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UI in the News

January 2007

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UI Calls For Computer Security Investigation (University Business, Jan. 31)
The University of Iowa has asked the state auditor's office to investigate computer security at University Hospitals after an employee accessed private information of a former director. UI Interim President GARY FETHKE said in a news release Monday he wanted the external review after an internal investigation showed a UI employee violated the university's policy on acceptable use of information. Members of the Iowa Board of Regents said earlier this month the documents accessed belonged to John Colloton, former, long-time director of the hospital.
http://www.universitybusiness.com/newssummary.aspx?news=yes&postid=1979

Fed Reserve Bank President Attended UI (Kansas City Star, Jan. 31)
Tom Hoenig, a 60-year-old Iowa-born and Kansas-educated economist, is president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. He attended St. Benedict's, a college in Atchison, Kan., since renamed Benedictine College, before completing his economics education at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/business/16584430.htm

Deer Accidents Caught As Part Of Distraction Study (CBS News, Jan. 31)
One and a half million times a year in America, a motor vehicle runs into a deer, and these accidents are blamed for 150 deaths and 29,000 injuries, resulting in about $1 billion in damage to cars and trucks. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA put cameras in the dashboards of cars of young drivers to study driver distractions, and they caught four deer collisions as well.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=697d0787212286bec957df081ecdfc37&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkVb&_md5=937ce50e57e307b6f8d52a5807ee04d1

Culver Budget Calls For UI Stem Cell Lab (BusinessWeek.com, Jan. 30)
Iowa Gov. Chet Culver proposed a $5.9 billion state budget Tuesday, which includes $12.5 million to construct a stem cell research facility at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the HOUSTON CHRONICLE and FORBES.
http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D8MVNT0G4.htm

UI Joins Statewide Disaster Management Team (BusinessWeek.com, Jan. 30)
Some of Iowa's largest businesses have formed an organization to help the state prevent and recover from catastrophic events. The Safeguard Iowa Partnership is a voluntary coalition intended to integrate resources from businesses and government agencies during all phases of disaster management. Among the partnership's members is the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D8MVMSPG1.htm

Former UI Professor Now At UC-Davis (Woodland Daily Democrat, Jan. 30)
A story about experiments conducted with babies by University of California-Davis psychology professor Lisa Oakes notes that she came to Davis last year from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.dailydemocrat.com/news/ci_5118207

UI Graduate Heads Technology Company (Lancaster New Era, Jan. 30)
Sam Abadir, chief executive officer of Broadclip, a Lancaster-based technology company, said with BroadClip's new product, MediaCatcher, consumers will have an easier - and less expensive - way of expanding their personal entertainment options. The product allows its user to fill up a portable player with unlimited amounts of video without paying extra fees. Abadir is a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF LAW. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://local.lancasteronline.com/4/200226

University of New Mexico Sets Up Candidate Visits (Albuquerque Tribune, Jan. 29)
As promised, the University of New Mexico moved quickly to schedule visits for its five presidential hopefuls. The regents want to hire a new president at their March meeting to replace Louis Caldera who resigned under pressure in January 2006. Finalist MEREDITH HAY, the University of Iowa's vice president for research, will be on campus Thursday. The newspaper is based in New Mexico. Similar stories appeared on the websites of KOAT-TV in New Mexico, KVIA-TV in El Paso, Texas New Mexico Business Weekly, http://www.abqtrib.com/news/2007/jan/29/nm-tech-president-plans-visit-unm/

Lie Claims Company Failed To Report Options (Canadian Business Online, Jan, 29)
According to ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, Research in Motion officials frequently failed to report options they received or reported them weeks late. That, he suggests, should be a red flag at Research in Motion, which Lie alleges has a history of granting options with fortuitous strike prices way too often for luck to be at work. His research into options dating and reporting has led the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to launch extensive investigations south of the border. http://www.canadianbusiness.com/columnists/tom_watson/article.jsp?content=20070129_155538_4692

UI Research: Think About Exercising During Super Bowl (L.A. Times, Jan. 29)
Super Bowl players burn a lot of calories, while viewers usually only ingest lots of them. Viewers could use that time in front of the tube to tone up. Or, for those who find the notion of exercising during the Super Bowl disrespectful to the principles of Super Bowl home viewership, there's an intriguing alternative. Instead of exercising, lie on the couch, stare at the TV and visualize yourself doing the exercises. This might confer some toning because just thinking about exercise might have some benefits, according to a 1992 study by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The study, published in the Journal of Neurophysiology, found that a four-week program that involved imagining exercising part of the hand resulted in a significant increase in hand strength over a control group.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-super29jan29,0,30017.story?coll=la-home-headlines

Bechara, Naqvi: Brain Damage Helped Smokers Quit (Washington Post, Jan. 29)
What if quitting smoking didn't involve fighting the urge to smoke over and over and over? Would that make it easier for smokers to kick the habit? That's the conclusion of a study of stroke survivors whose brain damage let them quit smoking seemingly effortlessly. ANTOINE BECHARA and NASIR H. NAQVI, neuroscientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA medical school, compared 19 smokers whose strokes had destroyed a part of the brain called the insula with 50 smokers whose strokes damaged other brain regions. Previous research had revealed the insula to be involved in anticipating and responding emotionally to physical sensations. The researchers found that people who had strokes affecting the insula were not significantly more likely to quit than those who had strokes elsewhere in the brain, but those who did quit had much less difficulty doing so.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/01/28/AR2007012801186.html

Squire Comments On Clinton Chances (The Independent, Jan. 29)
Hillary Clinton has gotten the reception of a pop celebrity in Iowa. But can she win the Democratic presidential caucuses? "I think she has a fair amount of work to do," said Professor PEVERILL SQUIRE, of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE. "Others have been in Iowa and have been able to build support -- John Edwards in particular has never really left ... She has not spent any of her time to court people, and they like to be courted." The Independent originates in the UK.
http://news.independent.co.uk/world/americas/article2193660.ece

Squire Comments On Giuliani Presidential Bid (Daily News, Jan. 29)
Can Rudy Giuliani become a serious contender for the GOP presidential nomination? "Giuliani is going to have to convince people that he's more conservative than his record otherwise would suggest," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, who teaches politics at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The former mayor's support for abortion rights, homosexual rights and gun control conflict with the hard-line positions of the party's powerful right. The Daily News originates in South Africa.
http://www.dailynews.co.za/index.php?fArticleId=3650980

UI Research Links Smoking Addiction To Brain Area (news-medical.net, Jan. 29)
Smokers with a damaged insula -- a region in the brain linked to emotion and feelings -- quit smoking easily and immediately, according to a study in the Jan. 26 issue of the journal Science. The study provides direct evidence of smoking's grip on the brain. It also raises the possibility that other addictive behaviors may have an equally strong hold on neural circuits for pleasure. The senior authors of the study are Antoine Bechara and Hanna Damasio, both faculty in the year-old Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California, in collaboration with graduate students NASIR NAQVI, who was first author on the study, and DAVID RUDRAUF, both from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "This is the first study of its kind to use brain lesions to study a drug addiction in humans," Naqvi said. News-medical.net originates in Australia. This story also appeared in RxPGnews.com, which originates in California.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=21552

UI Stroke Research Yields Smoking Addiction Clue (Newsday, Jan. 29)
Damage to the brain after a stroke has changed people's personalities and moods, and now a new study suggests that it can -- depending on the site of the brain lesion -- eliminate the desire to smoke. It has been known for some time that a region in the brain called the insula is involved in addiction to all sorts of drugs. But this is the first time that investigators thought outside the box to see whether damage to this region (in stroke patients) had any impact on quitting tobacco habits. NASIR NAQVI and DAVID RUDRAUF of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and his colleagues Antoine Bechara and Hanna Damasio of the University of Southern California identified stroke patients who had quit right after the brain damage. They asked them about how they quit smoking and then went back to look at their damaged brains on scans taken at the time. According to Naqvi, the insula plays an important role in how a person experiences emotion. Smoking, in particular, stimulates a number of body sensations that the insula may be involved in sensing, and remembering when one craves cigarettes. "Damage to the insula may make one's body forget the urge to smoke," he said. Newsday is published in New York.
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/ny-hssmoke295071326jan29,0,6723725.story?coll=ny-health-print

Insula In Brain Key To Smoking Addiction (earthtimes.org, Jan. 29)
A location in between the ears in the brain holds the key to addiction to smoking, according to new research. Neuroscientists, who undertook a study of people with brain damage, in most cases caused by a stroke, found that the urge to light up be ignited by a lesser-studied region of the brain called the insula, which also helps the humans to realize hunger, nervous twitches and several other body signals. Researchers at the University of Southern California and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that smokers, who are into the activity for a long time, could give up the habit much more easily when they have some damage of insula.
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/24949.html

Brain Damage Makes Quitting Smoking Easier (China View, Jan. 29)
One of the causes of strokes is smoking, and now researchers have found stroke victims whose brains were damaged in the part of the brain called the insula have a much easier time quitting. ANTOINE BECHARA and NASIR H. NAQVI, neuroscientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MEDICAL SCHOOL, compared 19 smokers whose strokes had destroyed a part of the brain called the insula with 50 smokers whose strokes damaged other brain regions. Previous research had revealed the insula to be involved in anticipating and responding emotionally to physical sensations. The researchers discovered people who had strokes affecting the insula were not significantly more likely to quit than those who had strokes elsewhere in the brain, but it was much easier for those who wanted to quit. China View originates in Beijing.
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2007-01/29/content_5669808.htm

Experimental Surgery Based On UI Work (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Jan. 29)
Experimental surgery being performed at the University of Washington is based on hearing-loss research and cochlear-implant innovations at the University of Iowa. Of the nearly 30 million Americans who are hearing-impaired, about 50 percent to 60 percent fall into this category of hearing loss in which the two most common remedies aren't viable options, said Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, head of the DEPARTMENT OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY -- HEAD AND NECK SURGERY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Hearing aids are inadequate because they just make the muddling sound patients hear louder, not clearer. The traditional cochlear implant -- which less than 5 percent of the hearing-impaired qualify for -- would damage whatever hearing the patients have left. So this trial at 20 medical centers is testing a hybrid implant. First established at the University of Iowa, the hybrid auditory implant uses a shorter version of the traditional cochlear implant electrode. Surgeons and researchers hope to restore hearing without damaging the low-frequency hearing, which would happen with a traditional, longer cochlear implant.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/health/301568_auditory29.html

Squire Comments On Clinton Strategy (Bloomberg.com, Jan. 29)
Hillary Clinton is getting prepared to pursue the support of the first-in-the-country caucuses "the Iowa way" - in living rooms and church basements. It's an indication of how important the Iowa result will be. "Given how front loaded the primary calendar looks like it will be, the winner in Iowa will get a huge boost," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601100&sid=aiBloOZUmP0U&refer=germany

Squire Comments On Union Influence (Las Vegas Sun, Jan. 29)
The Democratic National Committee gave Nevada the No. 2 slot on its 2008 presidential nomination calendar last year for three reasons: its ethnically diverse population, its strong union presence and its chance to raise issues of importance to the West. "Unions are better positioned to exert influence in caucuses than other groups," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and an expert on state caucuses. "It could be a situation where if it appears that the unions better understand how this process works and they're the ones who are going to show up, people could worry their voice won't be heard," Squire said. "It's critical for the integrity of the process that people see the caucus as organized in a way that's fair to all the candidates and all the participants."
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/lv-other/2007/jan/20/566644862.html

Barta: UI Won't Play UND Without Name Change (Grand Forks Herald, Jan. 29)
The University of North Dakota is moving to Division I in athletics, but may have problems finding opponents because of its "Fighting Sioux" nickname. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA official says the Hawkeyes won't play the Sioux in any sports because of the nickname. GARY BARTA, Iowa athletic director, says the Hawkeyes won't schedule the Sioux unless the policy changes. "We have a policy that came out several years ago indicating that we would not play any university outside of the Big Ten conference who had a Native American mascot," Barta said. "All policies can be reviewed, but it hasn't come out as something we're planning to review in the near future. Up until now, North Dakota hasn't been Division I. I don't think there's been any match-up that has brought it to the forefront."
http://www.in-forum.com/Sports/articles/154592

