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September 2006

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Nixon Cited In Road Surface Technology Story (Road & Bridges, September)
The Mitchell Bridge near Hibbing, Minn., has always been dangerous in the winter, but a new surfacing technology -- which has been called "potentially the biggest technological breakthrough for improving highway safety in snow-belt regions since the invention of the snowplow" -- has dramatically improved its safety. An analysis of the surface overlay's performance during the 2005-06 winter season has already been conducted by WILFRED NIXON, a leading snow- and ice-control authority who is president of Asset Insight Technologies and professor of engineering at the University of Iowa. The report found no weather-related accidents at all nine test sites studied.
http://www.roadsbridges.com/rb/index.cfm?powergrid=rfah=
|cfap=&fuseaction=showArticle&appDirectory=rb&articleID=7303

UI Facilities Management Named Top 10 Property Management Group (Buildings, September 2006)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
has been named one of the ten best property management groups in the country by Buildings magazine. For the last 25 years, Buildings magazine's Who's Who in the Buildings Market report has recognized the companies, organizations, and departments whose innovations, accomplishments, and entrepreneurial spirit have helped define the commercial and institutional buildings industry. Whether through projects, processes, or people, these visionaries have broken new ground in an ever-increasingly competitive real estate arena, differentiating themselves with confidence and know-how - yet generously providing the leadership and expertise for industry peers to follow. Other organizations in the top 10 include the Los Angeles Unified School District, the U.S. General Service Administration's Public Buildings Group, and Simon Property Management.
http://www.buildingsmag.com/Articles/detail.asp?ArticleID=3313

Gross Book Recommended (GulfNews, Sept. 30)
"The Secret History of Emotion: From Aristotle's Rhetoric to Modern Brain Science," by DANIEL M. GROSS, a rhetoric faculty member at the University of Iowa, addresses intriguing questions about emotion, including, "How can the death of a famous person such as a rock star or a royal evoke widespread grief when that of a homeless person is met with indifference?"
http://www.gulfnews.com/notes/books/10071287.html

Cub's Star Lee Supports UI Research (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 30)
Chicago Cub's star Derrick Lee, along with Boston Celtics co-owner Wyc Grousbeck, are spearheading a project to promote research about Leber Congenital Amaurosis, a rare genetic disease that affects Lee's daughter and Grousbeck's son. "The two will work with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S CARVER NON-PROFIT GENETIC TESTING LABORATORY to try to get the estimated 3,000 people in the United States who have LCA to undergo genetic testing... About 500 LCA patients already have been tested, said DR. EDWIN STONE, director of the Iowa's CARVER FAMILY CENTER FOR MACULAR DEGENERATION." Versions of this story appeared in the CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, NBA.com and nearly 90 other media outlets.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/cubs/chi-0609300129sep30,1,3660813.story?track=rss&ctrack=1&cset=true

Squire Comments on Iowa Governor Race (USA Today, Sept. 29)
Jim Nussle is one of Washington's major players - an eight-term Republican who has led the powerful House Budget Committee since 2001. But as Nussle seeks to move from the House of Representatives to become Iowa's next governor, his formidable Washington résumé is one of the last things he talks to voters Political analysts say low ratings for President Bush and Congress as an institution present a particularly challenging environment for House members. These lawmakers also get little bounce in local races from the GOP's major political strength in most polls: national security. "It's a tough year to be a Republican, but it's particularly tough to be a Republican from Washington," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political analyst at the University of Iowa.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-09-28-promotion_x.htm

Ferguson Advises on Dieting (WBAY-TV, Sept. 29)
A study done at the University of Colorado Health Science Center and reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicates that for a majority of weight-loss maintainers success was usually preceded by a "trigger event or critical incident." This event could be medical (a doctor tells you to lose weight), emotional (someone makes a derogatory comment about your weight) or a life event (a divorce). However, "The decision to lose weight, and the reasons behind the decision, do not necessarily differentiate the successful dieter from the unsuccessful dieter. In fact, the decision may only start the process but be insufficient to maintain enthusiasm beyond a few months," says KRISTI J. FERGUSON, Ph.D., an associate professor at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. The television station is based in Green Bay, Wisc.
http://www.wbay.com/Global/story.asp?S=5466035

Bloom Comments on Lubavitch Jews (South Florida Sun Sentinel, Sept. 29)
Chabad-Lubavitch, is a small, growing and controversial Hasidic branch of Judaism. In an era in which some denominations have left pulpits empty because of clergy shortages, the offspring of Chabad rabbis are following in their parents' footsteps in such numbers that a surplus of about 200 new rabbis and their wives are now staged in Brooklyn, awaiting assignments around the world, Lubavitch officials said. Some say the movement is clannish, with an unhealthy devotion to its late leader, viewed by some as the Messiah, and with overly aggressive tactics. "They have this sense of manifest destiny to promulgate, to proselytize, to spread the word everywhere, every day, throughout the world," said STEPHEN G. BLOOM, a University of Iowa journalism professor. Bloom's best-selling book "Postville" chronicled the clash of cultures between residents of a small Iowa town and Lubavitchers who moved to the Midwest to operate a kosher slaughterhouse. "For them, this is a deadly serious holy war," he added.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/lifestyle/sfl-jrecruitsep29,0,164882.story?coll=sfla-features-headlines

Prisinzano Says Legal Highs Soon Won't Be (New Scientist, Sept. 29)
"Legal highs" including salvia divonorum are becoming increasingly popular and are easily available. But THOMAS PRISINZANO, who studies natural medicinal products in the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy, predicts they won't be legal for long. Prisinzano, who is studying salvia to research new methods for treating substance abuse and pain, believes it is only a matter of time. "If LSD is schedule 1, then salvia will almost certainly be classed the same," he says.
http://www.newscientist.com/channel/health/mg19125711.000

UI Alumna Vies For Bachelor's Heart (Daily Herald, Sept. 29)
Jeannette Pawula, who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a degree in secondary education, is one of the hopefuls in ABC's new "The Bachelor: Rome" series. This time the bachelor is Prince Lorenzo Borghese, a 34-year-old cosmetics entrepreneur. The Daily Herald is a suburban Chicago publication.
http://www.dailyherald.com/story.asp?id=233056

