The University of Iowa
University News Services
Archives Services Contact Us A-Z Search

UI in the News

February 2007

See UI in the New Archive Index

Professor Writes About Mexican Wood Carvings (Muse Magazine, Feb. 2007)
MICHAEL CHIBNIK, a UI anthropology professor, wrote a cover story about brightly colored woodcarvings from the Mexican state of Oaxaca for the February issue of MUSE magazine, a publication aimed at bright "tweens." Muse is a Smithsonian publication.

Kiplinger's: UI Is A Best Value (Kiplinger's Personal Finance, February 2007)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was ranked by Kiplinger's as one of the 100 best values in public colleges and universities in the United States. The magazine ranked the UI in 56th place.
http://www.kiplinger.com/magazine/archives/2007/02/colleges.html

UI Professor Comments On Voting Technology (American Heritage.com Winter 2007)
DOUGLAS JONES
, a University of Iowa computer scientist, spoke about voting machines at the recent annual meeting of the Society for the History of Technology in Las Vegas. He pointed out that for most of the 19th century, paper ballots were considered the foundation of the era's pervasive political corruption, and voting machines were seen as a technological vaccine that would save democracy.
http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/magazine/it/2007/3/2007_3_6.shtml

Stapleton: Bird Flu Vaccine 'Better Than Nothing' (ABC 33/40, Feb. 28)
Even as U.S. health officials decide whether to approve the first bird flu vaccine, Sanofi Aventis SA and others are studying ways of fending off a pandemic with even better shots. The Food and Drug Administration is considering a recommendation from an outside panel of expert advisers that it approve the Sanofi vaccine. Those experts endorsed the vaccine's safety and efficacy Tuesday, but with a caveat: that it's only the first step in developing a way of successfully immunizing humans against the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu. DR. JACK STAPLETON of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics called the Sanofi vaccine "better than nothing." Also published in the Wilmington (N.C.) Star and on Aol.com. ABC 33/40 is based in Alabama.
http://beta.abc3340.com/news/stories/0207/401293.html

UI Study Shows Journaling Helps Reduce Stress (Arizona Republic, Feb. 28)
Longtime journalers say getting thoughts down on paper, the computer screen or even a handy cocktail napkin has the power to heal and pinpoint one's life purpose. The promotion of expressive writing on shows such as The Oprah Winfrey Show has led bookstores to stock dozens of journals tailor-made for any conceivable chronicle: addiction recovery, weight loss, relationships or gratitude. The journaler's testimony about the healing properties of writing can sound fantastical and magical - "it changed my life" is common - but it is buttressed by research. A 2002 study in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine found that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who journaled about their emotions and tried to understand stressful events saw improvements in their relationships, personal strength, spirituality and appreciation for life.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/arizonaliving/articles/0228journal0228.html

Stapleton: Interim Vaccine 'Better Than Nothing' (Orlando Sentinel, Feb. 28)
Even as U.S. health officials decide whether to approve the first bird flu vaccine, Sanofi Aventis SA and others are studying ways of fending off a pandemic with even better shots. The Food and Drug Administration is considering a recommendation from an outside panel of expert advisers that it approve the Sanofi vaccine. Those experts endorsed the vaccine's safety and efficacy Tuesday, but with a caveat: that it's only the first step in developing a way of successfully immunizing humans against the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu. Sanofi said it recognizes the vaccine is only an interim solution, since evidence suggests it wouldn't protect most people against the flu strain. Still, the government is stockpiling the vaccine, regardless of whether the FDA approves it. Officials plan to use it to immunize emergency and health care workers in an outbreak. Those officials hope the Sanofi vaccine eventually will be replaced by better vaccines, perhaps juiced up with immune boosters. Other companies, including Novartis AG and GlaxoSmithKline PLC, are developing bird flu vaccines. One adviser, Dr. JACK STAPLETON of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, called the Sanofi vaccine "better than nothing." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the BALTIMORE SUN, HARTFORD COURANT, FT. LAUDERDALE (Fla.) SUN SENTINEL, FT. WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT, SAN JOSSE MERCURY NEWS, US NEWS AND WORLD REPORT, CBS NEWS, LOS ANGELES TIMES, DENVER POST, FOX NEWS, KOTV-TVB (Oklahoma City), SCI-TECH TODAY and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/health/ats-ap_health12feb28,0,5704172.story?coll=sns-health-headlines

McGehee: Teens Drive Better When Mentored (Arizona Republic, Feb. 28)
A story about DriveCam, a new in-car video surveillance system that monitors teenagers' driving habits, notes that it was tested at the University of Iowa. The Iowa study includes 25 teenagers who have driven 300,000 total miles in 10 months. The researchers first let the teens drive with the device, but hid the light that lets a driver know the recording has been triggered. After several weeks, they uncovered the light, and began sending results to parents. Those most prone to trigger a recording during the preliminary period saw a 72 percent drop in safety-related events after using DriveCam for the next two months, says DANIEL McGEHEE, director of the Human Factors & Vehicle Safety Research division of the university's Public Policy Center. Registration is required to read this story online.
http://www.azcentral.com/offbeat/articles/0228wsj-teen-cameras28-ON.html

UI Study Shows Journaling Helps Reduce Stress (Arizona Republic, Feb. 28)
Longtime journalers say getting thoughts down on paper, the computer screen or even a handy cocktail napkin has the power to heal and pinpoint one's life purpose. The promotion of expressive writing on shows such as The Oprah Winfrey Show has led bookstores to stock dozens of journals tailor-made for any conceivable chronicle: addiction recovery, weight loss, relationships or gratitude. The journaler's testimony about the healing properties of writing can sound fantastical and magical - "it changed my life" is common - but it is buttressed by research. A 2002 study in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine found that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who journaled about their emotions and tried to understand stressful events saw improvements in their relationships, personal strength, spirituality and appreciation for life.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/arizonaliving/articles/0228journal0228.html

Stapleton: Interim Vaccine 'Better Than Nothing' (Orlando Sentinel, Feb. 28)
Even as U.S. health officials decide whether to approve the first bird flu vaccine, Sanofi Aventis SA and others are studying ways of fending off a pandemic with even better shots. The Food and Drug Administration is considering a recommendation from an outside panel of expert advisers that it approve the Sanofi vaccine. Those experts endorsed the vaccine's safety and efficacy Tuesday, but with a caveat: that it's only the first step in developing a way of successfully immunizing humans against the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu. Sanofi said it recognizes the vaccine is only an interim solution, since evidence suggests it wouldn't protect most people against the flu strain. Still, the government is stockpiling the vaccine, regardless of whether the FDA approves it. Officials plan to use it to immunize emergency and health care workers in an outbreak. Those officials hope the Sanofi vaccine eventually will be replaced by better vaccines, perhaps juiced up with immune boosters. Other companies, including Novartis AG and GlaxoSmithKline PLC, are developing bird flu vaccines. One adviser, Dr. JACK STAPLETON of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, called the Sanofi vaccine "better than nothing." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the BALTIMORE SUN, HARTFORD COURANT, FT. LAUDERDALE (Fla.) SUN SENTINEL, FT. WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT, SAN JOSSE MERCURY NEWS, US NEWS AND WORLD REPORT, CBS NEWS, LOS ANGELES TIMES, DENVER POST, FOX NEWS, KOTV-TVB (Oklahoma City), SCI-TECH TODAY and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/health/ats-ap_health12feb28,0,5704172.story?coll=sns-health-headlines

McGehee: Teens Drive Better When Monitored (Wall Street Journal, Feb. 28)
A story about DriveCam, a new in-car video surveillance system that monitors teenagers' driving habits, notes that it was tested at the University of Iowa. The Iowa study includes 25 teenagers who have driven 300,000 total miles in 10 months. The researchers first let the teens drive with the device, but hid the light that lets a driver know the recording has been triggered. After several weeks, they uncovered the light, and began sending results to parents. Those most prone to trigger a recording during the preliminary period saw a 72 percent drop in safety-related events after using DriveCam for the next two months, says DANIEL McGEHEE, director of the Human Factors & Vehicle Safety Research division of the university's Public Policy Center. Registration is required to read this story online.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB117263140441721581-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22university+of+iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Stapleton: Flu Vaccine Is 'Better Than Nothing' (BusinessWeek, Feb. 27)
It's better than nothing, federal health advisers said Tuesday in urging approval of the first bird flu vaccine as a stopgap against a potential pandemic until more effective vaccines can be developed. The panel said in a 14-0 vote that the vaccine was effective, despite evidence it wouldn't protect most people against the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu. The panel then voted that it was safe. The votes came after Food and Drug Administration officials said the Sanofi Aventis SA vaccine could play an important role in protecting against a pandemic, considered ever more likely, despite its limited effectiveness. Dr. JACK STAPLETON of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics called the vaccine "better than nothing." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the HOUSTON CHRONICLE, SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, FORBES, KTLA-TV (Los Angeles), FLINT (Mich.) JOURNAL and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D8NI8G3O0.htm

Forkenbrock Comments On Alternate Highway Financing (Kansas City Star, Feb. 27)
The time may come, experts say, when you will be taxed for every mile you drive instead of every gallon of gasoline you buy. Already, federally financed studies are examining how cars can be fitted with gadgets to measure how far you drive and how much tax you owe. The systems can be designed to know which state you're driving in. They can even charge you more for driving during the weekday rush hour. "What you're doing is turning the road system into a public utility just like water or electric at home. The more you use, the more you pay," said DAVID J. FORKENBROCK, director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/16790360.htm

Robinson Gets Her Ideas From Reading (Deseret News, Feb. 27)
Award-winning novelist MARILYNNE ROBINSON has a taste in books as broad as the topics of her own publications. Ideas for her next piece of writing often come from the books she reads, Robinson told audience members Friday at a Utah Valley State College reading of her recently published novel, "Gilead." "Over time, a precipitation occurs, and some of whatever it is I've ingested comes out of that," she said. History, theology and science all interest her, she said, but she steers clear of history books written from a modern perspective. "I'm a terrible skeptic," she said. "If I want to find out about the 19th century, I read things that were written in the 19th century." As a teacher at the University of Iowa, Robinson said she picks books she thinks will interest her students. The News is published in Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,660198883,00.html

Adrain Nominates Researcher For Fossil Naming (Springfield News Leader, Feb. 27)
A story about a fossil named for Missouri State University professor James Miller notes he was nominated for the honor by JON ADRAIN of the University of Iowa. The News Leader is published in Missouri.
http://www.news-leader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070227/NEWS01/702270389/1007

Frazier Photos Document Decline Of Rural Iowa (Popular Photography, Feb. 26)
DANNY WILCOX FRAZIER
's powerful black-and-white photos have documented rural Iowa -- and its demise -- in stark detail. "Ultimately, many rural communities across the Midwest will die," he writes in the prologue to his first book, "Driftless: Photographs from Iowa," to be published this fall. "In some ways the pictures I have made simply document the process." When Frazier, who now teaches photojournalism at the University of Iowa, started this project a few years ago -- at the time nothing more than an idea and a class assignment.
http://www.popphoto.com/photographynewswire/3865/amber-waves-of-pain.html

Canady Comments On Plastic Surgery Fraud (CBC, Feb. 26)
In the past few years, reports of fraudulent or shoddy cosmetic and plastic surgery procedures have grabbed headlines. It's tough to tell how often these types of dangerous procedures are being performed in the United States, experts said. Dr. JOHN W. CANADY, vice president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) and professor of plastic surgery at the University of Iowa, said that the underground nature of these sub-par procedures makes them especially hard to track. The same story appeared on the Web site of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, AUSTIN (TEXAS) AMERICAN STATESMAN, WFIE-TV (Indianapolis) and WQAD-TV (Moline, Ill.).
http://www.cbc.ca/cp/HealthScout/070226/6022621AU.html

UI Stroke Study Cited (Florida Today, Feb. 26)
A column about the workings of the brain notes that doctors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA noticed this about certain patients after they had strokes: They forgot, once the insular cortex of their brains got obliterated by a blood clot, to smoke. In the wake of a stroke, familiar with cause and effect, any one of us could choose not to smoke. Exposed to the heat, we seek shade. But quitting isn't like that; it's more like you feel the heat but someone hacked down all the trees. Florida Today is published in Brevard County, Fla.
http://www.floridatoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070226/COLUMNISTS0602/703010311/1071/life02

UI Press To Publish Detainee Poetry Collection (The Guardian, Feb. 26)
Poetry's capacity to rattle governments is not, it appears, confined to totalitarian regimes. A collection of poems by detainees at the U.S. military base in Guantánamo Bay is to be published later this year, but only in the face of strong opposition by suspicious American censors. Twenty-one poems written "inside the wire" in Arabic, Pashto and English have been gathered together despite formidable obstacles by Marc Falkoff, a law professor at Northern Illinois University who represents 17 of the detainees at the camp. The collection, entitled "Poems from Guantánamo: The Detainees Speak," will be published in August by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press. The Guardian is published in the United Kingdom. The same story appeared on the Web site of THE OBSERVER (UK).
http://books.guardian.co.uk/poetry/features/0,,2021897,00.html?gusrc=rss&feed=10