Former Workshop Faculty Member Lee Featured (Ocala Star-Banner, Jan. 28)
Li-Young Lee, a former faculty member of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, is considered one of America's leading poets. He finds that his poetry is powered by a paradox. "The more personal you get, the more universal it becomes. It's a strange contradiction. What I want to reveal, ultimately, isn't all just personal stuff. What I want to reveal is my connection to a larger context of a larger human story." Longtime workshop faculty member GERALD STERN wrote, "What characterizes Lee's poetry is a certain humility -- a willingness to let the sublime enter his field of concentration and take over, a devotion to language, a belief in its holiness." The Ocala Star-Banner is published in Florida.
http://www.ocala.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070128/FEATURES03/201280303/1027/YOURLIFE

Hoffert Welcomed Septuagenarian English Teacher To China (nwi.com, Jan. 28)
One night while she was living in Kalamazoo, Mich., she dreamed she was in China, standing on a cliff, and looking out toward the sea. Three months later the dream turned into reality. Grace Alice Mashaw, having reached her seventh decade, was in Tianjin, China, teaching English. It happened so quickly it made her head spin. Her sojourn lasted for two years and eight months. As a member of the Baha'i Faith, her journey and job there were arranged by the Baha'i National Spiritual Assembly in Evanston. Grace was welcomed to China by DR. JOHN HOFFERT, a retired biology professor from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who now teaches biochemistry through English at the Medical University in Tianjin. NWI.com originates in Indiana.
http://nwitimes.com/articles/2007/01/29/community/rop/140f2142d68f89c68625726f007d0824.txt

Doctors Confirm UI Research On Fat Consumption (Gainesville Sun, Jan. 28)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found that people who live with children tend to eat more fatty foods than those who do not. The study reported that adults living with children ate up to two more grams of saturated fats a day. According to an Associated Press report on the study, saturated fats are linked to heart disease. Dr. Louis Kuritzky of Family Medicine at Fourth Avenue in Gainesville said that in his experience the study rings true. He said part of the problem is that fatty foods appeal to children. His advice is to help build awareness in children of available healthy foods and to set dietary and exercise goals for the entire family.
http://www.gainesville.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070128/LOCAL/701280302/-1/news

Poet, Workshop Alumna Profiled (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Jan. 28)
Over the past two decades, thousands of children have put their fantasies on paper and submitted stories to the annual Once Upon a Story Contest, co-sponsored by the Pioneer Press and the Minnesota Children's Museum. Rachel Beck, who was a sixth-grader when she won in 1987. In junior high she switched to poetry, and years later she earned a degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. Now, at the age of 31, she is a working toward a doctorate at the University of California, with the goal of becoming a college teacher - since it's difficult to make a living as a poet. "If you're Seamus Heaney, yeah," she said. "Seamus Heaney is a lovely, lovely man. And, among other things, he wrote a new translation of 'Beowulf,' which is on the best-seller list. But that's not the usual scenario. The usual scenario is that a poet struggles for some time, sending out pieces and maybe getting published here and there, and then finally wins a first book contest, and maybe gets $1,000 and publication of their manuscript. It's not about the money. It's about having the book in hand and saying to your friends and family, 'Yes! Yes! You can find this on Amazon.' It's about feeling that you've arrived."
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/16547082.htm

Critic Gives Thumbs Down To Swofford Novel (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Jan. 28)
Book critic Michael McIntyre writes: "In a pivotal scene in 'Jar head,' Anthony Swofford's memoir of serving in the first Gulf War, Swofford, a Marine Corps sniper, draws a bead on an enemy commander in a distant tower. A superior orders him not to take the shot. The war ends, and Swofford never pulls the trigger. In his latest book, a novel called 'Exit A,' Swofford again comes armed -- this time with the accolades heaped on "Jarhead" and his training at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S acclaimed WRITERS' WORKSHOP. Also in his rucksack are the makings of a few interesting characters: Severin Boxx, an Air Force brat in Japan (as was Swofford growing up), is drawn into trouble by petty criminal Virginia Kindwall, the hafu (half Japanese, half American) daughter of Gen. Oliver Kindwall, who rules the Yokota Air Base in 1980s Japan, where Severin's mostly absent father, a colonel, is stationed. Again, Swofford never pulls the trigger."
http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/1169891673197260.xml&coll=2

Squire Says Clinton Is Getting Late Start (The Peninsula, Jan. 28)
Hillary Clinton faces an uphill battle in the Iowa caucuses. "Although it's still a year to go before the caucus she's actually a little late getting here," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. While well known, Clinton has spent little time in Iowa. "In Iowa you do a lot of campaigning on a personal level. That's not something she's had to do a lot," Squire said. "She has to be able to do the campaigning we've come to expect here-appearing in small settings and making people comfortable with her." But a bigger concern among Iowans is whether the divisive Clinton can win, he said. A Time poll released Thursday showed that 41 per cent of respondents disliked her. "It's not that Iowa Democrats don't like her, it's just that they're aware she might not be able to win," Squire said. The Peninsula originates in Qatar.
http://www.thepeninsulaqatar.com/Display_news.asp?section=World_News&subsection=Americas&month=January2007&file=World_News2007012842422.xml

Ex-Hawk Clark Is Joyful With Colts (USA Today, Jan. 27)
Though the Indianapolis Colts have a set of Pro Bowl wide receivers in Marvin Harrison and Reggie Wayne, quarterback Peyton Manning's prime target this postseason has been a tight end who loves the feel of a wide open passing lane. "It's very joyful for me, and I really like that better than just blocking all day," says DALLAS CLARK, in his fourth NFL season from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "Getting out is kind of like a lineman picking up a fumble and being able to actually touch the ball. Wow! ... It's the same enjoyment being out there running with Marv and Reggie." In three playoff games, Clark has 17 catches for 281 yards and an average of 16.5 yards per reception - all team highs.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/nfl/colts/2007-01-25-clark_x.htm?csp=34

Squire: Clinton's Iowa Visit Important (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jan. 27)
Hillary Clinton has never been a front-runner in Iowa polls, but the Iowa caucuses will be her first test and she is making her first visit to the state. "This trip is very important," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. "She's lagging a little bit behind some of the other candidates, so she needs to jump-start her caucus efforts."
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=558125

Hay Finalist For New Mexico Post (Albuquerque Tribune, Jan. 27)
MEREDITH HAY
, the University of Iowa's vice president for research, will be on campus Thursday as the University of New Mexico seeks a new president. She will be the second of four finalists to visit.
http://www.abqtrib.com/news/2007/jan/27/unm-presidential-visits-start-tuesday/

Phillips Comments On ISU Study Of Big Football Players (Daily Star, Jan. 27)
Heavy tackles and 300-pound nose guards are common in pro and college football. Now a study shows the trend toward beefier, overweight linemen is emerging at the high school level. Researchers at Iowa State University found nearly half of the offensive and defensive linemen playing on Iowa high school teams qualify as overweight, and one in 10 meets medical standards for severe obesity. The National Football League and players have taken greater note of health risks for heavy athletes because of two high-profile NFL player deaths and a 2005 study, which concluded that 56 percent of NFL players fit medical standards for obesity. The size, bulk and ever-widening girth of the pros apparently has not gone unnoticed by those dreaming of one day playing at the next level. "I think if we're honest about it, at least in this case, we'd have to look at the role models for these young athletes," said Dr. GEORGE PHILLIPS, a pediatrician at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER. "Most of these kids aren't going to play professionally or even at the college level. So what we need to do is to make sure if they're going to add weight, muscle mass, that they do it in a healthy way." The Daily Star is published in Cooperstown, N.Y. This story came from the Associated Press.
http://www.thedailystar.com/sports/2007/01/27/c1-bigguys-273.html

Drews Comments On Computer Distractions (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 26)
As the number of wireless access points for laptop computers has increased on campuses, so has the number of reports of web surfing, text-messaging, and gaming during class, causing students to become distracted from their studies. JANE DREWS, information-technology security officer for the University of Iowa, believes that a solution to wireless distractions is etiquette education. "From the person who endlessly chats on a phone while in a restaurant, to someone's pager or cell going off in the middle of a presentation or lecture, we are creating a society of very rude technology users. We have an online class offered to freshmen that includes a responsible computing module, with a section on etiquette. I've suggested it be expanded to include classroom etiquette, too."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i21/21c00101.htm

Lie Alleges Company Backdated Options (Globe Investor, Jan. 26)
Research In Motion Ltd. backdated hundreds of thousands of stock options in order to make them more lucrative for company executives and directors, alleges an American academic whose research on backdating has led to nearly 200 investigations in the United States. "I believe that backdating has taken place here," professor ERIK LIE alleges in an affidavit filed in support of a court action launched by the Ironworkers Ontario Pension Fund, which owns 13,200 RIM shares. Prof. Lie is an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa and a well-known expert on backdating. After his research was first reported in late 2005, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission launched investigations into backdating allegations at 180 companies. Lie has since worked with the SEC and testified on backdating before the U.S. Senate last September. The publication is based in Toronto.
http://www.globeinvestor.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20070126.wxrrim26/GIStory/

BlackBerry Maker May Have Misdated Option Grants (Jan. 26, Bloomberg)
Canadian stocks may decline for a second day, led by Research In Motion Ltd., after a report raised concern that the BlackBerry maker may have backdated stock option grants. Research In Motion may decline $1.86 to $147.97, based on bids already submitted on the Toronto Stock Exchange. The maker of the BlackBerry e-mail device misdated "hundreds of thousands" of grants, the Globe and Mail reported, citing ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601082&sid=alar49jyp0Ck

Brain Injury Can Stop Craving To Smoke (Los Angeles Times, Jan. 26)
Smokers with injuries in a specific part of their brains kick their habits instantly and without the intense cravings that can make it so hard to quit, a new study reports today. The researchers from the University of Southern California and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA linked a brain area called the insula to the powerful urges that cause people to continue smoking. Smokers with damaged insulas were 136 times more likely to have their addictions erased than smokers with damage in other parts of their brains, researchers said.
http://www.latimes.com/news/science/la-sci-smoking26jan26,1,1871963.story?coll=la-news-science

Regents Examine Emeriti Benefits (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 26)
The Board of Regents, State of Iowa has undertaken an investigation of the benefits given to emeritus professors and staff members at the state's public universities. Teresa A. Wahlert, the board's president pro tem, called for universities to review the benefits extended to retired employees and report back to the regents. The issue arose when local newspapers reported on the many perks enjoyed by a retired director of hospitals at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The benefits included an office, a secretary paid with state dollars, and parking privileges.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2007/01/2007012604n.htm

Everett Will Lead Clarian Program (Indianapolis Star, Jan. 26)
LINDA EVERETT
, now the chief nursing officer at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL AND CLINICS, will become the executive vice president and chief nurse executive at Clarian, the largest hospital system in Indianapolis. Everett will oversee about 4,500 nurses and other staff working in areas including social work, respiratory therapy and nurse recruitment at Clarian's three central locations: Methodist Hospital, Indiana University Hospital and Riley Hospital for Children. Everett is the current president of the American Organization of Nurse Executives.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070126/BUSINESS/701260415/1003/BUSINESS

Damasios Began Brain Research At UI (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 26)
An unusual study of people with brain damage, caused in most cases by a stroke, suggests the compulsion to light up might be driven by the same little-studied brain region that helps us make sense of hunger pangs, nervous twitches and all sorts of visceral body signals. In the latest study, published in this week's issue of the journal Science, researchers at the University of Southern California and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that longtime smokers who had sustained insula damage had a remarkably easy time giving up cigarettes. The year-old brain institute at USC is directed by the husband-and-wife team of Antonio and Hanna Damasio, who until 2005 were based at Iowa. The Damasios are prominent for their research into the physical origins of consciousness and emotion, including the role of the insula in those realms. Hanna Damasio was a senior author of the new study, led by a University of Iowa graduate student, NASIR NAQVI.
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/01/26/MNGMHNPK651.DTL&type=health

Drugs Might Help Stop Smoking Urge (Canadian Press, Jan. 25)
Some smokers who suffered damage to a particular area of the brain - the insula -- were able to butt out for good with no effort, researchers have found, suggesting the region could be a target for drugs or other interventions to break the cycle of addiction. The co-principal co-principal investigator, Dr. ANTOINE BECHARA, who collaborated on the research at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is originally from Toronto. "From a theoretical perspective, I do suspect that the insula also plays a role in the pleasure that you also get from smoking," he said. "But from this study we could not get at that directly. So that's why we suggest that probably what we were doing, we were disrupting the urge that drives someone to go and smoke." What doctors can't do, obviously, is drill into the brain and deliberately damage the insula as a way of blocking feelings that help fuel addictive behavior. But Bechara said drugs could be designed that would target the area to interfere with signals of nicotine withdrawal being sent from the body, and there may be other techniques that could be developed to have a similar effect. One of those is transcranial magnetic stimulation - which involves inducing weak electrical currents in brain tissue that creates a temporary lesion. But as current technology stands, it is able only to reach the outside surface of the brain. "We would need to advance the technique," Bechara said.
http://mediresource.sympatico.ca/health_news_detail.asp?channel_id=7&news_id=11610