Activities For Older Adults Offered (News Gazette, Sept. 29)
The University of Illinois has established the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, a member-driven, fee-based program for people age 50 and older. The Bernard Osher Foundation, a philanthropic organization based in San Francisco, has helped found over 90 other such institutes in 39 states, including institutes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Michigan and University of Kansas. The newspaper is based in Illinois. http://www.news-gazette.com/news/u_of_i/2006/09/29/activities_for_older_adults_to_be_offered_at_ui

IEM Seen As Election Indicator (CNN, Sept. 28)
CNN's Jeff Greenfield said the University of Iowa Business School have created an electronic futures market, where anyone can bet on political events. It's real money, although there is a maximum of $500, to prevent some megabucks partisan from gaming the system.

So, in a political campaign, like the last presidential race, the better the candidate is doing, the higher the price of his futures contract. Unlike polling, there is no scientific sampling. By election day in 2004, the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS suggested that Bush would get just about 51 percent of the total, while Kerry would get about 48 percent. That is exactly what the final result was. This year, in the Senate, the overwhelming action in the IEM's Congressional Control market is on the Republicans keeping control. On the House side, in the last week or so, the action has shifted a bit toward the view of Republicans holding the House.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=d01e339d5c9047ba0a3de2a23e43bb37&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVb&_md5=c71f1cb40ff760758722f898e3deb1ac

Pai Attended Writers' Workshop (Santa Barbara Independent, Sept. 28)
Pai Hsien-Yung, a best-selling author in China whose popularity has been compared to rock-star status, attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP in the 1950s. He has taught at the University of California at Santa Barbara for three decades. UCSB professor of Taiwan studies and East Asian languages Kuo-Ch'ing Tu recently said, "Kenneth Pai is probably the most famous contemporary writer in the Chinese Diaspora, often mentioned in conversation among Chinese intellectuals as a potential candidate for the Nobel Prize."
http://www.independent.com/archives/2006/09/peony_dreams.html

Soldiers' Votes Could Be At Risk (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Sept. 28)
Just weeks before the November election, the Pentagon is struggling to fix its system for handling the votes of soldiers overseas. Yet experts in computer security and election technology say the Pentagon's current attempt to keep those ballots from being rejected in large numbers, as they have been in past elections, has created a system that is ripe for fraud. During the next six weeks, thousands of service members are expected to fax or e-mail ballots over international communications networks that are susceptible to interception and tampering, putting those votes at risk. "I can't for the life of me figure out how the Defense Department decided this is the right thing to do,'' said DOUG JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Minnesota. The article originally appeared in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS. http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/business/technology/15629523.htm

Congressional Seat Seen as Must-Win (Time, Sept. 28)
Republican Jim Nussle is giving up his seat representing Iowa's 1st district to run for governor, making this rare open seat a must-win if the Democrats have any real hope of regaining control of the House of Representatives. Democrat Bruce Braley leading by seven percentage points over Republican Mike Whalen in pollsThis explains why Presidential Advisor Karl Rove and Vice President Dick Cheney have also shown up for campaign fundraisers near the Mississippi River. Meanwhile, national party dollars continue to flood in - and so do national party stars, including Laura Bush and Barack Obama, who is scheduled to visit this coming weekend. But, says the University of Iowa's PEVERILL SQUIRE, "I don't think either candidate wants to appear as being too attuned with Washington this time around." http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1540771,00.html

UI Is Center For Huntington's Disease Treatment (Courier-Journal, Sept. 28)
Huntington's disease, a progressive disease that causes nerve cells to waste away. Although it was first documented in 1872, many people don't know it exists. JOANNE WOJCIESZEK, a co-director of the IU Center and associate professor of neurology at IU School of Medicine, said human trials should begin in the next few years for a drug that stops the abnormal gene from producing abnormal proteins that cause the disease. The University of Iowa is the main center for that work. The newspaper serves Louisville, Ky. http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060928/FEATURES03/609280317

Lie Study Tipped Off Stock Options Investigation (Financial Director, Sept. 28
Tipped off by an academic study, which showed that more than 2,000 companies may have backdated options between 1996 and 2005, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) began investigating options backdating in earnest last spring. The study came from ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa and has now become required reading for those interested in executive compensation. Dr Lie doesn't name any companies, but suggests that the practice of backdating grant dates to boost senior executives' bank accounts is widespread among US issuers. The publication is based in the United Kingdom.
http://www.financialdirector.co.uk/financial-director/analysis/2165241/bcakdating-comes-fore

UI Finishes Second In Sex Health Survey (New Haven Daily Register, Sept. 28)
The sons and daughters of Eli finished first in this year's first Trojan Sexual Health Report Card. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA finished in second place in the survey, that ranked colleges in such categories as STD prevention, free condoms, and counseling. The Daily Register is based in Connecticut. Regstration is required to enter the site.
http://www.nhregister.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=17255625&BRD=1281&PAG=461&dept_id=7576&rfi=6

UI Is Main Huntington's Research Site (Louisville Courier-Journal, Sept. 28)
A story about Huntington's Disease explains that human trials should begin in the next few years for a drug that stops the abnormal gene from producing abnormal proteins that cause the disease, she said. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is the main center for that work.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060928/FEATURES03/609280317/1012/FEATURES

Lie Study Required Reading (Financial Director, Sept. 28)
UK finance directors have never been offered the lucrative mega-million stock option packages that American CFOs regularly rake in, but as a result they've been shielded from the latest pay scandal. The US stock options backdating furore hasn't spiked the interest of UK regulators because stringent governance standards here prevent any serious fiddling with grant dates. Tipped off by an academic study, which showed that more than 2,000 companies may have backdated options between 1996 and 2005, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) began investigating options backdating in earnest last spring. The study came from ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa and has now become required reading for those interested in executive compensation. Dr Lie doesn't name any companies, but suggests that the practice of backdating grant dates to boost senior executives' bank accounts is widespread among US issuers. Financial Director is published in the United Kingdom.
http://www.whatpc.co.uk/financial-director/analysis/2165241/bcakdating-comes-fore

