the dealers get arrested. Someone just takes their place."
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/olympics/2007-03-01-steroid-focus_N.htm

NASA Awards Supercomputing Time To Stern (SpaceRef, March 3)
NASA has awarded 4.75 million hours of supercomputing time for the coming year to leading U.S. researchers. FREDERICK STERN of the University of Iowa will receive 500,000 hours to accelerate code development for viscous ship hydrodynamics simulation, with the goal of accelerating the realization of simulation-based design of naval ships. SpaceRef originates in Virginia and Vancouver, BC. The story also appeared on other science/tech sites.
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=22048

Grassian Studies Acid Rain Effects (Chemical Science, March 2)
To understand the processes by which acid rain attacks limestone on a molecular level, VICKI GRASSIAN and colleagues at the University of Iowa studied laboratory reactions of sulfur dioxide on calcium carbonate surfaces, using several different analytical techniques, in the presence and absence of water. The researchers found that adsorbed water increased the amount of sulfur adsorbed onto the carbonate surface by up to 13 times, because of increased mobility of the surface ions. Chemical Science, published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, originates in the UK.
http://www.rsc.org/Publishing/ChemScience/Volume/2007/04/pollutant_attack.asp

Ponseti Method Treats Children In Ghana (Joy Online, March 2)
The Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) within the last two years, with support from the Rotary Club of Kumasi East, performed surgeries to treat 267 babies with clubfoot. Rotary International and FOCOS, a USA based philanthropic organization, contacted Professor IGNACIO PONSETI of the University of Iowa and the originator of the Correctional "Ponseti" method to train staff of KATH to enable the Hospital perform the surgeries. Margaret Karikari, head of the Physiotherapy Unit of KATH, asked mothers not to attribute the deformity to witchcraft; instead they should report such cases to the hospital for treatment. Joy Online originates in Ghana.
http://www.myjoyonline.com/archives/health/200703/2171.asp

Sivitz Participated In Diabetes Research (Boston dBusiness News, March 2)
A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences may shed light on why some people can eat excessive amounts of food and not gain weight or develop type 2 diabetes, while others are more likely to develop obesity and this most common form of diabetes on any diet. The study, which used two strains of mice with differing tendencies to gain weight and develop diabetes on a high-fat diet, identified genetic and cellular mechanisms that may prevent certain mice on a calorie-dense diet from gaining weight and developing metabolic syndrome. WILLIAM I. SIVITZ, Ph.D., of the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa, was one of the collaborators in the study.
http://boston.dbusinessnews.com/shownews.php?newsid=110116&type_news=latest

Erik Lie's Research Cited In Flir Case (The Oregonian, March 2)
Flir Systems Inc. has reversed itself and acknowledged -- for the first time -- problems with stock option grants issued to its current executives in 2001. Flir said Thursday it will restate a decade of financial reports and record a noncash charge of about $14 million to account for improper options. Flir said it may also have to pay tax on past options that weren't accurately reported. Close to 200 companies nationwide face scrutiny over the practice, first uncovered in 2005 by University of Iowa professor ERIK LIE. The Oregonian originates in Portland.
http://www.oregonlive.com/business/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/business/1172809542314430.xml&coll=7

Paradiso, Narushima Conducted Stroke Research (UPI, March 2)
The anti-depressants Prozac and Pamelor helped executive mental functioning in post-stroke patients, according to U.S. researchers. Interestingly, the effect of the drugs did not appear until 21 months after the trial ended, said the team at the University of Iowa. SERGIO PARADISO, KENJI NARUSHIMA and colleagues randomized 47 patients who had suffered strokes in the previous six months to receive 12 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine (Prozac), nortriptyline (Pamelor) or placebo. No significant differences were found between the groups at the end of treatment, but two years after the study began, the placebo group's executive functioning had worsened, while people in the anti-depressant groups showed clear and significant executive-function improvement, regardless of whether their depressive symptoms had changed. The team attributed the delay to the slow pace of neural regeneration, which took time to manifest after the drugs stimulated its initiation. This UPI version of the story has appeared widely.
http://www.upi.com/HealthBusiness/view.php?StoryID=20070302-014126-4094r

Fethke Comments On Economic Impact (Red Orbit, March 2)
While higher education is being asked to perform more roles in the local economy, specific pathways for influencing local and regional economic transformation are still being identified. On October 30, 2006, the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and the Midwest Higher Education Compact held a conference on higher education and economic growth. GARY FETHKE, University of Iowa, noted that the university only receives 15 percent of its budget from the state, and state money is increasingly being earmarked for particular programs, such as the life sciences. For Fethke, the key issue is whether the university would distribute its resources in the same way if it weren't forced to do so. The primary relationship of any university to the economy is through the production of skilled workers. In the University of Iowa's case, 60 percent of its resident liberal arts and business undergraduates are employed in Iowa after graduation. Even higher percentages of resident students with other majors, such as engineering, are employed instate after graduation. Fethke also pointed out that the university has a clear advantage in educating aspiring entrepreneurs, assisting in the commercialization of innovations, and evaluating public policies that can increase the competitiveness of the state.
http://www.redorbit.com/news/education/858411/can_higher_education_foster_economic_growtha_conference_summary/index.htm