Brain Structure Linked To Smoking Addiction (Reuters, Jan. 25)
Scientists who noticed that one heavy smoker suddenly lost all desire for cigarettes after suffering brain damage in a stroke have identified a structure deep in the brain as a key player in smoking addiction. Writing in the journal Science on Thursday, they said the findings about the brain structure called the insula could lead to therapies targeting it to help people kick the habit. "It's a very significant finding because it kind of shifts attention to an area that we were not looking at seriously before," one of the researchers, ANTOINE BECHARA of the University of Southern California and the University of Iowa, said in an interview.
http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=scienceNews&storyid=2007-01-25T195614Z_01_N25483015_RTRUKOC_0_US-SMOKING-BRAIN.xml

Discovery Sheds Light On Smoking Addiction (Associated Press, Jan. 25)
Damage to a silver dollar-sized spot deep in the brain seems to wipe out the urge to smoke, a surprising discovery that may shed important new light on addiction. The research was inspired by a stroke survivor who claimed he simply forgot his two-pack-a-day addiction. DR. ANTOINE BECHARA of the University of Southern California, who scanned the brains of 69 smokers and ex-smokers to pinpoint the region involved. A patient he code-named "Nathan" note nonchalantly that "my body forgot the urge to smoke" right after his stroke. At the time, Bechara was at the University Of Iowa studying the effects of certain types of brain damage after strokes or other injury. While Nathan was hospitalized, stroke specialists sent his information to that brain registry. He was 38, had smoked since 14, said he enjoyed it and had had no intention to quit. But his last puff was the night before his stroke. Bechara is also an adjunct associate professor of neurology at the UI. The article appeared in the SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, DALLAS MORNING NEWS, LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS, MIAMI HERALD, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, TAMPA TRIBUNE, BALTIMORE SUN, CBS NEWS, and many other sources.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070125/ap_on_he_me/smoking_brain_damage_4

Smoking Study Is Co-Authored By UI Researchers (New York Times, Jan. 25)
Scientists studying stroke patients are reporting that an injury to a specific part of the brain, near the ear, can instantly and permanently break a smoking habit, effectively erasing the most stubborn of addictions. People with the injury who stopped smoking found that their bodies, as one man put it, "forgot the urge to smoke."  The research was done at the University of Southern California; co-authors included NASIR NAQVI and DAVID RUDRAUF of the University of Iowa. The article also appeared in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, DETROIT NEWS, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, and ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/25/science/25cnd-brain.html

Study Links Brain Area, Smoking Urge (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 25)
The insula is a rarely studied brain region linked to deep-seated emotion, speech planning and the brain's need to monitor and regulate bodily functions. Now, a study in the latest issue of the journal Science suggests it could be a key element in the circuitry that keeps smokers addicted. An unusual study of brain-damaged stroke patients led by researchers at the University of Southern California and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found those who had sustained damage to the insula had a remarkably easy time giving up cigarettes. A similar article appeared on the BBC Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/01/25/BAG89NOCVN9.DTL&feed=rss.news

Bechara Comments On Smoking/Brain Damage Study (Scientific American, Jan. 25)
A patient who damaged his left insula, a region of the brain located deep within the cortex on either lateral side, after suffering a stroke may have opened the door to kick the smoking habit without even trying.  This revelation prompted a study that found the insula is intimately linked to smoking addiction. In fact, the authors report in Science this week that damage to that region is 136 times more likely to result in a "disruption of smoking addiction" -- defined as the ability to quit easily without relapse -- than injury to other parts of the brain. "Finding the insula may not be surprising in a way, because there was knowledge that preceded that and it makes sense," says senior study author ANTOINE BECHARA, a neuroscientist at the University of Southern California and the University of Iowa's Carver College of Medicine. "But, it's surprising in another way because nobody was looking there."
http://www.sciammind.com/article.cfm?articleID=5A961D91-E7F2-99DF-3CCCA8DBF29BBC74

Squire Comments on Giuliani Candidacy (Boston Globe, Jan. 25)
Backers say that former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani is the Republican most likely to beat the presumptive Democratic front-runner, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York. But first he has to capture the GOP nomination -- and the big question is whether he can win over enough Republicans in states like Iowa and South Carolina, among the first nominating contests where voters are solid conservatives and could be turned off by his stance on social issues. "Giuliani is going to have to convince people that he's more conservative than his record otherwise would suggest," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, who teaches politics at the University of Iowa. The ASSOCIATED PRESS story also appeared on the Web site of WCBS-TV in New York, SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, and several other publications.
http://www.boston.com/news/local/new_hampshire/articles/2007/01/25/giuliani_can_republicans_star_shine_with_conservatives/

Culver Proposes Stem Cell Research (KETV, Jan. 25)
Iowa Gov. Chet Culver is calling on the Legislature to lift a state ban on a certain type of embryonic stem cell research to "restore hope for thousands of Iowans." Culver said lifting the ban will give hope to those suffering from diseases such as cancer, diabetes, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Culver called for the bill on Thursday morning in Iowa City, where he proposed spending $12.5 million to establish a stem cell research center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The TV station is based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.ketv.com/news/10845659/detail.html?rss=oma&psp=news

Play Shows How Prisoners' Families Cope (Herald Sun, Jan. 25)
Ashley Lucas created "Doin' Time: Through the Visiting Glass" as a way for her to talk about the fact that her father is in prison in Texas. The one-woman documentary play being performed Saturday at the Criminal Justice Resource Center in Durham. Lucas will bring "Doin' Time" to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in April. The newspaper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.heraldsun.com/durham/4-812576.cfm

Culver Proposes Stem Cell Research Center At UI (WQAD-TV, Jan. 25)
Governor Culver will be in Iowa City this morning to propose spending over $12 million to establish a stem cell research center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5987880&nav=1sW7

Hay Is Finalist For New Mexico Presidency (KOTV-TV, Jan. 25)
A story about the finalists for the presidency at the University of New Mexico notes that one of the finalists is MEREDITH HAY, vice president for research at the University of Iowa. KOTV is based in Oklahoma City, Okla. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the ALBEQUERQUE JOURNAL, SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, NEW MEXICO BUSINESS WEEKLY, KOB-TV and KOAT-TV (both Albuquerque), KSWO-TV (Lawton, Okla.), KTEN-TV (Ada, Okla.), WQAD-TV (Moline, Ill.) and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.kotv.com/news/local/story/?id=118849

UI Grade-skipping Study Is Cited (Canada.com, Jan. 25)
A story about the reluctance of school officials to allow students to skip grades in Canada says that parent advocates of grade-skipping cite the influential "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students" study, in which researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Center for Gifted Education show an overwhelming majority of accelerated students say it was an excellent experience for them, both academically and socially. The exhaustive study concluded that schools hold back the brightest kids due to: a limited familiarity with research on acceleration, a belief that children must be kept with their age group so as not to hurry them out of childhood, and political concerns about equity.
http://www.canada.com/topics/news/cns_writers/story.html?id=4186f86b-ae7d-4c01-a962-351a342361f9&k=85062

Culver Accepts Bedell Resignation (WQAD-TV, Jan. 25)
Governor Chet Culver has accepted the resignation of Regent Tom Bedell. It comes more than a month after Bedell announced he was leaving his post amid a stalled UNIVERSITY OF IOWA presidential search that has fueled animosity between regents and school staff. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5986714&nav=1sW7

Nursing Alumnus Leads National Nursing Group (Charlotte Observer, Jan. 25)
Celebrating National Nurse Anesthetists Week this week, a Rutherford College, N.C., man who heads the national organization wants to make people more aware of the services that nurse anesthetists perform. Terry Wicks, a certified registered nurse anesthetist at Catawba Valley Medical Center in North Carolina, is president of the 36,000-member association. Wicks earned his nursing degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/states/north_carolina/counties/catawba/16539676.htm

Phillips Comments On Overweight Adolescents (KOMO-TV, Jan. 24)
Heavy tackles and 300-pound nose guards are common in pro and college football. Now a study shows the trend toward beefier, overweight linemen is emerging at the high school level. Researchers at Iowa State University found nearly half of the offensive and defensive linemen playing on Iowa high school teams qualify as overweight, and one in 10 meet medical standards for severe obesity. Health experts said the results are no surprise in a society dealing with high rates of child and adolescent obesity. Overweight children and teens face higher risks for heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and weight problems through adulthood. They said it's impossible to lay blame on any single source or factor. "But I think if we're honest about it, at least in this case, we'd have to look at the role models for these young athletes," said Dr. GEORGE PHILLIPS, a pediatrician at the University of Iowa's Sports Medicine Center. "Most of these kids aren't going to play professionally or even at the college level. So what we need to do is to make sure if they're going to add weight, muscle mass, that they do it in a healthy way." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, KTVH-TV (Little Rock), WTVJ-TV (Miami), WMAQ-TV (Chicago), KMGH-TV (Denver), WJXT-TV (Jacksonville, Fla.), KNBC-TV (New York City), KCRA-TV (Sacramento), WSB-TV (Atlanta), KOMO-TV (Seattle), WHIO-TV (Columbus), KIRO-TV (Seattle) and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/sfl-124overweight,0,2748020.story?coll=sfla-sports-headlines

Former Resident Is Doctor, Pilot, Cowboy (Gladwin County Record, Jan. 24)
A story about Dr. Barb Miller notes that she completed her residency at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Record is published in Gladwin, Mich.
http://www.gladwinmi.com/placed/story/01-24-2007miller.html

Phillips Comments On Overweight Adolescents (ABCNews.com, Jan. 24)
Heavy tackles and 300-pound nose guards are common in pro and college football. Now a study shows the trend toward beefier, overweight linemen is emerging at the high school level. Researchers at Iowa State University found nearly half of the offensive and defensive linemen playing on Iowa high school teams qualify as overweight, and one in 10 meet medical standards for severe obesity. Health experts said the results are no surprise in a society dealing with high rates of child and adolescent obesity. Overweight children and teens face higher risks for heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and weight problems through adulthood. They said it's impossible to lay blame on any single source or factor. "But I think if we're honest about it, at least in this case, we'd have to look at the role models for these young athletes," said Dr. GEORGE PHILLIPS, a pediatrician at the University of Iowa's Sports Medicine Center. "Most of these kids aren't going to play professionally or even at the college level. So what we need to do is to make sure if they're going to add weight, muscle mass, that they do it in a healthy way." The same story appeared on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES, WASHINGTON POST, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, ROCHESTER (NY) DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE, SOUTH CAROLINA ENQUIRER HERALD, LEXINGTON (Kent.) HERALD LEADER, MIAMI HERALD, NEWSDAY, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, KANSAS CITY STAR, AUSTIN (Tex.) AMERICAN STATESMAN, SAN MATEO (Calif.) JOURNAL, CNN, CBS NEWS, KARE-TV (Minneapolis), MSNBC, FORBES and numerous other news organizations.
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory?id=2816745

UI School Nurse Study Cited (Deseret Morning News, Jan. 24)
A story about the lack of school nurses in Utah notes that Utah schools are giving more than 1,600 medications to students every day, most often via a school secretary or teacher, according to an American Federation of Teachers study presented to lawmakers last month. Yet a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA School of Nursing study shows schools are three times more likely to err in medicating students in such situations.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,650225613,00.html

Gronbeck: Clinton Has Neutralized Abortion Issue (CNSNews.com, Jan. 24)
A story about how Hillary Clinton's position on abortion may affect her chances for the Democratic presidential nomination notes that she has been a consistent supporter of abortion rights. "No one else -- of the candidates currently in -- is so tied to the issue, not only because of her past but because of her gender," said BRUCE GRONBECK, a professor of media studies and political culture at the University of Iowa. But, he added, "I watched her in the last [Senate] campaign in New York and she neutralized the issue. She has taken the position that no one likes abortion, but it's important that it's legal."
http://www.cnsnews.com/ViewPolitics.asp?Page=/Politics/archive/200701/POL20070122b.html