Lie Uncovered Backdating Scandal (Hartford Courant, Sept. 28)
A framed single share of Enron Corp. stock hangs on the wall of University of Iowa finance professor ERIK LIE's office. The stock, purchased in 2002 when Enron's value hit rock bottom, features the inscription "Respect. Integrity. Communication. Excellence." That served as the disgraced energy company's corporate slogan. "It's a good reminder for people who forget," said Lie. In executive suites across the country, there are plenty of CEOs, financial officers and board members who might like to forget Lie. From his second floor office at Iowa's Tippie College of Business, Lie spent months analyzing data to demonstrate how companies were illegally and retroactively timing stock option grants to fatten bonuses paid to top executives. His work is widely credited with exposing the latest scandal to rattle corporate America.
www.courant.com

Kutcher Attended UI (Daily Herald, Sept. 28)
A story about actor Ashton Kutcher notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before leaving for a career in modeling and acting. The Daily Herald is based in Provo, UT.
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/194328/3/

A story on the same topic appeared in the TORONTO SUN:

http://torontosun.com/Entertainment/Movies/2006/09/28/1911521-sun.html

Playwright Gilman Attended UI (Rocktown Weekly, Sept. 27)
"The Sweetest Swing in Baseball" opened at London's Royal Court Theatre in March 2004. Author Rebecca Gilman attended Middlebury College in Vermont and Birmingham Southern University, worked on a graduate degree in English at the University of Virginia and finished her formal education in the playwriting program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Her best-known plays are "The Glory of Living" (1997), "Spinning Into Butter" (1999), "Boy Gets Girl" (2000) and "Blue Serge" (2002).
http://www.rocktownweekly.com/artsandentertainment_details.php?AID=6526&sub=Escape

Weinstock Comments On Allergy Epidemic (Cosmos, Sept. 27)
Allergies seem to be epidemic, and medical researchers are looking into the human immune system in a variety of studies. In the U.S., parasitologist JOEL WEINSTOCK from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is using pig whipworms (Trichuris suis) to treat a chronic bowel disorder called ulcerative colitis. People with this disease have immune systems that are so overactive, they literally attack and breaks down the gut - as if they were "allergic" to themselves. Every three weeks, Weinstock's patients drink a glass of tonic with some worm eggs mixed in. These hatch and attach to the lining of the intestine, where they force the immune system to produce cells that dampen immune reactions, reducing the inflammation that makes this disease so painful. Cosmos is a science magazine published in Australia.
http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/node/695

IEM Tracks Congressional Control (Wall Street Journal, Sept. 27)
Stock market gains and declining gasoline prices are likely helping boost Republican odds for holding the House and Senate in some market-style exchanges. In the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, a futures market operated for research purposes by economics professors at the University of Iowa, the latest trading data suggests a 55 percent probability that Republicans will keep control of the House, up from 37 percent just a few weeks ago. As for the big kahuna - control of both chambers of Congress - IEM traders are currently placing a 59% likelihood that Republicans will still be calling the shots in both chambers after the Nov. 7 midterm elections, up from 38% earlier this month.
http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2006/09/27/betting-republican/

Cause Found for Van Allen Belt Gaps (Science Daily, Sept. 27)
A team of British and U.S. scientists says a gap in the Van Allen radiation belts was formed by natural wave turbulence in space. That discovery ends years of controversy among space scientists about the mechanisms responsible for causing the gap. Based on analysis of satellite wave data collected over 13 months, lead researcher Nigel Meredith of the British Antarctic Survey in Cambridge, England, and colleagues from the University of California-Los Angeles and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, say the gap is most likely formed by natural wave turbulence in space, rather than by lightning as an alternative theory suggests.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060926171157.htm

Jones: Military Voting Procedures Ripe For Fraud (San Jose Mercury News, Sept. 27)
Just weeks before the November election, the Pentagon is struggling to fix its system for handling the votes of soldiers overseas. Yet experts in computer security and election technology say the Pentagon's current attempt to keep those ballots from being rejected in large numbers, as they have been in past elections, has created a system that is ripe for fraud. During the next six weeks, thousands of service members are expected to fax or e-mail ballots over international communications networks that are susceptible to interception and tampering, putting those votes at risk. ``I can't for the life of me figure out how the Defense Department decided this is the right thing to do,'' said DOUG JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. The same story appeared on the Web site of the ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/breaking_news/15627858.htm

Poet Laureate Attended UI (The Oregonian, Sept. 27)
In a story about a celebration of the life and work of William Stafford, the late poet laureate of Oregon, it's noted that he earned a doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1954. http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/rick_bella/index.ssf?/base/metro_southwest_news/1159334928130920.xml&coll=7

Study Show High Mold Levels in New Orleans (Innovations Report, Sept. 26)
In a study assessing flood clean-up procedures in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, a team of scientists led by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, report that household levels of mold and bacterial endotoxins in three single-family homes were so considerable that they equaled or surpassed those in waste-water treatment plants, cotton mills, and agricultural environments. The project was carried out by the Mailman School, and several other academic institutions including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/studies/report-71123.html

Cause Found for Van Allen Belt Gaps (Daily India, Sept. 26)
A team of British and U.S. scientists says a gap in the Van Allen radiation belts was formed by natural wave turbulence in space. That discovery ends years of controversy among space scientists about the mechanisms responsible for causing the gap. Based on analysis of satellite wave data collected over 13 months, lead researcher Nigel Meredith of the British Antarctic Survey in Cambridge, England, and colleagues from the University of California-Los Angeles and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, say the gap is most likely formed by natural wave turbulence in space, rather than by lightning as an alternative theory suggests. The story appeared on the UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL wire.
http://www.dailyindia.com/show/63617.php/Cause-found-for-Van-Allen-belt-gaps