Erik Lie Comments On Brocade Case (Business Week, Feb. 26)
Prosecution of stock option backdating appears to be losing steam, especially with the ouster of the U.S. attorney responsible for the indictment of Brocade Communications Systems executives. But some parts of the case are strong - 25 percent of Brocade's options were pegged at monthly lows. The mathematical odds of such luck are miniscule, says ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa business school professor who first raised questions about backdating. "It just can't happen" without benefit of hindsight, he says.
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_10/b4024053.htm?campaign_id=rss_tech

Steelman Supports OR Safety Kits (Materials Management, Feb. 26)
A new operating room safety kit will help combat fires that result from the combination of flammable materials, oxygen and heating sources including lasers and cauterizing devices. VICTORIA STEELMAN, R.N., an advanced practice nurse in perioperative nursing at the University of Iowa Healthcare, Iowa City, says, "Fire safety in operating rooms is a critical component of an overall program of safety. This toolkit is intended to make it easier for busy managers to develop their policies, educational programs and an emergency preparedness plan."
http://www.matmanmag.com/matmanmag_app/jsp/articledisplay.jsp?dcrpath=MATMANMAG/PubsNewsArticleGen/data/02FEB2007/0702MMH_DEPT_PatSafety&domain=MATMANMAG

UI Research Links Hearing Loss With Injury (WSAW, Feb. 25)
A new study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA says farmers who have trouble hearing a normal conversation are 80% more likely to get injured on the job. The study says they are more likely to not pay attention to quiet sounds that can lead to injuries like falls. And because farmers may not always wear hearing protection they are at a higher risk of hearing loss and injury. WSAW is a television station in Wisconsin.
http://www.wsaw.com/home/headlines/6074006.html

Squire Comments On Edwards (The Politico, Feb. 25)
If any candidate inherits something from Tom Vilsack's departure from the Democratic presidential campaign, it's John Edwards. What he gets: Pressure. "Edwards has as much or more riding on Iowa's outcome as any of the others," University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE said. The Politico originates in Washington, DC.
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0207/2888.html

Sittenfeld Attended Writers' Workshop (The Age, Feb. 25)
A story about author Curtis Sittenfeld says her book "Prep" was published in 2005 when Sittenfeld was 29. It was written in tandem with her second book, "The Man of My Dreams," while she was completing an MA in fiction at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP is regarded as America's most prestigious, with the likes of Raymond Carver, John Irving and Flannery O'Connor among the alumni, the article states The Age originates in Australia.
http://www.theage.com.au/news/books/class-struggles/2007/02/22/1171733946148.html

Project 3000 Provides Hope (Medical News Today, Feb. 25)
The first objective of the University of Iowa's "Project 3000" is to identify all 3,000 U.S. men, women and children who have LCA (Leber's Congenital Amaurosis). Along the way, Project 3000 will become the first program of its kind to offer genetic testing for any eye disease to every affected person in the country. According to DR. EDWIN STONE, Seamans-Hauser Chair in Molecular Ophthalmology at the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, Project 3000 likely will achieve its first objective and become the "blueprint" recipe for attacking dozens of other sight-robbing diseases. Based at the UI Carver College of Medicine, Project 3000 will offer state-of-the-art genetic testing to identify individuals on a nonprofit basis. Partnering with the Carver Nonprofit Genetic Testing Laboratory is the Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, a joint research unit of the UI College of Engineering and Carver College of Medicine.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=63566

UI Study On Home Health Care Cited (The Northwestern, Feb. 25)
With the U.S. population aging, demand for home health care workers will increase. The home health care segment of America's workforce is expected to grow by 70 percent by 2014, according to recent research done by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Northwestern is published in Oshkosh, Wis.
http://www.thenorthwestern.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070225/APC03/702250600/1028/OSHbusiness

Experiment Inspired By UI Pink Lockers (Daily Sentinel, Feb. 24)
Some students at the Western Colorado Regional Science Fair took inspiration from a Hayden Fry psychological ploy. Hotchkiss Middle School students Braeden Horton, 13, and Marco Meza, 12, wanted to know if the color pink would result in decreased physical ability. They got the idea for their experiment after the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA installed pink lockers, carpet and bathroom facilities in its visiting football team locker room. The Daily Sentinel is published in Grand Junction, Colo.
http://www.gjsentinel.com/news/content/news/stories/2007/02/24/2_24_1B_Science_fair.html

Frazier Wins Photography Award (Photo District News, Feb. 24)
DANNY WILCOX FRAZIER
, a freelance photographer whose work documents the culture of rural Iowa, has won the 2006 Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography. Frazier teaches at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he also received his master's degree.
http://www.pdnonline.com/pdn/newswire/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003549827

Net Firm Emulates UI Political Markets (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 24)
Inkling, a Chicago Internet firm, is offering everyday Web users and corporate giants a chance to predict outcomes. Jimm Dispensa, a Chicago political junkie, is using Inkling's prediction tool on his blog to try to predict the outcome of Tuesday's aldermanic elections. Dispensa wanted to emulate the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S election market, which since 1988 has more accurately predicted the outcome of the presidential election than traditional polling methods.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0702240047feb24,0,4457296.story?track=rss

UI Alumnus Reflects On Career As A Spy (The Fort Stockton Pioneer, Feb. 23)
"Never would I have dreamed that I would turn out to be a spy," James M. Olson told a captivated audience at a Feb. 16 banquet in the Pecos County Civic Center. Olson presented a clear picture of a family in the CIA, in undercover operations. He grew up in Iowa, attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, then went into the U.S. Navy. He left the Navy to attend the University of Iowa College of Law, hoping to marry and have a normal family life. During his last semester of law school, he received a phone call about a career opportunity with the CIA. The Pioneer is based in Fort Stockton, Tx.
http://www.fortstocktonpioneer.com/articles/2007/02/22/news/news07.txt

UI Doctor Estimates Extent of Parasitic Disease (Washington Times, Feb. 23)
A large study of blood donations collected from two U.S. border states found that nearly one in 5,000 was positive for Chagas' disease, a potentially fatal parasitic disorder endemic in Latin America, according to a federal report. Chagas' disease affects an estimated 11 million people throughout Latin America, and nearly a third suffer chronic cardiac or gastrointestinal illnesses. Cardiac conditions include a diseased heart, irregular heartbeat and sudden death. DR. LOUIS V. KIRCHHOFF, a Chagas' disease specialist at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, has estimated that as many as 10 percent of the Mexicans who migrate to the United States are infected. The Times is based in Washington, D.C.
http://www.washtimes.com/national/20070222-111038-5018r.htm

UI Lab Identifies Salmonella Source (Associated Content, Feb. 23)
Last week, the USDA warned consumers against Con Agra peanut butter (brand names Peter Pan and Great Value) with jar label beginning with numbers "2111." The University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory released a report Thursday providing DNA proof of a link between contamination cases to the Great Value brand, the university reported. "The isolation of salmonella from the open jar of peanut butter is extremely useful to the epidemiologists in their investigation of this outbreak," said MIKE PENTELLA, interim associate director of infectious disease programs at the UI lab.
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/159549/peanut_butter_tests_positive_for_salmonella.html

UI Research Identifies Genetic Variation (Science Daily, Feb. 23)
University of Iowa researchers have learned more about a genetic variation that is a small risk factor for a mild form of schizophrenia, yet also is associated with improved overall survival. ROBERT PHILIBERT, associate professor of psychiatry in the UI Roy J. And Lucille A. Carver College Of Medicine and the study's co-author, says, "The study used the National Institute of Mental Health's largest publicly available sample, and thus it provides even more convincing evidence that the gene variation is worth studying." Because this gene variant is often helpful, the fact that it sometimes is not reveals that it can react with environmental or other genetic factors to result in illness. "If we can find a way to intervene in those interactions, then we may be able to avert disease and harness how this gene variation may help us," Philibert explains. DONALD BLACK, UI professor of psychiatry, was a co-author, and other UI experts in psychiatry and neurosciences also contributed to the research.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070213173933.htm

UI Lab Identifies Cause Of Salmonella Outbreak (Time, Feb. 23)
The CDC has now confirmed that peanut butter is the culprit in a rash of salmonella cases nationwide, totaling 329 reported cases in 41 states. While the FDA has not attributed any deaths thus far to the peanut butter infestation, at least two wrongful death lawsuits are already in the works. On Thursday a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA lab announced the first finding of salmonella in an open jar of peanut butter. The jar had been provided by an infected patient. Experts say it's the first time in U.S. history that peanut butter has been linked to a salmonella outbreak.
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,1593051,00.html

Pascarella Questions Value Of Elite Degrees (OhmyNews.com, Feb. 23)
Contrary to many parents' belief that a degree from a highly esteemed college is the key to future red carpet treatment for their child, researchers found that that's not always the case. "We haven't found any convincing evidence that selectivity or prestige matters," says ERNEST T. PASCARELLA of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, in his book, How College Affects Students, an evaluation of hundreds of studies of the college experience. According to his research, highly selective colleges don't offer better teaching approaches than less-selective colleges. Interestingly, selective schools do slightly worse on two measures -- professors' feedback and the number of essay exams. OhmyNews news is a multilingual news site originating in Korea.
http://english.ohmynews.com/articleview/article_view.asp?article_class=5&no=346856&rel_no=1

UI Collaborated On Volcano Research (Bend Weekly, Feb. 23)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA collaborated in a National Science Foundation-funded research project studying the causes of the Mt. St. Helens explosion. The results, being published this week, suggest that gas and vapor movement to the top of the magma body may have caused fairly rapid increases in pressure and could have been the triggering mechanism that caused Mount St. Helens to erupt in both 1980 and 2004. The Bend Weekly is published in Oregon.
http://www.bendweekly.com/Science/3035.html

Repeal Of Cloning Ban Would Include UI Center (CNSNews.com)
Iowa's General Assembly is considering a bill that would lift the state's prohibition on human cloning and replace it with a statute allowing cloning for some purposes, including the production of embryonic stem cells. In a statement in January, Gov. Chet Culver said allowing embryonic stem cell research in the state would "restore hope for thousands of Iowans' and proposed spending $12.5 million to construct the Center for Regenerative Medicine at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to conduct research." Cybercast News Service originates in Virginia.
http://www.cnsnews.com/news/viewstory.asp?Page=/Politics/archive/200702/POL20070223a.html

Tranel Comments On Brain Research (Innovations Report, Feb. 22)
New research pinpoints specific areas in sound processing centers in the brains of macaque monkeys that shows enhanced activity when the animals watch a video. This study confirms a number of recent findings but contradicts classical thinking, in which hearing, taste, touch, sight, and smell are each processed in distinct areas of the brain and only later integrated. "This finding suggests that sensory integration, which is so fundamental to complex mental activity, takes place at very early processing stages," says DANIEL TRANEL, Ph.D., of the University of Iowa, who is not affiliated with the study. "This knowledge could help scientists pinpoint sources of extraordinary sensory processing, such as creativity and genius, as well as abnormal sensory processing, as seen in schizophrenia." This quote was also included in a Feb. 23 article in Scientific American.
http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/life_sciences/report-79331.html

Lazereva And Wasserman Research Cited (Innovations Report, Feb. 22)
Pigeons and humans use similar visual cues to identify objects, a finding that could have promising implications in the development of novel technologies, according to new research by Brett Gibson, detailed in the journal article, "Non-accidental properties underlie shape recognition in mammalian and non-mammalian vision," published today in Current Biology. Gibson and his colleagues found that humans and pigeons, which have different visual systems, have evolved to use similar techniques and information to recognize objects. Gibson and his colleagues from the University of Iowa (Lazereva And Wasserman Research Cited (Innovations Report, Feb. 22) and EDWARD WASSERMAN), the University of Montreal (Frédéric Gosselin), and the University of Glasgow (Philippe Schyns) found that pigeons, like humans, primarily rely on corners (coterminations) of an object in order to recognize it instead of relying on other features such as shading and color.
http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/life_sciences/report-79333.html

UI Music Alumna Has Written Her Own Songbook (Willits News, Feb. 22)
At a time when many singers are mining the archives in search of standards to sing, Susan Werner has written her own songbook. The New Yorker magazine said of her, "Susan Werner, a clever songwriter and an engaging performer, brings literacy and wit back to popular song." Werner made her first public performance at age 5, playing guitar and singing at church. She began playing piano when she was 11, and earned a degree in voice from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. While she'll still on occasion perform "Madame Butterfly" to close any one of the 125 club dates she does annually throughout the United States and Canada, she opted to forgo a career as an opera singer and dedicated herself to songwriting, performing at coffeehouses from Washington, D.C., to Boston. The Willits News is published in California.
http://www.willitsnews.com/people/ci_5282980