Johnson Quoted In Smoke-Free Campus Trend Story (USA Today, March 2)
Colleges are snuffing out smoking everywhere on campus, even in outdoor light-up spots such as main quads and sidewalks. At least 43 campuses from California to New Jersey have gone smoke-free, a trend that is accelerating, according to Americans for Non-smokers' Rights. Most have been community colleges and commuter schools, but more large universities with student housing are debating campus-wide bans. At the University of Iowa, a committee of staff, faculty and students recommended in November that the campus go smoke-free as early as July 2009. SUSAN JOHNSON, an associate provost, says the 30,000-student school is preparing for an intense debate.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-03-01-colleges-smokefree_x.htm

Polgreen: UI Tool Predicts Pandemic Chance (Springfield News Leader, March 2)
In an unusual effort to better predict the advance of a potential flu pandemic, public health experts will be staked about $100 apiece to bet on the spread of bird flu. "Farmers have used futures markets for decades to make decisions about what crops to plant. We're just borrowing that concept to help people in public health and health care make decisions about the future," said DR. PHIL POLGREEN, a University of Iowa assistant professor of medicine who helped create the project. The News Leader is based in Springfield, Mo. The story was also carried by CNN, ABC, CBS, the BALTIMORE SUN, the DENVER POST, the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, the LIVINGSTON DAILY PRESS & ARGUS in Howell, Mich., THE DAILY ADVANCE in Elizabeth City, N.C., THE DAILY BREEZE in Torrance, Calif., the OTTAWA CITIZEN, the TUCSON CITIZEN and other news organizations.
http://www.news-leader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070301/NEWS07/703010375/1090

Judge Rules For UI In Lab Case (Chronicle, March 2)
An Iowa judge has ruled that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was within its rights when it fired an outspoken laboratory director last year. Mary Gilchrist, former director of the university's Hygienic Laboratory, had claimed that officials broke the state's whistle-blower laws by firing her for objecting to cutting the size of a planned laboratory building. But a state judge found that Ms. Gilchrist was not blowing any whistle, just lobbying.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i26/26a00802.htm

Story Cites UI Study Of Teen Drivers (Saint Paul Pioneer-Press, March 1)
Beginning today, American Family Insurance is offering customers in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Indiana the chance to install cameras in their kids' cars for free through its new Teen Safe Driver Program. A University of Iowa study recruited 25 teens in rural Iowa to drive around for several months with the cameras. Students at Eagan High School in Minnesota will be the subjects of the university's next study, which will begin in the spring. "They've got about 100 kids turning 16 every month," said DANIEL MCGEHEE, director of the UI Human Factors & Vehicle Safety Research division of the Public Policy Center. Researchers hope to get 60 kids to sign up. The high school was of interest to researchers because it is close to the freeway system and only minutes from the Mall of America, where many of the teens like to go after school, McGehee said.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/16805475.htm

McGehee Comments On Drivecam Project (NBC Nightly News, March 1)
DAN MCGEHEE, director of the University of Iowa Human Factors & Vehicle
Safety Research division of the Public Policy Center, was featured in a
report on the growing use of video cameras -- called Drivecams -- in
vehicles driven by teenagers as a means of encouraging safe driving. To view the report, visit http://video.msn.com/v/us/msnbc.htm and click on the
headline "Drivecams force teens to be careful on the road." A related
segment also featuring McGehee was broadcast March 2 on NBC’s TODAY show. To view that video, go to http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12495633/ and click “Part 7: The end of the hour.”

UI Named A 'Best Place' For Postdocs (Vancouver Sun, March 1)
The Scientist, a life sciences magazine, ranked the University of British Columbia 12th in North America in its fifth annual Best Places to Work for Postdocs survey. Other institutions, like the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and the Mayo Clinic, jumped into the top 15 for the first time. Many postdocs attribute the leaps to a growing recognition of the importance of postdocs on those campuses.
http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/story.html?id=74b5bf71-ee48-442b-a8ee-9f197f167a80&k=2644

Writers' Workshop Alumnus Repossesses Cargo Ships (L.A. Times, March 1)
If repossessing a used Chevrolet can be tricky, consider retrieving the Aztec Express, a 700-foot cargo ship under guard in Haiti as civil unrest spread through the country. Only a few repo men possess the guile and resourcefulness for such a job. One of them is F. Max Hardberger of Lacombe, La. Since 1991, the 58-year-old attorney and ship captain has surreptitiously sailed away about a dozen freighters from ports around the world. He taught history and English in Louisiana and Mississippi after graduating from the University of New Orleans and earning a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-repoman1mar01,0,7780387.story?page=1&coll=la-home-headlines

