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UI in the News

August 2007

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Studies: breakfast important to student athletes (Observer Online, Aug. 31)
A story about the new school year says that breakfast is the one meal that should not be skipped by students, particularly if the children are going to have a very hectic, demanding day. This is especially true if they are involved in sports. Studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine showed a connection between eating a nutritious breakfast and improved physical and mental performance. The Observer Online is a family of community newspapers serving Fairfax and Loudoun Counties, Va.
http://www.observernews.com/stories/current/news/083107/recipes.shtml

UI alumna Axelrod is poet laureate (Village Beacon Record, Aug. 30)
A story about David Axelrod, the poet laureate of Suffolk County, N.Y., notes that he is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop. The Beacon Record is published in New York.
http://www.beaconrecord.com/1editorialbody.lasso?-token.folder=2007-08-30&-token.story=66274.112114&-token.subpub=

Redlawsk: ethanol plant stops obligatory for candidates (Fox News, Aug. 30)
Don't expect to hear much talk about farming from the presidential candidates who regularly tour Iowa, one of the nation's premier agriculture states. Instead, prepare for three words: I love ethanol. To a great extent, it's the only agricultural topic that candidates address, often during stops at one of the state's ethanol plants. "It's sort of an obligatory stop to say, 'Hey, I get it. I know the farm economy is important and ethanol is potentially an important part of that economy,'" said DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political science professor. This Associated Press story was published on the Web sites of several news organizations, including The Fresno Bee, the International Herald Tribune and Canadian Business Magazine.
http://www.foxnews.com/wires/2007Aug30/0,4670,Iowa2008Ethanol,00.html

Story highlights International Writing Program (Radio Bulgaria, Aug. 29)
Bulgarian writer Aziz Shakir-Tash has been selected to participate in this year's International Writing Program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Shakir-Tash is one of 17 participants chosen out of 58 extremely competitive nominations to be awarded an all-expenses-paid grant from the U.S. government to participate in the three-month program. The UI's International Writing Program brings together outstanding authors from every continent to work on their own projects, give readings and lectures, travel within the U.S., and interact with American audiences and literary communities. Since 1967, over 1,000 writers from 120 nations have participated in the program, which provides a wonderful setting for cultural exchange. The writers participate in the academic life of a Big Ten university, allowing them to share their literary cultures with others, and make contact with the larger publishing scene.
http://www.bnr.bg/RadioBulgaria/Emission_English/Theme_Culture/Material/BanwriterUS.htm

Bomb threats plague UI (USNews & World Report, Aug. 29)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA yesterday received its third bomb threat in a month, the Daily Iowan reports. Other schools that have recently received threats are the University of Alaska, Middle Tennessee State, Oregon State University, Princeton University, and Carnegie Mellon University. At Iowa, the latest scare has officials on alert. "This is the first time I can recall we've had this many in the 20 years I've been at the university," said one university administrator. "And we've never had this many in a short period of time."
http://www.usnews.com/blogs/paper-trail/2007/8/29/bomb-threats-plague-iowa.html

Andrejevic: reality TV touts casts' opportunity to 'grow' (LA Times, Aug. 29)
CBS's "Kid Nation," a show on which kids haul wagons, cook meals, manage stores and clean outhouses, all in the name of building a society in front of reality TV cameras, is under fire. The welfare of the 40 children who spent 40 days on a New Mexico ranch without contact with their parents has been questioned, and the series is the subject of several official investigations, highlighting some of the inherent problems in reality television, which keeps costs down by avoiding paying writers and actors. To get what they want, reality show producers cite documentary filmmaking as their inspiration and claim their shows are more than just a form of entertainment, said MARK ANDREJEVIC, an associate professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa and author of "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched." "In order to legitimate the free labor that they extract from cast members, every reality show producer claims that this is some kind of experience where people grow and learn about themselves," he said. "The producers rely on the tradition of the documentary to make this seem like it's not exploitation when the only true commitment they have is to turn a profit."
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-et-kidnation29aug29,1,5667439,full.story?amp;ctrack=2&coll=la-headlines-california&cset=true&ctrack=3&cset=true

Redlawsk: firefighters' endorsement may boost Dodd (Bloomberg, Aug. 29)
The International Association of Fire Fighters union, which backed John Kerry for president when he was an "afterthought" in the 2004 race, today endorsed Connecticut Senator Christopher Dodd, who trails his Democratic rivals in the 2008 field. DAVID REDLAWSK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, said the endorsement gives Dodd "attention and has the potential to break him a bit out of the pack."
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=a3DCGNqQlugg&refer=politics

Athlete's grandmother comments on charges (USA Today, Aug. 29)
Maeola Bowman was shocked when her grandson, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA receiver Anthony Bowman, walked into her Detroit home on Monday, Aug. 20. "He told me he made a mistake," she told The Des Moines Register in a telephone interview from her home in Detroit on Wednesday. "Before that, the worst thing he ever did was go to sleep in a class."
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/football/bigten/2007-08-29-iowa-bowman_N.htm

Gronbeck: early flood of political ads unprecedented (RTT News, Aug. 30)
Iowans are being inundated with political ads as the crowded field of presidential hopefuls lay the groundwork for the first-in-the-nation presidential caucuses, hoping for a strong showing to get the momentum necessary to carry their campaigns forward. Ahead of the traditional post-Labor Day launch of the fall campaign season, in the last week six of those vying to be the next president have flooded the Hawkeye State's TV and radio waves. "I have never seen this many ads this early," said BRUCE GRONBECK, a University of Iowa communication studies professor, in an interview with RTTNews. When Iowa held its caucuses in late January and before than in early February, presidential campaigns began advertising in earnest in mid-December and "flooded" the state with ads three weeks before the caucuses, said Gronbeck, director of the university's Center for Media Studies and Political Culture.
http://www.rttnews.com/sp/todaystop.asp?item=35

Gronbeck: YouTube debates are fascinating (USINFO, Aug. 29)
Thanks to the Internet, the tide may be turning for young American voters who feel they have no say in politics. YouTube, the "broadcast yourself" cyberspace phenomenon that allows anyone with a digital camera to post videos on the Internet for free, offered an unprecedented political platform in July: Democratic candidates were grilled by ordinary Americans via video questions. University of Iowa elections expert BRUCE GRONBECK found this "fascinating." "Television maintained its position as the dominant framer," he said. "It threw the YouTube questions up on the screen and took a picture of them with a camera rather than direct feeding into the broadcast. So the dominant medium tried to stay in control and they picked the questions." USINFO is the news service of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of International Information Programs.
http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2007&m=August&x=20070829165830mlenuhret0.6714136

Latenser comments on burn centers (Anchorage Daily News, Aug. 29)
U.S. hospitals are increasingly shutting down their burn centers in a trend experts say could leave the nation unable to handle widespread burn casualties from a fiery terrorist attack or other major disaster. Some states -- Mississippi, North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, New Hampshire and Alaska among them -- have no burn centers at all. "People ought to be pretty frightened by this," said BARBARA LATENSER, burn center director at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "Some people who live out West, they are 800 miles from a burn center." The newspaper is published in Alaska.
http://www.adn.com/life/story/9261127p-9176118c.html

Iowa universities consider arming campus police (Foxnews.com, Aug. 29)
In an editorial about measures to prevent and stop armed attacks on campuses, it's noted that some universities don't allow officers to carry handguns. By Sept. 10, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa will also decide whether to end an almost 30-year ban and allow campus police to again carry handguns.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,294954,00.html

Doctor's death focus of Dateline story (MSNBC, Aug. 28)
A Dateline NBC story focused on the death of Richard Nelson and the circumstances surrounding it. Nelson was the executive dean of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Carver College of Medicine and a nationally regarded pediatrics specialist.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20398043/

Marketer adapts to changing trade (Courier Journal, Aug. 27)
ProMarketing President Michael Waddell has seen the tools of his trade change dramatically since he founded his multimedia firm about 30 years ago. Virtually all productions were done in film then, and traditionalists were aghast when videotape began making inroads. Waddell, a native of Kansas City, Mo., received a communication degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with training in theatrical productions. The newspaper is based in Louisville, Ky.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070827/BUSINESS/708270334

Latenser comments on burn centers (Anchorage Daily News, Aug. 29)
U.S. hospitals are increasingly shutting down their burn centers in a trend experts say could leave the nation unable to handle widespread burn casualties from a fiery terrorist attack or other major disaster. Some states -- Mississippi, North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, New Hampshire and Alaska among them -- have no burn centers at all. "People ought to be pretty frightened by this," said BARBARA LATENSER, burn center director at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "Some people who live out West, they are 800 miles from a burn center." The newspaper is published in Alaska.
http://www.adn.com/life/story/9261127p-9176118c.html

Iowa universities consider arming campus police (Foxnews.com, Aug. 29)
In an editorial about measures to prevent and stop armed attacks on campuses, it's noted that some universities don't allow officers to carry handguns. By Sept. 10, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa will also decide whether to end an almost 30-year ban and allow campus police to again carry handguns.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,294954,00.html

UI medical school to integrate mannequins into more programs (Florida Today, Aug. 28)
Educators and others agree the use of simulation in medical training has boomed during the past several years, coupled with increasing complexity of technology. Simulation includes mannequins and sophisticated computer software, video-game-type programs and "standardized patients," who are actors posing as patients. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has used a number of full-size, high-tech mannequins in various departments, including anesthesia and emergency medicine, along with other medical simulators, according to a university official. Now, a special task force in the College of Medicine is looking at how it can integrate simulation training into more of its programs. Florida Today is published in Brevard County. The same story appeared on the Web site of the ASBURY PARK (NJ) PRESS.
http://www.floridatoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070828/LIFE01/708280312/1023

Marketer adapts to changing trade (Courier Journal, Aug. 27)
ProMarketing President Michael Waddell has seen the tools of his trade change dramatically since he founded his multimedia firm about 30 years ago. Virtually all productions were done in film then, and traditionalists were aghast when videotape began making inroads. Waddell, a native of Kansas City, Mo., received a communication degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with training in theatrical productions. The newspaper is based in Louisville, Ky.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070827/BUSINESS/708270334

UI investigates new round of bomb threats (WQAD-TV, Aug. 27)
For the second time in less than three weeks officials at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are investigating e-mailed bomb threats. Officials say that three people with ties to the university received the anonymous threats Saturday night and early Sunday morning. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6989141&nav=menu132_3

McPherson discusses black literary imagination (NPR, Aug. 27)
JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON
, Pulitzer Prize-winning author and professor in the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, was interviewed on News & Notes, a program on National Public Radio, about the black literary imagination and what it takes to become an author. Also interviewed was Kecia Lynn, a graduate of the Workshop. This is an audio file.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=13975722&ft=1&f=11

Monster study settlement is analyzed (USA Today, Aug. 27)
The legal settlement about the "Monster Study" at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and the issues that remain, are analyzed.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-08-26-stuttering_N.htm

Redlawsk comments on candidate spouses (New York Times, Aug. 26)
DAVID REDLAWSK
, who teaches political science at the University of Iowa, said that polls showed that most people do not vote for a candidate based on that person's spouse, although that might be different this year in the case of Hillary Clinton. But generally, he said, the spouses might as well say what they want. "It might get folks up in arms," he said, "but it also gets media attention."
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/26/weekinreview/26seelye.html?ex=1188878400&en=593d76c46b4ca65a&ei=5040&partner=MOREOVERFEATURES

Book by UI alumnus is reviewed (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 26)
A review of Ehud Havazelet's "Bearing the Body" notes that the author is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/books/la-bk-reynolds26aug26,1,7597966.story?coll=la-headlines-bookreview

Hussein attended International Writing Program (Sunday Times, Aug. 26)
A feature about Sri Lankan writer Ameena Hussein, long-listed for the Man Award, notes that she attended the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM at the University of Iowa in 2005. The Sunday Times is published in Sri Lanka.
http://www.sundaytimes.lk/070826/Plus/pls17.html

Campbell's research celebrated (Denver Post, Aug. 25)
A party for contributors to the Samantha Loewi Fund celebrated research by Colorado Nobel laureate Tom Cech and Dr. KEVIN CAMPBELL, director of the University of Iowa's Sen. Paul D. Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy Cooperative Research Center, who discovered a missing protein that was the cause -- and possibly the cure -- for the congenital muscular dystrophy that was diagnosed when Samantha Loewi was an infant.
http://www.denverpost.com/lifestyles/ci_6703576