Greer Returns To N.C. After UI Treatment (Charlotte Observer, Feb. 22)
Melissa Greer, the WBTV meteorologist battling a rare cancer, returned to Charlotte on Thursday after medical treatment in Iowa. Greer and her newborn son, Connor, were flown on a special medical charter arranged by Carolinas Medical Center, where the premature infant will be treated as he gains strength and weight. Greer underwent more than 12 hours of surgery on Feb. 6 beginning with a Caesarean section. Surgeons at the HOLDEN COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA then performed a hysterectomy and removed five tumors removed from her liver.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/16759827.htm

UI Law Professor Comments On Satellite Radio Merger (Bloomberg.com, Feb. 22)
Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Holdings Inc. will have trouble persuading the U.S. Justice Department to approve their $4.84-billion merger because the combination appears to threaten competition, antitrust experts say. Antitrust enforcers won't readily accept assertions by Sirius and XM that satellite radio competes for listeners with broadcast radio, iPods and music downloads by cell phone users, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust at the University of Iowa College of Law. The Justice Department probably won't agree with that "fairly common error," he said. Also published in the Detroit Free Press.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601204&sid=aB3aEyHVb1_Q&refer=technology

UI Registry Cited In 'Miracle Baby' Story (The Seattle Times, Feb. 22)
When she was born, she was 9 1/2 inches long and weighed about 10 ounces. The doctors didn't give her much of a chance. But Amillia Taylor -- the first baby known to have survived after a gestation period of less than 23 weeks -- is a fighter. Wednesday, she went home with her parents. In saying she is the most premature baby to survive, the doctors in Florida cite the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S national registry, which compiles reports on babies in the media and in medical journals. Similar stories on this topic were published by the BBC, the Moscow (Russia) Times and the Kenya (Africa) Broadcasting Corporation.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2003583174_tinybaby22.html

Anderson Speaks On Stem Cell Research (WQAD-TV, Feb. 22)
Proposals to lift restrictions on types of stem cell research are generating a lot of talk at the Statehouse. At public hearing last night drew scores of speakers, including religious leaders, scientists and children with diabetes. Dr. MARK ANDERSON of University of Iowa says the bill would help ensure scientists have the tools to seek cures for heart disease, diabetes and other serious maladies. The Senate has approved its version of a bill that would allow researchers to create embryonic stem cells through cloning. The TV station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6124752

Postpartum Depression Strikes Dads Too (Courier-Journal, Feb. 22)
Postpartum depression has been recognized for more than a century as a problem affecting new mothers in the weeks and months after the birth of a child. Now, doctors and researchers are finding that fathers, too, can suffer that same stress and sadness. Having a baby is "also stressful for men," said ROBIN COOK KOPELMAN, a psychiatrist with the Iowa Depression and Clinical Research Center at the University of Iowa, who is completing a study on postpartum depression in fathers as part of a larger study conducted by colleagues Scott Stuart, professor of psychiatry, and Michael O'Hara, professor of psychology. In a survey conducted with 808 new fathers in eastern Iowa, Kopelman found that 6.3 percent indicated they might be depressed according to the Inventory to Diagnose Depression, a standardized test. The newspaper is based in Louisville, Ky.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070222/FEATURES03/702220353

Playwright Earned MFA From UI (San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 22)
In a Black History Month profile of playwright Robert Alexander, it's noted that he earned a master of fine arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1996.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/02/21/DDG1BO7I7A1.DTL&feed=rss.entertainment

Times Story Features Author With UI Tie (Madison County Journal, Feb. 21)
A New York Times feature about author Flannery O'Connor notes that she learned her craft at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and at Yaddo, the writer's colony in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The Journal is based in Madison, Miss.
http://www.onlinemadison.com/main.asp?SectionID=52&SubSectionID=89&ArticleID=18309&TM=73718.64

UI Graduation Guarantee Inspires Similar Plan (Arizona Daily Sun, Feb. 21.)
Beginning this fall, Northern Arizona University will guarantee freshmen students that they can graduate in four years. Its "Finish in Four" plan promises to give students the advisement help and courses they need to finish on time. Utah State, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Colorado-Boulder are among those offering four-year guarantees.
http://www.azdailysun.com/articles/2007/02/21/news/20070221_news_31.txt

Callaghan Comments On Hip Surgery Revisions (KIMO-TV, Feb. 21)
In the last 10 years, huge gains have been made in using "minimally invasive surgery" (MIS) for hip replacements. Those patients, who qualify for this type of surgery, no longer have to endure the pain from "open" surgeries where the orthopedic surgeon had to make large incisions, up to six inches long.  JOHN J. CALLAGHAN, M.D., Professor of the Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, is concerned about the number of surgical "revisions" -- MIS procedures that have to be redone due to problems with the first surgery.  "At the present time," Callaghan says, "we have many more revisions than Sweden."  The TV station is located in Anchorage, Alaska.
http://www.aksuperstation.com/health/5854421.html

Kidder Wrote Doctor's Biography (Boise Weekly, Feb. 21)
Author Tracy Kidder has written a biography titled "Mountains Beyond Mountain: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, a Man Who Would Cure the World." Kidder will speak about the book at the Student Union Special Events Center at Boise State University. "In Mountains Beyond Mountains" we learn that Farmer is recognized as one of the world's leading experts on public health and infectious diseases and is an advocate for poor people worldwide, often defying conventional wisdom and treatment. Kidder attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP where he earned a master of fine arts degree. The newspaper is based in Idaho.
http://www.boiseweekly.com/gyrobase/Content?oid=oid%3A217282

Kerber: Faust Scholarship Could Help Harvard President (Chronicle, Feb. 21)
A profile of the new president of Harvard University, Drew Gilpin Faust, says her colleagues believe the questions she has explored through her scholarship will serve her well as Harvard's president. Her second book, a 1982 biography of a slaveholder, is "a long meditation on authority and its power and abuse," says LINDA K. KERBER, a professor of history at the University of Iowa. "In an odd way, by choosing this subject, she was thinking through a lot of big questions that will face her as a university president - equality and inequality, power and its uses, and what leadership requires: forgiveness, humanity, and a generosity of spirit."
http://chronicle.com/free/v53/i25/25a00101.htm

Tiny Baby's Homecoming Delayed (New York Times, Feb. 21)
A Florida baby that is the earliest-term baby to survive will be going home later this week, after doctors decided to keep her in the hospital a few more days. The claim that she is the tiniest baby to survive is based on a registry of tiny babies kept by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the ABC NEWS, WASHINGTON POST, THE SCOTSMAN, WEST AUSTRALIAN, SOUTHLAND TIMES (New Zealand), TARANKAI NEWS (New Zealand), SYDNEY MORNING HERALD (Australia), SOUTH AFRICAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION, NEW SCIENTIST and dozens of other news organizations.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/news/news-usa-baby.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Karet Finds Fast-Spinning Neutron Star (New Scientist, Feb. 20)
A dense stellar corpse called a neutron star has been found spinning at an astonishing 1122 rotations per second: 1.5 times faster than any other star. If confirmed, the finding could bolster the possibility of exotic "soft" states of matter inside dense stars. PHILLIP KARET of the University of Iowa led a team that used NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite to observe violent outbursts on a neutron star called XTE J1739-285.
http://space.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn11221&feedId=online-news_rss20

Energy Conservation Earns UI $5 Million In Savings (AgriNews, Feb. 20)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is on track to save more than $5 million in reduced energy expenditures for the 24-month period that ends in June. The energy-savings plan is the most ambitious in UI's 160-year history and one of the most comprehensive in the Big 10. AgriNews is published in Rochester, Minn.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/288249003907865.bsp

Tiniest Baby Set To Go Home (Miami Herald, Feb. 20)
A story about a baby born at less than 23 weeks, who was only 9 inches long and 10 ounces at birth, is set to go home Tuesday at 17 weeks of age. She is the most premature baby to survive, according to the tiny baby registry at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/16737090.htm

A version of this story also appeared on the Web sites of numerous news organizations, including ABC NEWS, NEW YORK TIMES, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, WASHINGTON POST, USA TODAY, NORTH COUNTY TIMES (Calif.), CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, GRAND ISLAND (Neb) INDEPENDENT, HELENA (Mont.) INDEPENDENT RECORD, CNN, WLS-TV (Chicago), WVPI-TV (Philadelphia), TIMES OF LONDON, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, WEST AUSTRALIA TIMES, CBC, CTV, BBC, KENYA BROADCASTING CORPORATION and dozens of others.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Tiny-Baby.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

UI Offers Four-Year Graduation Guarantee (Arizona Daily Star, Feb. 20)
Beginning this fall, Northern Arizona University will guarantee freshmen students that they can graduate in four years. Its "Finish in Four" plan promises to give students the advisement help and courses they need to finish on time. Among other colleges and universities that offer similar programs is the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Star is published in Tucson, Ariz.
http://www.azstarnet.com/sn/hourlyupdate/170046.php

Smiley Received Doctorate From UI (Washington Post, Feb. 20)
A story about author Jane Smiley and her new book "Ten Days in the Hills," notes that she received her doctorate in medieval literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/19/AR2007021901231.html?nav=rss_print/style

Gruca Study Shows Customer Satisfaction Improves Business (Forbes, Feb. 19)
Consumer surveys show that many businesses are seeing significant drop-offs in customer satisfaction, which could prove to hurt their bottom lines in the long run. A study by University of Iowa marketing professor THOMAS GRUCA shows that when consumers are satisfied with a company, they come back for more. For each point a company improves its rating, net cash flow improves by $55 million a year later, he found. And that rate includes auto companies and other sellers of durable goods, which rarely make a follow up sale to the same customer a year later. So for retailers, banks and other companies that sell goods more frequently, that rate is even higher. "When a business says they want customers satisfied, it means two things. It means it wants them satisfied now, but it also means it wants them to come back," Gruca says.
http://www.forbes.com/business/2007/02/19/consumer-satisfaction-survey-biz-cx_tvr_0220consumer.html

UI Team Wins Off-Road Vehicle Contest (Daily Mining Gazette, Feb. 19)
Lake Linden Park looked like a makeshift NASCAR track Saturday - the minor differences being the snow, the rookie drivers and the dune-buggy look-alikes tearing around the track. Michigan Tech University held its annual Winter Baja Competition this weekend. The event began in 1981 as a way to test off-road vehicles in winter conditions. The number of laps each team completed in the two races was added together to determine the winner. A team from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA won the competition with 81 total laps. The Gazette is published in Houghton, Mich.
http://www.mininggazette.com/stories/articles.asp?articleID=5849

Squire Comments On Thompson Candidacy (Holmen Courier, Feb. 19)
A story about the presidential campaign of former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson notes that he drew audiences of about 35 and 150 in appearances over the weekend in Marshalltown and Des Moines. "Given where he's starting in the field, that's about as good as he could've hoped for," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "It suggests he's at least being taken seriously by the people who are following this." The Courier is published in Wisconsin.
http://holmencourier.com/articles/2007/02/19/election/01thompson.txt

Student Writes Play About Abu Ghraib Experience (Hamilton Spectator, Feb. 19)
Joshua Casteel spent eight months at Iraq's infamous Abu Ghraib prison, interrogating teenage boys, grandfathers, taxi drivers, religious leaders and an occasional self-professed jihadist. Since leaving Iraq, then later the Army in May 2005, Casteel has struggled to make sense of his experience, coming to terms with what he considers questionable techniques used by fellow interrogators. From his effort to deal with post-traumatic stress and ensuing spasms of guilt has come a play that opens this weekend at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Returns is Casteel's first play, an autobiographical journey with a smattering of anti-war sentiment. Casteel is a student in the playwright division of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. The Spectator is published in Ontario.

http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?GXHC_gx_session_id_=ff7fb17098a0cb1b&pagename=hamilton/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1171712713712&call_pageid=1112702686981&col=Query:1112617069074

Marra's UI Press Book Noted (Chronicle, Feb. 19)
To play the tempest Katharina in Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew," an actress must convey a fury within. For Ada Rehan, the fury was real. The American actress was in London in the spring of 1888 with Augustin Daly's New York company to stage the play. But on opening night she refused to go on. Rehan was incensed over Daly's flirtation with the production's Bianca, says KIM MARRA, an associate professor of theater arts and American studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. When Daly knelt, begging Rehan, she took the impresario's hand and bit him "to the bone." Blood still on her lips, says Marra, Rehan commanded that the play start half an hour late and then gave one of the best performances of her career. In "Strange Duets: Impresarios and Actresses in the American Theatre, 1865-1914" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS), Marra explores the social and sexual politics of theater.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i25/25a01401.htm

Grassian: Think Small To Solve Big Problems (Nanotechnology Now, Feb. 19)
By thinking small, scientists can solve big environmental problems.