British Regulators Warns Companies About Stock Option Malpractice (The Guardian, Sept. 26)
The Financial Services Authority, a regulatory authority in the United Kingdom, is warning stock market-listed companies and directors that they face public sanction and unlimited fines if they try to manipulate stock options. Spurred by official investigations into practices in the United States, the City regulator is reminding companies that options awards - used to motivate and reward directors - are subject to its "market abuse" regime. The FSA has been prompted to address the issue of options grants after its US counterpart, the Securities and Exchange Commission, began investigating whether American companies had manipulated the dates of grants to executives in an attempt to boost the profits that might be made. Professor ERIK LIE, of the University of Iowa, has conducted research into 8,000 US companies. This appears to indicate that at least 1,000 had manipulated or backdated the granting of options.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/frontpage/story/0,,1881164,00.html

Gayley Comments on Star's Potential Breaking Apart (MSNBC.com, Sept. 26)
A sizzling-hot star is spinning around at near break-up velocity, according to a new study. Astronomers wonder if material will be ejected from the star, called Alpha Arae. Keeping gas particles swirling together in a disk requires top speed. "For material to be in orbit in a disk, it requires a great deal of angular momentum," said KEN GAYLEY, a researcher at the University of Iowa.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15001535/

Kutcher Attended UI (Washington Post, Sept. 26)
In a profile of actor Ashton Kutcher, it's noted that he enrolled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and at 19, entered and won a "Fresh Faces of Iowa" modeling competition on a whim -- the big prize was at trip to New York City. He ended up staying in New York City to model and didn't return to the UI.  The article also appeared in the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/09/22/AR2006092200251.html?sub=AR

Professors Create New Major (Times Record, Sept. 25)
Two business assistant professors at the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith are marketing a new major. Jerry Peerbolte and Terry Gabel teach marketing classes that were once just electives, but in the spring will become requirements of a newly approved marketing major. Gabel has a bachelor's degree in marketing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, his master's from Texas A&M University and his doctorate in marketing from the University of Memphis. The newspaper is based in Fort Smith, Ark. http://www.swtimes.com/articles/2006/09/25/news/news04.txt

Jones Alerted Public To E-Vote Vulnerabilities (New York Times, Sept. 24)
Recent research at Princeton University has verified the e-vote vulnerabilities about which University of Iowa computer security expert DOUGLAS JONES has been sounding alarms for years. Reprinted in many other papers.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/24/business/yourmoney/24digi.html

Fisher, Peters Estimated Business Inducements (Dayton Daily News, Sept. 24)
Getting a handle on how much states and local governments spend - or forfeit - to attract businesses and jobs is tough. But PETER FISHER and ALAN PETERS made an analysis at the University of Iowa a couple of years ago, coming up with an estimate of $50 billion. They are faculty members in Urban and Regional Planning.
http://www.daytondailynews.com/opinion/content/oh/story/opinions/editorial/2006/09/24/ddn092406econchart.html?cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=22

Van Allen Contributed Until The End (Toronto Star, Sept. 24)
It's been said that scientists seldom make important contributions after mid-life. But just two weeks before his death on Aug. 9, the American Institute of Physics reported that University of Iowa physicist JAMES VAN ALLEN had worked out a formula that showed that the chance of a collision between the Earth and an asteroid is enhanced by the gravitational pull between the two bodies.
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&pubid=968163964505&cid=1159011488894&call_page=TS_@Biz&call_pageid=971794782442&call_pagepath=Business/@Biz

Black: Compulsive Shoppers Court Financial Ruin (Winona Daily News, Sept. 24)
Uncontrolled shopping is a serious problem that can hurt relationships, ruin your credit and severely damage your bank account. Aside from hitting stores frequently, compulsive shoppers fantasize about their future purchases, find the process intensely exciting and feel guilty after they've finished buying, said DR. DONALD BLACK, professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. This story also appeared in the NEWS-PRESS of southwest Florida.
http://www.winonadailynews.com/articles/2006/09/24/connections/24connections.txt

Cook Rides Solar Bike (Mankato Free Press, Sept. 23)
University of Iowa Professor TOM COOK rode an eye-catching solar-powered bike in the eight-day Green Bike Tour through southern Minnesota, southeastern South Dakota, northeast Nebraska and northern Iowa. The point of the tour is to get people talking about the connection between energy, transportation, the environment and the economy. DAVID OSTERBERG, a UI professor of occupational and environmental health, also participated.
http://www.mankatofreepress.com/features/local_story_266235804.html?keyword=topstory

Fine Arts Center Director Judges Films (The Daily Journal, Sept. 22)
September Shorts will screen 17 independently produced short films Friday at Zelphy's Liberation Center for the Performing Arts in Millville, New Jersey. One of the judges for the film festival is Gregory R. Hambleton is the director of the Frank Guaracini, Jr. Fine and Performing Arts Center at Cumberland County College.  He has designed sets and lights for theater and dance for more than 30 years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Northern Iowa, as well as the Cumberland County College. The newspaper is based in New Jersey. http://www.thedailyjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060921/LIFESTYLE/609210309/1024

Dark Comedy Based on Movie (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 22)
"The Last Supper"--in its U.S. premiere from Infusion Theatre at the Chopin Theatre in Chicago--is a play with a cinematic counterpart as well. This production started out as a 1995 movie, a supposed dark comedy starring Cameron Diaz, Ron Eldard, Annabeth Gish and Courtney B. Vance as housemates and liberal graduate students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who systematically poison their dinner guests with tainted wine. They are killing in the name of the greater good: they only invite (and murder) those who hold extremist conservative beliefs the group finds dangerous.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/stage/chi-0609220188sep22,1,442668.story

UI Part Of Sexual Health Services Ranking (Inside Higher Education, Sept. 22)
The Trojan Sexual Health Report Card is a new ranking, released by the condom company, on colleges' policies and services. Institutions were judged on such factors as the availability of condoms, other contraceptives, and HIV testing; whether student papers have a sex columnist; and education programs. Yale led the nation, followed by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://insidehighered.com/news/2006/09/22/qt