Covington comments on Giuliani weaknesses (Las Vegas Sun, Aug. 25)
A series of exposes has revealed weaknesses in the Giuliani candidacy and have begun to seep down into the public's consciousness. And if they haven't yet, they will, said CARY COVINGTON, a University of Iowa political scientist who studies the nomination process. He noted that even if Republican voters don't trust the mainstream media, which are delivering this barrage right now, they will trust the mail and TV advertisements of Giuliani's Republican opponents.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/lv-other/2007/aug/25/566686354.html

UI alumnus is golfing legend (Tucson Citizen, Aug. 25)
Dr. Ed Updegraff, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumnus and a native of Boone, Iowa, was once one of the best amateur golfers in the country. Now the retired Arizona urologist may be the best 85-year-old golfer on the planet.
http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/daily/pro/61112.php

Olshansky discussed 'nocebo effect' (The Times, Aug. 25)
The "nocebo effect" is the opposite of the placebo effect. Dr. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, who reported earlier this year on nocebo in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, says that patients who are anxious or depressed are more prone to suffer. So, too, are patients who are specifically asked if they are suffering adverse effects, which can send nocebo spiraling as high as 71 percent. This power of suggestion means that nocebo can often be triggered by poor bedside manners, says Olshansky, of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "A cold, uncaring, disinterested and emotionless doctor will encourage a nocebo response," he says. "In contrast, a caring, empathetic physician fosters trust, strengthens beneficent patient expectations and elicits a strong placebo response. A compassionate, hands-on approach may be more valuable than any single medical therapy." The Times is published in London, UK.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/article2321071.ece

UI alumnus named poet laureate (Times of Smithtown, Aug. 24)
David Axelrod, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, has been named the poet laureate of Suffolk County. The Times of Smithtown is published in New York.
http://www.timesofsmithtown.com/1editorialbody.lasso?-token.folder=2007-08-23&-token.story=66219.112114&-token.subpub=

Redlawsk: Obama's message reaches across party lines (Salon, Aug. 24)
In late July and early August, Iowa Republican voters were asked to name their choice for president in a University of Iowa poll. Mitt Romney, who leads most Iowa surveys, got 22 percent of the total. Rudy Giuliani came in second with 10 percent. But third place went to a Democrat, Barack Obama, who got nearly 7 percent -- more than Mike Huckabee, John McCain and Sam Brownback combined. Not to worry: The Obama campaign isn't likely to join the Grand Old Party, and pollsters are convinced that Obama has exactly zero chance of winning the Republican caucus in Iowa. But something is going on. "I don't want to make too much of it," says DAVID REDLAWSK, the professor who commissioned the poll. "But I do think that the message Obama is putting out right now is the most likely to reach across party lines."
http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2007/08/24/obama_gop/index_np.html

UI will help train Olympics News Service staff (Xinhua News Agency, Aug. 24)
The University of Missouri-Columbia is one of 13 international universities that will recruit and train Olympic News Service volunteers for the Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Tsinghua University signed cooperation files with organizing committee in May. Xinhua News Agency is the state and worldwide news agency in China. This story was also published in PEOPLE'S DAILY ONLINE, an English language newspaper based in Beijing, China.
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2007-08/24/content_6597734.htm

Lie documents widespread stock option backdating (Law.com Aug. 24)
A year after John C. Burris was hired as senior vice president of Citrix Systems, the company's compensation committee granted him options for 42,000 shares of company stock valued at $15.69 a share, according to court documents. The stock option grant was dated July 24, 2000. Just 15 days later, the Fort Lauderdale, Fla., software company's stock traded on Nasdaq at $18.25 a share, giving Burris a $107,520 windfall on paper. But lawsuits brought on behalf of Citrix shareholders say that's not a coincidence. They contend Burris and other executives received falsely backdated stock options to reap large profits that cheated shareholders. Stock options backdating is not new, having occurred as early as 1997. Although eventually regulated, there was no real crackdown until the past year, after University of Iowa professor ERIK LIE documented how widespread backdating had become. He noticed that stock prices shot up immediately after corporate boards made option awards. The Wall Street Journal reports followed up on Lie's work.
http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1187859734781

Christensen comments on decision-making research (Reuters, Aug. 23)
Not all patients want an active role in their health care and medical decision making, according to a study reported in the August issue of the Annals of Behavioral Medicine. In some cases, therefore, a patient-centered approach to healthcare can be counterproductive. "There's really a sizable subset of patients with whom the patient-centered approach is going to backfire," says DR. ALAN CHRISTENSEN of the University of Iowa. "There are patients who strongly believe it's the physician's job to make decisions."
http://www.cancerpage.com/news/article.asp?id=11238

Columnist participated in UI neuroeconomics experiment (CNN, Aug. 23)
Columnist Jason Zweig, writing about the emerging field of neuroeconomics, says he participated in an experiment at the University of Iowa designed by ANTOINE BECHARA and ANTONIO DAMASIO.
http://money.cnn.com/2007/08/14/pf/zweig.moneymag/?postversion=2007082313

Hancher will host world premiere (Playbill Arts, Aug. 23)
In October, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA hosts clarinetist David Krakauer and the Orion String Quartet in the world premiere of "Magyar Madness" by David Del Tredici.
http://www.playbillarts.com/news/article/6966.html

UI Press book cited in fall review (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 23)
A list of recommended reading for fall includes Berkeley writer Don Waters' story collection, Desert Gothic (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press).
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/08/23/RVK7RIBCU.DTL&feed=rss.books

UI study strengthens organic lawn movement (The News & Observer, Aug. 23)
An increasing interest in organic law care comes as studies increasingly link pesticide exposure to a variety of illnesses. A Harvard School of Public Health study last year found that people exposed to pesticides had a 70 percent higher incidence of Parkinson's disease. And a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study in the mid-1990s found that golf course superintendents across the country died of cancer far more often than the general population. The News & Observer is based in Raleigh, N.C.
http://www.newsobserver.com/business/story/679743.html

Research links cleft palates, cognitive deficits (Reuters, Aug. 23)
Children with isolated clefts of the lip and/or palate (ICLP) appear to have abnormal brain structure, Iowa City-based researchers report in the August issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. Dr. PEG NOPOULOS of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and colleagues note that ICLP patients may have cognitive deficits, and reading disabilities may be as much as 10 times more prevalent than in normal children.
http://www.medicexchange.com/mall/departmentpage.cfm/MedicExchangeUSA/_96103/2376/departments-contentview

Berg: IEM more accurate than polls (Campaigns & Elections, Aug. 22)
With the presidential race intensifying, so is trading activity on the Iowa Electronic Markets, and the program team at the University of Iowa is gearing up to open markets for more 2008 races. Since 1988, the IEM have allowed traders from around the world to invest between $5 and $500 to "bet" on the future performance of political candidates, parties and more. The site has been even more accurate than polls in predicting the outcomes of races, according to IEM board member JOYCE BERG, a professor of accounting at the UI.
http://campaignsandelections.com/IA/articles/?ID=545

Porter: Macy's move 'aggressively pushing' credit (New York Post, Aug. 22)
Holders of Macy's credit cards that have been inactive for two years can expect a surprise in the mail: a Citibank MasterCard that will replace their store card. The switch affects about 3.5 million Macy's cardholders, and has raised questions among consumer advocates who worry that the practice, known as flipping, does not provide consumers with enough control over their credit. The inactive cardholders were sent a letter explaining the changes and requiring them to "opt out" if they did not want the Citibank card. Those who did not read the fine print or simply tossed the letter, assuming it was junk mail, got the card automatically. "Credit cards can be a source of financial distress and this is one more example of the industry aggressively pushing credit on people who may not want it," said KATIE PORTER, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law.
http://www.nypost.com/seven/08222007/business/macys_card_sharks.htm

Polls show McCain's support dwindling (The Business Journal, Aug. 22)
A new poll shows support for Arizona Sen. John McCain's presidential bid dropping in the key early battleground state of Iowa. A new Zogby International poll shows McCain with 6 percent support among likely Republican voters in Iowa. McCain had support in the high teens in previous Zogby Iowa polls. The Arizona Republican trails former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who is shown with 33 percent support, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani at 14 percent, actor Fred Thompson at 12 percent and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee with 8 percent support in the new Zogby poll. McCain's showing in recent surveys by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and ABC News/Washington Post also is in single-digits. The Business Journal is based in Phoenix.
http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/2007/08/20/daily33.html

Fine arts dean with UI ties to step down (Lawrence Journal-World, Aug. 22)
Steve Hedden is stepping down as dean of Kansas University's School of Fine Arts in order to pursue a dream he had as a KU undergraduate. "I've had a great privilege to serve here as dean of my alma mater and give back to a school that has given so much to me," he said. "As an undergraduate, I'd always dreamed of being a college professor." Now he'll be able to do that as a member of the school's music department. Hedden will step down at the end of the 2007-08 academic year. The story notes that Hedden served in teaching and administrative roles at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Arizona.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2007/aug/22/dean_fine_arts_step_down/?city_local

Study: golf course superintendents risk cancer deaths (Daily Green, Aug. 22)
The American obsession with perfect, green carpet lawns has taken a heavy toll on the environment and may be contributing to high cancer rates. These days, a movement is growing to manage yards in a less chemical-intensive way, with organic techniques, as the News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) reports. Fueling the interest is concern about studies that increasingly link pesticide exposure to a variety of illnesses. A Harvard School of Public Health study last year found that people exposed to pesticides had a 70 percent higher incidence of Parkinson's disease. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study in the mid-1990s found that golf course superintendents died of cancer far more often than average. THE DAILY GREEN, published by the Digital Media unit of Hearst Magazines, is a Web site geared toward "green" consumers.
http://www.thedailygreen.com/2007/08/23/fueled-by-cancer-fears-organic-lawn-care-grows/5729/

Lie Stock Option Research Noted (Business Week, Aug. 22)
When ERIK LIE began studying the influence of stock options on company behavior, he wasn't searching for a scandal. Lie, a 38-year-old finance professor at the University of Iowa, was just checking out a hunch. "It was a side project," he recalls. "I wasn't sure I'd find anything significant. And he didn't, at first. But as Lie kept crunching numbers, he stumbled across some explosive data: Hundreds of companies appeared to be manipulating stock-option accounting rules for profit. A later study done with his research partner, Indiana University associate professor Randall Heron, puts the number at 2,000, or 29 percent of all public corporations. Lie and Heron are cited in the article about "star" professors at business schools. http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/content/aug2007/bs20070821_430502.htm?chan=top+news_top+news+index_b-schools

Bell Created Tiniest Babies Registry (Courier News, Aug. 22)
Morgan Ratcliff weighed 13 ounces when she was born June 1 at 25 weeks' gestation in Houston. (Full-term for a single baby is 37 to 42 completed weeks. Visit http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/tiniestbabies/index.htm for an international list of 85 babies who all weighed less than 14 ounces at birth.) She's not the tiniest baby ever, not by a long shot. The chance of surviving without a major handicap depends on gestation length, not birth weight. The outlook for babies like Morgan, born at 25 weeks, is far better: 75 percent survive, only 10 percent of them with a major handicap. "These kids do tend to be smaller than their peers, especially skinny, but most of them are functioning in regular classrooms, and the families are glad to have them," said University of Iowa pediatrician EDWARD BELL, who created the "tiniest babies" registry after the parents of his smallest patient asked whether he knew of any others that size. The newspaper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.c-n.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070819/FEATURES02/708190383/1023

Squire Comments On Iowa Caucuses (Guardian Unlimited, Aug. 22)South Carolina's Republican party has announced its intention to move its primary forward to Jan. 19. That would change the date of New Hampshire's primary since the state is bound by law to hold its primary a week before any other. Since Iowa is compelled to hold its caucuses at least eight days before any other voting, it too will have to move forward. An election season that is usually competitive until March could effectively be over by mid-January. Candidates now have less time to gain momentum. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a visiting professor of political science at the University of Iowa, says: "It has increased the importance of Iowa rather than diminished it; a number of the candidates see Iowa as their best chance." The newspaper is published in the United Kingdom.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uselections08/story/0,,2153672,00.html