That is the message University of Iowa researcher VICKI H. GRASSIAN delivered to colleagues Sunday, Feb. 18, at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Francisco. She urged them to take a molecular view in order to understand problems, find solutions and move the country toward a sustainable society. Grassian is professor of chemistry in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, professor of chemical and biochemical engineering in the UI College of Engineering, and director of the UI Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Institute. This story appeared internationally on a variety of science and technology sites.
http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=20564

UI Chicago Center Opens (WQAD-TV, Feb. 19, from AP)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S Chicago Center opened Dec. 1 with goals that include increasing Iowa's recruitment, career placement and alumni relations in the Chicago metro area. The Chicago area is home to about one of every three of Iowa's undergraduates and more than 21,000 alumni. The center is the brainchild the university's interim president, GARY FETHKE, and has a prominent location on Michigan Avenue in Chicago. The center's co-director, EMILY RUBY, says that the center is trying to tap the largest community of Hawkeyes outside of Iowa. WQAD originates in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6105921&nav=1sW7

Cochran Says 'Midlife Crisis' Is Exaggeration (The Oregonian, Feb. 17)
SAM V. COCHRAN
, outgoing editor of the journal Psychology of Men and Masculinity, sees the popular concept of midlife crisis as overblown and exaggerated. A crisis implies a "very damaging event," said Cochran, who also is director of counseling services at the University of Iowa. That certainly happens, he says, and because the results are so dramatic the crisis gets most of the attention. Men who undergo true crises involving disruption of family life usually have failed to come to terms with their midlife problems, he said. "Most of us probably cope with it rather quietly, with help from our family and friends. In the years between 40 and 60 you begin to consider the choices and commitments you've made, do a re-examination and make adjustments."
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/117132996332740.xml&coll=7

Magazine Cites UI Finance Professors' Work (Traders Magazine, Feb. 16)
A floor broker using discretion (by taking a customer order out of his pocket for execution in relatively small pieces when conditions are right) can be thought of as a micro market timer, as a human algorithm, as a bearer of dark liquidity. In so doing, the floor broker offers a value-added service. A 2004 Journal of Business paper, "The Economic Value of a Trading Floor," produced with PUNEET HANDA and ASHISH TIWARI, associate professors of finance at the University of Iowa, presents evidence that floor broker intermediation on the American Stock Exchange results in better market timing and lower impact costs.
http://www.tradersmagazine.com/magazine.cfm?id=2722

Wilcox Is Featured In ACT Podcast (The Daily Dispatch, Feb. 16)
Parents and students who want to know more about financial aid now have the option of listening to tips from a college financial aid professional on ACT's student website. Prep Talk is a free podcast that covers a number of college planning topics. Parents and students can listen online or download the program to computers or MP3 players. In the latest podcast (on financial aid) CATHY WILCOX, senior associate director in the office of student financial aid at the University of Iowa, answers questions families want to know about filing for financial aid and working with a college financial aid office. The Daily Dispatch is published in Arizona.
http://www.douglasdispatch.com/articles/2007/02/16/news/school%20news/education5.txt

Heimer Presents Crime-Rate Research (Huliq.com, Feb. 16)
Although the gender gap among victims of homicide and robbery has remained relatively stable over the past 30 years, the gap has closed significantly for aggravated and simple assault because male rates of victimization have declined faster than female rates. That is one finding of a first-of-its-kind study presented by researchers KAREN HEIMER of the University of Iowa and Janet Lauritsen of the University of Missouri-St. Louis on Friday, Feb. 16, at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Francisco. The study examined data from the National Crime Victimization Surveys to compare trends in violence against women and men over the past three decades. Huliq is an international news website.
http://www.huliq.com/11346/gender-gap-narrowing-among-victims-of-certain-crimes

UI Lottery-Ad Row Cited (Sports Illustrated, Feb. 16)
Columnist Eric Horowitz writes, "Gambling and college athletics always seem to have a way of finding each other. This time it's at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where the athletic department has come under fire for allowing the school's fight song and logo to be used in a state lottery commercial. Many university officials are concerned that the commercials may encourage students to gamble, while others are angry the school didn't associate itself with a form of gambling that has a higher expected value and smaller standard deviation--such as Keno or sports betting."
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/sioncampus/02/14/campus.chronicles/index.html

Kaaret Participated In Neutron Star Discovery (SpaceRef.com, Feb. 16)
Astronomers using European Space Agency's gamma-ray observatory, Integral, have detected what appears to be the fastest spinning neutron star yet. This tiny stellar corpse is spinning 1,122 times every second. The neutron star was discovered during one of its active phases in 1999. In August 2005, while Integral was monitoring the bulge of the galaxy, the star started to come back to life. Erik Kuulkers of the ESA Integral Science Operations Centre, Spain, who leads the Galactic bulge monitoring program, informed PHILIP KAARET, University of Iowa, via email that things were still hotting up near the end of October. Kaaret arranged for the RXTE satellite to observe the star for two weeks. Together the two satellites recorded about 20 bursts between September and November.
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=21909

Ludwig Taught Dance At UI (theStreet.com, Feb. 16)
Ann Ludwig, 70 founder of the modern-dance company, A Ludwig Dance Theatre, believes in the vast possibilities of modern dance. "I think there's a billion ways to do things," she says. The Arizona-based company, which was formed in 1977, originally began in California with three dancers, three musicians and one mime. They have since performed all over the U.S. and in Europe. Ludwig has been on the dance faculty for many institutions, including the University of Kansas, San Diego State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she led the dance program. The Street is a national financial-news website.
http://www.thestreet.com/_googlen/funds/goodlife/10338914.html?cm_ven=GOOGLEN&cm_cat=FREE&cm_ite=NA

Redlawsk Comments On YouTube Impact (Sydney Morning Herald, Feb. 16)
YouTube has become a fact of political life. Politicians can no longer afford unguarded moments, because what they say, any time or anywhere, can be shown to the world. To a certain extent, candidates have accepted this intrusion as a fact of political life, says DAVID REDLAWSK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, and try to condition themselves to behave accordingly. Of more immediate concern for observers such as Redlawsk is that unlike other political advertising, YouTube attacks can be lobbed without a return address. Under the first amendment of the US constitution, freedom of speech is sacrosanct in every aspect of public life in America, and especially during election campaigns. "It's going to be extremely hard to ever deal with," Redlawsk says. "There's a sacrosanct vision of the first amendment ... but having said that, it's hard for me to imagine how you enforce regulations in an Internet environment." The Sydney Morning Herald is published in Australia.
http://www.smh.com.au/news/technology/no-more-unguarded-moments/2007/02/16/1171405446871.html

UI Doctor Concerned About 'Revisions' To Surgeries (KTBS-TV, Feb. 16)
In the last 10 years, huge gains have been made in using "minimally invasive surgery" (MIS) for hip replacements. Patients who qualify for this type of surgery no longer have to endure the pain from "open" surgeries where the orthopaedic surgeon had to make large incisions, up to six inches long. Dr. JOHN J. CALLAGHAN, a professor in the departments of orthopaedic surgery and biomedical engineering at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, is concerned about the number of surgical "revisions" -- MIS procedures that have to be redone due to problems with the first surgery. KTBS is based in Shreveport, La.
http://www.ktbs.com/health/5854421.html

UI Student's Play Focuses On Abu Ghraib (Bradenton Herald, Feb. 15)
JOSHUA CASTEEL, a student in the University of Iowa Playwrights Workshop, spent eight months at Iraq's infamous Abu Ghraib prison, interrogating teenage boys, grandfathers, taxi drivers, religious leaders and an occasional self-professed jihadist. Since leaving Iraq, then later the Army in May 2005, he has struggled to make sense of his experience, coming to terms with what he considers questionable techniques used by fellow interrogators. From his effort to deal with post-traumatic stress and ensuing spasms of guilt has come a play that opens this weekend at the UI. The Herald is based in Bradenton, Fla. The Associated Press story has appeared widely, including the France-based International Herald Tribune.
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/entertainment/16707652.htm

UI Professor Comments On Google Copyright Case (Computerworld.com, Feb. 15)
Earlier this week, a court in Belgium ruled that Google Inc. violated the copyright of Belgian newspapers for posting portions of their stories on its Web site. The judgment could open the door to further lawsuits and limit the ability of search engines in Europe to display copyrighted material on their Web sites. But the larger question is, could this happen here? KEMBREW MCLEOD, associate professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa, said there is potential for copyright infringement lawsuits by U.S. media companies. "It always could happen because if you're handling someone else's copyrighted materials you always can be potentially sued." However, McLeod said it was unlikely because there have already been decisions in the U.S. regarding similar cases of archiving and linking to news materials, and the courts have ruled it was fair use, not copyright infringement.
http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=9011364&pageNumber=1

UI Economist Comments On Ethanol Plants (Tri-State Neighbor, Feb. 15)
It might seem counterintuitive that the best way for a local investor to realize the full value of his investment in an ethanol plant is to have the facility big enough to be listed as publicly traded stock. JOHN SOLOW, an economist at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, says there might be advantages to corporate ownership of ethanol plants. The Tri-State Neighbor is based in Sioux Falls, S.D.
http://www.tristateneighbor.com/articles/2007/02/15/tri_state_news/top_stories/news16.txt

Robinson: Writers Should Find Their Passion (Deseret News, Feb. 15)
Young writers should seek out their passions and stick to them, novelist MARILYNNE ROBINSON said Friday at a reading of her latest book. "The only conclusion that I can draw from my own experience is that you have to -- this sounds so stupid -- you have to find your own way," Robinson, whose novel "Gilead" won the Pulitzer Prize in 2005, told a Utah Valley State College audience. "No good writer sounds like anybody else." After reading a passage of "Gilead," Robinson answered questions about her inspiration to write, her philosophy on religion and her roots as a writer. Robinson, who currently teaches creative writing at the University of Iowa, said she began writing poetry as a child. The News is published in Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,660195717,00.html

Jones: Voting Machine Paper Trail Has Problems (Tampa Tribune, Feb. 15)
A proposal to outfit electronic voting machines in Florida with printers to help disabled voters has generated controversy. "They jam, they don't always print, and people make silly mistakes running them," said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa and former chairman of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems. If no one notices a printer jam, he said, voters may vote on a machine that has stopped producing a paper trail. The paper itself, often a roll of thermal paper, may degrade easily and become difficult to read.
http://www.tbo.com/news/nationworld/MGB0VD6N6YE.html

Squire: Miller Endorsement Won't Mean Much To Obama (Legal News, Feb. 15)
Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller's recent endorsement of Illinois Sen. Barack Obama will likely not have much influence on next year's caucus. "In a very crowded field like this one endorsements such as Miller's might matter on the margins," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. Nonetheless, Squire believes an endorsement from Miller, whom he describes as "a fixture in Iowa politics," provides some boost to the freshman Illinois senator. "Clearly, it is a plus for Obama's campaign in that it signals that serious and sober politicians in the state are taking his chances seriously," said Squire, who also co-edits Legislative Studies Quarterly.
http://www.legalnewsline.com/news/190573-reality-trumps-state-loyalty-in-iowa-ags-endorsement

Backdating Scandal Hits In-House Counsel Hard (Legal Week, Feb. 15)
Among all the cases of white-collar abuse to hit the U.S. in the past 10 years, it is the fallout from the recent backdating share options scandal that has rocked the in-house world and seen an unprecedented number of general counsel given the chop. While previous scandals have, for the most part, hit chief executives and financial directors, a series of investigations has put general counsel firmly and uncomfortably in the spotlight. By the end of 2006, at least 15 senior corporate counsels had exited their jobs in the wake of backdating investigations. The scandal has unfolded rapidly. The row over backdating share options can be traced back to 2005 and the publication of a paper by an academic at the University of Iowa, professor ERIK LIE.
http://www.legalweek.com/Navigation/34/Articles/1007788/Corporate+Counsel+Careful+what+you+wish+for.html

New Mexico Faculty Backs Hay (Albuquerque Tribune, Feb. 15)
MEREDITH HAY of the University of Iowa won a unanimous vote of confidence from the University of New Mexico faculty, which outright rejected three of the five finalists for UNM president. Only Hay, Iowa's research vice president and the lone female candidate, and Robert McGrath of Ohio State University "hold the credentials and qualifications to engender respect from the faculty," says a faculty resolution adopted Tuesday.
http://www.abqtrib.com/news/2007/feb/14/unm-faculty-backs-hay/