Jones Faults Voting Machines (CBS 4, Sept. 21)
A computer security expert testified Wednesday that a study has found electronic voting machines like those approved for Colorado's elections can be tampered with and reprogrammed in a matter of minutes. DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa computer science professor, said Finnish computer expert Harry Hursti found problems with the Diebold TSX machine earlier this year in Utah. Jones' testimony came in a lawsuit filed in Denver District Court by 13 voters who want a judge to bar the use of these voting machines in the November election, saying they are unreliable. With the election only six weeks away, they've also suggested stopgap measures to help ensure the machines count votes accurately. The television station is located in Denver, Colo. A similar story appeared on the website of KUSA-TV and the LONGMONT DAILY TIMES-CALL in Colorado. http://cbs4denver.com/local/local_story_264095210.html

Novelist Graduated From Iowa Writers' Workshop (Daily Freeman, Sept. 21)
Kim Edwards debut novel, "The Memory Keeper's Daughter, " recently was at the top of The New York Times list of best sellers for paperback fiction. It's the the story of a child born with Downs Syndrome and the web of family secrets and lies that follow. She is an assistant English professor at the University of Kentucky, a graduate of the esteemed IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University Of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Kentucky.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=17219291&BRD=1769&PAG=461&dept_id=81975&rfi=6

Lie Uncovered Backdating Scandal (New York Times, Sept. 21)
A framed single share of Enron Corp. stock hangs on the wall of University of Iowa finance professor ERIK LIE's office. The stock, purchased in 2002 when Enron's value hit rock bottom, features the inscription "Respect. Integrity. Communication. Excellence." That served as the disgraced energy company's corporate slogan. "It's a good reminder for people who forget," said Lie. In executive suites across the country, there are plenty of CEOs, financial officers and board members who might like to forget Lie. From his second floor office at Iowa's Tippie College of Business, Lie spent months analyzing data to demonstrate how companies were illegally and retroactively timing stock option grants to fatten bonuses paid to top executives. His work is widely credited with exposing the latest scandal to rattle corporate America. The same story was published on the Web sites of the BOSTON GLOBE, WASHINGTON POST, NEWSDAY, KANSAS CITY STAR, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER, DETROIT NEWS, AMARILLO GLOBE NEWS, PORTLAND OREGONIAN, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, JACKSON (WY) NEWS TRIBUNE, CHARLESTON (WV) GAZETTE, SHARE WATCH, ABC NEWS.COM, CBS NEWS.COM, OTTAWA (CANADA) RECORDER and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/business/AP-Backdating-Sleuth.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Jones Says Electronic Voting Is Unsecure (Aurora Sentinel, Sept. 21)
Claiming unsecure electronic voting machines are a threat to the integrity of the November elections, 13 Colorado voters are asking a judge to bar their use on grounds that the state failed to do the tests required by law. DOUGLAS JONES, an associate computer professor at the University of Iowa, said in a deposition for the lawsuit that many states rushed to get electronic voting machines to comply with new federal laws after problems with the 2000 presidential election. He said many electronic voting systems rely on old technology. "While many older voting systems do have severe defects, the rush to fund the purchase of large numbers of new voting systems in the aftermath of passage of the Help America Vote Act of 2002 was a mistake. The potential gains from a corrupt election are immense," Jones said. The Sentinel is published in Colorado. The story also appeared on the Web sites of the BOULDER DAILY CAMERA and GREELEY TRIBUNE.
http://www.aurorasentinel.com/main.asp?SectionID=55&SubSectionID=143&ArticleID=14085

Nickelsburg: Scrolls Affirmed OT Translations (Post Intelligencer, Sept. 20)
When the Dead Sea Scrolls were first discovered in a cave at Qumran in the late 1940s, the texts in many ways shook up our ideas of Christianity and the Bible. But the scrolls also attest to "the general reliability of the Hebrew text on which most modern translations have been made," agreed GEORGE NICKELSBURG, professor emeritus of religion at the University of Iowa and an Issaquah, Wash., resident. At the same time, Nickelsburg said, the discovery indicates that in "the centuries before the turn of the era, Jews saw the texts of scripture as a dynamic entity whose wording could be tweaked here and there so that it spoke relevantly to new times and changing circumstances," he said. The paper is based in Seattle.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/285572_deadseatabmain.html

Andreasen Discusses Creativity In Q&A (Indianapolis Star, Sept. 20)
How does the human brain create an evocative haiku, a beautiful painting, a sculpture or even a delicious new dinner? Neuroscientist NANCY ANDREASEN tackles that question in her book to be released this fall in paperback: "The Creating Brain: The Neuroscience of Genius." And who better to take on that topic than Andreasen, a psychiatrist at the University of Iowa, who started her career with a Ph.D. not in neuroscience but in Renaissance literature?
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060920/LIVING/609200313/1007/LIVING

IEM Results 'Eerily Close' To Outcome (Investor's Business Daily, Sept. 20)
A story about electronic prediction markets points out that in 2004 the Iowa Electronic Markets, a research vehicle operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, gave President Bush a 51.4 percent chance of winning re-election vs. a 48.6 percent chance for a Sen. John Kerry victory. Those totals were eerily close to the popular vote results.
http://www.investors.com/editorial/IBDArticles.asp?artsec=16&issue=20060919

Alumnus Running For Congress (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Sept. 20)
A columnist writes about Sium Sium, a Republican candidate for the U.S. House in Minnesota who has a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/state/minnesota/15559830.htm

Alumnus Developing Program At Arkansas (Northwest Arkansas News, Sept. 20)
William McComas joined the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville this fall to help develop a doctorate in science education. It's one effort on behalf of the College of Education and Health Professions to increase its math, science and technology offerings. The goal is to train much-needed math and science teachers for Arkansas public schools. McComas has a doctoral degree in science education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and serves on the board of directors of the Association for Science Teacher Education. The News is based in Fayetteville, AR. The same story appeared on the Web site of the ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT GAZETTE.
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/167128/