Clinton's Campaign Focus Working In Iowa (Newsday, Aug. 22)Organizational muscle and campaign elbow grease appear to be paying off for Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton in early-caucus Iowa, where the former first lady has pulled ahead among Democratic presidential hopefuls, according to the latest polling there. Clinton is the choice of 30 percent of Iowa Democrats, according to a survey of 503 likely caucus goers questioned Aug. 17-19 by pollster Zogby International. DAVID REDLAWSK, director of polling at the University of Iowa, attributed her surge to focused campaigning during which she has spent 11 days in Iowa since July 1, and has opened a total of 19 offices in the state. "Clinton has built an organization in the state and has been fairly aggressive in her campaigning here," Redlawsk said. "[John] Edwards has led most of the year in Iowa. Now, it has tightened into a three-way race." The newspaper is based in New York.
http://www.newsday.com/news/printedition/nation/ny-uspoll225341033aug22,0,374956.story

UI Football Players Suspended (ESPN.com, Aug. 20)
A year after the lack of a respectable passing game saw the Iowa Hawkeyes drop out of Big Ten title contention, the school announced that sophomore wide receivers Dominique Douglas and Anthony Bowman have been suspended indefinitely by the team following an arrest on Sunday. The two wideouts were arrested and charged with unauthorized use of a credit card, but were later released by authorities on their own recognizance. Douglas, who led the team in receptions (49) and receiving yards (654), was charged with making more than $2,000 in purchases to credit cards belonging to two other people, Johnson County District Court record said. In a statement issued Monday, Iowa head coach KIRK FERENTZ announced the two would not participate in any team activities. http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id=2983050&campaign=rss&source=NCFHeadlines

Schoenbaum Writes About Violinist Joachim (Jerusalem Report, Aug. 20)
DAVID SCHOENBAUM, professor of history at the University of Iowa, wrote an article about violinist Joseph Joachim, recalling the 100th anniversary of his death in Berlin, at 76, on Aug. 15, 1907. "Looking back across the Grand Canyon of secular calamity and global change separating 1907 from 2007, it would be easy to call him the most famous Jewish violinist most people have never heard of. But that would be a little too easy. Consciously or not, all of us have heard Joachim's transcriptions of Brahms' 'Hungarian Dances,'" Schoenbaum wrote.
http://www.lexisnexis.com:80/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?risb=21_T1935598429&format=GNBFI&sort=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T1935598432&cisb=22_T1935598431&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&selRCNodeID=6&nodeStateId=411en_US,1,10,36&docsInCategory=1&csi=222751&docNo=1

UI Poll Shows Clinton Trails Among Men (Boston Herald, Aug. 21)
Former Hollywood madam-turned-laundromat-owner Heidi Fleiss and former vampire novelist-turned-reconcerted Christian Anne Rice have added their voices to porn superstar Jenna Jameson's in support of Hillary Clinton. But Clinton has it tough with male voters. And her toughest potential matchup is with Rudy Giuliani. Among men, Clinton got only 18 percent support in a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll in July, while she had 30 percent support among women. By comparison, Barack Obama showed no difference in gender support in the same poll of likely Iowa caucus voters. And 32 percent of the women in the Iowa poll think Clinton is electable, while only 14 percent of the men do.
http://news.bostonherald.com/politics/view.bg?articleid=1018176

Big Ten Network Story Notes UI Emails (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 21)
A story about the controversy surrounding the Big Ten Network notes that the battle over the new network started to heat up around the beginning of summer. That's when a major cable company questioned whether there was the need for a 24-hour channel devoted to a single athletic conference. Not just football and basketball games, but also softball, soccer and diving. And studio shows to dissect it all. That's when conference Commissioner Jim Delany accused a cable executive of denigrating women's sports and asked for an apology. Then fans started expressing their anger and worry on Internet message boards. Soon, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA got into the act, sending a mass e-mail that encouraged Hawkeye alumni to complain to their cable systems.
http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-bigten21aug21,1,1917766.story?coll=la-headlines-sports&track=crosspromo

UI Makes Princeton Review Top Party School List (KUTV-TV, Aug. 20)
A story about the Princeton Review's annual Top Party Schools ranking shows the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has slipped to number 12. KUTV is based in Salt Lake City. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, WDIV-TV (Detroit), CBS News, SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, HAMPTON ROADS (Virg.) DAILY PRESS, DENTON (Texas) RECORD, WQAD-TV (Moline) and numerous other news organizations.
http://kutv.com/topstories/local_story_232171251.html

McMurray: Children Learn Best When Talked To (Everett Herald, Aug. 20)
An editorial about a recent study by the University of Washington that questions whether Baby Einstein videos help toddlers learn more cites a University of Iowa professor who recently released an unastonishing assessment of how babies learn to talk: They start jabbering after they've mastered enough easy words to tackle more of the harder ones. Then a snowball effect happens, and the babies are talking like crazy. The key to reaching this "word spurt," says Professor BOB McMURRAY, is talking and reading to a child a lot. No videos required. The Herald is published in Washington.
http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20070820/OPINION01/708200340

Cost Leads To UI Students Switching Birth Control (Arlington Heights Daily Herald, Aug. 20)
A story about the rising costs of birth control on college campuses notes that, to save money, about three-fourths of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students on Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo -- a pill that has no generic form -- have switched to a less-expensive option. The Herald is published in Illinois.
http://www.dailyherald.com/health/story.asp?id=341732

Hensley Cites Entrepreneurial Program (Entrepreneur Magazine, September 2007)
An article on interdisciplinary entrepreneurial programs begins, "Business students aren't the only ones learning about entrepreneurship these days. More colleges are encouraging students of every major -- from science and technology to humanities and the arts -- to pursue their entrepreneurial dreams. Programs like the one at the University of Iowa's John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center give non-business majors a chance to sharpen their entrepreneurial skills. 'At last count, we had about 48 different majors from across our campus in the entrepreneurship program,' says DAVID HENSLEY, the center's executive director. 'In our classes, we'll have a biomedical engineering student next to a finance major next to a dance major, which makes it a pretty unique educational experience for all students.'"
http://www.entrepreneur.com/magazine/entrepreneur/2007/september/182974.html

Settlement Reached In Stuttering Case (Chronicle, Aug. 20)
Almost 70 years after orphans were unwittingly pressured to stutter as part of a speech experiment at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the State of Iowa has agreed to pay them $925,000 to settle a lawsuit.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2007/08/2007082008n.htm?=attn

Settlement Is Reached In Stuttering Case (Fox News, Aug. 20)
Iowa has agreed to pay $925,000 to subjects of a 1930s stuttering experiment -- orphans in whom UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers attempted to induce speech impediments. This story is appearing widely.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,293774,00.html

UI 'Inherited Judgment' Addressed (Outside The Beltway, Aug. 20)
Columnist Alex Knapp uses the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA stuttering judgment to address the question of "inherited judgments": "Money judgments in civil lawsuits primarily serve two purposes. The first and primary is to compensate the victims for the damages done to them. The secondary purpose is to deter future unlawful behavior. Both of these purposes are served by awarding judgments to the estates of deceased plaintiffs." Outside the Beltway originates in Virginia.
http://www.outsidethebeltway.com/archives/2007/08/whats_wrong_with_inherited_judgments/

UI Aging Statistics Cited (NewsMax, Aug. 20)
An article on retirement pitfalls notes, "UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Health Care Web site reports that individuals over the age are 80 are the fastest growing group of Americans, and that by the year 2040, the United States will have an estimated 1 million people over the age of 100." NewsMax originates in Florida.
http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2007/8/20/82622.shtml?s=us

Poll Addresses Clinton Appeal To Males (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Aug. 20)
Can Hillary Clinton attract male voters? A July poll of likely Democratic caucus-goers by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that Clinton had 30 percent support among women and 18 percent among men. By comparison, there was no difference in gender support for Illinois Sen. Barack Obama, who got 21 percent from both men and women. This AP story is running widely.
http://www.startribune.com/587/story/1372074.html

Brooks Founded '10,000 Hour Show' At UI (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 20)
A "Power of One" story about people who make a positive impact includes Michael Brooks, who founded the "10,000 Hours Show" at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to encourage students to volunteer for community service. Brooks and his nonprofit group have gone on to encourage this event on several other college campuses.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/magazine/chi-070819better-story,0,969608,full.story

UI Press Published Guantanamo Poems (Slate, Aug. 20)
Prisons have always been surprisingly fruitful places for the production of poetry. But the detention center at Guantanamo Bay would have seemed an exception, since its purpose was the isolation and sequestration of high-level "enemy combatants." Yet, even here, inmates found a way to write. The results of this labor are now available in a slim volume, Poems From Guantanamo: The Detainees Speak (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA).
http://www.slate.com/id/2172345/

Arens Comments On Va. Tech 'Brand' (Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 20)
After the killings on the Virginia Tech campus, the university allowed its "brand" to slip into the public domain. "At times like that, it's not about money," said DALE R. ARENS, trademark licensing director at the University of Iowa.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2007/08/2007082002n.htm

UI Alumnus Teaches Self-Sufficiency For The Blind (WBAL, Aug. 20)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
chemistry and mathematics alumnus Dale Wohlers is teaching self-sufficiency as part of Youth Slam 2007, a science camp sponsored in August by the Baltimore-based National Federation of the Blind. WBAL is a TV station in Maryland.
http://www.wbaltv.com/news/13925863/detail.html

UI In First Intercollegiate Basketball Game (Providence Journal, Aug. 20)
An historical feature about basketball inventor Dr. James Naismith notes, "The first intercollegiate game of basketball was held in 1896, when the University of Chicago played the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA."
http://www.projo.com/opinion/contributors/content/CT_aronson20_08-20-07_AC6OLQE.19d3c44.html

Covington Comments On Clinton Juggernaut (Inquirer, Aug. 19)
Powered by polished debate showings, gaping opinion poll leads, and a pitch-perfect political machine, Hillary Clinton seems to be barnstorming towards the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination. "If she continues to campaign without making a major mistake, it's hard to see how anybody beats her," said CARY COVINGTON, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "It is a lot like a chess match, and she has the superior board position." The Inquirer is published in the Philippines.
http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/breakingnews/world/view_article.php?article_id=83451

New Grisham Hero Is UI Quarterback (Chronicle Herald, Aug. 19)
The protagonist of the new John Grisham novel, "Playing for Pizza," is a quarterback at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Chronicle Herald is published in Canada.
http://thechronicleherald.ca/Books/854242.html

UI Alumnus Keeps Army Athletes Fit (Times Herald-Record, Aug. 19)
Tim Kelly, the athletic trainer responsible for the fitness of 1000 athletes at the U.S. Military Academy, began his training studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Times Herald-Record is published in New York State.
http://www.recordonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070819/SPORTS/708190360

UI Is Benchmark For Literary Excellence (Las Vegas Sun, Aug. 19)
An article on the rise of the University of Nevada-Las Vegas English department noted, "For UNLV to be mentioned in an article titled 'Best of the Best' in company with esteemed literary institutions such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA... and Brown University and USC, is pretty tall cotton for a school that once was known only for its hoop dreams and as a place where valet parkers and cocktail waitresses could pick up a few college credits when their graveyard shifts ended."
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/commentary/2007/aug/19/566649071.html

McNulty Is Subject Of Feature (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Aug. 19)
University of Iowa emeritus geography professor MICHAEL L. MCNULTY and his wife, Dr. Darlene M. McNulty, were the subjects of a feature when they returned to Pennsylvania for multiple reunions.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/cityregion/s_522763.html

Redlawsk Comments On Edwards' Tone (New York Times, Aug. 19)
Faced with a must-win situation in Iowa, Democratic presidential hopeful John Edwards is taking on a harsher tone. "There's a fine line between passion and anger," said DAVID P. REDLAWSK, an associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa and director of the university's political poll.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/19/us/politics/19edwards.html

Covington Analyzes Thompson's Prospects (Time, Aug. 18)
Former Sen. Fred Thompson's late entry into an already crowded field of eight GOP presidential candidates may present a logistical challenge, said CARY COVINGTON, an associate professor of American politics at the University of Iowa. "He's looking at trouble because Iowa's a caucus state," Covington said. "Caucuses are won by grassroots organizing among county party officials. The other Republican candidates have long been busily getting these party officials to choose up sides and I don't know how many are left as free agents."
http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,1654125,00.html