Rynes, Schmidt Find Benefits Of Corporate Responsibility (WZZM-TV, Feb. 15)
A story about the growing sense of corporate social responsibility among businesses notes research by the University of Iowa's SARA RYNES and FRANK SCHMIDT that looked at 52 studies covering 34,000 companies worldwide on corporate social responsibility over a 30-year period. Their 2004 study found that well-run, profitable businesses also boasted strong social and environmental records, and vise versa. Overwhelmingly, firms that rewarded employees with good work climates and higher pay and benefits ultimately saw stronger sales and stock prices, plus less employee turnover. "It's a virtuous cycle," Rynes says. "As a company becomes more socially responsible, its reputation and financial performance go up, which causes them to become even more socially responsible." WZZM is based in Grand Rapids, Mich.
http://www.wzzm13.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=70666

UI May Go Smoke-Free (WQAD-TV, Feb. 15)
Taking a cigarette break at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA could mean hopping in a car and driving off campus. The proposed smoking ban is headed for the school's president, and it could make Iowa the first major public university to go entirely smoke free. Supporters say they're motivated by concern for public health and a belief that the school should not condone tobacco use. WQAD originates in Illinois.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6096960&nav=1sW7

Folk Studies Biological Clocks (Science Daily, Feb. 14)
How do animals living in the continuous light of the Arctic summer know when to sleep and when to be active? Do they maintain a 24-hour cycle of rest and activity, or does living in continuous light alter their circadian rhythm? Answering these questions may improve our understanding of biological clocks -- the internal, genetically programmed cycle of rest and activity that affects the behavior, metabolism and physiology of all animals, including humans. A better understanding may also help solve problems -- such as shift-work fatigue, jet lag and even seasonal affective disorder -- that are associated with disruptions of biological clocks. One scientist who has spent a lifetime pursuing these questions and finding answers that have helped build the field of biological clock research is G. EDGAR FOLK, emeritus professor of molecular physiology and biophysics at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070208225110.htm

Recent NWP Alumna Is Featured Author (Identity Theory, Feb. 14)
Amy Leach, a 2005 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA NONFICTION WRITING PROGRAM, is the featured author in the new issue of Identity Theory. She teaches literature and writing at the University of St. Francis in Joliet. Her writing has been published in THE IOWA REVIEW, A Public Space, and The Wilson Quarterly. Identity Theory is a web magazine about literature and culture.
http://www.identitytheory.com/featauth/amy_leach.php

Rynes, Schmidt Find Benefits Of Corporate Responsibility (USA Today, Feb. 14)
A story about the growing sense of corporate social responsibility among businesses notes research by the University of Iowa's SARA RYNES and FRANK SCHMIDT that looked at 52 studies covering 34,000 companies worldwide on corporate social responsibility over a 30-year period. Their 2004 study found that well-run, profitable businesses also boasted strong social and environmental records, and vise versa. Overwhelmingly, firms that rewarded employees with good work climates and higher pay and benefits ultimately saw stronger sales and stock prices, plus less employee turnover. "It's a virtuous cycle," Rynes says. "As a company becomes more socially responsible, its reputation and financial performance go up, which causes them to become even more socially responsible."
http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/2007-02-14-high-purpose-usat_x.htm?csp=34

TV Meteorologist Released From UI Hospital (Charlotte Observer, Feb. 14)
Meteorologist Melissa Greer has been released from a hospital following a lengthy cancer surgery last week, according to WBTV in Charlotte. Greer, a staff meteorologist at the station, was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer several months ago, while she was pregnant with her first child. The baby, a boy named Connor, was delivered in surgery last week. Greer then underwent 12 hours of cancer surgery immediately after the baby was delivered. The surgery took place at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's HOLDEN CANCER CENTER.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/entertainment/television/16696194.htm

UI Research Shows Cherries Might Reduce Cancer (The News-Journal, Feb. 14)
A story about the nutritional benefits of cherries says that evidence from studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA shows cherries are so powerful they might reduce the risk of cancer by 50 percent. The News-Journal is based in Texas.
http://www.news-journal.com/featr/content/features/stories/02142007UdyColumn.html

Hay Is New Mexico President Finalist (New Mexico Business Weekly, Feb. 14)
The University of New Mexico Board of Regents will name a new university president at a meeting on Saturday, Feb. 17. Among the finalists is MEREDITH HAY, vice president for research at the University of Iowa.
http://www.bizjournals.com/albuquerque/stories/2007/02/12/daily11.html?b=1171256400^1417220

Lottery Pulls UI Fight Song Ad (KTTV-TV, Feb. 13)
The Iowa Lottery has pulled an ad campaign featuring a parody of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA fight song. KTTV is based in Rochester, Minn.
http://www.kttc.com/News/index.php?ID=12689

Law Grad To Be Honored (Quincy Herald Whig, Feb. 13)
The Quincy YWCA will honor several local women this month during its Women of Achievement commemoration. Among them is Judith Abbott, Adams County assistant state's attorney and a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law. The Herald Whig is published in Illinois.
http://www.whig.com/318805685561363.php

Squire Comments On Romney's Candidacy (Bloomberg News, Feb. 13)
Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney today became the first of the leading Republican hopefuls to make official his bid for the 2008 presidential nomination, casting himself as an outsider who can transform the government. Facing questions about his positions early in the race may work to Romney's benefit, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "It gives him an opportunity to respond and an opportunity to continue to try to reinforce the notion that he is a true conservative," Squire said.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=aWCmKtz3OBd0&refer=us

UI Graduate Leads Award-Winning Arts Agency (Lexington Herald Leader, Feb. 13)
A county arts extension program in Pike County, Kent, has been honored with a government award for establishing numerous new arts programs. The program's director, Stephanie Richards, earned a master's degree in acting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Herald Leader is published in Kentucky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/news/state/16685854.htm

Ergun Uc: Parkinson's Patients Should Not Drive (South County Journal, Feb. 12)
A columnist writing about impediments to good driving writes that drivers who have Parkinson's disease should be wary of declines in their ability, advised a paper published in the journal of the American Academy of Neurology by researchers at the University of Iowa and Veterans' Affairs Medical Center in Iowa City. "Clearly, Parkinson disease can affect the ability to drive, and that effect grows as the disease progresses," said ERGUN UC, M.D. "People with Parkinson disease should be aware of this potential decline in driving ability and their family and friends should also monitor it and then recheck periodically." The Journal is published in Missouri.
http://southcountyjournal.stltoday.com/articles/2007/02/12/business/sj2tn20070209-0211all_stoff.ii1.txt

Kopelman: Men Get Postpartum Blues, Too (The Northwestern, Feb. 12)
Postpartum depression has been recognized for more than a century as a problem affecting new mothers in the weeks and months after the birth of a child. Doctors are finding that fathers, too, can suffer that same stress. Postpartum depression once was thought to be caused by hormones, but scientists now believe that other factors also contribute, including environment, family support systems, finances, the child's health and workplace pressures. Fathers are just as sensitive to those issues as mothers. Having a baby is "also stressful for men," says ROBIN COOK KOPELMAN, a psychiatrist with the IOWA DEPRESSION AND CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTER at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who is completing a study on postpartum depression in fathers. The Northwestern is published in Oshkosh, Wis. This story originated on Gannett News Service.
http://www.thenorthwestern.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070212/OSH05/702120348/1168

Willson's Widow Objects To Lottery Ads (KOTV, Feb. 12)
The widow of Meredith Willson, the man who composed the "Iowa Fight Song," wouldn't have approved a parody of the song used in an Iowa Lottery television commercial, her lawyer says. The lawyer said his client would not have approved the use of the song in the lottery commercial, even if she had been asked, and he is exploring legal options for what he considers a violation of copyright law by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the lottery. UI officials are looking into the issue, said MARK ABBOTT, an assistant athletic director. "If a mistake has been made, it will have to be rectified," he said. Iowa athletic director GARY BARTA told the Des Moines Register last week that he didn't review the commercial before it aired. If there were a copyright violation, Barta said, "it certainly was accidental." KOTV is based in Oklahoma. This AP story has appeared widely.
http://www.kotv.com/sports/local/story/?id=120141

Forkenbrock Studies Road-Use Fee (San Diego Business Journal, Feb. 12)
San Diego is about to become part of a cutting-edge national study that could result in a new way to raise revenue for improvements to the country's aging roadways. Funded through the national highway bill passed by Congress in 2005, the $16.5 million study will test the feasibility of replacing the gas tax with fees based on road use. The study raises two questions, according to DAVID FORKENBROCK, a professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S PUBLIC POLICY CENTER who is spearheading the testing: Will the results justify abandoning the use of gas taxes to generate revenue? And, he said, "Will it play in Peoria?" The fuel tax - in place for more than a half-century - is now generating about $80 billion a year, he said. The concept of a user fee would be a major departure, essentially turning the road system into a public utility, "not unlike having gas, water and electrical meters on your house," Forkenbrock explained. "With them, if you consume more energy or water, you pay more," he said. "With a mileage base, if you travel more, you would pay more."
http://www.sdbj.com/industry_article.asp?aID=45753529.7971157.1432184.2316197.8162304.835&aID2=110159

Landmark In Dyslexia Study Came At The UI (Post-Gazette, Feb. 11)
The American who left an indelible stamp on dyslexia was neurologist Samuel Orton. While running a mobile mental health clinic at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the 1920s, Orton began seeing farm boys whose vision was excellent, but who could barely read. He noticed many of them reversed letters or mixed them up. Eventually, he coined the term "strephosymbolia" to describe that process, and theorized that it was the root cause of dyslexia. The Post-Gazette is published in Pittsburgh, Pa.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07042/760823-114.stm

Book About Iowa Wrestling Reviewed (San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 11)
James Brown began his review of "Four Days to Glory," sportswriter Mark Kreidler's book about high-school wrestling in Iowa: "Iowa is best known for producing two things: wrestlers and writers. Corn is big, too, as its major cash crop. But outside of its farming communities, outside of its famous master's of fine arts program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, wrestling, like reading and writing books, is not exactly a major American pastime. So it is with a peculiar sense of irony that Mark Kreidler, a sportswriter and columnist for the Sacramento Bee, chooses to record the careers of two brilliant high school athletes in 'Four Days to Glory: Wrestling With the Soul of the American Heartland.'"
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/02/11/RVGPUNRST41.DTL&type=books

Swanson Comments On Theater Economics (The Record, Feb. 11)
The city-funded Bob Hope Theater in Stockton, Calif., is struggling financially, losing more than $800,000 since its opening in 2004. Experts in the industry point to a variety of factors that are challenges for venues. CHUCK SWANSON, executive director of the University of Iowa's 2,500-seat Hancher Auditorium, noted that people today are more interested in staying home than going out to a concert. The Record is published in Stockton, Calif.
http://www.recordnet.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070211/A_NEWS/702110337

IWP Veteran Wins Nigerian Book Prize (Nigeria Guardian, Feb. 11)
Playwright Emeka Nwabueze, who attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM in 1994, is the co-winner of the rich Pat Utomi Book Prize -- sharing N1m with poet Obu Udeozo. Nwabueze is a professor of theatre arts at the University of Nigeria Nsukka. He was honored for the play, "The Dragon's Funeral."
http://www.guardiannewsngr.com/arts/article01

Printmaker Attended UI (Columbia Tribune, Feb. 11)
Brooke Cameron's intaglio and photo intaglio print, "This Year I Outlive My Father" was selected to appear in "Paper in Particular," through Feb. 28 in Larson Gallery at Columbia College. Cameron, who has taught printmaking for 40 years at the University of Missouri, earned her master of fine arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Columbia Tribune is published in Missouri.
http://www.columbiatribune.com/2007/Feb/20070211Ovat001.asp

Alarcón Attended Writers' Workshop (Tennessean.com, Feb. 11)
Book critic Joel Rice wrote, "A portrait of a nameless, war-ravaged South American country, 'Lost City Radio' is poetic without being pretentious, serious and affecting without being ponderous, carefully constructed without being precious. Though the Peruvian-American author, Daniel Alarcón, is still in his 20s, he exerts extraordinary command over his craft. With an M.F.A. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a collection of short stories already to his credit, this young author is not simply lucky: He is in enviable possession of the right stuff."
http://tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070211/FEATURES07/702110330/1086/FEATURES

Squire Comments On Thompson Candidacy (Wisconsin State Journal, Feb. 10)
Former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson has been stumping in Iowa, pushing his long-shot bid for the GOP presidential nomination, and recently drawing crowds of 45 and 130 in Ames and Des Moines. "Given where he's starting in the field, that's about as good as he could've hoped for," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "It suggests he's at least being taken seriously by the people who are following this... At this point it doesn't look like he's gained some traction but he has put together an organization and he's introducing himself to voters. I think he's doing the things he has to do at this point, but the question is whether it's going to generate any support for him." The Wisconsin State Journal is published in Madison. Versions of this story also appeared in other Wisconsin media.
http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/local/index.php?ntid=118516&ntpid=2