Regents Approve UI Presidential Search Committee (WQAD-TV, Jan. 24)
The Iowa Board of Regents has added the final seven members to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's presidential search committee. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5980954&nav=1sW7

Hunter: Moskow Is Vigilant On Inflation (St. Louis Post Dispatch, Jan. 23)
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago President Michael H. Moskow, whose inflation warnings have weakened bonds, on Monday confirmed he will retire on Aug. 31. When serving as a voting member of the Fed's Open Market Committee, Moskow helped set the benchmark interest rate that affected the nation's economy. "(Moskow) has been vigilant against inflation and always talks about that," said WILLIAM CURT HUNTER, a former Chicago Fed research director and now dean of the University of Iowa's business school in Iowa City. "He is mildly hawkish, but at the same time focuses on maximum sustainable growth."
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/business/stories.nsf/story/6BB7191234BD009B8625726C000F7C7C?OpenDocument

Student Discusses His Love Of Cooking (Milwaukee Journal Star, Jan. 23)
A Q&A interview with teenage chef Simon Barcelona of Wauwatosa, Wisc. was published. Barcelona, 18, is a freshman English major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=555747

Grant: Football, Basketball Costs Harm Some Sports (Inside HigherEd, Jan. 23)
At a Knight Commission meeting recently, a panel on the state of Title IX bred a conversation about escalating coaches' salaries and burgeoning athletics budgets -- issues that dominated sessions at the National Collegiate Athletic Association's annual convention earlier this month. As panelists Monday pointed out, many college athletics programs continue to sink into the red, and some of the highest-paid coaches earn more than their institutions' presidents. CHRISTINE GRANT, a former director of women's athletics at the University of Iowa, said the insatiable appetite for men's basketball and football are leading some colleges to overspend and eventually drop men's Olympic sports (swimming, wrestling, track) as a way to balance the budget.
http://insidehighered.com/news/2007/01/23/knight

UI Press Publishes Guantanamo Detainee Poetry Collection (Harper's, Jan. 23)
A story about the forthcoming book, "Detainees Speak: Declassified Poetry From Guantanamo Bay," notes that it is being published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press.
http://harpers.org/sb-the-waste-land-1169582427.html

State Senator Calls For Regents Resignation (AgriNews, Jan. 23)
A state senator called last week for the entire Iowa State Board of Regents to resign, saying "new ideas" are needed. Sen. Brad Zaun, R-Urbandale, said the controversy over the search for a new president for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA shows there is a lack of leadership on the board. AgriNews is published in Rochester, Minn.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/292263524074830.bsp

Playwright Studied At UI (Detroit Jewish News, Jan. 23)
A story about a performance of the play "It Should Be" notes that playwright Ted Herstand earned his bachelor's and master's degrees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://jnonline.us/main.asp?SectionID=3&SubSectionID=43&ArticleID=2411&TM=29965.91

Regents To Vote On Search Committee (WQAD-TV, Jan. 23)
The Board of Regents, State of Iowa is expected to vote today on the rest of a 13-member search committee that has the task of finding a new president at the University of Iowa. The regents approved the first five members earlier this month. They're slated to approve the remaining slots during a conference call this afternoon. The head of the committee, DAVID JOHNSEN, has recommended a group with one Iowa graduate student, but no undergrads or regents. The TV station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5975805

Hunter Comments on Moskow Retirement (Los Angeles Times, Jan. 23)
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago President Michael H. Moskow, whose inflation warnings have raised bond yields, confirmed Monday that he would retire Aug. 31, leaving a fourth high-level opening at the central bank. Moskow "has been vigilant against inflation and always talks about that," said WILLIAM CURT HUNTER, a former Chicago Fed research director and now dean of the University of Iowa's business school. "He is mildly hawkish but at the same time focuses on maximum sustainable growth." The article originally appeared in BLOOMBERG NEWS.
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-fed23jan23,1,4892091.story?coll=la-headlines-business&ctrack=1&cset=true

Gronbeck Comments On Clinton Candidacy (CNSNews.com, Jan. 22)
Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.) will have a lengthy pro-abortion rights record to defend during her 2008 presidential campaign -- a record established not only by her Senate votes but also by her eight years as first lady. "No one else - of the candidates currently in - is so tied to the issue, not only because of her past but because of her gender," said BRUCE GRONBECK, a professor of media studies and political culture at the University of Iowa. But, he added, "I watched her in the last [Senate] campaign in New York and she neutralized the issue. She has taken the position that no one likes abortion, but it's important that it's legal." The article also appeared on NEWSMAX.COM and other news websites.
http://www.cnsnews.com/ViewPolitics.asp?Page=/Politics/archive/200701/POL20070122b.html

Resignations May Slow Backdating Probes (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 21)
The abrupt resignations last week of U.S. Attorney Kevin Ryan, the Justice Department's top law enforcement official in Northern California, and Assistant U.S. Attorney Chris Steskal, the lead prosecutor on the task force investigating stock-option backdating, raise questions about the fate of Bay Area technology companies under investigation. Backdating -- manipulating the timing of stock-option grants to enrich company executives -- became a cause celebre for Ryan, who in July formed a task force to focus on the growing scandal. More than 2,000 public companies have backdating issues, according to ERIK LIE, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA finance professor whose research zeroed in on the widespread practice of choosing dates on which the stock was trading lower to inflate the value of options for executives.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/01/21/BUGL0NM5831.DTL&feed=rss.business

Coach Was Mentored By Stringer At UI (Courier-Journal, Jan. 21)
As an African-American teenager growing up in Alabama, Tim Eatman idolized five basketball coaches: John Thompson, George Raveling, John Chaney, Marian Washington and C. Vivian Stringer. He finally got to meet one of his role models when Stringer was at a coaching clinic in Birmingham. The 19-year-old Eatman told the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA coach, "One day I'm going to work for you."

Stringer first hired Eatman to work at her camp, and he boarded a bus for a 48-hour trip to a place he had never been before. Stringer later made him an assistant coach for her final two seasons at Iowa (1993-95), where he occasionally biked to practice in the snow. This year Stringer and Eatman faced each other when Rutgers played Louisville, where Eatman is an assistant. The Courier-Journal is published in Louisville.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070121/SPORTS02/701210525/1028

South Carolina Residents Use UI Site In Ethanol Fight (The State, Jan. 21)
Sleepy Batesburg-Leesville, S.C. has been shaken awake by a couple of stay-at-home moms armed with the Internet. Worried by the prospect of a giant ethanol factory coming to town, Kim Duvall and Sarah Brunson used a few mouse clicks to ignite a high-tech version of old grass-roots activism. Councilman Billy Derrick then did his own research, including using a Web site from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, in a state where ethanol is an established industry, finding that much of the anti-ethanol information is outdated. Ethanol-making technology has advanced, plants pollute less and are more strictly regulated now, he said. The State is published in Columbia, S.C.
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/news/16508678.htm

Sci-Fi Producer Attended UI (South Bend Tribune, Jan. 21)
David Simkins is the producer of the new sci-fi cable series "The Dresden Files." After earning a bachelor's degree in film and broadcasting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1982, Simkins moved to Los Angeles and worked his way up in the business. After a stint as the development executive for such cult classics as "Children of the Corn" at New World Pictures, Simkins' own script, "Adventures in Babysitting," was optioned and then produced by Disney's Touchstone Pictures. He then was hired by Warner Bros. Television to write the cult hit "The Adventures of Brisco County Jr." He's been working in TV ever since, writing and producing "Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman," "Charmed," "Dark Angel," "Roswell," "FreakyLinks" and, most recently, "Blade: The Series." The South Bend Tribune is published in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070121/Ent04/701210483

UI Hog Lot Research Is Cited (Daily Telegram, Jan. 20)
For months, environmental groups have been fighting a proposed dairy in Ogden Township, Mich., fearful that it will damage the environment or even put their health at risk. A 2002 study of air quality at Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations performed by Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that workers in such facilities -- especially in hog and poultry CAFOs -- commonly suffer from respiratory problems. But the study also said those problems do not necessarily translate into a wider health risk for people living around such facilities.
http://www.lenconnect.com/articles/2007/01/21/news/news02.txt

UI Alumnus Was First African To Earn Writing Degree (allAfrica.com, Jan. 20)
Taban Lo Liyong is considered one of the greatest literary minds in sub-Saharan Africa. He came to the United States to attend Howard University, and then came to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he became the first African to receive a master's degree in creative writing.  In a five-decade career he has won praise and provoked controversy with his poetry and scholarly work.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200701220022.html

UI Row With Regents Focuses On Gartner (Associated Press, Jan. 20)
Henry C. Jackson wrote, in an Associated Press story, "The fumbling search for a new president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has led to a faculty uprising, with many professors complaining that meddling by one of the state's favorite sons -- Pulitzer Prize-winning newsman Michael Gartner -- has scared off a top candidate. Everyone involved has gotten some of the blame. But most of the ire has been aimed at the Board of Regents, and particularly its president, Gartner, who has been criticized as tactless, abrasive and ill-suited to the collegial ways of academia...An unapologetic Gartner does not deny some of the criticism, but said members of the faculty and staff have long resented his authority, and 'the search was the fuse that lit it.'" This story appeared widely.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16711324/

Tomlinson Wins Iowa Short Fiction Award (Courier-Journal, Jan. 20)
Jim Tomlinson worked as an engineer in Berea, Ky., for 30 years before he became a writer. Most of his debut-book characters are carved from Appalachian stock, but their human frailties and needs are universal. Tomlinson's book, "Things Kept, Things Left Behind" -- written with the help of many Kentucky foundations, writers groups and writers -- allowed him to become the first Kentuckian to win the prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SHORT FICTION AWARD.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070120/FEATURES06/701200346/1010/FEATURES

Squire Comments On Union Influence (Las Vegas Sun, Jan. 20)
The Democratic National Committee gave Nevada the No. 2 slot on its 2008 presidential nomination calendar last year for three reasons: its ethnically diverse population, its strong union presence and its chance to raise issues of importance to the West. "Unions are better positioned to exert influence in caucuses than other groups," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and an expert on state caucuses. "It could be a situation where if it appears that the unions better understand how this process works and they're the ones who are going to show up, people could worry their voice won't be heard," Squire said. "It's critical for the integrity of the process that people see the caucus as organized in a way that's fair to all the candidates and all the participants."
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/lv-other/2007/jan/20/566644862.html

Johnsen Comments On Presidential Search (Denver Post, Jan. 20)
A story about the University of Colorado's upcoming search for a new president says that DAVID JOHNSEN, the dean of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY, is chairing the UI's search committee for a new president. "I think the competition for the very best potential presidents has been very fierce," he said. "The stakes are fairly high." The compensation reflects the need to attract presidents with an academic and leadership background capable of running a $2.4 billion operation like Iowa's, Johnsen said. "It's a lot more complicated than it was 30 years ago," he said of a university president's job.
http://www.denverpost.com/nuggetsmailbag/ci_5050013

Poet/Activist Taught At UI (Business Day, Jan. 20)
For 36 years, Mazizi Kunene was exiled from South Africa until his return in 1993, when United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization declared him the continent's poet laureate. Before then, he was the African National Congress's chief representative in London, from where he began to lobby European governments, raising awareness of the issues facing black South Africans at the time. But Mazizi eventually left political activism and went on to teach at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Stanford University before joining the University of California Los Angeles in 1975 as a lecturer in African literature and Zulu. The newspaper is based in South Africa.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200701221343.html

Gallup Book Reviewed (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 19)
George Gallup's polling about who saw the movie "Gone With the Wind" marked the film industry's first full-scale effort at empirical market research, says Susan Ohmer, an assistant professor of modern communication at the University of Notre Dame and author of "George Gallup in Hollywood" (Columbia University Press).  Before discussing Gallup's creation of the Audience Research Institute, Ms. Ohmer sets the stage by detailing his master's and doctoral research in psychology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, his advertising work, and the polling that would make him a household name with the presidential election of 1936.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i20/20a01301.htm

Story On Amnesia Research Directs Readers To The UI (KVOA, Jan. 19)
A story on British amnesia research directs readers to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS web site for background information on amnesia. This story appeared widely. KVOA is located in Arizona.
http://kvoa.com/Global/story.asp?S=5963877&nav=HMO9