Guantanamo Poems Reviewed (International Herald Tribune, Aug. 17)
Dan Chiasson reviews the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS volume of poems by Guantanamo detainees: "It is hard to imagine a reader so hardhearted as to bring aesthetic judgment to bear on a book written by men in prison without legal recourse, several of them held in solitary confinement, some of them likely subjected to practices that many disinterested parties have called torture. You don't read this book for pleasure; you read it for evidence. And if you are an American citizen you read it for evidence of the violence your government is doing to total strangers in a distant place, some of whom (perhaps all of whom, since without due process how are we to tell?) are as innocent of crimes against our nation as you are."
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/08/17/arts/idbriefs18B.php

Smith Assesses 'HIV Denialists' (MediLexicon, Aug. 17)
The Internet is serving as a fertile medium for "HIV denialists" to spread false ideas about HIV/AIDS, which could have terrible public health consequences. "It may seem remarkable that, 23 years after the identification of HIV, there is still denial that the virus is the cause of AIDS," says TARA SMITH of University of Iowa College of Public Health and her collaborators on a new paper, in PLoS Medicine. MediLexicon originates in Mexico.
http://www.medilexicon.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=79853

Redlawsk Comments On Edwards' Tough Talk In Campaign (Bloomberg, Aug. 17)
As the Democrats' 2004 vice presidential nominee, John Edwards ran as an ever-smiling optimist. These days, as he tries to catch up to better-funded rivals in Iowa's crucial caucuses, Edwards sounds more like the scourge of corporate America. In campaign speeches and conversations with voters, the presidential candidate calls some companies "robber barons." Behind the tough talk is an effort by the former North Carolina senator, 54, to carve out a sharper identity as he battles Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama in Iowa's caucuses, traditionally the first in the nation. "This is an active effort on the campaign to define Edwards more clearly for caucus-goers," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Bloomberg is a global multimedia financial news service that provides news, data and analysis.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=axt0_zeYamvU&refer=worldwide

Andrejevic Weighs In On Child Exploitation Debate (LA Times, Aug. 17)
Just when Americans thought they had seen it all when it comes to reality television, CBS, the oldest-skewing network, has come up with a humdinger: "Kid Nation." For 40 days in April and May, CBS sent 40 children, ages 8 to 15, to a former ghost town in New Mexico to build a society from scratch. "To say that these kids aren't working is absurd," said MARK ANDREJEVIC, associate professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa and author of "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched."
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/tv/la-et-kidnation17aug17,0,3651934.story?coll=la-home-entertainment

UI Dentistry Study Cited In Debate Over Sports Drink (The Age, Aug. 17)
School students are being encouraged by a Federal Government body to consume energy-dense flavored drinks, which have been criticized by health experts. A sponsorship deal between the Australian Sports Commission and PepsiCo requires the Australian Institute of Sport to promote the sports drink Gatorade through its education programs, despite warnings by nutritionists and dentists that the beverage rots children's teeth and is contributing to the childhood obesity problem. A study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S College of Dentistry published last year found that Gatorade caused greater tooth enamel erosion than Coca-Cola. The Age is an Australian based newspaper owned by Fairfax, a newspaper and magazine subscription service.
http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/ais-row-over-sports-drink/2007/08/16/1186857682293.html?s_cid=rss_national

Redlawsk: Campaign Pace Takes Toll (Albuquerque Tribune, Aug. 16)
In a single moment, Gov. Bill Richardson has become the Sominex candidate. Richardson, tired and apparently worn down by a long stretch of campaign travel, caused a stir last week when asked during a debate whether it was a person's choice to be gay. "Yes," Richardson said. "No," he said the next day. Then, when clarifying what he really meant to say, Richardson said a long flight was to blame. Although no one is calling for Richardson to leave the Democratic presidential race after the gaffe, the moment might be an example of how the cruel pace of campaigning can catch up with the candidates, said DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa associate professor of political science.
http://www.abqtrib.com/news/2007/aug/16/groggy-guv/

Covington Discusses Edwards' Iowa Strategies (RealClearPolitics, Aug. 16)
John Edwards, suffering in the polls and increasingly seen as a second-tier candidate, is reshuffling his campaign's strategy more dramatically than virtually any Democrat so far this year. The former North Carolina senator is faced with a crucial question: How many eggs can he fit in his Iowa basket? After the 2004 race, Edwards practically made Iowa his second home. Since Edwards lost his bid to become vice president, he has made at least 30 trips to the state, far more than any other candidate. "He's building on his strength, which is in Iowa, because he poured so much effort into it last time around," said University of Iowa Professor CARY COVINGTON. RealClearPolitics is an independent political web site based in Chicago.
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2007/08/john_edwards_long_slow_slide.html

Bern-Klug Discusses 'Ambiguous Dying Syndrome' (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 16)
In the days after the Aug. 1 Minneapolis bridge collapse, families of the missing stood by the Mississippi River, waiting for word. Some 1,300 miles away, in Virginia Beach, Va., a widower named Matt Buckley found himself empathizing with their sadness and sense of uncertainty. "I know that feeling of limbo," he says. "I can picture myself staring into that murky water, wondering and hoping. That's how I felt when I'd sit with my wife, wondering what was in her head: Are you there? Are you with us?" In 2004, Buckley's 44-year-old wife, Mary, had routine foot surgery and, because of an anesthesia mishap, suffered massive brain damage. She spent 30 months in a coma before dying last year. "We're prolonging life, but we're also prolonging dying," says MERCEDES BERN-KLUG, an end-of-life researcher at the University of Iowa, who studies what she terms "ambiguous dying syndrome." http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118722600588099157.html?mod=hps_europe_at_glance_columnists

Top Chef Finalist Was UI Diver (Arlington Heights Daily Herald, Aug. 16)
A story about Dale Levitzki, one of eight finalists on the Bravo TV program "Top Chef," notes that he was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he competed on the varsity diving team. The Herald is published in Illinois.
http://www.dailyherald.com/food/story.asp?id=340402&rec=levistsky15[w]

E-mail Can't Keep Up During Bomb Threat (The Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 15)
After receiving an anonymous threat that four pipe bombs had been left on the campus Monday, officials at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA rushed to warn students, faculty, and employees. Unfortunately, the e-mail system didn't rush along with them. Mass e-mail messages about the threat, which were sent to about 45,000 people affiliated with the institution, took between 90 minutes and two hours to arrive.
http://chronicle.com/wiredcampus/index.php?id=2305

Biden Discusses War With Protestors At UI (New York Sun, Aug. 15)
A story about Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden's vote in favor of providing additional funding for U.S. troops in Iraq notes that he was able to convince anti-war protestors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that his vote was a good thing.
http://www.nysun.com/article/60612

Spelman Professor Has UI Connection (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Aug. 15)
A story about Andrew Williams, a professor at Spelman College, mentions his UI connection: It was hope -- and a sense of purpose -- that brought Williams to Spelman in the first place to become an associate professor of computer and information sciences. And Williams, 42, hadn't been disappointed with that decision. Three years ago, he was a faculty member at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who loved teaching but who longed to help African-Americans reach their full potential. "Why not give the best years of my life to fulfilling my purpose?" he asked himself, then began applying to historically black colleges and universities. He settled on Spelman and Atlanta as a place to raise his three children.
http://www.ajc.com/living/content/printedition/2007/08/15/real.html

Markets Predict Hurricane Paths, Damage (Saint Petersburg Times, Aug. 15)
Let the betting begin. When tropical storms like Dean start churning in the Atlantic, a small cadre of hurricane speculators springs into action. They're out to make money by predicting the path, the strength or the damage from the season's big storms. However, researchers at the University of Miami and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA hope some of the speculators will do something else: help us understand how people decide where a hurricane is headed. The goal isn't to replace the National Hurricane Center but to gather information that might be useful in improving hurricane warning systems. The two universities teamed up to launch the Hurricane Futures Market in 2005 and are now in their third hurricane season. While their market is still just an experimental tool, other markets have been shown to be useful in forecasting everything from oil supplies to presidential elections. Some companies even use prediction markets in decision making.
http://www.sptimes.com/2007/08/15/Business/Hurricane_hunches_and.shtml

Patient-Centered Care Isn't For Everyone (UPI, Aug. 14)

Some patients prefer the traditional "paternalistic" style doctor and not the more in vogue "patient-centered" healthcare approach, a U.S. study suggests. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study suggests that some patients are significantly less likely to follow doctors' orders and feel satisfied with their care when physicians take the patient-centered approach. The patient-centered approach involves educating patients about their conditions, encouraging questions and collaboration, discussing how the condition affects the patient emotionally and involving patients in treatment decisions. But some patients, especially older patients, prefer a doctor with a more traditional "doctor-centered" style -- someone who spends less time explaining a condition and seeks little patient input.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Health/2007/08/14/some_dont_prefer_patientcentered_care/6023/

'Word Spurt' Explained (National Catholic Register, Aug. 14)

Most toddlers speak gibberish, uttering an easy new word here and there, before exploding into little chatterboxes seemingly overnight. Now researchers think they know why. It's the "word spurt" effect, according to an intriguing new study conducted at the University of Iowa and published in the journal Science. Lead researcher BOB MCMURRAY, a psychology professor, says the sudden vocabulary growth owes to the child's need to decipher many words at once -- some of them far more difficult than others. He says that, as long as toddlers are exposed to more difficult words than easy ones, the word spurt is "guaranteed."
http://ncregister.com/site/article/3432/

Cochran: Men Reluctant To Admit Depression (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 14)
While many women don't hesitate to confide their troubles to a hairdresser, friend or even complete stranger, men shoulder the reputation of being more reluctant to share their blues. Their depression may be manifested in obvious ways, such as being suicidal, but they also hide their pain, letting it escape through irritability, anger or lethargy. This reluctance to seek help has been borne out for years in health surveys showing that men prefer to tough it out, whether medically or emotionally, even to their detriment. But that seems to be changing as more men seek help for depression. "There's been a recent focus on mood disorders in men in the popular media in the last five years," said SAM COCHRAN, a clinical professor of counseling psychology at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Cochran credits a new candor in men's magazines and by public figures such as journalist Mike Wallace and baseball player Mark McGwire, who have come forward to say they got help for depression. There also has been an increasing awareness by health professionals that depression in men has gone unrecognized for a long time, Cochran said, adding, "Men don't come in and say in so many words, 'I am depressed.'"
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/chi-0814_health_depress_raug14,1,6990904.story

Hagle: Huckabee Helped By Straw Poll Turnout (Arkansas News Bureau, Aug. 14)
GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee's strong showing in the Iowa Republican straw poll was helped by the dynamics of this year's event, said TIM HAGLE, a professor at the University of Iowa. Only about 14,000 Iowans voted Saturday, compared to 23,000 who cast ballots eight years ago. "You got a lot of people who came on message," he said. "Huckabee was able to do very well and get his message out in Iowa. Iowa is about going hand-to-hand and he did a good job like that." Arkansas News is a cooperative news Web site operated by several news organizations in the state.
http://www.arkansasnews.com/archive/2007/08/14/WashingtonDCBureau/343035.html

Redlawsk Can't Explain Dodd's Lack Of Support (Hartford Courant, Aug. 14)
It looks like Chris Dodd's July trip across Iowa with singer Paul Simon didn't do much to pull him out of the poll doldrums. The latest University of Iowa survey, conducted July 29-Aug. 5, listed Dodd's support as an asterisk, meaning he had less than 1 percent. Dodd got warm receptions as he traveled from town to town, and even pollster DAVID REDLAWSK said Monday that he could not fully explain why the Connecticut Democrat's not moving. "I've seen him connect with people," said Redlawsk, an associate professor of political science at the university.
http://www.courant.com/news/politics/hc-caucus0814.artaug14,0,7695497.story