UI Driving Study Cited (Suburban Journals, Feb. 10)
A variety of factors should alert drivers to take extra care. Drivers who have Parkinson's disease should be wary of declines in their ability, advised a paper published in the journal of the American Academy of Neurology by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Veterans' Affairs Medical Center in Iowa City. "Clearly, Parkinson disease can affect the ability to drive, and that effect grows as the disease progresses," said ERGUN UC, M.D. "People with Parkinson disease should be aware of this potential decline in driving ability and their family and friends should also monitor it and then recheck periodically." Suburban Journals is published by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
http://suburbanjournals.stltoday.com/articles/2007/02/10/business/sj2tn20070209-0211all_stoff.ii1.txt

UI Coach's Illness Prompted 'Link To Pink' (Gainsville Sun, Feb. 10)
SEC gymnasts are wearing pink to raise awareness of breast cancer. "Link to Pink" was initiated because a former University of Georgia gymnast, TALYA VEXLER, was diagnosed with the disease. Vexler is now an assistant coach with the University of Iowa.
http://gainesville.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070210/DAYBREAK/70209048

Lyne Created 'Inner Writer Program" (The Daily Advertiser, Feb. 10)
Sandford Lyne, a graduate of the MFA program in writing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was the creator of The Inner Writer Program. He traveled throughout the country for 20 years teaching in public schools as an artist-educator with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. This work took him to 36 states where he taught creative writing to over 50,000 young people and several thousand teachers. His collection of poems by young people, "Ten-Second Rainshowers," was showcased on National Public Radio and was followed by a companion book, "Soft Hay Will Catch You." His latest book, "Writing Poetry from the Inside Out," to be published in March, focuses on the soul's journey and the role that writing poetry plays in enriching and deepening one's life experience. Lyne passed away on Feb. 7. The Daily Advertiser is published in Lafayette, La.
http://www.theadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/dclassifieds?Dato=20070209&Kategori=OBITUARY&Class=30&Type=CAT30200&Lopenr=702000173&Selected=14

UI Alumnus Teaches Improv Workshops (Catholic Explorer, Feb. 10)
Bill Bungeroth, from the Second City Training Center in Chicago, recently headed improv workshops for students in suburban Chicago Catholic high schools. A graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, he's made a practice of reaching out to students through the arts. The Catholic Explorer is published in Illinois.
http://www.catholicexplorer.com/explore4325/youth/festival-workshops-turn-a.shtml

Gamble Moves From Entrepreneur To Coach (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 10)
When Kevin Gamble was growing up in Illinois' capital city, he lived in the John Hay public-housing projects, where his single mother sacrificed so her children could aspire to higher goals. He led Lanphier High School to the 1983 Class AA title, and his reputation expanded at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before he spent a decade in the NBA. After he made his money, Gamble returned to his roots, and since then he has put much of that money back into the community, into commercial and residential real estate and strip malls, into replacing dilapidated buildings on the predominantly African-American east side. Then he was asked to do more. Then-mayor Karen Hasara called Gamble to a breakfast meeting in early 2002 where he met University of Illinois-Springfield Chancellor Richard Ringeisen. "My first reaction was, `They're starting a basketball team,'" said Gamble, who had run summer clinics for hundreds of Springfield kids. "I knew he wanted me to become the coach." Five years later the Prairie Stars have gained national renown and changed the way Gamble, 41, views himself. He has morphed from businessman to basketball coach.
http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/college/mensbasketball/cs-0702100185feb10,1,4280547.story?coll=cs-sports-print

Al-Tawil's Art Is On View In Muskegon (Arab-American News, Feb. 9)
"Memoir from an Old City," an exhibit of art by Hashim al-Tawil, is on view during February at Muskegon Community College in Michigan. Al-Tawil is an Arab American from Iraq who migrated to the United States in 1976. He served on the faculty of the Academy of Fine Arts at the University of Baghdad, and now holds a doctorate in art history from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The exhibit is a collection of three-dimensional structures, paintings and prints reflecting the collective memory of a typical Arab city. Some of the works also show reflections of the artist on the destruction of Baghdad that has occurred since the U.S. invasion in 2003. Arab-American News is based in Dearborn, Mich.
http://www.arabamericannews.com/newsarticle.php?articleid=7547

Andrejevic Comments On Smith's Death (Boston Globe, Feb. 9)
American media has been dominated by the story of Anna Nicole Smith's death. "Anna Nicole is someone who moved rapidly through several strata of American life to become a celebrity," said MARK ANDREJEVIC, author of "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched." "Her story serves as the tabloid version of the American dream." Andrejevic, a communications professor at the University of Iowa, said Smith's "exaggerated character" quenched our collective thirst for ever-more sensational and eccentric celebrities. So what if she didn't have any talent? "That's what made her an interesting character for reality TV," said Andrejevic, "the way in which she embodied the lottery of fame in American, the randomness of it."
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2007/02/10/anna_nicoles_rise_and_fall_has_captured_our_attention/

UI Research Cited In Flir Backdating Case (AP, Feb. 9)
Improperly dated stock options at Flir Systems Inc. will cost at least three times more than expected, company officials said. Nearly 200 companies have acknowledged backdating over the past several months, a national scandal triggered when a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor uncovered suspicious patterns in corporate option grants in 2005. This AP story has appeared widely.
http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2007/02/09/ap3414454.html

Kinnick Is Inaugural Inductee To Omaha Hall Of Fame (KETV, Feb. 9)
The first 10 inductees of the new Omaha Sports Hall of Fame have been announced. Included in the class is Nile Kinnick, an All-City, All-State football player at Omaha Benson, Kinnick went on to All-Conference, All-American recognition at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, ending his senior year with the Heisman Trophy, the Walter Camp Award, and the Maxwell Award. He was voted Male Athlete of the Year (1939) by the Associated Press, beating out Joe DiMaggio, Byron Nelson and Joe Lewis. Kinnick served as a pilot in the United State Navy and was killed in the line of duty during World War II on June 2, 1943.
http://www.ketv.com/sports/10975861/detail.html

Adams Comments On Stroke Finding (MedPage Today, Feb. 9)
Getting selected patients out of bed and moving in the first 24 hours after a stroke appears to be safe, according to a new Australian study. In the United States, patients usually start with some form of mobilization in the first day or two and move within several days to more comprehensive rehabilitation, depending on the severity of the stroke, said HAROLD P. ADAMS, M.D., of the University of Iowa, who commented as an American Heart Association spokesperson.
http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ASAMeeting/tb/5029

Swofford Attended Iowa Writers' Workshop (The Australian, Feb. 9)
"Jarhead" author Anthony Swofford was interviewed in advance of his appearance at the Perth International Arts Festival's Writers Week. The story noted, "Leaving the marines, Swofford studied at the University of California and then at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, whose alumni include Jane Smiley and Michael Cunningham."
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,21181127-5001986,00.html

Murray's Research Benefits From March Of Dimes (Medical News Today, Feb. 9)
In its ongoing effort to predict and prevent premature birth, the March of Dimes announced new support for the innovative research of eight scientists with combined grant awards of $3 million. One of the recipients is JEFFREY CLARK MURRAY, M.D., professor of Pediatrics, University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=62589&nfid=mnf

UI Doctor Explains Trans Fats (Omaha World-Herald, Feb. 9)
A year ago, the FDA revamped food labels, creating a stir in the food business. Manufacturers scrambled to remove trans fat from Oreos and potato chips because savvy consumers started reading food labels. . . . "The problem with trans fatty acids is that your body doesn't know what to do with them," said Dr. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, professor of internal medicine at the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. "Trans fatty acids may help preserve food so that it tastes good, but your body can't break them down and use them correctly," Olshansky said. "Normal fats are very supple and pliable, but the trans fatty acid is a stiff fat that can build up in the body and create havoc."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1000&u_si.00d=2322544

UI Study On Gifted Students Is Cited (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Feb. 8)
In an editorial, the paper argues that the state of Georgia -- faced with challenges posed by underperforming students who need remedial help -- has overlooked the needs of academically gifted students. "Georgia parents eager for their bright children to move ahead often find themselves rebuked by principals who complain that jumping around grades wreaks havoc with the schedule," the editorial states. "But the research challenges the long-held assumption that acceleration hurts students in the long run. A 2004 study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA concludes, 'While the popular perception is that a child who skips a grade will be socially stunted, 50 years of research shows that moving bright students ahead often makes them happy.'"
http://www.ajc.com/opinion/content/opinion/stories/2007/02/07/0208edadvance.html

Professor's Stock Research Cited (The Morning News, Feb. 8)
Seven past and present directors of Tyson Foods Inc. might be asked to defend their actions in a Delaware court relating to stock option grants given to key executives and directors between 1999 and 2003. An academic study published by University of Iowa professor ERIK LIE in May 2005 reviewed 6,000 CEO stock option awards from 1992 through 2002. Lie found a pattern of abnormally low stock returns before grant dates and unusually high return after those grants. Lie concluded that while it is possible some executives timed stock option grants based on savvy market intuition, the odds that this would occur with such frequency are so remote the results suggested that at least some of the awards were either timed retroactively or spring-loaded. The Morning News is based in northwest Arkansas.
http://www.nwaonline.net/articles/2007/02/09/business/020907tysongrants.txt

UI Doctors Remove Tumors From Meteorologist's Liver (The Sun Herald, Feb. 8)
Melissa Greer, the WBTV meteorologist battling a rare cancer, was able to walk Wednesday after resting up from more than 12 hours of surgery in which she underwent a hysterectomy and had five tumors removed from her liver. Greer, 27, was in good condition Wednesday following the operations at the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS, said hospital spokesman Tom Moore. The Sun Herald is based in Biloxi, Miss.
http://www.sunherald.com/mld/sunherald/entertainment/television/16649146.htm

Law Alumna Runs For Council In Fort Wayne, Ind. (The Journal-Gazette, Feb. 8)
Elizabeth "Liz" Brown, 48, filed as a Republican candidate for the Fort Wayne, Indiana council's three at-large seats. Brown, a stay-at-home mother of seven children, earned a bachelor of science degree from the University of Notre Dame and law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/fortwayne/news/local/16651958.htm

Baseball-reference.com Founder Is UI Alumnus (Sports Illustrated.com, Feb. 7)
A Q&A interview with Sean Burton, founder and manager of the Web site baseball-reference.com, notes that he is an alumnus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/john_donovan/02/06/forman.reference/index.html

UI Researcher Supports Cigarette Tax (KXLT Fox-47, Feb. 7)
Anti-tobacco activists are back at the Statehouse pushing Iowa Gov. Chet Culver's call to raise the state's cigarette tax by $1 per pack. They say after years if frustration, the political climate is finally shifting their way. CHRISTOPHER SQUIER is a researcher at the University of Iowa, and has spent decades studying the health impacts of smoking. He says the tax is about trying to reduce death. KXLT is based in Rochester, Minn.
http://fox47kxlt.com/news/state.html

Squier Supports Cigarette Tax Hike (WQAD-TV, Feb. 7)
Anti-tobacco activists are back at the Statehouse pushing Gov. Chet Culver's call to raise the state's cigarette tax by a-dollar-a-pack. They say after years of frustration, the political climate is finally shifting their way. CHRISTOPHER SQUIER is a researcher at the University of Iowa, and has spent decades studying the health impact of smoking. He says the tax is about trying to reduce death. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6045995&nav=1sW7

Regents Set UI Presidential Search Duties (WQAD-TV, Feb. 7)
The Iowa Board of Regents unanimously has approved the duties of the second UNIVERSITY OF IOWA presidential search committee and agreed on the procedures for considering candidates. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6049004&nav=1sW7

Meteorologist Undergoes Surgery At UI Hospital (Charlotte Observer, Feb. 7)
A meteorologist for a TV station in Charlotte, N.C. successfully delivered her son by Caesarian section Tuesday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA hospital before beginning a surgery to fight a cancer that had invaded her body during the last three months of her pregnancy. The Charlotte Observer is based in North Carolina. Stories on the same topic appeared on the Web sites of the ROCK HILL (S.C.) HERALD and SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/entertainment/columnists/mark_washburn/16639907.htm

Playwright Attended Writers' Workshop (Berkeley Daily Planet, Feb. 6)
A profile of playwright Robert Ernst notes that he had been a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop. The Daily Planet is published in California.
http://www.berkeleydaily.org/article.cfm?issue=02-06-07&storyID=26281

Vlastos Comments On Iraq Resolution (Lancaster Eagle-Gazette, Feb. 6)
This editorial concerning a congressional resolution on Iraq quotes STEPHEN VLASTOS, a history professor at the University of Iowa, saying there are parallels between the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin Resolution and the 2002 congressional resolution to use force in Iraq. "Both were based on false information," he said. In the 1960s, Congress had been told the Vietnamese twice fired on U.S. boats. "On that basis, Congress voted to authorize the use of force. . . It turns out the second attack had never occurred. . . A parallel with the Iraq war resolution was that it was based on false information, the WMDs and links to al-Qaida and so forth." The editiorial, which originally appeared in the DES MOINES REGISTER, also was carried by the STATESMAN JOURNAL in Salem, Ore.
http://www.lancastereaglegazette.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070203/OPINION01/702030323/1014/OPINION