Alumnus Named Top AP Reporter (Las Vegas Review Journal, Sept. 20)
Scott Sonner, Reno correspondent for The Associated Press, has been named AP's Nevada staffer of the year. Sonner was recognized for his contributions to the wire service's state report in Nevada, including breaking several important stories on such subjects as a polluted copper mine in Lyon County, the theft of petroglyphs near Reno, the Donner Party and the fight to save a rare butterfly. Sonner has been the AP's Reno correspondent since 1998. Before that he was the AP's Northwest regional reporter in Washington, D.C., from 1990 to 1998 and worked in the Omaha bureau from 1988 to 1990. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1982.
http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2006/Sep-19-Tue-2006/news/9733725.html

Alumnus Stages Chinese Theater Epic (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 20)
Four hundred years ago, the poet Tang Xianzu wrote the Chinese version of "Romeo and Juliet" - except that for his Juliet, the power of love manages to overcome social censure, as well as death itself. Tang's epic opera, "The Peony Pavilion," is one of the most celebrated in Chinese drama, and the 19-hour, 55-scene work has been a lifelong fascination of Kenneth Pai, a noted Chinese American writer, retired University of California professor and, now, theater impresario. Pai has spent the last three years shaping an ambitious new nine-hour "Peony," and after lauded appearances in China, this version, called "the young lover's edition," has landed in California. It will be performed over several nights this week at the Barclay Theatre at Irvine and next weekend at Royce Hall at UCLA, where it launches UCLA Live's Fifth International Theatre Festival. Pai and his family left Shanghai for Taiwan after the Communist takeover in 1949, and in 1963 he came to the United States to study creative writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.calendarlive.com/music/cl-et-peony20sep20,0,5017275.story?coll=cl-music

Hall Comments on Dementia (Honolulu Star Bulletin, Sept. 19)
Uninhibited spending and loss of judgment are typical components of the degenerative brain disease called Frontotemporal Dementia, or FTD, that attacks slowly and yields devastating results, often stripping patients of language skills and inciting behavior so bizarre, destructive and unpredictable that they're frequently misdiagnosed with psychiatric disorders. Experts regard FTD as the second most prevalent cause of dementia in patients under 65. Alzheimer's, which affects 4.5 million people in the United States, causes 60 percent of dementias. But FTD strikes otherwise healthy individuals in their 40s, 50s and early 60s, often at the peak of their earning power and while they are raising children. In addition, symptoms may vary enough that casual acquaintances and workmates underestimate the severity of the illness. But that's not true for those who live with the patient."With FTD, we see families in major crisis," said GERI HALL, a clinical professor at the University of Iowa College of Nursing and an advance-practice nurse who has worked with hundreds of FTD patients since 1978. "The problem is that the patient has not been determined to be incompetent, and nobody wants to take away the autonomy of someone who is not impaired. So the caregiver is constantly being barraged by negative restrictive feedback that he is trying to limit this competent person. It's like swimming in one of those endless pools." The newspaper is based in Hawaii.
http://starbulletin.com/2006/09/19/news/story04.html

DNA Technology Licensed (Houston Chronicle Sept. 19)
Vical Inc. said Tuesday it granted non-exclusive, academic licenses for its DNA delivery technology patents to six additional research institutions, including the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Notre Dame, University of Pittsburgh, and University of Washington. The academic licenses are intended to encourage widespread commercial use of the company's DNA delivery technologies in the development of new antibodies, vaccines, therapeutic proteins, and diagnostics. The academic licenses allow university researchers to use Vical's technology free of charge for educational and internal, non-commercial research purposes. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared on the website of MSN MONEY.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/fn/4197670.html

Alumnus Awared Professorship (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Sept. 19)
William McComas of the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has been awarded the Parks Family Endowed Professorship in Science and Technology Education at UA. It's one effort on behalf of the College of Education and Health Professions to increase its math, science and technology offerings. McComas has a doctoral degree in science education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/167128/

Black Comments on Compulsive Shopping (Macon Telegraph, Sept. 19)
Some call it therapy, others call it an irresistible urge. Either way, uncontrolled shopping is a serious problem that can hurt relationships, ruin your credit and severely damage your bank account. Between 2 percent and 8 percent of the U.S. population are considered compulsive shoppers - outnumbering the country's gambling addicts. Nine of 10 mega-shoppers are women. How do you know if your shopping is out of control?  Aside from hitting stores frequently, compulsive shoppers fantasize about their future purchases, find the process intensely exciting and feel guilty after they've finished buying, said DR. DONALD BLACK, professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.  The newspaper is based in Georgia. The article also appeared in the ARIZONA REPUBLIC, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS-DEMOCRAT and the FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL.
http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/living/15550128.htm

Jones Reports on Computer Voting (Rocky Mountain News, Sept. 19)
Some computerized voting machines approved by Colorado officials for November's election can be reprogrammed over the Internet, according to expert witnesses for the group trying to prevent their use.

The witness reports are among the documents filed for Wednesday's trial in the case, which claims the state failed to follow state law in certifying the machines. DOUG JONES of the University of Iowa said in his report that Diebold machines can be reprogrammed over the Internet, and that rules set by Secretary of State Gigi Dennis indirectly require all of the computerized voting machines to be connected to a network. Security rules should call for election equipment to be kept physically separated from any network, he wrote. The newspaper is based in Colorado. http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_5004232,00.html

Journalist Honored (Las Vegas Sun, Sept. 18)
Scott Sonner, Reno correspondent for The Associated Press, has been named AP's Nevada Staffer of the Year. Sonner was recognized for his contributions to the AP's state report in Nevada, including breaking several important stories on such subjects as a polluted northern Nevada copper mine, the theft of petroglyphs near Reno, the Donner Party and the fight to save a rare butterfly. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1982. http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nevada/2006/sep/18/091810711.html