UI Poll Shows Edwards' Caucus Lead Shrinking (Boston Globe, Aug. 14)
Democratic presidential hopeful John Edwards is staking his campaign on winning Iowa's first-in-the-nation caucus, even at the cost of stinting on the next big test in New Hampshire. Edwards yesterday began a bus tour that will snake through Iowa's cities and towns for seven days -- just a week after a two-day swing -- packed with stops that will let him exploit his down-home style to win over Iowans. He has campaigned here more than twice as much as he has in New Hampshire, where his folksy demeanor does not seem to connect as well with flinty New Englanders. So far, his Iowa gamble is paying some dividends in the polls, but it is hardly a safe bet. Iowa is the only state where Edwards has kept up with Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama in the 2008 Democratic race. But the latest UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll showed that Edwards' lead has shrunk as other candidates spend more time in the state.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2007/08/14/edwards_takes_risk_staking_run_on_iowa/?rss_id=Boston+Globe+--+Today%27s+paper+A+to+Z

UI Poll Helps Interpret Straw Poll Results (American Thinker, Aug. 14)
A story about the Iowa straw poll noted that the latest UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll has Romney getting 27 percent of the vote, comfortably ahead of Rudy Giuliani, who trails with 18 percent. At the Ames Hoedown, Romney walked away with 31 percent of the 14,000 votes cast. And since his two main rivals -- Giuliani and former Sen. Fred Thompson -- weren't competing, it could be said that Romney won big in Ames while Giuliani lost. The American Thinker is published in New Zealand.
http://www.americanthinker.com/2007/08/a_straw_in_the_wind.html

Rao Defines Symptoms Of Constipation (Jackson Clarion-Ledger, Aug. 14)
If you've tried loading up on fruits, vegetables and whole grains and still can't get relief from constipation, maybe you need more than a boost of fiber. The symptoms of constipation are excessive straining, hard stools, a feeling of incomplete evacuation, a sensation of blockage in the anorectal region, use of digital maneuvers to facilitate a bowel movement, and a stool frequency of less than three bowel movements a week, said Dr. SATISH S.C. RAO, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa. The Clarion-Ledger is published in Mississippi.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070814/HEALTH/708140323/1242/health

UI Researchers Find Disgust In The Brain (The Guardian, Aug. 14)
A story about what emotions are felt where in the brain notes that Jorge Moll and colleagues at LABS-Hospitais D'Or in Rio de Janeiro, at Hershey Medical Centre in Pennsylvania, at Pennsylvania State University, and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, say they found disgust lodged "mainly in the frontal and temporal lobes." The Guardian is published in the UK.
http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/research/improbable/story/0,,2147816,00.html

Alumnus Runs Science Camp For Blind Children (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 14)
A story about a science education camp for blind school children notes that its founder and director, Dave Wohlers, is an alumnus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/education/k12/bal-md.blind14aug14,0,5631639.story

VanBeek: People Use Too Little Sunscreen (Cosmetics Design Europe, Aug. 13)

Despite a seemingly never-ending round of health warnings and educational programs by both government authorities and cancer organizations, MARTA VANBEEK, assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa, points out that consumer awareness over sunscreens is still limited. VanBeek points out that one of the biggest misunderstandings over sunscreen is the level of and type of protection, with confusion still reigning over SPFs and how much protection they provide, as well as over products that provide both UVA and UVB filters. "The problem with sunscreen is that most people don't use enough to fully protect themselves," VanBeek said. "If used all over the body, an eight-ounce bottle should really only last a few applications. I usually tell people to use SPF-30 and figure they're getting the protection of SPF-15."
http://www.cosmeticsdesign-europe.com/news/ng.asp?n=79013-sunscreen-misunderstanding

Redlawsk: GOP Angered At Straw Poll No-Shows (Ottawa Herald, Aug. 13)
A story about Saturday's GOP straw poll notes that a recently released University of Iowa poll suggests that many Iowa Republicans aren't too happy that former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Arizona Sen. John McCain decided to skip the straw poll. Almost half of all Republicans believed that candidates not participating in the straw poll would hurt their chances in the state's first-in-the-nation caucus. DAVID REDLAWSK, an associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa and the poll's director, said 15 percent of respondents indicated it would affect their vote. "Clearly most Republicans think not participating in the straw poll will hurt both candidates," Redlawsk said. The Herald is published in Kansas.
http://www3.ottawaherald.com/ottsub/forum/stories/081307green.shtml

Campus Evacuated After Suspicious Package Found (KTTC-TV, Aug. 13)
Two buildings on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus were evacuated Monday afternoon after a suspicious package was found. The discovery came after a university employee received two anonymous e-mails early Monday that said four pipe bombs had been placed on university property. KTTC is based in Rochester, Minn. Stories on the same topic appeared on the Web sites of WQAD-TV (Moline) and the CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION.
http://www.kttc.com/News/index.php?ID=17570

Hagle: Straw Poll Leaves Chaotic Field (Wichita Falls Times-Record, Aug. 11)
The Iowa Straw Poll has left the Republican presidential contest as crowded and chaotic as the carnival-like crowd scene outside the building where the votes were cast. As expected, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney won the most votes in Saturday's symbolic test of campaign organizing strength in this first-in-the-nation caucus state. But in the more critical expectations game, there were so many other declarations of victory that the GOP field is likely to stay as muddled as ever. "It's a big question mark at this point," said TIM HAGLE, associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa. The Times News is published in Texas. The same story was published on the Web sites of the ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, MSBNC and other news organizations.
http://www.timesrecordnews.com/trn/nw_politics/article/0,1891,TRN_5705_5670235,00.html

UI Poll Is Not Encouraging For GOP (Channel 4, Aug. 13)
Commentator Felicity Spector says that in the wake of the Republican straw poll the real news from Iowa isn't great for the GOP. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll shows the most popular candidate among Republican voters is "don't know." Channel 4 originates in the UK.
http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/politics/international_politics/romney+masters++iowas+straw+poll+circus/673527

Hogan Faces Challenges At UConn (Norwich Bulletin, Aug. 13)
MICHAEL HOGAN
, who has been provost at the University of Iowa, faces many challenges as the president of UConn. The Norwich Bulletin is published in Connecticut.
http://www.norwichbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070813/OPINION01/708130323/1014/OPINION

Hagle, Squire Comment On Straw Poll (Boston Herald, Aug. 13)
In the wake of the straw poll, the GOP field is likely to stay as muddled as ever. "It's a big question mark at this point," said TIM HAGLE, associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "I think the results yesterday may actually have opened up the caucuses on the Republican side a little bit," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a longtime Iowa analyst and a visiting political science professor at the University of Iowa. This is a Scripps-Howard wire story.
http://news.bostonherald.com/politics/view.bg?articleid=1016920&srvc=news

McMurray Speech Research Explained (Manila Bulletin, Aug. 13)
When a baby reaches the age of 1 or so, his or her ability to talk suddenly doubles or triples. "The field of developmental psychology and language development has always assumed that something happens at that point to account for this word spurt: kids discover things have names, they switch to using more efficient mechanisms and they use their first words to help discover new ones," said BOB MCMURRAY, assistant professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. "Many such mechanisms have been proposed." He suggests far simpler mechanisms may be at play: word repetition, variations in the difficulty of words and the fact that children are learning multiple words at once. The Manila Bulletin is published in the Philippines.
http://www.mb.com.ph/TECH2007081399803.html

Redlawsk Comments On Straw Poll (Christian Science Monitor, Aug. 13)
Is Romney's win in the Iowa straw poll important? "I don't think 31 percent is convincing when you don't have at least [former New York Mayor Rudolph] Giuliani or [actor] Fred Thompson competing," DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political scientist and pollster, said of the Romney vote. "The reality is the race is still fairly wide open here in Iowa."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0813/p02s02-uspo.html

UI Alumna Is A Life-Saver (San Antonio Bizwomen, Aug. 13)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
alumna Linda T. Farr, a dietician is profiled: "Linda T. Farr doesn't always see herself as a life saver, but she is. As a registered dietitian and owner of Nutrition Associates of San Antonio, she counsels and consoles individuals in need of special diets: the overweight and underweight, those with diabetes, heart disease, cancer, gastro-intestinal problems like Crohn's disease, kidney and liver diseases. "I practice medical nutrition therapy -- that's translating the science of nutrition into practical application," she says.
http://www.bizjournals.com/bizwomen/sanantonio/content/feature/item.html?item_id=2064&feature_id=227

UI Poll Indicated Romney Win (the Peninsula, Aug. 12)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll predicted Mitt Romney's win in the Iowa straw poll. This AGENCE FRANCE-PRESS story was published in the Peninsula, which is based in Qatar.
http://www.thepeninsulaqatar.com/Display_news.asp?section=World_News&subsection=Americas&month=August2007&file=World_News200708124057.xml

Thompson Trailed In UI Poll (Appleton Post Crescent, Aug. 12)
Going into the Iowa straw poll, former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson trailed in a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll. The Appleton Post Crescent is published in Wisconsin.
http://www.postcrescent.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070812/APC0101/708120575/1979

UI Art Alumnus Completes Quest Story (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Aug. 12)
Allan Shickman, who did graduate work in art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and taught at the University of Northern Iowa for 30 years, has completed the book "Zan-Gah," the story of a boy on a quest for his brother. "It's about a young man in a harsh prehistoric world, having to struggle with the environment in which he finds himself," he explains. "There's no magic in it; it's not a book of fantasy. There are no dinosaurs. It's a book in which the main character is reality."
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/books/story/B10D36B55FB3D76686257333007C9C6B?OpenDocument

Hogan Is A Good Match for UConn (Hartford Courant, Aug. 12)
University of Iowa Provost MICHAEL J. HOGAN, soon to become 14th president of the University of Connecticut, sounds like a good fit for the job, according to this commentary.
http://www.courant.com/news/opinion/editorials/hc-ucpres.artaug12,0,7987753.story

Kidder Attended UI (Salisbury Post, Aug. 12)
A preview of an upcoming reading by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Kidder notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop. The Salisbury Post is published in North Carolina.
http://www.salisburypost.com/area/328929936483522.php

UI GOP Poll Cited (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 11)
Democrats urged Iowa Republicans on Friday to vote "none of the above" in today's Iowa Straw Poll that gauges the early organizational strength of Republican candidates seeking the presidential nomination in 2008. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S latest poll showed former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney ahead of 10 rivals. This HEARST NEWSPAPERS story was published by the San Francisco Chronicle.
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/08/11/MN7TRGK5G.DTL

Letendre Becomes Pharmacy Dean (Providence Journal, Aug. 11)
DONALD LETENDRE
, the dean of the University of Rhode Island's pharmacy school is stepping down to become dean of pharmacy at The University of Iowa's Academic Health Science Center. This Associated Press story was published in the Providence Journal, which is based in Rhode Island.
http://www.projo.com/news/content/uri_dean_08-11-07_AP6NAI2.2a6bb57.html

UI Art Alumna Designs For Burning Man (Marin Independent Journal, Aug. 11)
Laura Kimpton, who has degrees in art and art education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is in charge of "the aesthetic layout" of a spectacular work of art that's being created for Burning Man, the annual "experiment in radical self-expression" in Nevada's Black Rock Desert. The Marin Independent Journal is published in California.
http://www.marinij.com/ci_6604416?source=most_emailed

Thompson Barely Registered In UI Poll (Wisconsin Radio Network, Aug. 11)
Going into the Iowa straw poll, former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson barely registered in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll, setting the stage for the end of his campaign.
http://www.wrn.com/gestalt/go.cfm?objectid=50F429FD-9AD1-8097-B33A81E0EDADD295

UI Poll Not Encouraging For McCain (The Nation, Aug. 10)
As John McCain sat out the Iowa straw poll, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA phone survey found his support weak -- barely three percent of likely caucus attendees.
http://www.thenation.com/blogs/campaignmatters/?pid=221809

Huckabee Standing In UI Poll Cited (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Aug. 10)
Going into the Iowa straw poll, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll found Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee in seventh place.
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/198112/

Dubus Stories Inspired Film (Providence Journal, Aug. 10)
A new documentary film follows writer Andre Dubus from his childhood in Louisiana, where he first started writing, through a stint in the Marines and on to studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Dubus was later permanently disabled in an auto accident. The Providence Journal is published in Rhode Island.
http://www.projo.com/movies/content/LB_DELANEY10_08-10-07_CC6IE0J.1f8c8a2.html