UI Story Is Sundance Film Inspiration (KTVX-TV, Jan. 19)
A story about films that will be shown in the upcoming Sundance Film Festival lists DARK MATTER from first-time director, Chen Shi-Zheng. The film is based on actual events that took place at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1991 when politics threatened the aspirations of a Chinese science prodigy. The film stars Ye Liu, Meryl Streep and Aidan Quinn. KTVX is based in Salt Lake City.
http://www.abc4.com/mostpopular/story.aspx?content_id=3191195e-23c2-4f67-83d9-9c7859989056

UI Lottery Ads Bother Some (WQAD-TV, Jan. 19)
Some gambling opponents are speaking out about an Iowa Lottery television commercial featuring the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The ad features the university logos, a version of the Iowa Fight Song and shots from sporting events at Carver Hawkeye Arena. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5956281&nav=1sW7

Pegnetter Named Interim President Of FGCU (Naples News, Jan. 19)
Richard Pegnetter has been named interim president of Florida Gulf Coast University in Ft. Myers. Pegnetter is a former associate dean of the college of business at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2007/jan/19/pegnetter_named_acting_fgcu_president/?local_news

Alumna Brings No Shame To North Carolina (Raleigh News & Observer, Jan. 19)
Deep Dish Theater's "Side Dish" fundraiser at University Mall in Chapel Hill tonight will include spoofs of "Hamlet," "Waiting for Godot" and Deep Dish's first production, Beckett's "Endgame." The spoof sketches come from No Shame Theatre, a group of troupes across the country with ties to the theater program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where "Side Dish" director and performer Jeri Lynn Schulke got her undergrad degree.
http://www.newsobserver.com/669/story/533746.html

Alumnus Is Broadway Impresario -- Sort Of (New York Times, Jan. 19)
A hungry producer shivering in the snow outside a theater, handing out flyers to his latest event, is a far less glamorous image than that of a flamboyant impresario, flanked by chorus girls, holding court in a cloud of cigar smoke. But on many nights, rain or shine, outside a Broadway theater is where you'll find Scott Siegel, a producer, writer, critic and aspiring show business entrepreneur, leafleting one of four events he puts on each year at Town Hall. On Jan. 29 one of his most ambitious enterprises, the 2007 Nightlife Awards, an annual show honoring the best in local cabaret, comedy and jazz (in clubs, not concert halls) will be held there. These still-little-known awards, now in their third year, bring together one of the strongest lineups of local nightclub talent to gather in one room. As Mr. Siegel observed recently, "One-night events don't get press coverage, which makes it hard to sell 1,500 seats." Diminutive, soft-spoken and unfailingly polite, Mr. Siegel, wearing his signature bolo tie, is the quintessential scuffling, do-it-yourself-on-a-shoestring producer working just below New York's pop-culture radar. He is often joined on the sidewalk by his wife and collaborator, Barbara, with whom he writes theater and cabaret columns and reviews for two Web sites. Siegel is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/19/arts/music/19sieg.html

Kingan Is At University Of New Mexico (New Mexico Business Weekly, Jan. 18)
A profile of Michael Kingan, new vice president for institutional advancement at the University of New Mexico and president of the UNM Foundation, notes that he worked for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Readers must pay a subscription to enter this site.
http://albuquerque.bizjournals.com/albuquerque/stories/2007/01/15/story12.html

Columnist Cites Luo, Klohnen Research (Winston Salem Journal, Jan. 18)
An advice columnist cites research by University of Iowa psychologists SHANHONG LUO and EVA C. KLOHNEN that found people tend to couple up with others who are similar in attitude, religion and values, but it's overall personality similarity that's the best predictor of whether they'll be happy together.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_RelishArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1149192684678&path=!entertainment!general!&s=1037645508970

Pegnetter Named Interim President Of FGCU (Ft. Myers News-Press, Jan. 18)
Richard Pegnetter has been named interim president of Florida Gulf Coast University in Ft. Myers. Pegnetter is a former associate dean of the college of business at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.news-press.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070118/NEWS01/701180377/1002

The News-Press also published a separate profile of Pegnetter that notes he was a faculty member for 15 years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA:
http://www.news-press.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070118/NEWS01/701180379/1002/NEWS01

State Senator Calls For Regent Resignations (WQAD-TV, Jan. 18)
A state senator is calling for the resignation of the entire Iowa State Board of Regents. Republican Senator Brad Zaun, of Urbandale, says the controversy of the search for a new president for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA shows there is a lack of leadership on the board. He says new ideas are needed. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5952628&nav=1sW7

Alumna Is Portland Police Chief (The Oregonian, Jan. 18)
A story about a police academy for civilians operated by the Portland Police Bureau notes that Chief Rosie Sizer attended graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA intending to get a doctorate in history. Instead, she joined Portland's police force 22 years ago. The Oregonian is published in Portland.
http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/portland_news/1168565139316350.xml&coll=7

UI Policy Against Indian Nicknames Cited (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 17)
As the University of North Dakota fights to preserve its Fighting Sioux nickname while moving its entire athletics program to the NCAA's top division, the university has hit a roadblock: More teams are refusing to schedule games against it, according to The Minnesota Daily. The University of Minnesota is the latest to take a pass on scheduling such games, based on a policy discouraging play against universities with American Indian logos. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has a similar policy encouraging its athletic teams to not schedule games against teams with such nicknames or logos.
http://chronicle.com/news/article/1528/fighting-sioux-name-prevents-north-dakota-from-playing-against-some-teams

Edwards Appeared at UI (ABC News, Jan. 17)
In a story about presidential candidates and the Iowa Caucus, it's noted that former Sen. John Edwards planned to come to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Jan. 20 to talk about the Iraq war.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=3c3995548d9d736f26d784fcc56d165a&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVb&_md5=59fd968826ee8cc7cc70e06e22d38cae

Alumnus Developed Baseball-Reference.com At UI (ESPN.com, Jan. 17)
Among the things you will learn on baseball-reference.com: The Colorado Rockies drew almost as many fans for their first game (80,277) as the St. Louis Browns drew the entire 1935 season (80,922); that three players--Adam Greenberg, Harvey Grubb and Cy Malis--were hit by a pitch in their only career plate appearance; and that Sandy Koufax held the Mets to one run over eight innings to win his 19th game in 1963 despite pitching on just one day of rest. The founder of the site, which the writer of the article says is the best site on the internet, is Sean Forman, an alumnus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He started working on the site in the mid-'90s when he was supposed to be working on his dissertation for a doctorate at UI. "The dissertation was on protein folding," he says. "Baseball-Reference was far more interesting to me."
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=caple/070117&lpos=spotlight&lid=tab4pos1

Naked Trucker's Brother Is UI Law Professor (Dispatch and Argus, Jan. 17)
A story about actor/comedian Dave "Gruber" Allen, who stars as The Naked Trucker in a new Comedy Central series, notes that his brother, JOHN ALLEN, is a law professor at the University of Iowa. The Dispatch and Argus is published in Moline, Ill.
http://qconline.com/archives/qco/display.php?id=323308

UI Wrestler Competes With U.S. Team In Iran (New York Times, Jan. 17)
The United States wrestling team arrived to a warm welcome in Tehran on Tuesday to compete in the Persian Gulf Cup wrestling tournament, the first time a U.S. wrestling team has competed in the country since hard-line president Mahmoud Ahmadinejd became president in 2005. Among the wrestlers on the U.S. team is Mike Zadick, a former wrestler for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, WASHINGTON POST, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, KANSAS CITY STAR, BALTIMORE SUN, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, FORBES, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, SARASOTA TRIBUNE, GREAT FALLS (Mont.) TRIBUNE, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/17/sports/othersports/17wrestlers.html?ex=1169701200&en=f2eb8ed9d6786c29&ei=5040&partner=MOREOVERNEWS

Kopelman: Men Also Suffer Postpartum Depression (Arizona Republic, Jan. 16)
Postpartum depression once was thought to be caused by hormones released in a mother's body during and after pregnancy. That theory is being challenged, and scientists believe that although hormones play a role, other factors contribute, including environment, family support systems, finances, the health of the child, a history of depression and workplace pressures. Some doctors suspect a genetic component could be involved. Fathers are just as sensitive to those issues as mothers. "It's also stressful for men to have a baby," said ROBIN COOK KOPELMAN, a psychiatrist with the Iowa Depression and Clinical Research Center at the University of Iowa, who is completing a study on postpartum depression in fathers as part of a larger study on postpartum conducted by university colleagues SCOTT STUART, professor of psychiatry, and MICHAEL O'HARA, professor of psychology. In a survey conducted with 808 new fathers in eastern Iowa, Kopelman found that 6.3 percent responded affirmatively to diagnostic criteria for depression on the Inventory to Diagnose Depression, a standardized test.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/arizonaliving/articles/0116poppartum0116.html

Law Alumna Nance Delivers MLK Day Lecture (Saipan Tribune, Jan. 16)
The island territory of Saipan celebrated Martin Luther King Jr. Day Monday with a lecture featuring Cynthia Nance, dean of the University of Arkansas School of Law. Nance earned her law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law. Nance focused on women of color and their changing status over time.
http://www.saipantribune.com/newsstory.aspx?cat=1&newsID=64846

Moore To Perform In Malta (The Independent, Jan. 16)
DAN MOORE
, professor of music and director of the percussion program at the University of Iowa, will be visiting Malta to collaborate on a new, innovative project alongside Malta's own percussionist Renzo Spiteri. The concerts will be presented on Jan. 26, 27 and 28. The newspaper is based in Malta.
http://www.independent.com.mt/news.asp?newsitemid=44708

Grant Wood Painted in Small Iowa Studio (Wall Street Journal, Jan 16.)
It is fitting that many of  Grant Wood's most-celebrated works -- including the undeniably iconic "American Gothic" -- were painted in a converted hayloft behind a Midwestern funeral parlor that still operates today. 5 Turner Alley, the name Wood gave his studio and residence from 1924 to 1935, is located in Cedar Rapids. In 1935, Wood left 5 Turner Alley and moved to nearby Iowa City, where he married a former opera singer named Sara Sherman Maxon and began a tumultuous career as professor of art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116890503401377112.html?mod=moj_topics

Musician Received Cochlear Implant (Providence Journal, Jan. 16)
Piano player Richard Reed's hearing was impaired after an accident, but he received a cochlear implant in 2002. After the operation, he went to KATE GFELLER, a professor at the University of Iowa who studies musical perception. Gfeller says that Reed is one of the "stars" among implant recipients. "Not only did he seem to enjoy music," Gfeller says, "but he did so much better on most of our tests than the typical recipient does." The newspaper is based in Rhode Island.
http://www.projo.com/news/content/Dickie_Reed_01-14-07_6C2VRHL.2d0fbc0.html

McLeod Writes Column On Commercialization (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 15)
KEMBREW MCLEOD
, an associate professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa, wrote a column about his "educational prank" where six corporations "sponsored" his undergraduate course during the fall of 2006 He also contends that "cutting the workforce and extracting more labor for less compensation may increase the bottom line of corporations, but it's no way to run a university, for a number of reasons."
http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2007/01/2007011501c/careers.html

Kidder To Speak (Tampa Tribune, Jan. 15)
Tracy Kidder, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and regular contributor to The New Yorker and the New York Times Book Review, will visit Florida Southern College on Wednesday for a lecture and discussion of his New York Times best seller "Mountains Beyond Mountains." He earned his master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.tbo.com/news/metro/MGB24B19YWE.html

Athletes' Arrests Noted (Salt Lake Tribune, Jan. 14)
The recent rash of arrests and run-ins with the law involving Utah's professional and college athletes have administrators around the state doubling their efforts to educate players on what is expected of them. Brigham Young University point guard Rashaun Broadus, coming off his best game as a Cougar, was arrested and briefly jailed on suspicion of drunk driving and other violation, is the only one of BYU's nearly 600 athletes to face criminal prosecution this school year. Officials say that's remarkable, compared to what other similar-sized schools report. For instance, The Daily Iowan newspaper in 2005 ran the names of 562 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA athletes through the Iowa courts' online database and found that 10.8 percent had been convicted of at least a simple misdemeanor within that state's borders. The newspaper is based in Utah.
http://www.sltrib.com/ci_5012148

Critic Praises UI Art Building Design (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 14)
In a review, architecture critic Blair Kamin says "Against a backdrop of "look at me" campus architecture, Steven Holl's new art and art history building at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is that rare thing: A strong design that overwhelms neither its site nor its users. Dedicated last September and named a winner Friday of a national Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects, the $21.5 million building floats serenely over an old quarry pond next to a limestone bluff."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-0701130238jan14,1,2871949.story?track=rss