Sleep Study Noted (WFTS-TV, Sept. 18)
A new study reveals the impact that a lack of sleep can have on your health. This study found the less a person sleeps, the more body fat they may have. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers say the link was seen regardless of a person's age, sex, education, physical job demands, income, depression, marital status or alcohol use. It's thought that a lack of sleep may disrupt hormones that regulate fat. The TV station is located in Tampa, Fla.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=bd616a6d37942865dabad02c85c8080a&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVb&_md5=c67b660d032b057dd0b8b32f98230923

UI Research On Racial Identity Is Cited (Medical News Today, Sept. 18)
UI research has shown that racial identity is not as straightforward as is commonly assumed. In fact, adolescents from multi-racial families tend to shift their reported racial category as they move from early adolescence to young adulthood, and more adolescents changed their category over time than stayed the same. "We conducted a preliminary exploration of various social and psychological factors that influence this fluidity," said lead author STEVEN HITLIN, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology at the University of Iowa, "and found suggestive evidence that higher socioeconomic background and homogeneous racial environments led to a lower chance of adolescents switching racial identification over time."
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=51980&nfid=mnf

UI Dancer Is Now Taoist Practitioner (LaCrosse Tribune, Sept. 18)
ANDREA ISAACS
, who earned a master's degree in modern dance from the University of Iowa, and taught dance for many years, is now a Taoist practitioner whose work emphasizes charting neural pathways through the Enneagram, a system for identifying personality types. "It's a tool that can be used psychologically, spiritually, in business, in leadership, in personal development, in the arts," she said.
http://www.lacrossetribune.com/articles/2006/09/18/faith/faith2.txt

Herr Comments On Pain Awareness (Health News Digest, Sept. 18)
September is Pain Awareness Month, and UI faculty member Keela Herr notes the special challenges of pain management in older adults. "The prevalence of persistent pain climbs steadily with advancing age," said KEELA HERR, R.N., Ph.D., professor and chair of adult and gerontological nursing at the University of Iowa. "A major problem inhibiting treatment success is that older people mistakenly think they have to live with pain and also are worried about becoming addicted to pain medication. This makes pain assessments in older adults a difficult challenge because they tend to underreport their pain."
http://healthnewsdigest.com/news/article_4461.shtml

UI Press Book Is Profiled (Journal-Sentinel, Sept. 16)
Book columnist Geeta Sharma-Jensen notes the contribution of Door County writer Norb Blei to "Rooted: Seven Midwest Writers of Place," published by THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. "Ralph Ellison once famously said that the search for identity is the American theme. Geography - place - has always been a major trope of American literature," the article states. "Door County writer Norb Blei is among those who've spent decades meditating on this theme. Now, Blei's inspiration has made him a subject of a new book that explores the relationship between place and art." The Journal-Sentinel is published in Milwaukee.
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=497783

UI Research Advances Understanding Of Evolution (Science Daily, Sept. 16)
DNA analysis by DEBASHISH BHATTACHARYA and colleagues HWAN SU YOON and ADRIAN REYES-PRIETO at the University of Iowa has advanced the understanding of ancient evolutionary events that were crucial in the evolution of plants. Their research appears in the current issue of Current Biology.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060915205033.htm

Schoen Exposed Eugenics Program (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 16)
States are now grappling with possible restitution of victims of eugenics programs, undertaken from the 1920s to the 1970s, which forced many "less desirable" women to undergo sterilization surgery. JOHANNA SCHOEN, a University of Iowa professor who exposed the eugenics program in North Carolina while working on her doctoral dissertation, said many of the women battled depression. Some said the surgery led to other gynecological problems. At least 7,500 poor women in North Carolina were sterilized during the eugenics era.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/chi-0609160179sep16,1,7600859.story?coll=chi-opinionfront-hed

Press Hall Of Fame Inducts UI Alumnus (Columbia Daily Tribune, Sept. 16)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
alumnus Paul Stevens, a 33-year veteran of The Associated Press who now oversees the news cooperative's central U.S. bureaus, has been inducted into the Missouri Press Association Hall of Fame.
http://www.columbiatribune.com/2006/Sep/20060916News012.asp

Bloom Comments On Lubavichers (Journal Gazette, Sept. 16)
While some religions are short of priests or ministers, the Chabad-Lubavitch sect of Judaism has an excess, as "schluchim," or members of rabbi-and-wife emissary teams, wait to be sent around the world. A surplus of about 200 new rabbis and their wives are now staged in Brooklyn, awaiting assignments. "They have this sense of manifest destiny to promulgate, to proselytize, to spread the word everywhere, every day, throughout the world," said STEPHEN BLOOM, a University of Iowa journalism professor. His best-selling book, "Postville," chronicled the clash of cultures between residents of a small Iowa town and Lubavitchers who moved to the Midwest to operate a kosher slaughterhouse. "For them, this is a deadly serious holy war," he added. The Journal Gazette is published in Ft. Wayne, Ind.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/living/15532876.htm

Italy's Stability-Control Mandate Cites UI Research (DueMotori, Sept. 15)
The government of Italy has announced that ESP(R) stability control, a safety system pioneered by Mercedes-Benz, will be required on all future cars. Mercedes-Benz study from 2002 that revealed a 40 percent reduction in "loss of control" accidents after the company made ESP standard equipment on all models. Studies by other automakers and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found similar results. DueMotori is published in Italy.
http://www.duemotori.com/news/auto_news/8038_ESP_Stability_Control_to_be_Mandated_for_All_Cars.php

UI-Bound Student Cited In College Funding Story (Kiplinger's, Sept. 15)
A columnist advises approaching funding of a child's college education as a joint venture between the parents and the student. She cites on instance of a young woman named Ashley who had set her sights on attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She received enough financial aid to cover tuition and fees, but came up short on room and board. Rather than have Ashley go into debt, her mother, a single parent, recommended that she attend a community college. Ashley did, with the intention of saving enough to transfer.
http://www.kiplinger.com/personalfinance/magazine/archives/2006/09/msk.html