Neumann Comments On UI/Wellmark Controversy (NPR, Aug. 10)
A "Marketplace" story reflects on the controversy surrounding the potential renaming of the UI College of Public Health. University of Iowa economics professor GEORGE NEUMANN says there is a substantial difference between naming a stadium after a company and naming a school of health after a corporation.
http://marketplace.publicradio.org/shows/2007/08/10/PM200708107.html

Redlawsk Comments On '08 Votes Cast in '07 (New York Daily News, Aug. 10)
Voting for the 2008 presidential nominations could start in 2007, thanks to South Carolina Republicans who yesterday jumped their primary to Jan. 19. That's three days before New Hampshire, whose law says its primary must be first. But moving up that primary would put it in front of Iowa's caucus. Iowa has its own law saying it must be the first contest overall. Iowa votes on Mondays, and since Dec. 31 and Dec. 24 -- New Year's Eve and Christmas Eve -- wouldn't work, "You possibly end up with Iowa going three weeks before New Hampshire, on Dec. 17," said the University of Iowa's DAVID REDLAWSK.
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/wn_report/2007/08/10/2007-08-10_08_votes_cast_in_07_maybe.html

UI Poll Shows Romney Strong On Eve Of Straw Poll (The New York Sun, Aug. 10)
The Republican presidential field will likely shrink by the end of this weekend following an Iowa straw poll that carries the last hopes for a litany of long shot contenders. This year, however, two leading candidates, Mayor Giuliani and Senator McCain of Arizona, are not actively competing, making the poll essentially a race between the overwhelming favorite, Mitt Romney, and everyone else. Anything less than a convincing victory could be seen as a significant blow to Romney's campaign, particularly with surveys showing him with a double-digit lead in Iowa. In a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll released Wednesday, he had a 16-point lead over Giuliani, 27 percent to 11 percent.
http://www.nysun.com/article/60224

Squire: Prospect Of December Caucuses 'Insane' (Straights Times, Aug. 10)
Americans may cast some of the first votes in the 2008 presidential election later this year after South Carolina on Thursday moved up its voting calendar to compete with traditional first states Iowa and New Hampshire. "Changes to primary dates are only a problem for long-running candidates," said Randy Enwright, national political director of the Thompson committee. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a visiting political science professor at the University of Iowa, called the prospect of having the Iowa caucuses in December 'insane' but said that is what happens when states compete for the attention. This REUTERS story was published in the Straight Times, the most widely read newspaper in Singapore.
http://www.straitstimes.com/Latest%2BNews/World/STIStory_147198.html

UI Poll Shows Tight Democratic Race (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Aug. 9)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll show that Hillary Clinton is apparently leading in Iowa but by a much smaller margin than indicated in national polls. This ASSOCIATED PRESS story was published by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/national/1130AP_2008_Poll_Iowa.html

Squire Comments On Thompson Plans To Mingle In Iowa (Jackson Sun, Aug. 9)
Former Tennessee Sen. Fred Thompson plans to make his first Iowa trip as a presidential prospect next week, a development that is expected to reset the Republican field in the leadoff caucus state in the wake of the GOP straw poll in Ames on Saturday. Thompson is scheduled to visit the Des Moines area on Aug. 17 and meet with state legislators and social conservative activists before attending the Iowa State Fair, always a "must" on the summertime campaign trail in Iowa. Thompson's decision to come to Iowa in the immediate aftermath of the straw poll could blunt the momentum of candidates who are expecting to perform well on Saturday, especially former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, said University of Iowa visiting political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE. The Jackson Sun is published in Jackson, Tenn.
http://jacksonsun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070809/NEWS01/70809014

Porter Finds Credit Card Companies Target Bankrupt People (Forbes, Aug. 9)
Credit-card companies target people fresh out of bankruptcy with credit offers, a finding that raises questions about the industry's efforts to paint bankruptcy filers as "untrustworthy deadbeats," according to a recent study. The study by KATHERINE PORTER, an associate professor of law at the University of Iowa, found that nearly 100 percent of more than 300 families surveyed had been offered new credit cards within a year after completing Chapter 7 bankruptcy proceedings. Versions of this story also appeared in DELAWARE ONLINE, OMAHA WORLD-HERALD and LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR.
http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2007/08/09/ap4004839.html

UI Poll: Edwards Continues To Lead In Iowa (Boston Globe, Aug. 9)
A new UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll released today shows the race for the Democratic presidential nomination tightening in Iowa with caucus goers splitting nearly evenly between former vice presidential nominee John Edwards and Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.
http://www.boston.com/news/politics/politicalintelligence/2007/08/edwards_continu.html

UI Poll Of Republicans Reveals McCain's Showing (Salon, Aug. 9)
John McCain's showing in a new UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll of Republicans who say they'll participate in Iowa's caucuses is just 3.2 percent. Just a month ago, aides to the cash-strapped Arizona senator said they'd be focusing their efforts on just three states. Iowa was one of them.
http://www.salon.com/politics/war_room/2007/08/09/mccain/index.html?source=rss

Covington: Straw Poll A Campaign Commercial (Southwest Times Record, Aug. 9)
A pep rally and a proving ground, the Iowa Straw Poll on Saturday gives Mike Huckabee his first and perhaps best chance to improve his standing among Republican presidential contenders. Huckabee looks to the straw poll as an indicator of what he sees as growing momentum in Iowa, the state with the first 2008 presidential caucuses. He will battle six other Republicans. Proceeds from ticket sales go to the Iowa Republican Party, which has held the quadrennial straw poll for three decades. The event is a campaign commercial, said CARY COVINGTON, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. The Southwest Times Record is published in Fort Smith, Ark.
http://www.swtimes.com/articles/2007/08/09/news/news01.txt

UI Test Shows Company Had Record of Lead In Toys (Examiner-Houston, Aug. 9)
The toy company that issued a voluntary recall for a Thomas & Friends spinning top this week had a 2002 test report showing the toy contained lead paint, according to a published report. The Chicago Tribune reported in its Thursday editions that toymaker Schylling Associates Inc. changed the design of the toy that year rather than recall it when a test found it had lead paint. The company reviewed its records after the Tribune bought one of the spinning tops online through eBay and had it tested at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA lab. This ASSOCIATED PRESS story appeared in 54 other sources.
http://www.examiner.com/a-874193~Company_Had_Record_of_Lead_in_Toys.html

Covington: Straw Poll Is Mystifying (Arkansas News Bureau, Aug. 9)
A pep rally and a proving ground, the Iowa Straw Poll on Saturday gives Mike Huckabee his first and perhaps his best chance to improve his standing among Republican presidential contenders. Huckabee looks to the straw poll as an indicator of what he sees as growing momentum in Iowa, the state with the first 2008 presidential caucuses. He will battle six other Republicans. The event is a campaign commercial writ large, said CARY COVINGTON, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "It's not clear what it tells you, that's what's sort of mystifying about the straw poll," Covington said. "It only tells you which candidates are willing to spend the money to do well." The Arkansas News Bureau is an online partnership of numerous news organizations in Arkansas.
http://www.arkansasnews.com/archive/2007/08/09/WashingtonDCBureau/342969.html

Leicht: Texas' Top 10 Admissions Program Victim Of Its Success (Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, Aug. 9)
Both supporters and critics of Texas' Top 10 Percent law have been surprised at its popularity, but some University of Texas-Austin officials and legislators would like to see the program scaled back. The program was enacted in response to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals' decision in Hopwood v. University of Texas Law School, which Texas officials interpreted as banning the use of race in academic admissions. The U.S. Supreme Court, however, issued an affirmative action ruling in 2003 that permits universities to use race as one of many decision-making factors in admissions, and UT-Austin has since allowed race-conscious admissions for transfer and non-Top 10 Percent applicants. In late July, an anti-affirmative action organization known as the Project on Fair Representation filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education over UT-Austin's use of race-conscious admissions policies. Dr. KEVIN T. LEICHT, a sociology professor at the University of Iowa, says UT-Austin could be considered a "victim of its own success." Leicht and other researchers, led by Princeton University's Dr. Marta Tienda, authored a report in 2003 that concluded that the Top 10 Percent program was failing to broaden racial and ethnic diversity in many of Texas' schools. But today, Leicht says UT-Austin is actually exceeding pre-Hopwood diversity levels. Diverse: Issues in Higher Education is published in Fairfax, Va.
http://diverseeducation.com/artman/publish/article_9014.shtml

UI Poll Puts Romney In Front (New York Sun, Aug. 9)
A new poll from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA shows Mitt Romney surging to the lead among Iowa Republicans in advance of this weekend's straw poll.
http://www.latestpolitics.com/blog/

Romney Leads In UI Poll (MSNBC, Aug. 9)
Just two days before the Ames straw poll, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll shows Romney with a substantial lead in the Hawkeye State over Giuliani, 26.9% to 11.3%. Fred Thompson was third with 6.5%. One-third of those questioned said they were undecided.
http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2007/08/09/310677.aspx

Columnist Writes About Naming Controversy (St. Cloud Times, Aug. 9)Op-ed columnist Linda Larson, writing about the naming controversy at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Public Health, says that with legislators refusing to increase funding and students unable to pay additional tuition, corporations are one of the few places left for public universities to get money. The Times is published in Minnesota.
http://www.sctimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070809/OPINION/108090010/1006/NEWS01

Alumna To Run For Illinois Legislature (Suburban Chicago News, Aug. 9)
A story about Batavia, Ill., Resident Mary Schneider's announcement that she is running for the Illinois General Assembly notes that she attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/couriernews/news/503523,3_1_EL09_A450TH_S1.article

Latenser: Shrinking Number Of Burn Centers A Concern (North County Times, Aug. 8)
U.S. hospitals are increasingly shutting down their burn centers in a trend experts say could leave the nation unable to handle widespread burn casualties from a fiery terrorist attack or other major disaster. The number of burn centers in the U.S. has dropped from 132 in 2004 to 127, and burn beds have fallen from 1,897 to 1,820, according to American Burn Association records compiled from voluntary reporting by hospitals. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services puts the number of burn beds even lower, at just 1,500. And most of those are already filled, with the number available on any given day variously estimated at just 300 to 500. "People ought to be pretty frightened by this," said Dr. BARBARA LATENSER, burn center director at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "Some people who live out West, they are 800 miles from a burn center." The Times is published in California. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the MOBILE REGISTER, CASA GRANDE VALLEY (Ariz.) NEWSPAPER, KBCI-TV (Boise), SOUTH BEND (Ind.) TRIBUNE, TACOMA NEWS TRIBUNE, CANTON (Ohio) REPOSITORY and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2007/08/09/health/11_02_168_8_07.txt

UI Poll Puts Tommy Thompson Far Back (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Aug. 8)
A new poll of Iowa voters, conducted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, suggests former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson has not gotten much traction in his presidential bid.
http://blogs.jsonline.com/allpoliticswatch/archive/2007/08/08/new-iowa-poll-shows-tommy-trailing.aspx

Redlawsk: Poll Shows Iowa GOP Punishing Giuliani, McCain (Boston Globe, Aug. 8)
A new University of Iowa poll has good news for former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney and bad news for his two major Republican presidential rivals, who are taking a pass on Saturday's GOP straw poll in Ames. For one of them, Arizona Republican John McCain, the survey shows the bottom falling out of his candidacy in the first caucus state. "Republicans appear to be punishing both (former New York mayor Rudy) Giuliani and McCain for their unwillingness to compete in the Aug. 11 straw poll, while Romney's campaign has hit its stride," said DAVID REDLAWSK, the poll's director and political science professor.
http://www.boston.com/news/politics/politicalintelligence/2007/08/romney_lengthen.html

Hygienic Lab Tested Chinese-made Toy For Lead (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 8)
The makers of a Thomas & Friends spinning top on Wednesday initiated a voluntary recall of the product, prompted by a Tribune test that found a painted wooden handle on one of the toys contained 40 times the legal limit for lead. The toymaker, Schylling Associates, of Rowley, Mass., said the recall would cover 24,000 Chinese-made tops shipped by the company between June 2001 and July 2002. Tribune recently had the Schylling top tested by the Hygienic Laboratory of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as part of a broader examination of the hazards hidden among popular children's products. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the SANTA BARBARA (Calif.) NEWS, and the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-070808-lead-toys,0,3173308.story

An Aug. 9 follow up story notes that the distributor of the toy apparently knew that the paint contained lead.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/illinois/chi-ap-il-toyrecall,0,7168012.story