Polgreen: Markets Can Predict Flu (Scientific American, March 1)
Is a bird flu pandemic coming? Health experts say there is no way to know, and especially no way to know when. But someone does know, or, rather, the combined experience of a lot of someones -- doctors and nurses treating the odd human patient, microbiologists studying virus samples and virus experts studying disease patterns. A new "market" launched on Thursday aims to take advantage of this combined knowledge to predict any actual pandemic. "We have been doing this on a very local level in Iowa to predict seasonal influenza," said Dr. PHIL POLGREEN, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Iowa and director of the Infectious Disease Society of America's Emerging Infections Network. The same story appeared on the Web site of REUTERS.
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa001&articleID=D1A143E596968B69CF21CE65F88B6159

UI Opens Avian Flu Prediction Market (NPR Marketplace, March 1)
Starting today, doctors and other health experts will be able to "bet" on the likelihood of an avian flu pandemic using a new predictive market at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://marketplace.publicradio.org/shows/2007/03/01/AM200703015.html

Polgreen: Prediction Market Borrows Concept From Farmers (MSNBC, March 1)
In an unusual effort to better predict the advance of a potential flu
pandemic, public health experts will be staked about $100 apiece to bet on the spread of bird flu. This type of futures market has also been created to predict hurricanes. In this case, the goal is to develop a faster way to collect expert opinion about the potential spread of a deadly disease outbreak. "Farmers have used futures markets for decades to make decisions about what crops to plant. We're just borrowing that concept to help people in public health and health care make decisions about the future," said Dr. PHIL POLGREEN, a University of Iowa assistant professor of medicine who helped create the project. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the WASHINGTON POST, PHYSORG.COM, PORTSMOUTH (NH) HERALD, HELENA (Mont.) RECORD, CASPER (Wyo.) STAR TRIBUNE, HARTFORD COURANT, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, LOS ANGELES TIMES, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, PHILADELPHIA INQURER, NEWSDAY, WORCESTER (Mass.) DAILY TELEGRAM, CBS NEWS, ABC NEWS, WHNS-TV (SC), KSTP-TV (Minneapolis-St. Paul) CTV (Canada) and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17388954/

Gaffney: HGH Can Be Used For Cosmetic Purposes (USA Today, March 1)
A story about human growth hormone notes that its rejuvenating powers have been touted as "the new Botox," but use for that purpose has not been approved by the federal government. HGH can be used to help repair damaged muscle quickly, but it also can lead to lethal cardiac failure. "Athletes may be the minority of those using these drugs," says GARY GAFFNEY, a University of Iowa associate professor of child psychology and behavior. He's also the editor of Steroid Nation, a blog that examines the use of anabolic steroids and performance-enhancing drugs in society. "It is done for cosmetic purposes. There are doctors who prescribe HGH at anti-aging clinics. Athletes and actors have many of the same reasons to use these drugs."
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/2007-03-01-hgh-outside-athletics_x.htm

Prisinzano: Plant Can Help Cocaine Addicts (Brunei Times, March 1)
A story about attempts to outlaw the Mexican plant salvia divinorum for its potential hallucinogenic effects notes that it has positive uses. THOMAS PRISINZANO, assistant professor of medicinal and natural products chemistry at the University of Iowa, says salvia may help doctors treat cocaine addicts. "You can give a rat free access to cocaine, give them free access to Salvinorin A, and they stop taking cocaine," Prisinzano says, explaining that the goal of his project is to change the structure of the Salvinorin A molecule to retain its anti-addictive properties, while eliminating the hallucinogenic effects. There are currently no anti-addiction medicines for cocaine and methamphetamine users. The Times is published in the nation of Brunei.
http://www.bruneitimes.com.bn/details.php?shape_ID=22258

Study: Walking, Weight Vests Increase Calorie Burn (New York Times, March 1)
Until recently, most weight vests were bulky 50-pound training tools designed for firefighters and football players. So a lot of walkers looking to increase their calorie burn carted around hand weights instead. Now vests made for walkers have hit the market. They range from 4 to 30 pounds, and many are adjustable. The makers of these vests (which can vary in price based on their weight) say they are safer, more effective alternatives to hand weights, which can strain shoulders and elbows. Some biomechanics researchers agree. A 2006 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise also found that walking with a weighted vest can raise caloric burn by about 7 percent and increase exercise intensity.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/01/fashion/01Physical.html?_r=1&ref=fashion&oref=slogin

Stem Cell Bill Includes UI Money (WQAD-TV, March 1)
Governor Culver has signed the bill that eases Iowa's restrictions on stem cell research, which also includes $12.5 million for a new Center for Regenerative Medicine at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6158901&nav=1sW7

Opinion Piece: End Four-Year Graduation Guarantee (Inside Higher Ed, March 1)
An opinion piece urges colleges and universities to stop offering students guarantees that they will graduate in four years, mentioning that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA offers such a policy.
http://insidehighered.com/views/2007/03/01/four

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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