UI Art Building Design Wins Award (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 14)
With colleges and universities spending billions of dollars to upgrade facilities and attract students in a hypercompetitive academic marketplace, the pressure to produce iconic, "look at me" architecture is more intense than ever. Yet there is no guarantee that a sexy, signature building will successfully fuse form and function. Consider New York architect Steven Holl's Simmons Hall at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a spectacular, spongelike structure with thousands of two-foot-square windows. A typical single room in the 5-year-old dorm has nine windows, each of which has its own tiny curtain. At night, students have complained, it can take five minutes to close the curtains. On the other hand, there's the happier saga of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's new art and art history building, an eye-popping, reddish-brown collage of oxidizing steel that soars over an old quarry pond. Students genuinely seem to like the building, and Friday the American Institute of Architects named it the winner of a prestigious national Honor Award.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-0701130258jan14,1,3789455.story?track=rss

UI Gifted Education Study Cited (National Post, Jan. 13)
In this story about talented and gifted education, the study "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students," is cited. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S CENTER FOR GIFTED EDUCATION show an overwhelming majority of accelerated students say it was an excellent experience for them, both academically and socially. The exhaustive study concluded schools hold back the brightest kids because of their limited familiarity with the research on acceleration, as well as political concerns about equity and beliefs that children must be kept with their age group and that it hurries children out of childhood. The newspaper is based in Canada.
http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/news/toronto/story.html?id=5f852b4d-e8c0-4d54-81fe-2b3da8104fd4

Architects' Association Names Award-Winning Buildings (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Jan. 13)
The SCHOOL OF ART AND ART HISTORY building at the University of Iowa, designed by Steven Holl Architects, with Herbert Lewis Kruse Blunck Architecture, was among 11 winners of the Honor Award for Architecture from the American Institute of Architects announced Friday.
http://www.cbc.ca/arts/artdesign/story/2007/01/12/ballet-school.html

Casino Owner Worked In Iowa (In Business, Jan. 12)
New York-New York Casino is being run by a president with an eclectic background. Lorenzo Creighton used to work in Iowa prisons, then in banks. He was a judge, then he became a gambling regulator. He built his casino career in the just-budding markets in the Midwest and on the Gulf Coast before moving to Las Vegas.  He also worked for the Iowa Department of Personnel as a personnel consultant to huge departments like the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Northern Iowa, and various large departments in the state government. The publication is based in Las Vegas.
http://www.inbusinesslasvegas.com/2007/01/12/qa.html

SUNY Bans Smoking In Dorms (Albany Times Union, Jan. 12)
The State University of New York board of trustees, following up on a promise made back in June, has finished a blanket ban on smoking in its dormitories. As SUNY moves to eliminate smoking from dormitories, some schools are going a step farther. Officials at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, for example, are proposing a 25-foot no-smoke zone around all buildings and to ban all smoking on campus, even outdoors, by 2009.  The newspaper is based in New York.
http://www.timesunion.com/ASPStories/Story.asp?StoryID=553110&Category=STATE

UI Lab Break-In Noted (Newsday, Jan. 12)
In an editorial about the tactics of the Animal Liberation Front, it's noted that in 2004, authorities charged that ALF destroyed and released $450,000 worth of equipment and animals at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, setting research back weeks. The newspaper is based in New York.
http://www.newsday.com/news/opinion/ny-opnewa5048769jan12,0,2904268.story?coll=ny-viewpoints-headlines

Knight To Resign Post In Washington (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Jan. 12)
The dean of the University of Washington Law School, the subject of a state ethics complaint and in the midst of a performance review, will resign from his post in June. W.H. "Joe" Knight Jr., who has served as dean since 2001, joined the UW after serving as vice provost and law professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/299470_uwlaw12.html

UI Press Author Writes About Aircraft Relics (New York Times, Jan. 12)
Jeff Porter of Iowa City is the author of "Oppenheimer Is Watching Me," to be published this year by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. He wrote a letter saying Google can be used to see satellite photos of decommissioned B-52s at the Boneyard at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson. "Like Roman ruins, the once formidable planes are a shell of their former selves, their sawed-off fuselages lying sadly in the dust," he said.
http://travel.nytimes.com/2007/01/12/travel/escapes/12letters.html

Lie Comments On Apple's Jobs Backdating Investigation (Time, Jan. 11)
An internal investigation at Apple recently cleared CEO Steve Jobs of any wrongdoing in a potential stock options backdating scheme. ERIK LIE, an options expert at the University of Iowa, says, "Apple has carefully released some information -- not so much as to fall into a trap but enough to tease the media and investors." He says that the extent of Jobs' involvement is still unclear and that Jobs can claim ignorance, as others have done. "But there will be continuous pressure on Apple to reveal more information," says Lie. "And if it doesn't, ongoing investigations might."
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1576840,00.html

Indiana President Candidates Kept Secret (Indianapolis Star, Jan 11)
A story about a decision by the Indiana University trustees to keep the names of the finalists for the IU presidency a secret notes that the finalists for the presidency of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA were also kept a secret. "At the University of Iowa, five of the seven finalists would not participate in any public process," said Gary Steinke, executive director of the Iowa Board of Regents. "At that point, you make a decision: Do we care if we don't get them? If you care, then you've got to protect" their identities."
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070111/LOCAL18/701110503/-1/ZONES04

UI Groundwater Study Cited (Bedford Bulletin, Jan. 11)
According to a group of county residents, the Bedford County Board of Supervisors in Virginia can do something about biosolids._Monday night, Moira Bell, a member of an organization fighting the use of biosolids as fertilizer, spoke before the supervisors during their first regular meeting of the new year. She presented them with draft copies of a proposed ordinance based on an ordinance that, she said, has worked in Pennsylvania. As part of a her presentation, she said that a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study reported that prescription drugs from sludge invades groundwater. The Bulletin is published in Virginia.
http://www.bedfordbulletin.com/articles/2007/01/11/news/news09.txt

Laroche Comments On Adult Fat Intake Study (Nashville Banner, Jan. 11)
Adults living with children tend to eat more fat than grownups in kid-free homes, consuming as much additional saturated fat each week as found in an individual-size pizza, a study suggests. It may not be the kids' fault, but household cupboards are more likely to be stocked with high-fat convenience foods such as cookies, cheese, peanuts and processed meats when children are around, the researchers said. "These dietary choices may be due to time pressures, advertising aimed at children that also includes adults, or adults' perception that children will eat only hot dogs or macaroni and cheese," said study author Dr. HELENA LAROCHE, who works in internal medicine and pediatrics at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. "Once these foods are in the house, even if bought for the children, adults appear more likely to eat them," she said. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the BOSTON GLOBE, NASHVILLE STAR BANNER, LONDON (Ont.) FREE PRESS, WCCO-TV (Minneapolis-St. Paul), WZZM-TV (Grand Rapids, Mich.), KOVR-TV (Sacramento), DISCOVERY CHANNEL and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/nation/4462120.html

Alumna Nance To Speak About Women's Rights (Saipan Tribune, Jan. 11)
A story about a lecture series by Cynthia Nance, dean of the Univeristy of Arkansas School of Law, notes that she earned her law and Master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Tribune is published in Micronesia.
http://www.saipantribune.com/newsstory.aspx?cat=1&newsID=64671

Cellist Yang Is Former UI Faculty Member (Huliq, Jan. 11)
A story about a performance by Among Yang notes that he is a former faculty member at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Huliq is published in North Carolina.
http://www.huliq.com/5671/philippe-entremont-performs-beethoven

Oregon Hospitals Struggle With On-Call Specialists (News Review, Jan. 10)
Despite offering stipends as high as $3,000 a night, Oregon hospitals are struggling to keep specialists on call for emergency room work, according to a study being published online Tuesday in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. The study found that almost half the hospitals in Oregon are unable to provide coverage around the clock in their emergency rooms in at least one specialty. The study authors, from Oregon Health & Science University, Sutter Emergency Medical Associates, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Office of Oregon Health Policy and Research, said the problem is likely to intensify without a long-term plan to curb it. The newspaper is based in Oregon.
http://www.newsreview.info/article/20070110/FEATURES03/70110030/-1/FEATURES

UI, Missouri Both Searching For Presidents (Columbia Tribune, Jan. 10)
A story about the search for a new president at the University of Missouri notes that many large public universities are currently engaged in presidential searches, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.showmenews.com/2007/Jan/20070110News008.asp

Laroche Comments On Adult Fat Intake Study (Tucson Citizen, Jan. 10)
Adults living with children tend to eat more fat than grownups in kid-free homes, consuming as much additional saturated fat each week as found in an individual-size pizza, a study suggests. It may not be the kids' fault, but household cupboards are more likely to be stocked with high-fat convenience foods such as cookies, cheese, peanuts and processed meats when children are around, the researchers said. "These dietary choices may be due to time pressures, advertising aimed at children that also includes adults, or adults' perception that children will eat only hot dogs or macaroni and cheese," said study author Dr. HELENA LAROCHE, who works in internal medicine and pediatrics at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. "Once these foods are in the house, even if bought for the children, adults appear more likely to eat them," she said. The same story appeared on the Web site of the USA TODAY, FORT LAUDERDALE SUN SENTINEL, COLUMBIA (SC) STATE, WICHITA EAGLE BEACON, PHILADEPHIA INQUIRER, ARIZONA REPUBLIC, LAWRENCE (Kan.)) JOURNAL WORD, SAN JOSE EXAMINER, NBC-10 (Philadelphia), WHDH-TV (Boston), WTEN-TV (Albany, NY), WMAQ-TV (Chicago) and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/daily/nationworld/38165.php

UI Studies Oregon Trauma Care (McMinnville News-Register, Jan. 9)
The 56 Oregon hospitals certified for trauma care have gone to great lengths to keep surgeons, neurologists, orthopedists and other medical specialists on call 24 hours a day to deal with patients coming into their emergency rooms. However, despite offering generous stipends, they have not always been successful and trauma care has suffered as a result, according to a report just released by, among other organizations, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The News Register is published in Oregon.
http://www.newsregister.com/news/story.cfm?story_no=217225

UI Helps OSU Researcher Develop New Drug (Columbus Dispatch, Jan. 9)
A story about the Office of Technology Licensing at Ohio State University explains that the office helps faculty members get their inventions to market. The office has made life a lot easier for Laura Bohn, who is trying to create a pain reliever as strong as morphine but without the side effects, which include addiction. She's been working for two years with a researcher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to find this drug in a compound inside the Mexican mint, Salvia divinorum. Staff members from the technology licensing office have attended Bohn's seminars, contacted drug companies and worked to protect her idea. "They worked with the University of Iowa, which would be very difficult if I had to do it myself," said Bohn, an assistant professor of pharmacology in the College of Medicine.
http://www.dispatch.com/science/science.php?story=dispatch/2007/01/09/20070109-C4-00.html

Actress Hurt Graduated From UI (Backstage.com, Jan. 9)
A profile of Mary Beth Hurt, currently starring in the indie film "The Dead Girl," notes that earned her undergraduate degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.backstage.com/bso/news_reviews/features/feature_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003529852

Former UI Resident Is Opera Doc (Ft. Myers News Press, Jan. 9)
Talk to almost any singer in the University of Kentucky voice department, and they'll have a story about how Dr. Sanford Archer nursed them back to health and the show went on. Archer is an eye, ear, nose and throat specialist who helps performers nurse tired voices back to good health. Archer became interested in the professional singing voice when he was a resident at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS.
http://www.news-press.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070109/HEALTH/701090306/1013/LIFESTYLES

UI Business Etiquette Session Noted (CNN.com, Jan. 9)
To help executives learn the dos and don'ts of the culture, a leading business school in the British capital has set up a series of events to teach overseas luminaries more about the culture. The London Program, a two-day event that took place at the Cass Business School late last year and will be repeated this March, is part of a wider trend of culturally-based courses offered by schools around the globe. For example, the Tippie School of Management at the University of Iowa offered a special initiation course for new students from overseas countries last year, bringing in an etiquette expert to teach them, for example, the correct cutlery use during each course of a business lunch. "Because so many of our students come from so many different countries, they come with significant differences in their cultural backgrounds, especially in areas like etiquette," explained GARY GAETH, associate dean of the Tippie School.
http://edition.cnn.com/2007/BUSINESS/01/05/execed.British/