Law Alumnus Named Nebraska Judge (KMTV-TV, Aug. 8)
A story about the appointment of William Wright as a state district court judge in Nebraska notes that he is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law. KMTV is based in Omaha. Stories on the same topic appeared on the Web sites of KSNB-TV (Kearney, Neb.), KGFW radio (Kearney), FREMONT TRIBUNE, LINCOLN JOURNAL STAR, and NEBRASKA STATE PAPER.
http://www.action3news.com/Global/story.asp?S=6904827&nav=menu550_2

Latenser: Shrinking Number Of Burn Centers A Concern (CBS News, Aug. 8)
U.S. hospitals are increasingly shutting down their burn centers in a trend experts say could leave the nation unable to handle widespread burn casualties from a fiery terrorist attack or other major disaster. The number of burn centers in the U.S. has dropped from 132 in 2004 to 127, and burn beds have fallen from 1,897 to 1,820, according to American Burn Association records compiled from voluntary reporting by hospitals. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services puts the number of burn beds even lower, at just 1,500. And most of those are already filled, with the number available on any given day variously estimated at just 300 to 500. "People ought to be pretty frightened by this," said Dr. BARBARA LATENSER, burn center director at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "Some people who live out West, they are 800 miles from a burn center." This Associated Press story was published by numerous news organizations, including ABC, MSNBC, NEWSDAY, the ARIZONA DAILY STAR, the HONOLULU ADVERTISER, the HARTFORD COURANT, the MEMPHIS COMMERCIAL APPEAL, the SANTA BARBARA NEWS and the KANSAS CITY STAR.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/08/08/health/main3144759.shtml

UI Research: Exercise Cuts Cancer Risk (Runner's World, Aug. 8)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Cancer Center in Iowa City found that women over age 65, a group that accounts for 50 percent of all breast cancer cases, are less likely to get the disease if they exercise moderately. In fact, the more active these women are, the lower their chances of being diagnosed with breast cancer.
http://runnersworld.co.za/walking/archive/july_walking_is_powerful_medicine.php

Porter: Older Americans Will Continue To Hold Debt (Times Union, Aug. 8)
Concern that credit card companies are taking advantage of older Americans has some members of Congress weighing increased regulation of the industry. Congress has been holding hearings on the issue to determine what steps, if any, could be proposed. Whether Congress takes action or not, KATHERINE PORTER, a bankruptcy professor at the University of Iowa, suggested the debt held by older Americans is unlikely to wane: "The baby boom generation has an appetite for credit cards that is unparalleled," she said at Tuesday's hearing. The TIMES UNION is based in Albany, N.Y.
http://timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=612485&category=BUSINESS&newsdate=8/8/2007

For UI Student, Mexican Cheese Is Link To Home (Lufkin [Texas] Daily News, Aug. 7)
On one side of the mountains is the so-called Hot Earth, a region plagued by drug violence and infested with clandestine marijuana fields. On the other is the Bermuda Triangle, so named by the truckers who lose their loads to highway bandits. Nestled in this unlikely spot, a two hours' drive from electricity and the nearest town, residents make perhaps the most celebrated cheese in Mexico. Their Cotija cheese dazzled gourmands in Europe last November when it took the prize for best foreign cheese at the prestigious world cheese championship in Cremona, Italy. For Karina Silva, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA medical student, the Cotija cheese is a link to her roots. She migrated to the United States with her family when she was 15 but always buys some cheese when she comes back to Mexico to visit. "In (the United States), there're lots of stores that ... sell Cotija-style cheese, but it's not the same,'' said Silva, 27. "I keep it in the freezer so it lasts.''
http://www.lufkindailynews.com/featr/content/features/stories/2007/08/08/food.html?cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=5

Story Notes UI's Low Tuition (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Aug. 7)
The University of Wisconsin System's Board of Regents voted Tuesday to raise resident undergraduate tuition 5.5 percent, gambling that Senate Democrats will prevail in upcoming budget negotiations with the Republican-controlled Assembly. A UW official said the in-state tuition increase was the lowest dollar increase in five years and the lowest percentage increase in seven years. He said UW-Madison would remain the second-cheapest Big Ten school, behind only the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=643969

Doern Comments On Free Antibiotics (ABC News, Aug. 7)
Doctors say that a Florida supermarket chain's plan to give away antibiotics is a double-edged sword when it comes to health, and a downright danger for a society in which antibiotics are already overprescribed. Publix Super Markets Inc., which is privately held, said Monday it would give away seven generic antibiotics, most often taken for such ailments as strep throat and bronchitis. Doctors say giving away antibiotics for free can be good for families who need but can't afford them, but that the move could encourage the use of antibiotics without checks and balances, causing problems with resistance. "This will be particularly concerning in Florida, a state that already has certain antibiotic resistance problems at levels far greater than other parts of the country," said GARY V. DOERN, professor of pathology at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=3456140&page=1

Study Explains Explorers' Limited Ability To Navigate (Science Daily, Aug. 4)
When explorers like Magellan and Columbus sailed from Europe to the New World 500 years ago, they amazingly managed to navigate the open sea without terrestrial landmarks, natural boundaries or the navigational technology we have today. Historical reports suggest that some explorers and other seafaring people did so by imagining an island just over the horizon; if they kept track of where the "virtual island" was, they knew which direction to go in the open water. But new research from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA suggests that people's ability to imagine virtual islands -- without any perceptual cues to help -- is quite limited. The story was also published by News-Medical.net
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070803151249.htm

UI Study: Altering A Protein Makes Mice Less Fearful (Science Daily, Aug. 2)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study shows that loss or chemical inhibition of a protein, known as acid sensing ion channel protein (ASIC1a), reduces innate fear behavior in lab animals, making normally timid mice relatively fearless. The findings might provide useful insight into anxiety disorders and may even point the way to a new therapeutic target.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070801112201.htm

UI Study Provides Useful Insight Into Anxiety Disorders (UPI, Aug. 2)
A U.S. study shows inhibiting an acid sensing ion channel protein can reduce fearful behavior, making normally timid lab mice relatively fearless. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists said their finding provides useful insight into anxiety disorders and might even point the way to a new therapeutic target.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Science/2007/08/02/altering_a_protein_makes_mice_less_fearful/3320/

Redlawsk: Edwards Positions Himself As Candidate Of Change (Raleigh News and Observer, Aug. 7)
John Edwards took aim at the free trade policies of the Clinton administration Monday, calling for greater skepticism about deals with other nations. Edwards said past trade policies have hurt American workers, in what some saw as a dig at New York Sen. Hillary Clinton, one of his chief rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination. With his poll numbers lagging, Edwards has stepped up his attacks on Clinton. In recent days, he has criticized her for accepting contributions from Washington lobbyists and accepting donations from executives of companies owned by conservative media mogul Rupert Murdoch. "You can read this [trade] rhetoric as a jab at Hillary -- an effort to say, 'I'm the change guy who will take us in the new direction we need, and Hillary is the past,' " said DAVID REDLAWSK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.newsobserver.com/politics/story/662353.html

Toddler Talking Takes Off Once Easy Words Learned (Wilmington News Journal, Aug. 7)
It is called the "word spurt," that magical time when a toddler's vocabulary explodes, seemingly overnight. New research offers a decidedly unmagical explanation: Babies start really jabbering after they have mastered enough easy words to tackle more of the harder ones. That explanation, published in today's edition of the journal Science, is far simpler than scientists' assumptions that some special brain mechanisms must click to trigger the word boom. Instead, University of Iowa psychology professor BOB McMURRAY contends that what astonishes parents is the fairly guaranteed outcome of a lot of under-the-radar work by toddlers as they start their journey to learn 60,000 words by adulthood. The News Journal is published in Delaware. The same story also appeared on the Web site of the MARQUETTE (Mich.) MINING JOURNAL.
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070807/LIFE/708060373/1005/LIFE

UI Identifies Teachers' Autumn Vocal Troubles (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 7)
Teaching is a high-risk occupation for voice disorders. Yet unlike singers and actors, who also give their vocal cords strenuous workouts, teachers are less likely to properly care for and protect their voices, experts say. The fall is particularly bad, experts say, because teachers have to readjust to daily teaching after summer break. "Autumn vocal meltdown" is how it is described by the Voice Academy, a Web site developed by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and the National Center for Voice and Speech to help teachers prevent and treat voice problems.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-teachersvoice07aug07,1,3579531.story

A sidebar to the story provides tips for teachers to avoid vocal strain from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Voice Academy.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/services/newspaper/premium/printedition/Tuesday/chi-0807_sub_voice_boxaug07,0,4604534.story

Editorial Urges Hogan To Continue UConn Growth (The Day, Aug. 7)
An editorial welcomes UI Provost MICHAEL HOGAN as the new president of the University of Connecticut and urges him to continue the pattern of the school's growth established by outgoing president Phillip Austin. The Day is published in New London, Conn.
http://www.theday.com/re.aspx?re=620d5129-fe60-4c26-adce-285f629955c9

UI Student Achieves Eagle Scout (Arlington Heights Daily Herald, Aug. 7)
A story about Jordan Loprena of Lake Zurich, Ill., receiving his Eagle Scout badge notes that he is a sophomore at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.dailyherald.com/news/lakestory.asp?id=338097&cc=l&tc=lzu&t=Lake%20Zurich

New City Manager of Florida Town Is UI Alumnus (Orlando Sentinel, Aug. 7)
A profile of Paul Berg, the new city manager of Eustis, Fla., notes that he earned a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/orl-lberg0707aug07,0,3619343.story

Florida Woman Helped Start UI Women's Athletics (The Villages Daily Sun, Aug. 7)
A story about changes in the roles of women in the workplace notes that Pat Wilson had few career options growing up in Michigan in the 1930s and '40s, but would later help to establish the women's athletic program as a coach at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Sun is published in Florida.
http://www.thevillagesdailysun.com/articles/2007/08/06/news/news01.txt

Koenigs Paper Topic Of Online Discussion (Scientific American, Aug. 6)
A group of experts gathers online to discuss the recent paper "Damage to the prefrontal cortex increases utilitarian moral judgements," in which an illustrious team led by the University of Iowa's MICHAEL KOENIGS and the University of Southern California's Antonio Damasio explored the tendency of certain brain-damaged patients to favor utilitarian moral judgments.
http://blog.sciam.com/index.php?title=when_morality_is_hard_to_like&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1

Cram: Orthopedic Hospital Patients Have Fewer Complications (UPI, Aug. 6)
A new study suggests certain patients have fewer post-surgery complications at U.S. orthopedic hospitals compared with general hospitals. Investigators at the University of Iowa and the Veterans Affairs' Iowa City Health Care System found Medicare patients who receive hip or knee replacement at orthopedic hospitals have a 40 percent lower risk of post-surgery complications compared with Medicare patients at general hospitals. The researchers said the difference in complications holds even after accounting for the fact that specialty orthopedic hospitals admit less complex cases. "The findings were somewhat surprising and important," said the study's lead author, Dr. PETER CRAM.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Science/2007/08/06/orthopedic_general_hospitals_compared/9068/

Redlawsk: Democrats More Excited About Election (Denver Post, Aug. 6)
The state GOP predicts a turnout of about 40,000 people at the Iowa Straw Poll. Tickets are going for $35 apiece with roughly 24,000 Iowans casting votes. There is some question, however, about whether turnout will be as high as the party expects. "There is a general feeling here that Republicans are not nearly as excited as Democrats," said University of Iowa political scientist DAVID REDLAWSK, noting that Democrats are generally drawing larger crowds at campaign events in the state. "If people don't show up, it may be a further signal that Republicans are not satisfied with their choices."
http://www.denverpost.com/carman/ci_6552122

Redlawsk Comments On Obama Fundraising (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 4)
After presidential hopeful Barack Obama made a show of standing up to Washington insiders by returning donations from lobbyists, he received help raising campaign money from at least two of them. The Illinois Democrat began airing television commercials this week in the early-voting state of Iowa decrying the Washington culture and proclaiming that he accepts no money from federal lobbyists or political action committees. In his campaign finance statements, Obama has disclosed that he has returned more than $52,000 given to him by Washington lobbyists, though there is no law against taking money from them. Even as he shuns donations from lobbyists, Obama has taken more than $1.4 million this year from law and consultancy firms that have partners who are registered to lobby, a Times analysis of Obama's fundraising shows. "There is always the risk if you set yourself up as being better than others," University of Iowa political scientist DAVID REDLAWSK said. "If there is evidence that you're not really walking the talk, the fall can be harder.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-obama4aug04,1,1022542,print.story?coll=la-headlines-nation&ctrack=2&cset=true