Smoking/Brain Tissue Connection Noted (New York Times, Feb. 6)
The recent news about smoking was sensational: some people with damage to a prune-size slab of brain tissue called the insula were able to give up cigarettes instantly. According to neuroscientists who study it, the insula is a long-neglected brain region that has emerged as crucial to understanding what it feels like to be human. Smokers enjoy whole-body effects, said NASIR NAQVI, a student at the University of Iowa Medical Scientist Training Program, who was the lead author of the recent article on smoking. It is not just nicotine binding to parts of the brain, he said, but sensations -- heart rate, blood pressure, a tickle in the lungs, a taste in the mouth, the position of the hands, all the rituals.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/06/health/psychology/06brain.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Musician Attended UI (San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 6)
Olly Wilson is s a composer and educator in the music department at the University of California, Berkeley. His music -- such as his Symphony No. 3, "Hold On," which was performed last month by George Thomson and the Berkeley Symphony Orchestra -- often blends elements from spirituals or African music with classical techniques. He studied music at Washington University, then earned advanced degrees at the University of Illinois and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=63412691d9b784d14b1b3c07117ce1ba&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=b641c1f4c81fb8a124dcc4a792eb1cba

UI Students Get Laundry Alerts By E-Mail (Globe and Mail, Feb. 6)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
students can now receive e-mail alerts when their laundry is done. Thanks to software installed along with new high-efficiency washers last fall, the school's dormitory residents can receive e-mail alerts when their laundry cycles have finished. The school also has a new Web-based service, called LaundryView, that lets residents look on-line for open washers and dryers. The newspaper is based in Canada.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=63412691d9b784d14b1b3c07117ce1ba&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=b5eec4e0ca40b9ba9fa8a795cbc113a6

Bowlsby Serving On Olympic Bid Committee (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 5)
The group that will decide whether Chicago or Los Angeles becomes the U.S. bid city for the 2016 Summer Olympic Games has lost the only member with longstanding close ties to Chicago. The change comes only two months before the United States Olympic Committee's 11-member board of directors is to make the decision on 2016. Jim McCarthy, who recently retired to Colorado after living and working in Chicago for nearly all his years of law practice, was one of two members who left the USOC board as part of a rotation mandated by the USOC reorganization in 2004. Also leaving was Harold Shapiro, the former president of Princeton University. Their replacements are Stanford athletic director Bob Bowlsby, former AD at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and Discovery Communications Chairman John Hendricks of Silver Spring, Md.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/chi-0702050026feb05,1,2333677.story?ctrack=1&cset=true

UI/USC Brain Injury Study Cited (Post and Courier, Feb. 5)
A few weeks ago, medical researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Southern California announced a startling discovery: Injury to the insula, an area in the human brain described as about the size of a silver dollar, appears to effect an instant and permanent cure to nicotine addiction, specifically the desire to smoke. They were studying survivors of cerebral stroke, and were intrigued by one subject's claim that after his attack he simply had "forgotten" his two-pack-a-day habit. The editorial later explores the positive and negative aspects of stopping addictive behaviors with brain surgery. The newspaper serves Charleston, S.C.
http://www.charleston.net/assets/webPages/departmental/news/Stories.aspx?section=commentary&tableId=129413&pubDate=2/5/2007

Berry Comments On Race Incidents (USA Today, Feb. 5)
From an editorial: "On the weekend before the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday last month, a bunch of Clemson University students held their own celebration: a party where guests reveled in degrading stereotypes of African-Americans. Some held large bottles of malt liquor, and one white student painted his body and face black... Sadly, the incident appears to be part of an epidemic. In recent months, students at several other colleges have held so-called theme parties mimicking the stereotypes found in "gangsta" rap videos... Some black academics believe rap's glorification of black men as pimps, thugs and gangsters has desensitized blacks and whites to what is acceptable. When the line "keeps shifting," says VENISE BERRY, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor, it's hard to 'figure out what's over the line.'"
http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2007/02/clueless_on_rac.html

Alumnus Robinson Also Faced Other Black Coaches (New York Times, Feb. 5)
Decades before Super Bowl XLI, with its history-making confrontation between African-American coaches, similar encounters took place every year. The setting was the Orange Blossom Classic, the unofficial but de facto championship game for the all-black colleges of the segregated South. From its inauguration in 1933 to the full integration of college football, the Orange Blossom Classic provided the showcase for such coaches as Eddie Robinson of Grambling, Jake Gaither of Florida A&M, John Merritt of Tennessee State and Earl Banks of Morgan State. Robinson would go on to accumulate the most victories (408) of any college football coach. Robinson earned a master's degree, but he had to go north to get it, at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and had to return south to have any chance to be a head coach.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/05/sports/football/05blossom.html?ref=footbal

UI Report Supported Grade Acceleration (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Feb. 5)
With federal law forcing educators to leave no stone unturned to help students lagging behind in their studies, supporters of grade- and single-subject-skipping -- called "acceleration" in school circles -- have seized an opportunity to champion children at the other end of the spectrum. In 2004, a report from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, "A Nation Deceived," summed up decades of research and concluded acceleration is the "easiest and most effective way to help highly capable students." "A Nation Deceived" (www.nationdeceived.org) quickly has become an anchor among gifted education supporters as they push for change.
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/stories/2007/02/04/0205metskip.html

UI Doctors To Treat N.C. Meteorologist (Charlotte Observer, Feb. 5)
Melissa Greer, a North Carolina TV meteorologist battling a rare form of cancer while eight months pregnant with her first child, is expected to undergo surgery Tuesday in Iowa. Doctors plan to deliver her son, Connor, by Caesarean section. They'll then perform a hysterectomy to get the main tumor, swollen to about the size of a golf ball, on her cervix. Doctors will also bathe Greer's liver to break up the tumors that have spread there, husband Roger Polsky said Sunday. The surgery is expected to last at least 10 hours at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL in Iowa City.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/16624695.htm

UI Tobogganers Participate In National Meet (Bangor Daily News, Feb. 5)
Office Monkeys, The Von Trap Family and Quack Attack were a few of the hundreds of teams from across the country and around the world that competed in the 17th annual National Toboggan Championships this weekend in Camden, Maine. Vans and trailers were set up for tailgating around the base of the chute. A large group from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and their Hawkeyes team even had a pig roast. The Bangor Daily News is published in Maine.
http://bangordailynews.com/news/t/news.aspx?articleid=146010&zoneid=500

Lauer Led UI Heart Disease Research (Medical News Today, Feb. 4)
Scientists at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, the University of Iowa and Roche Molecular Systems are the first to identify a new gene variant that makes women more susceptible to developing heart disease. The identification and monitoring of study participants was lead by RONALD LAUER, M.D., from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Medical News Today originates in the UK. This story has appeared in a variety of media worldwide.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=62189

UI Press Book Praised (El Paso Times, Feb. 4)
Book critic Daniel A. Olivas wrote, "There's much to be said for those who pen their first books at an age when many working folks are winding down their careers. Such writers can draw upon decades of experience, giving their writing the kind of nuance and ambiguity that comes with mature hindsight. For these reasons, one may rejoice in Jim Tomlinson's debut short-story collection, "Things Kept, Things Left Behind" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, $15.95 paperback), for which Tomlinson won the prestigious IOWA SHORT FICTION AWARD." The El Paso Times originates in Texas.
http://www.elpasotimes.com/living/ci_5154201

Alumnus Tippett Must Wait Another Year (Boston Globe, Feb. 4)
More than 25 years later, Patriots linebacker Andre Tippett felt like a rookie all over again. He was waiting by the phone yesterday, just like the 1982 draft when he was coming out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Only this time, the call he waited for was from the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Unfortunately for Tippett, the news wasn't as sweet, as he was denied entry into the Hall despite reaching the final round of 11 for the first time. "There is disappointment, but it was an honor to be this far along in the process," Tippett said from Massachusetts. "We still have next year, and if we don't have next year, we'll try again after that. I know how to persevere. I was trained to persevere."
http://www.boston.com/sports/football/patriots/articles/2007/02/04/irvin_5_others_in_hall/

Article Salutes UI Art Building West (Louisville Courier-Journal, Feb. 4)
Museum development consultant Chris Dercon of Munich, Germany, said that most of what's really hot in art in America is getting ready to happen in what we usually think of as the flyover states. "Forget the East Coast. Forget the West Coast," he said. Judging from an exhibit in St. Louis and architecture in Iowa, he may be right. "Let's applaud the decision by the American Institute of Architects on Jan. 12 to make the Steven Holl Architects' UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF ART AND ART HISTORY building its 2007 Honor Award for Architecture." The building, which the AIA calls "a hybrid instrument for teaching based on the idea of open edges and center," was one of 11 projects selected from nearly 700 submissions.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070204/SCENE05/702040350/1011/SCENE

Little Bob Sanders Makes Big Impact (Courier-Press, Feb. 4)
Sports writer Tim Ethridge wrote: "In the Indianapolis Colts' locker room, you have to look down to see safety Bob Sanders. He is, after all, only 5 feet, 8 inches tall. But on the field, more often than not, opposing running backs and receivers find themselves looking up at the blue-and-white clad No. 21 from their prone position on the turf, where they've been deposited by the Colts' hardest hitter... As a rookie, foot and knee problems limited Sanders to six games. He still made 39 tackles. Last year, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA product played in 14 games, making 118 tackles. He missed stretches of three, four and five games this year, but has toughed his way through the playoffs. "Basically, you just never can give up, never lose faith," he said. "You have to know that things will get better. For me, patience was the main thing. And now that I've worked my way back in, I'm comfortable. I feel good." The Courier-Press is published in Indiana.
http://www.courierpress.com/news/2007/feb/04/sanders-little-man-big-impact/

Bowlsby Appointed To U.S. Olympic Board (sportsfeatures.com, Feb. 4)
Bob Bowlsby, former athletic director at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has been appointed to the board of directors of the US Olympic Committee.
http://www.sportsfeatures.com/PressPoint/show.php?id=36626

Alumnus Jensen Holds On To Football Dream (Post-Crescent, Feb. 4)
Sports writer Ricardo Arguello writes, "What a difference a year makes for Erik Jensen. Last year, the former Appleton East football player was standing on the sidelines as a practice squad player for the Pittsburgh Steelers, who defeated Seattle 21-10 in Super Bowl XL in Detroit. This year, he's removed from the game he has played all of his life. He still wants to play football. He lives it, breathes it and does all the necessary work to get in shape to play it. He'll even head overseas to play if another NFL team gives him that chance. But Jensen, who played tight end at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, could be nearing the realization that his pro career, at the age of 26, may be over. No NFL team contacted Jensen in the months following his release from the Dallas Cowboys on Aug. 23. But that hasn't stopped Jensen from continuing to work on his dream. 'I've been working out and trying to catch on with a team and haven't been very successful,' Jensen said in a phone interview from Iowa. '(NFL Europe) might be an option this year. Or maybe it's time to just hang up the cleats and move on without football.'" The Post-Crescent is published in Appleton, Wis.
http://www.postcrescent.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070204/APC02/702040700/1892

O'Connor Learned Her Craft At The UI (New York Times, Feb. 4)
Editorial writer Lawrence Downes traveled to Milledgeville, Ga., where famed writer Flannery O'Connor lived most of her life: "The sun was white above the trees, and sinking fast. I was a few miles past Milledgeville, Ga., somewhere outside of Toomsboro, on a two-lane highway that rose and plunged and twisted through red clay hills and pine woods. I had no fixed destination, just a plan to follow a back road to some weedy field in time to watch the sun go down on Flannery O'Connor's Georgia." Downes notes that O'Connor "learned her craft at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA."
http://travel.nytimes.com/2007/02/04/travel/04Flannery.html?ex=1171342800&en=d1241df3261ec49a&ei=5040&partner=MOREOVERFEATURES

Grafft Warns About Confined Farm Spaces (Farm and Ranch Guide, Feb. 3)
LaMar Grafft, a safety specialist with Iowa's Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (I-CASH), a joint venture of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University, Iowa Department of Public Health, and the Iowa Department of Agriculture, warns about the dangers of confined spaces on farms. He writes, "A confined space is defined as an area that has limited openings that would make an escape difficult in an emergency. It also contains a hazard of some type, has limited ventilation and is not designed for continuous occupancy. In agriculture, that includes grain bins, silos, manure pits, well pits, tanks and some equipment."
http://www.farmandranchguide.com/articles/2007/02/03/ag_news/production_news/prod20.txt