Laroche Comments On Adult/Child Diet Study (New York Times, Jan. 9)
Adults who live with children eat more fat, and more saturated fat, than those who do not, according to a new study. The report, published online last week in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. The correlation between adults' and children's diets has usually been attributed to parental influence. But in the case of fat intake, it may be that children and teenagers, who consume more fat than other age groups, influence the diets of their parents. "I think the important thing we should take away from this study," said DR. HELENA H. LAROCHE, the lead author and an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa, "is that healthy nutrition should focus on the entire family, and not only on specific individuals within the family." A summary of a similar story also appeared in the Chicago Tribune.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/09/health/nutrition/09nutr.html?ei=5040&en=8bf54fce01703d7a&ex=1169010000&adxnnl=1&partner=MOREOVERFEATURES&adxnnlx=1168358635-T2/cW+gEzXFKfDd/KeZHLg

Need For UI Adult Fat Intake Study Questioned (Clanton Advertiser, Jan. 8)
An editorial questions the need for a recent study by a researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that found that adults with children are more likely to eat fatty foods than adults without children. Why did someone have to research this kind of behavior, the editorial asks? Of course, adults who have kids at home will more than likely eat more fatty foods.  Studies like these are meaningless. It doesn't draw a conclusion whether or not it is a good thing or not to be eating more saturated fat than those who don't live with children. It just seems like a way for some professor in a college to get money to study something that won't help us do anything. The Advertiser is published in Alabama.
http://www.clantonadvertiser.com/articles/2007/01/10/opinion/for_the_record/7-editorial.txt

UI Fights Obesity In Keokuk County (Health News Digest, Jan. 8)
A story about obesity prevention notes that in Keokuk County, Iowa, the obesity rates are higher than the national average. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Prevention Resource Center helped mobilize an entire community eager to be rid of that distinction. Restaurant owners are supplying healthy menu options and grocery store owners offer healthy food demonstrations and label foods certified by the American Heart Association.
http://healthnewsdigest.com/news/article_5109.shtml

Kerber Addresses American Historical Association (Chronicle, Jan. 8)
The 121st annual meeting of the American Historical Association, held in Atlanta this past weekend, drew 4,730 historians, students, and exhibitors to panels, meetings, and job interviews. The trouble faced by those who fall between the cracks in questions of citizenship was taken up by LINDA J. KERBER, a professor of history and law at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the association's 2006 president, in her presidential address on Friday night. In an essay titled "The Stateless as the Citizen's Other," Kerber observed, "The status of the mother and the status of the father are considered asymmetrically." She noted that the daughter of President Ulysses S. Grant was denaturalized by U.S. law when she married a British subject -- and needed a special act of the U.S. Congress to regain citizenship. The issue of statelessness, she argued, "should command the attention of historians as well as humanitarians."
http://chronicle.com/daily/2007/01/2007010803n.htm

UI Program Results In Fundraiser For Africa (African News Dimension, Jan. 8)
Computers for Africa, an organization working to ensure that more Africans get access to computers, has gotten a boost from the students at Horn Elementary in Iowa City. The students at Horn are this month holding a two-week fundraiser after connecting with Computers for Africa through the school's librarian, Susan Wells. Wells spent three weeks in Uganda and a week in neighboring Tanzania with husband Ryan through the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WIDERNET PROGRAM. The publication is based in Sandton, Johannesburg in South Africa.
http://www.andnetwork.com/index?service=direct/0/Home/recent.fullStory&sp=l129573

UI Fights Obesity In Keokuk County (Health News Digest, Jan. 8)
In Keokuk County, Iowa the obesity rates are higher than the national average. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PREVENTION RESEARCH CENTER helped mobilize an entire community eager to be rid of that distinction. Restaurant owners are supplying healthy menu options and grocery store owners offer healthy food demonstrations and label foods certified by the American Heart Association. Health News Digest is based in New York.
http://healthnewsdigest.com/news/article_5109.shtml

UI Poetry Alumnus Wins Boston Review Contest (Philippine Star, Jan. 8)
In his recap of 2006 cultural news, columnist Alfred A. Yuson wrote, "First off, congrats to Marc Gaba, who won the 9th annual Boston Review poetry contest... Marc attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S writing workshop a few years ago, which is already quite a distinction, as it's ever been a tough gig to enter. It's distinct from the UI'S INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM instituted by PAUL ENGLE, which continues to invite foreign writers for four months of literary camaraderie, but with hardly any critical evaluation conducted. The UI Workshop, on the other hand, is mostly for young American writers, who have to compete like crazy just to get in. I'm not sure now where Marc is based. Even in his absence, he's been helping run the High Chair group of Filipino poets and its online editions of poetry and criticism, together with leading poet in Filipino Allan Popa."
http://www.philstar.com/philstar/lifestyle200701080501.htm

Moore Collaborates With Percussionist In Malta (Malta Independent, Jan. 8)
Maltese multi-percussionist Renzo Spiteri will join forces with marimba and vibraphone artist DAN MOORE (University of Iowa School of Music), to present concerts Jan. 26, 27 and 28 in Malta. Spiteri and Moore performed together in May when they were invited to deliver master classes and perform at the China Conservatory of Music in Beijing. The January concerts are presented by Musiconnect (Malta) in collaboration with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as part of an artist exchange program -- the artists will join forces again during a US tour to be held at the end of 2007.
http://www.independent.com.mt/news.asp?newsitemid=44364

School Officials Use UI Research To Detect Cheating (Journal News, Jan. 7)
Yonkers, N.Y. school officials got some lessons in math and probability last year as they forged into the field of "erasure analysis" - a tool to investigate test tampering by staff members to improve class scores on standardized tests. Erasure analysis looks for frequent eraser marks on bubbled answer sheets and unlikely tendencies to get those answers right. Analysts use statistical models to determine what's natural test-taking behavior and what's probably not. Without standards on what's considered suspicious, Yonkers looked at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research and the state's analysis. The Journal News originates in Westchester County, N.Y.
http://www.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070107/NEWS01/701070371/1018/NEWS02

Squire Comments On Outlook For Pelosi (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jan. 6)
A collector's item surfaced last week: a button of Nancy Pelosi as the iconic Rosie the Riveter, rolling up her sleeve and flexing her muscle. Observers call her ascent remarkable. There have been 51 House speakers, most recently Republican Dennis Hastert of Illinois, and all were men. Pelosi also is the first Italian-American in the post. PEVERILL SQUIRE, political science professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said that 10 years ago nobody would have imagined Pelosi as speaker and called hers a "remarkable" rise. But while a veteran of Congress, the national stage is relatively new for her. He and others say her inexperience showed when she publicly championed Jack Murtha over Steny Hoyer instead of sitting out the contest; Hoyer trounced Murtha.
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=549682

Artifacts From State Archeologist On View In Muscatine (Stone Pages, Jan. 6)
Beginning this month, visitors can view relics at the Muscatine Art Center. Artifacts left behind thousands of years ago are being displayed Jan. 14 to April 1. The artifacts were discovered during an excavation that was conducted in 1998 on Muscatine's Eisele Hill. The site was located in what is known as the "McNeal Fan," part of a grouping of prehistoric sites where people lived thousands of years ago. Last year, the excavation report was finished and the Eisele Hill artifacts were permanently housed at the OFFICE OF THE STATE ARCHAEOLOGIST at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Stone Pages originates in the UK.
http://www.stonepages.com/news/archives/002226.html

Bechara: Loss Aversion Obstacle For Investors (Sunday Business Post, Jan. 6)
Is your brain preventing you from becoming a better investor? In 2005, an American research group found that "people with brain damage that impaired their ability to experience emotions such as fear outperformed other people in an investment game." According to ANTOINE BECHARA, an associate professor of neurology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a co-author of the study, the best investors may have a "functional psychopathy" that enables the emotional detachment necessary to succeed in the markets. The study confirms a wealth of evidence from behavioral finance experts that shows that human beings possess an inherent loss aversion not conducive to healthy investment returns. The Sunday Business Post originates in Ireland.
http://www.thepost.ie/post/pages/p/story.aspx-qqqt=THE+INSIDER-qqqs=themarket-qqqs=computersinbusiness-qqqid=20072-qqqx=1.asp

Cell Phone Conversations Researched (Wall Street Journal, Jan. 5)
In this article about research done about pedestrians being distracted while talking on cell phones, other studies about communication are noted. Research in the early 1990s from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showed that we're most likely to get into a fight with our partners on a Wednesday.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116793062431567225-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Writers' Workshop Inspired New Program For Young Authors (KOTA-TV, Jan. 5)
Stetson University's HATS (High Achieving Talented Students) Program is launching the first annual Mark Twain Young Authors Workshop in summer 2007. Students now in grades 5 through 8 from around the country are invited to apply for this scholarship program, which will be held in Hannibal, Mo., June 25-29. Dr. Cindy Oliver, director of the program and an assistant professor of Teacher Education at Stetson, said she founded the program from her experience as a graduate student at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, home of the highly regarded IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. Like the Iowa Writers' Workshop philosophy, the HATS Program will approach the project with the emphasis on talent development. "Our intention is to facilitate collaboration and discussion with other talented young writers," she said. "We want to recognize and encourage good writing." KOTA is based in Florida. This story all appeared in several other media.
http://www.kotatv.com/Global/story.asp?S=5898100&nav=menu411_8_11

Gronbeck Comments On Edwards' Candidacy (Newhouse News Service, Jan. 5)
By announcing his presidential candidacy in New Orleans, John Edwards said he was trying to make two points: that the city's slow recovery from Hurricane Katrina highlights the "two Americas" of rich and poor that became the symbol of his first run for president in 2004, and that it is important for Americans not to just complain about problems but to "take action" as so many post-Katrina volunteers did. BRUCE GRONBECK, a political scientist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said Katrina represents more than an issue about a city's recovery or the problems of the poor. "I think that voters still care about Katrina, especially for what Katrina stands for by now," Gronbeck said. "It's not just a natural disaster. It's a political disaster and a cultural sore." Gronbeck noted that while Edwards declared his candidacy in an unconventional spot, he wasted little time traveling to Iowa, which will be the home of the first presidential caucus on Jan. 14, 2008.
http://www.newhousenews.com/archive/alpert010507.html

Erik Lie Comments On Jobs' Future At Apple (MSNBC, Jan. 5)
Questions about possibly backdated stock options granted to Apple's Steve Jobs are one of the issues clouding his future. "I'm not saying it was backdated and I'm not saying they did anything illegal, but [the circumstances are] consistent with manipulation," says UNIVERSITY OF IOWA finance professor ERIK LIE, whose research helped ignite the options scandal.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16488399/

UI Presidential Search Controversy Is Chronicled (The Chronicle, Jan. 5)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, beset by controversy since its governing board scuttled a 10-month search for the institution's next president, will start its presidential search over from scratch. The Board of Regents, which in November rejected all four finalists in the first search, tapped a popular dean, DAVID C. JOHNSEN, to head the new search committee. The plan is to move quickly, with the selection of committee members to be completed early this month. The board says it wants to name a new president by July 1 or earlier. "We have to get to work right away," says Mr. Johnsen, dean of the College of Dentistry. "We're going to do everything we can to move the process ahead." He appears to have widespread support in his new role. But across the campus, anger at the regents is pervasive. Faculty members, staff members, and students all voted no confidence in the board's leadership following the failed search.
http://chronicle.com/free/v53/i18/18a02501.htm

Ombudsman Asks For Details On Presidential Search (WQAD, Jan. 5)
The state ombudsman has asked the Iowa Board of Regents for details about the search for a new president at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. William Angrick wants the board to explain the process used in the selection based on concerns about secrecy with the previous failed search. In a letter to the regents, Angrick says his office is interested in seeing that the process "be kept as open as possible." The TV station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5895613&nav=menu132_3

Gilchrist Sues To Get Job Back (WQAD, Jan. 5)
The former director of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY is suing to get her job back. Mary Gilchrist has asked a judge to order the university to reinstate her with back pay and benefits. She also seeks compensatory and punitive damages. The lawsuit was filed yesterday in Johnson County District Court and names interim President GARY FETHKE and MEREDITH HAY, the vice president for research. Gilchrist was fired last October. She says it was for speaking out against a decision to cut the size of a new lab complex. The TV station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5895852&nav=1sW7