Hogan Described As Experienced Leader (Hartford Courant, Aug. 4)
When MICHAEL J. HOGAN, the University of Connecticut's next president, was passed over in a bid for president of the University of Iowa in November, students were so outraged that they formed a group called Hogan's Heroes to promote his candidacy. "He always treated us all so well that it was just natural that we wanted to show our support for him," said Peter McElligott, the University of Iowa student body president who just graduated. But Hogan will be heading to UConn instead to become the university's 14th president starting Sept. 14. He is described as an experienced leader and a distinguished historian with a low-key, friendly personality and a good sense of humor.
http://www.courant.com/news/local/hc-hogan0805.artaug04,0,7355007.story

UI-born 'Duck's Breath' Comedy Troupe Reunites (Contra Costa Times, Aug. 4)
Duck's Breath Mystery Theater, one of the funniest comedy acts of the 1980s, will have a rare reunion at 8 p.m. Aug. 13 at the Freight & Salvage Coffee House in Berkeley. The Ducks are Merle Kessler, Jim Turner, Dan Coffey, Bill Allard and Leon Martell. The troupe was born in 1975 in Iowa City, Iowa, where the members were all literature and theater students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/columns/ci_6544450?nclick_check=1

Toddler Talking Takes Off Once Easy Words Learned (Boston Globe, Aug. 3)
It is called the "word spurt," that magical time when a toddler's vocabulary explodes, seemingly overnight. New research offers a decidedly unmagical explanation: Babies start really jabbering after they have mastered enough easy words to tackle more of the harder ones. That explanation, published in today's edition of the journal Science, is far simpler than scientists' assumptions that some special brain mechanisms must click to trigger the word boom. Instead, University of Iowa psychology professor BOB MCMURRAY contends that what astonishes parents is the fairly guaranteed outcome of a lot of under-the-radar work by toddlers as they start their journey to learn 60,000 words by adulthood. Versions of this Associated Press story also appeared on the Web sites of USA TODAY, ARIZONA DAILY STAR, WILMINGTON STAR, BENNINGTON (Vermont) BANNER, LANCASTER ONLINE, VICTORIA (Texas) ADVOCATE, DAILY BREEZE in Torrance, Calif., PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS, CNN, MSNBC, DISCOVERY CHANNEL and more than 20 other media outlets.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/washington/articles/2007/08/03/toddler_talking_takes_off_once_enough_easy_words_learned_researchers_say/?rss_id=Boston+Globe+--+Today%27s+paper+A+to+Z

UI Psychologist Explains Secret Of Baby Babble (The Guardian, Aug. 3)
Out of the mouths of babes spurts a rush of words, at least once they reach their second year. Now mathematics may finally explain why. A sudden explosion in a child's vocabulary usually strikes at around 18 months, with usage expanding dramatically to include more complex words, but scientists have previously failed to provide a convincing explanation. Writing in the U.S. journal Science, psychologist BOB MCMURRAY, at the University of Iowa, shows that the rapid improvement is an inevitable consequence of the way languages are structured. The Guardian is published in London.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2007/aug/03/1?gusrc=rss&feed=science

Defusing The Childhood Vocabulary Explosion (Science Magazine, Aug. 3)
During the second year of life, the rate at which children acquire new words accelerates dramatically, according to psychologist BOB MCMURRAY in the journal Science. This has led the field of language acquisition to posit specialized mechanisms that leverage the few words learned in the initial slow phase for faster vocabulary growth later. Simulations and mathematical analysis demonstrate that specialized cognitive changes are unnecessary.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/317/5838/631

Little Miracle Makes Big Strides (14 WFIE-TV, Aug. 3)
On July 6, Jeremy and Angie Norman of Owensville, Indiana became the parents of a baby girl named Summer Rae who weighed just 8.6 ounces, about the size of a candy bar. According to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA database, that makes her the smallest baby ever to survive a premature birth in the world. Amazingly, another Tri-State child is on that list. The station is located in Evansville, Ind.
http://www.14wfie.com/Global/story.asp?S=6880417&nav=3w6r

McMurray Shows Learning To Talk Requires Just Two Things (CBS News, Aug. 2)
There's no magic to the way toddlers learn to talk, a U.S. scientist says. It's about learning multiple words at once, and variations in the difficulty of words being learned. Developmental psychology has assumed that there's a mechanism that kicks in around 18 months (although the actual age can vary widely) that leads to the "word spurt," when the child suddenly starts learning words at a much faster rate. "Many such mechanisms have been proposed," said BOB MCMURRAY, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Iowa.
http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2007/08/02/children-talking.html

UI Professor Gives Tips For Fantasy Football Season Fans (USA Today, Aug. 2)
Ever get that sinking feeling during your draft when the last decent starting quarterback goes off the board just before you pick? Mathematics might soon be able to help. JEFFREY OHLMANN, a professor at the University of Iowa, along with Mike Fry and Andrew Lundberg of the University of Cincinnati, developed a model to determine the best available draft pick in each round. It builds on a theory commonly known as value-based drafting and runs a computer algorithm to determine the best immediate pick based on what other players are likely to be taken over the rest of the draft.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/fantasy/2007-08-02-insider_N.htm

Researcher Explains Toddler Chattering (New Scientist, Aug. 2)
Young children become chatterboxes within months of barely being able to speak a few words. Now one scientist thinks he knows why. Children do not need any specialized learning to suddenly improve their vocabularies, says language psychologist BOB MCMURRAY at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Instead, their behavior can be described by a simple mathematical rule of thumb.
http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn12407&feedId=online-news_rss20

UI Study Examines Specialty Orthopedic Hospitals (Orthopedics Today, Aug. 2)
Compared to general hospitals, specialty orthopedic hospitals serve a healthier population of Medicare patients, a new study found. However, Medicare patients who receive total hip or knee arthroplasty at specialty hospitals have a 40 percent lower risk of postoperative complications, the study authors noted. "The findings were somewhat surprising and important," PETER CRAM, MD, MBA, lead author of the study, said in a University of Iowa press release.
http://www.orthosupersite.com/default.asp?page=view&rid=22993

UConn President Hogan Outlines Goals (Hartford Courant, Aug. 2)
MICHAEL J. HOGAN, who was named the 14th president of the University of Connecticut Wednesday, pledged to raise the institution's academic reputation to new heights while ensuring that the state's flagship university uses its money wisely, making every penny count. Hogan, a charismatic historian and top administrator at the University of Iowa, outlined some of his goals in a press conference on campus minutes after the board of trustees unanimously appointed him to succeed Philip E. Austin. Hogan takes over Sept. 14. Wearing a blue tie emblazoned with tiny huskies, Hogan, 63, said he would like to see UConn continue to improve its national academic standing and would work to support research, diversity and the management of university finances, particularly in times of rising tuition. The newspaper is based in Connecticut.
http://www.courant.com/news/local/hc-newprez0802.artaug02,0,5432716.story?track=rss

UI Tiniest Baby Database Noted (Princeton Daily Clarion, Aug. 2)
An Owensville couple looking forward to bringing their new baby girl home may very well be the parents of a medical marvel. Summer Rae Norman was born July 6 by emergency Caesarian section at St. Mary's Medical Center in Evansville. Doctors and nurses at the hospital directed Angie to a Web site that catalogs reports of babies weighing less than 600 grams at birth. According to information collected by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DIVISION OF NEONATOLOGY, the tiniest baby in the database was born in 2004 in Maywood, Ill., and weighed 260 grams. Summer Rae was 245 grams at birth, her mother said. The newspaper is published in Princeton, Ind.
http://www.tristate-media.com/articles/2007/08/02/pdclarion/news/news1.txt

Economists Sign Free Trade Petition (Omaha World Herald, Aug. 2)
Twenty-one economists from Nebraska and Iowa universities joined Wednesday in a petition urging Congress to pursue free-trade policies with China. The names of the economists appeared in an advertisement in the Wall Street Journal paid for by the Club for Growth, a private organization that promotes nonrestrictive economic policies. A total of 1,028 economists signed the petition, the same number that supported a similar petition in 1930 warning that protectionist trade policies would devastate the U.S. economy. Thirteen Iowa economists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University were among the signers.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1208&u_sid=10093463

Hogan Named University Of Connecticut President (Connecticut Post, Aug. 1)
The University of Connecticut has named MICHAEL J. HOGAN, executive vice president and provost at the University of Iowa, as its 14th president. Hogan, 63, was named Wednesday by the Board of Trustees after a nationwide search conducted by a 33-member committee. Hogan will begin working at UConn in mid-September. Similar articles appeared on the Web sites of the NORWICH BULLETIN, NEW LONDON DAY, NBC30 and WTNH-TV in Connecticut, NEWSDAY in New York, and WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill.
http://www.connpost.com/ci_6521332?source=rss

Wellmark Gift Noted (CNN Headline News, Aug. 1)
A news segment noted a USA Today article saying that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is thinking about renaming its College of Public Health after Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield in exchange for a $15 million gift from the company. WBBM-TV in Chicago also cited the USA Today article.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5ed4126990dac9a6aabab7e273b84e12&_docnum=7&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkVb&_md5=b2677102a53171ad5b9c64d9fbd7e53c

New Glaucoma Treatment Shows Promise (Science Daily, Aug. 1)
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new technique that successfully treated rats for blindness caused by glaucoma. Their experimental treatment will be used on canine patients in the next year. If successful, it is expected to move to human trials. Iowa State University researchers lead the project team, which also included researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Yale University, Tulane University and the University of Miami.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070801161457.htm

MSU President Was Candidate For UI Job (Springfield News-Leader, Aug. 1)
Missouri State University officials are happy and relieved President Mike Nietzel took himself out of the running to be the next president at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. But they realize the next time they may not hang on to the two-year university leader. "I wasn't surprised (Nietzel was a finalist). We're fortunate to have him stay with us," said Mike Duggan, a member of the MSU Board of Governors. Nietzel confirmed Tuesday that he was a finalist in a recent search for the new president at Iowa's flagship university but withdrew his name not long after he was named to the short list. "I decided my work wasn't done here. I like (MSU), the job and the community here and withdrew," he told the News-Leader. The newspaper is based in Springfield, Mo.
http://www.news-leader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070801/NEWS01/708010373/1007

E-mail Suggests Amount Of Gift Matters (Inside Higher Ed, Aug. 1)
The dispute and negotiations over a proposed gift to rename the University of Iowa's College of Public Health have largely focused -- at least in public -- on the ethics of naming a college for a corporation. But e-mail records obtained by The Des Moines Register suggest that the size of the proposed gift may also have been a factor. Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield offered $15 million to have the college named for the company, an idea that faculty members first objected to but have since agreed to reconsider. One e-mail quoted by the newspaper, from the college's dean, noted that other schools of public health had been named (for individuals) based on gifts of $25 million to $50 million, much more than Wellmark was proposing. "The deans I consulted all indicated that an offer of $15 million would be embarrassingly small and significantly undervalue our college," wrote the Iowa dean, JIM MERCHANT.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/08/01/qt

Naming Proposal Inspires Debate (CBS, Aug. 1)
USA Today reports that a university is considering putting a corporate name on its diplomas. "The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is mulling whether to rename its College of Public Health after Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield's foundation in exchange for a $15 million gift from the company's philanthropic arm," the newspaper reports. "We're close to the tip of the sword for an AT&T School of Business or a Kodak School of Digital Communication. I can see that as not so far off," said Terry Burton, a naming-rights consultant. The idea has ignited debate. As Randa Safady, vice chancellor at the University of Texas, put it, "It's important that the public and we don't equate the generosity of corporations with selling out."
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/08/01/the_skinny/main3122295.shtml

UI Writing Programs In 'Best of the Best' (Atlantic, July/August 2007)
The Atlantic Monthly magazine profiles the 10 best creative writing graduate programs at U.S. universities, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200708/mfa-programs

 

 

 

 

 

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