Appeals Court Revives Lawsuit Against UI (Inside Higher Education, Feb. 3)
A federal appeals court has resuscitated a lawsuit with a Byzantine and bizarre history that accuses Temple University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA of discriminating against a learning-disabled athlete in carrying out the National Collegiate Athletic Association's academic rules. In a decision issued Thursday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled that the NCAA and the universities must defend themselves against charges that they violated Title II of the Americans With Disabilities Act by declaring Michael Bowers ineligible to compete as a freshman under the NCAA's eligibility standards. The court concluded that even though the University of Iowa is entitled to 11th amendment immunity, Congress waived immunity under Title II of the disabilities law, so the university must defend the lawsuit. The lawsuit, which the court's opinion describes as an "ongoing saga," has survived a fight over whether the plaintiff's lawyers inappropriately withheld medical records from the defense and even the death of Bowers himself from an apparent drug overdose in 2002.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/02/02/qt

UI Recruited Sanders Sight Unseen (Richmond Times-Dispatch, Feb. 3)
Bob Sanders always has been too small to be a football player. Coming out of high school in Pennsylvania, he figured on playing in Division III. Then, sight unseen, the University of Iowa called and said a scholarship was available, if he was interested. "One of the assistant coaches at my high school, Joe Moore, knew coach [KIRK] FERENTZ at Iowa," Sanders said. "He told coach Ferentz, 'I've got a kid who's good. People say he's too small, but he'll make your team better.'" Ferentz listened because Moore was a legendary offensive line coach at such places as Notre Dame and the University of Pittsburgh. To have the stamp of approval of Moore, who died in 2003, was to be recognized as a football player of the highest merit. Sanders, 5-8 and 206, went to Iowa, where he still seemed too small. But as a true freshman, he played special teams until, "Some guys got hurt, and they threw me into the lineup against Wisconsin. "I had 17 tackles, two sacks, a forced fumble, and the rest is history." Now Sanders is the primary reason that the Indianapolis Colts made it to the Super Bowl.
http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD%2FMGArticle%2FRTD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1149193000425&path=!sports&s=1045855934844

UI Muscatine Study Yields Heart Risk Discovery (Washington Post, Feb. 2)
Data from a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study that has followed more than 11,000 residents of Muscatine, Iowa, for more than 35 years has identified a gene variant associated with the early signs of heart disease and stroke in women. This story, originating on HealthDay News, has appeared in many media.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/02/AR2007020201200.html

Alarcón Novel Reviewed (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Feb. 2)
Critic Cherie Parker wrote, "Daniel Alarcón muscled onto the literary scene in 2005 with 'War by Candlelight,' a collection of short stories that showed off the young UNIVERSITY OF IOWA grad's keen intellect, classically elegant style and grounding in both North and South American cultures -- all suggesting the unveiling of a major talent. His first full-length novel has been hotly anticipated by fans of literary fiction. That novel, 'Lost City Radio,' is here. While it doesn't quite fulfill what were probably unrealistic expectations, it does contain all the qualities -- big ideas broached from unexpected angles, an apprehension of the human condition and every sentence constructed like a Stradivarius -- that make reading Alarcón feel like witnessing the arrival of a John Steinbeck or Gabriel García Márquez."
http://www.startribune.com/384/story/975063.html

Muller Comments On M.D./Pharmacist Coordination (MD Options, Feb. 2)
Coordination of care by physicians and pharmacists can improve the quality of patient care, according to pharmacists and physicians. Each profession brings specialized training and skills to medicine, and working collaboratively enhances the value of individual experience. Physicians are beginning to realize that pharmacists can provide the expertise needed to improve drug therapy and patient self-care skills. Quality and safety in patient care depend on a conscious collaborative effort among health care providers, says BARBARA MULLER, M.D., a professor of clinical medicine in the DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS in Iowa City. "Using the clinical expertise of all frontline professionals is critical to ensuring quality," she adds. "The role of the pharmacist at the point of care has evolved from a dispensing-based role to that of being an integral member of the health care team."
http://www.mdoptions.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?article_id=1922

UI Study Contributes To Heart Disease Discovery (Contra Costa Times, Feb. 2)
A certain gene variant may make women more susceptible to heart disease, doctors at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute reported Thursday. The findings could help clarify the role inflammation plays in heart attacks and stroke. Researchers used data gathered from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in a multi-decade study of the residents of Muscatine, Iowa.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/local/states/california/16605623.htm

UI Music Professor To Perform In Hometown (Longview News-Journal, Feb. 2)
University of Iowa music professor DANIEL MOORE will reunite with musicians he grew up with as he travels to his hometown, Longview, Texas, to perform for the East Texas Symphonic Band's Grand Winter Celebration on Feb. 13. Moore has a snare drum solo in the concert. The News-Journal is based in South Marshall, Texas.
http://www.newsjournal.com/featr/content/features/stories/02022007Percussion.html

Professor Comments On 'Gangsta' Parties (North Jersey Media Group, Feb. 2)
"Gangsta" theme parties thrown by whites are drawing the ire of college officials and heated complaints from black and white students who say the antics conjure the worst racial stereotypes. Whites often don't realize their actions are offensive because they are imitating behavior celebrated in music and seen on television, said VENISE BERRY, an associate professor of journalism at the University of Iowa who has researched rap music and popular culture. The article was also published in the MIAMI HERALD, WILMINGTON (Del.) STAR and several other publications.
http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyNSZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NzA2OTAxMyZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTI=

Graduation Rates Decline Slightly At UI (WQAD-TV, Feb. 2)
Graduation rates at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University are down slightly, but have reached an all-time high at the University of Northern Iowa. A report to the Board of Regents, State of Iowa shows six-year rates at UNI climbed from 65 percent in 2005 to just over 67 percent in 2006. The graduation rate at Iowa went from 66 percent in 2005 to 65.5 percent in 2006. Graduation rates at all three universities remain far above the national average, which is about 40 percent. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6028437&nav=1sW7

UI Benefits Director Comments On 'Boot Camp' (Denver Business News, Feb. 2)
CareFirst, Inc. in Owings Mills, Md., an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, is offering a "boot camp" for human resource directors, benefits managers, medical and wellness directors and other personnel whose work is related to improving employee health and well being. RICHARD SAUNDERS, director of benefits and payroll at the UI, cautions that employers have a tendency to keep an eye only on soaring health insurance costs, at the expense of an employee's total health and productivity.
http://denver.dbusinessnews.com/shownews.php?type_news=latest&newsid=106158

Appeals Court Revives Lawsuit Against UI (Inside Higher Ed, Feb. 2)
A federal appeals court has resuscitated a lawsuit with a byzantine and bizarre history that accuses Temple University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA of discriminating against a learning-disabled athlete in carrying out the National Collegiate Athletic Association's academic rules. In a decision issued Thursday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled that the NCAA and the universities must defend themselves against charges that they violated Title II of the Americans With Disabilities Act by declaring Michael Bowers ineligible to compete as a freshman under the NCAA's eligibility standards.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/02/02/qt

Regents Examine Retiree Benefits (Chronicle, Feb. 2)
The Iowa Board of Regents has undertaken an investigation of the benefits given to emeritus professors and staff members at the state's public universities. Teresa A. Wahlert, the board's president pro tem, called for universities to review the benefits extended to retired employees and report back to the regents. The issue arose when local newspapers reported on the many perks enjoyed by a retired director of hospitals at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The benefits included an office, a secretary paid with state dollars, and parking privileges.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i22/22a01802.htm

Grant Comments On Escalating Budgets (Chronicle, Feb. 2)
Last week's meeting of the Knight Foundation Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics was organized to tackle recruiting problems and gender inequities in college sports, but another topic -- the high pay of football and men's basketball coaches -- came up repeatedly. In a panel on gender-equity issues, experts blamed escalating coaches' salaries and expensive new facilities for depriving women's teams and men's Olympic sports of resources. "Men's budgets are being dominated by football and basketball, which leaves little money for the other teams," said CHRISTINE GRANT, a longtime women's sports advocate and a former director of women's athletics at the University of Iowa.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i22/22a02801.htm

Taiwan Director Is Workshop Graduate (The Australian, Feb. 1)
A profile of Lin Hwai-min, founder and long-time director of Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan, notes that he earned his master's degree from the Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,21149154-16947,00.html

UI Students Get Laundry Email Alerts (San Jose Mercury News, Feb. 1)
Thanks to software installed along with new high-efficiency washers last fall, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA dormitory residents can receive e-mail alerts when their laundry cycles have finished. The school paid for the $13,000 annual software fee in part by raising the cost of a load of laundry by about 50 cents, a UI official said. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared in the SUN SENTINEL in Florida, BOSTON GLOBE, SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, and several other media websites.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/weird_news/16599932.htm

Abortion Rights Author's Reading Is Cancelled (Fox News, Feb. 1)
An eastern Iowa bookstore canceled a planned reading by an abortion rights author and closed for the night after receiving intimidating e-mails and phone calls. Krista Jacobs, editor of "Abortion Under Attack: Women on the Challenges Facing Choice," said she was scheduled to read excerpts from the book at the Prairie Lights book store in downtown Iowa City at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The reading was to be broadcast on "Live from Prairie Lights," a radio program broadcast on WSUI, a public radio station operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,249329,00.html

UI Doctors Remove Brain Tumor (Boston Herald, Feb. 1)
After seeing his local physician, 8-year-old Reed Eckert of Sioux City underwent an MRI where a mass, more commonly known in the medical community as an anaplastic ependymoma, was located in his brain. The tumor was removed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS, and doctors recommended proton treatment to try to kill off any of the bad cells that may remain in his body.
http://sports.bostonherald.com/otherSports/view.bg?articleid=180383&srvc=home

Berry Comments on 'Gangsta Parties' (Houston Chronicle, Feb. 1)
From Connecticut to Colorado, "gangsta" theme parties thrown by whites are drawing the ire of college officials and heated complaints from black and white students who say the antics conjure the worst racial stereotypes. At the same time, some black academics say they aren't surprised, given the popularity of rap music among inner-city blacks and well-to-do suburban whites alike. The white students, they say, were mimicking the kind of outlaw posturing that blacks themselves engage in rap videos. Whites often don't realize their actions are offensive because they are imitating behavior celebrated in music and seen on television, said VENISE BERRY, an associate professor of journalism at the University of Iowa who has researched rap music and popular culture. "The segment of rap music that is glamorized and popularized by the media is gangsta rap," said Berry, who is black. "It has become an image that is normalized in our society. That to me explains clearly why they don't see it as wrong." The ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared on the Websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, WASHINGTON POST, DETROIT NEWS, BUFFALO (N.Y) NEWS, CNN.COM, NEW YORK NEWSDAY, SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, BOSTON GLOBE, FOX NEWS, and numerous other media.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/nation/4516659.html

Florida Governor Wants Voting Paper Trail (Tampa Tribune, Feb. 1)
Responding to outcry from voters and advocacy groups over the problems associated with touchscreen ballots, Florida Gov. Charlie Crist is expected today to announce a proposal to spend at least $20 million to make auditable paper trails of votes a standard feature of voting machines across the state. So far, the only kind of paper-trail voting technology that Florida has certified for use is the optical scan machine. Some states using different paper-trail technology have reported less-than-perfect experiences. Many machines print on flimsy, fading paper, said DOUG JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa and former chairman of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.tbo.com/news/metro/MGB3GP0QMXE.html

Sallie Mae Loans Scrutinized (Tucson Weekly, Feb. 1)
Sallie Mae, the country's largest financier of student loans, owns many of the largest collection agencies in the United States. It then goes after the student to make even more money. Adding insult to injury, Congress in 2005 made it so that private student loans can't easily be dismissed by declaring bankruptcy. That brought renewed attention to the issue, according to KATIE PORTER, a professor of law at the University of Iowa. She said the only recourse for those who want loans dismissed is proving the "undue-hardship standard" in court. "It's considered to be very, very strict," Porter said. The publication is based in Arizona.
http://www.tucsonweekly.com/gbase/Currents/Content?oid=oid:91984

Dance Director Bases Works On Calligraphy (The Australian, Feb. 1)
Lin Hwai-min, founder and long-time director of Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan, has created three works based on Chinese calligraphy. "Calligraphy is a floating dance," he says. "In Chinese, when we compliment a good piece of calligraphy we say it's like flying dragon or dancing phoenix." He received a master's degree from the influential IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa in 1972.
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,21149154-16947,00.html

Reading Canceled After Threat (WQAD-TV, Feb. 1)
An eastern Iowa bookstore canceled a planned reading by an abortion rights author and closed for the night (Jan. 31) after receiving intimidating e-mails and phone calls. Krista Jacobs, editor of "Abortion Under Attack: Women on the Challenges Facing Choice," says she was scheduled to read excerpts from the book at the Prairie Lights book store in downtown Iowa City at 7 p.m. The reading was to be broadcast on "Live from Prairie Lights," a radio program broadcast on WSUI, a public radio station operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6019987&nav=1sW7OfPV

 

 

 

 

 

The University of Iowa All rights reserved copyright 2006