Lubovitch Was UI Student (Washington Post, Jan. 5)
The first dance concert Lar Lubovitch ever saw, in the early '60s, changed his life. The one-time UNIVERSITY OF IOWA art student, who dabbled in gymnastics, recalls: "It was life changing in the old, corny way, truly an epiphany for me. I had never seen dance before." And what he saw, the influential Jose Limon Dance Company, sent him on a quest. He made a career as a dancer, founder of his own company and celebrated choreographer, whose works have entered the repertories of many major modern dance and ballet companies. On Thursday, the American Ballet Theatre revives his most elaborate work to date, "Othello: A Ballet in Three Acts."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/01/04/AR2007010400450.html?sub=AR

Porter Comments On Bankruptcy Law (CNN.com, Jan. 4)
The number of bankruptcy filings dropped significantly in 2006, a year after reforms were passed to amend U.S. bankruptcy law in hopes of curtailing fraud and abuse in the system. Critics of the reforms, however, said the drop in filings is a temporary phenomenon and expect a return to previous levels because the underlying causes of bankruptcy have not been addressed. KATHERINE PORTER, a law professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said many experts, bankruptcy lawyers and judges she has spoken to expect the number of filings to return to previous levels. "We haven't changed the economic structure of American families. We still have a lot of families in financial trouble," she said. "[This law] just makes it more expensive and more of a hassle to file."
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/01/03/debt.bankruptcy/index.html

Lie Uncovered Backdating Of Stock Options (Business Week, Jan. 4)
ERIK LIE loves academic life. The University of Iowa associate finance professor is free to research whatever topic intrigues him, and his $160,000-plus income goes a nice long way in Iowa City. It's particularly good now that Lie's research is having a major impact on corporate America. His mid-2005 research first suggested that hundreds of companies may have routinely manipulated stock- option accounting rules to sweeten top executives' paydays. A later study done with his research partner, Indiana University associate professor Randall Heron, puts the number at 2,000, or 29 percent of all public corporations. The scandal is creating a financial windfall for Lie. He and Heron have created a limited partnership now that the initial crush of calls from reporters has given way to people willing to actually pay for their insights. Lie says he has earned around $100,000 from hedge funds and other investors, who pay him to handicap whether a company's options irregularities are harmless paperwork errors or the kinds of fraud that lead to CEO ousters and big civil penalties.
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_03/b4017075.htm

Sutphin Named Chairman At Kansas (Kansas City Business Journal, Jan. 4)
Dr. John Sutphin has taken over as chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of Kansas School of Medicine, the school said Thursday. Sutphin joined the med school's faculty from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he was professor of clinical ophthalmology and director of the Cornea and External Disease Service. While at Iowa, Sutphin built the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences into one of the top six in the country, KU School of Medicine said. The newspaper is based in Missouri. The article also appeared in the WICHITA (Kan.) BUSINESS JOURNAL.
http://www.bizjournals.com/kansascity/stories/2007/01/01/daily24.html?b=1167627600^1398606

Art Exhibit To Focus On The Arab World (Grand Haven Tribune, Jan. 4)
The Overbrook Gallery at Muskegon Community College will feature the work of Dr. Hashim Al-Tawil in an exhibit running from Jan. 11 to Feb. 22. The exhibit, "Memoir from an Old City," will be in conjunction with MCC's 2007 Global Awareness Festival, held in February, which will focus on the Arab world. Al-Tawil has a Ph.D. in art history from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Michigan.
http://www.grandhaventribune.com/paid/330248604902667.bsp

Loebsack To Focus On Education (MSNBC.com, Jan. 4)
Iowa Democrat David Loebsack is a newly elected member of the 110th Congress. Loebsack will be representing a district that stretches from Cedar Rapids on the north all the way to Iowa's border with Missouri. It includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at Iowa City. When asked Wednesday what he wanted to be remembered for by the end of his first term, Loebsack said, "I'm on the Education and Workforce Committee because in my district those two constituencies are extremely important. It's not one of the top-tier committees; that doesn't matter to me. I want to be on Education and Workforce because especially the institutions of higher education in our district, whether it's Cornell College (where he taught until last year) or the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA or community colleges, tie in very nicely with economic development."
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16467353/

Laroche: Adult Diets Change After Kids Are Born (Hamilton Spectator, Jan. 4)
I can count on my hands the number of times I ate chicken fingers and fries for dinner before I had kids, writes a columnist. Sadly, I've lost track now. It seems many parents share my experience. A new U.S. study says that compared with childless adults, parents living with their children eat more saturated fat -- the equivalent of a little more than a whole Pizza Hut personal-pan pepperoni pizza each week. Lead author Dr. HELENA LAROCHE, an internal medicine and pediatric specialist who teaches at the University of Iowa's medical school, says she noticed her patients complaining about how their diets had gone downhill after having children. Some of the common anecdotes included, "I'm very busy, I don't have time to cook anymore" and "I eat my kids' leftovers." "It made me wonder how parents' diets were changing," the researcher said. The Spectator is based in Ontario.
http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?GXHC_gx_session_id_=86fdef02912d9c18&pagename=hamilton/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1167864610676&call_pageid=1112188062650&col=1112274690837

Healthy Radon Levels Are Cited (Environmental Science and Technology, Jan. 4)
An article about legally acceptable radon levels points out that If radon were regulated like other pollutants, where an acceptable cancer risk might be 1/100,000, the guideline would be less than 40 becquerels per cubic meter, says BILL FIELD, an epidemiologist at the University of Iowa. Instead, the current guidelines reflect what is economically and technically feasible to achieve, he says.
http://pubs.acs.org/subscribe/journals/esthag-w/2007/jan/policy/jp_canada.html

Adults With Kids Eat More Fat (TribuneStar, Jan. 3)
Adults who have children under the age of 17 in the house eat more fat than those in childless households. How much more? About an entire pepperoni pizza worth of extra fat and saturated fat every week, say researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Time constraints and picky eaters contribute to the situation, with parents buying more restaurant, ready-to-eat or snack foods -- all of which tend to be higher in fat content. They also tended to eat more high-fat foods such as cheese, ice cream, beef, pizza and salty snacks. The Tribune Star is published in Terre Haute, Ind.
http://www.tribstar.com/healthfitness/local_story_003201515.html

Ford Funeral Minister Is UI Graduate (Detroit Free Press, Jan. 3)
A story about today's funeral for President Gerald Ford notes that one of the celebrants, Rev. Dr. Nixon McMillan, interim rector of Grace Episcopal Church, earned his M.A. in organ performance and Ph.D. in philosophy of music from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070103/NEWS06/701030339/1008/NEWS06

Lie Comments On Backdating Investigation (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 3)
Macworld Expo is less than a week away and yet the headlines are not dominated by the iPod phone or iTV, but by the widespread use of backdating to sweeten the value of options granted to Apple Computer Inc. executives, including CEO Steve Jobs. So what does ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa professor behind the research that exposed the backdating scandal, think of all the brouhaha surrounding Jobs, who was declared innocent of all wrongdoing by his company's internal investigation and the Wall Street analysts who cover the company? Interestingly, Lie isn't so concerned with the October 2001 board meeting that never happened to approve a stock options grant to Jobs. That's because Apple didn't grant the options to Jobs at the lowest possible ebb in the stock price. But other options grants did take advantage of the lowest ebb right before a stock price spike and that concerns Lie more.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/sfgate/detail?blogid=19&entry_id=12238

Lie: Jobs Options May Not Be Nefarious (CIO Today, Jan. 3)
Apple CEO Steve Jobs is being investigated for what could be an illegal backdated options grant. But backdating expert ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa professor whose research helped spark the recent scrutiny of options, says he's unconvinced the suspicious 2001 grant to Jobs is nefarious. Even though the facts of the grant fit the classic scenario for backdating, Lie points out that Apple could have picked a more lucrative day to set the price than Oct. 19. Lie says his research suggests backdated grants tend to be granted at the low end of V-shaped curves -- that is, after periods in which the underlying shares have declined in price, and before big run-ups. But on Oct. 19, Apple's shares had been on the rise for two weeks. While Apple shares did rise 20 percent from Oct. 19 through the end of that year, the pattern isn't all that striking compared to other grants, says Lie.
http://www.toptechnews.com/story.xhtml?story_id=002000463C3O

Alumnus Is New Mall General Manager (San Francisco Business Times, Jan. 3)
Larry Beerman, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is the new general manager of the Sunvalley Mall in Concord, Calif.
http://sanfrancisco.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/stories/2007/01/01/daily6.html

Van Allen Remembered As Man Of Integrity (Red Orbit, Jan. 2)
A writer notes the passing in 2006 of University of Iowa physics professor JAMES VAN ALLEN, saying that "....his legacy will be remembered in the pages of history: a person who dedicated his life to science, his country and his students. Individuals of such character and integrity are rare, and we should take this time to celebrate his many achievements and contributions that span more than half a century. It is truly appropriate that his memory will be forever linked to our planet."
http://www.redorbit.com/news/space/786429/leaving_a_lasting_mark_on_earth_and_beyond/index.html?source=r_space

Squire Comments On Obama, Ethanol (Washington Post, Jan. 1)
A story about the Senate voting differences between potential Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama notes that Clinton traditionally opposes ethanol subsidies while Obama voted for the ethanol mandate. "As a senator from a corn-growing state, Obama will have no problem on the ethanol issue and can tout his credentials on this score with a clear conscience," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, who teaches politics at the University of Iowa. The same story appeared on the Web site of MSNBC.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/12/31/AR2006123101004.html

Herky Selected For 2007 Mascot Challenge (Investor's Business Daily, Jan. 1)
HERKY THE HAWKEYE was selected as the write-in champion of this year's Capitol One Mascot of the Year Challenge. The win guarantees Herky a spot in next year's challenge.
http://www.investors.com/breakingnews.asp?journalid=47370261

Alumnus Named Wabash President (Crawfordsville Journal Review, Jan. 1)
A year-in-review column notes that Pat White became president of Wabash College in 2006. White earned a Ph.D. in English and American literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Journal-Review is published in Indiana.
http://journalreview.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=25389&TM=28400.1

Alumnus Creates Bobbleheads (Ventura County Star, Jan. 1)
A profile of Bryan Guise, who creates bobblehead toys in the cramped basement of his home in Des Moines, notes that he graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Guise, 29, has made bobbleheads for Iowa's governor, police officers, a woman with a deformed face, even a rush job for a dying man. Typically, he takes orders over the Internet and relies on photos of his subjects. "It's assuming what I'm dealing with rather than knowing for sure, but there's that universal language in a face," he said. Guise, who graduated from the University of Iowa with a fine arts degree in 2002, has been drawing caricatures since he was a child. He turned that interest into a job making bobbleheads after graduation. The Star is published in California. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS, OCALA (Fla.) STAR BANNER, ESCANABA (Mich.) DAILY PRESS, EUGENE (Ore.) REGISTER GUARD and numerous other news organizations.
http://venturacountystar.com/vcs/business/article/0,1375,VCS_128_5251133,00.html

Lie Rocks The Business World (Business Finance Magazine, January 2007)
In a year when the power of deep-pocketed and well-connected groups that influence finance and accounting surged, a 37-year-old professor in Iowa City rocked the business world with nothing more than a sharp mind, an Internet connection, some savvy data analysis and a couple of telephone calls. Research on stock options backdating by University of Iowa associate professor of finance ERIK LIE demonstrated that an inquisitive academic's work can be just as influential as hefty political contributions, access to legislators, entrenched networks and stout rolodexes. Lie's May 2005 article in an academic journal helped propel some 120 companies into the regulatory spotlight as a result of past stock option grants. Lie's findings and the chain reaction of responses they sparked will continue to influence the realm of finance and accounting in the coming months. "This issue has legs because of the continuing lawsuits and the fact that there are new cases popping up every week," Lie says. "There are a lot of [backdating] cases where the circumstantial evidence is rather strong, but those cases have not come to the surface yet."
http://businessfinancemag.com/magazine/archives/article.html?articleID=14742&TF=Y

Architecture Of UI Art Building Reviewed (Architecture Review, January 2007)
Steven Holl Architects designed the $21.5 million, 70,000-square-foot Art and Art History Building at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. In this review, it's noted that the building "winningly navigates a third way between over-the-top expressionism and prosaic functionalism. Holl hasn't just made a knock-your-eyes-out building, a dynamic collage that wears a reddish-brown jacket of oxidizing steel and seems at home soaring over a old quarry pond. He's made a real place, one that painters carting around their canvases actually seem to like."
http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/portfolio/archives/0701iowa.asp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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