UI Study Backs Finding On Vehicle Stability Control (IndiaCar, Sept. 15)
The Federal government announced today that ESP(R) stability control, a safety system pioneered by Mercedes-Benz, will be required on all future cars. In making the announcement, the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration (NHTSA) cited its analysis showing conclusively that cars equipped with stability control are 35 percent less likely to be involved in a collision. Now being used by other manufacturers, stability control systems reduce the likelihood of all fatal accidents by 43 percent and fatal single-vehicle crashes by 56 percent, according to another accident study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). When the IIHS recently updated the results of their 2004 accident study, they found that stability control provides even more life-saving benefits for SUVs. The NHTSA and IIHS analysis corroborates a Mercedes-Benz study from 2002 that revealed a 40 percent reduction in "loss of control" accidents after the company made ESP standard equipment on all models. Studies by other automakers and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found similar results. The publication is based in India. A version of the story also ran on the Italian Website AUTOCORSE.IT.
http://www.indiacar.net/news/n40078.htm

UI Suicide Case Cited (Chronicle, Sept. 15)
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology settled a lawsuit this month that had been filed by the parents of Julie Carpenter, a student who committed suicide in 2001. The plaintiffs had accused MIT of failing to prevent their daughter's death despite knowledge that she was suicidal. Before Ms. Carpenter took her life, she had complained that a male student in her dorm was stalking her. After MIT removed the man from the dorm, Ms. Carpenter learned that he would be able to reapply for a room in the building the following semester. A few days later, she took her life by ingesting cyanide. College officials around the nation have closely watched recent lawsuits arising from student suicides. In several prominent cases, judges and juries have not expanded the legal liability of colleges. In 2000, for instance, the Iowa Supreme Court found that nontherapist officials at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA had no legal obligation to notify parents that their son was in "impending danger" before he took his own life.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i04/04a03903.htm

Hesli Says Rice Not Target Of Stereotypes (Toronto Globe and Mail, Sept. 14)
According to gossip columns, U.S. Secretary of State Condeleezza Rice may be smitten with Peter MacKay, the foreign minister of Canada. Some observers question whether the speculation will hurt Rice's ability to be taken seriously, but others aren't concerned. VICKI HESLI, a politics professor at the University of Iowa, said Rice has been less a target of stereotypes than other high-profile women in politics like Senator Hillary Clinton. "Rice is more of a figurehead and people realize she is not an autonomous decision-maker,'' said Hesli. "Clinton has the potential to wield real power and this makes people who see women as emotional, rather than as rational beings, particularly uncomfortable.'' The same story appeared on the Web site of CTV, CNEWS, AOL CANADA, MACLEAN'S and numerous other Canadian news organizations.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20060913.wRice13/BNStory/Technology/?page=rss&id=..wRice13

Alumna Sings Of Religion On New Recording (Daily Record, Sept. 14)
Susan Werner has a sense of weathered skepticism when addressing religion in her new songs. It's borne out of her frustration concerning much of the self-righteousness she said she observes from various religious and political leaders in America. She will unveil some of her new spiritual songs, as well as her older cabaret and still older folk-rock songs, on Friday. Werner followed a different route to spiritual, cabaret and folk songs than most musicians. She grew up on a farm in Iowa, where she lived a simple, isolated and beautiful life until her musical interests and skill with languages took her to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and later to graduate studies in classical voice at Temple University in Philadelphia. The Daily Record is published in Morris County, NJ.
http://www.dailyrecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060914/ENT01/609140352/1082/NEWS01

Black: Shopaholics Feel Excitement, Guilt (New York Daily News, Sept. 13)
Uncontrolled shopping is a serious problem that can hurt relationships, ruin credit and severely damage bank accounts. Between 2 percent and 8 percent of the U.S. population are considered compulsive shoppers -- outnumbering the country's gambling addicts. Nine of 10 mega-shoppers are women. While the problem has existed for years, easy shopping on the Internet, stores that dazzle with enticing displays and a culture that glorifies shopping has fueled a new generation of extreme buyers. How do you know if your shopping is out of control? Aside from hitting stores frequently, compulsive shoppers fantasize about their future purchases, find the process intensely exciting and feel guilty after they've finished buying, said Dr. DONALD BLACK, professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. Not paying attention to your expenses can have severe consequences. "I had a patient who spent so much, they went bankrupt," Black said.
http://www.nydailynews.com/business/story/451806p-380246c.html

Massa: New Federal Application System Too Late (Washington Post, Sept. 13)
The federal government is in the process of designing a new online grant application process so that it will be compatible with Macintosh computers. Currently, the process only works with PCs. The new system should be ready by March, but some researchers point out that's of little help because the application deadline for many federal grants is February 1. "The big NIH deadline is Feb. 1, 2007," said JOHN S. MASSA, associate director of the University of Iowa's division of sponsored programs, in an e-mail. So a March release "isn't going to help much."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/09/12/AR2006091201445_2.html

Robinson: Disrupted Sleep Stresses Body (Online News Pakistan, Sept. 13)
If your schedule robs you of slumber, you may be setting yourself up for diabetes. But don't press the snooze bar too many times, because oversleeping might bring the same result. Those are the surprising findings of a new study that suggests too little or too much sleep could lead to the blood sugar disease, at least in older people. Dr. JENNIFER G. ROBINSON, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Iowa, said the findings make sense because disruptions in sleep rhythms put high levels of stress on the body. "We certainly are understanding, really within the last decade, about the complexities of sleep and the prevalence of sleep disorders," she said. "It's quite high, and there's certainly a lot of potential for adverse health impacts."
http://www.onlinenews.com.pk/details.php?id=102255

UI Student Believes Clinton Has Too Much Baggage (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 12)
A story assessing the chances of Sen. Hillary Clinton competing in the 2008 Democratic presidential caucus in Iowa says she has a lot of hurdles to jump. "She has too much political baggage," said Josh Murphy, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student. "Hillary Clinton has been portrayed by Republicans - with a lot of success - as a dominating, heartless type of lady, and it's going to be very hard to shake that image."
http://newsblogs.chicagotribune.com/news_theswamp/2006/09/hillary_clinton.html#more

Factory Farm Emissions Exceed UI-ISU Recommended Levels (AgriNews, Sept. 12)
An Iowa citizen advocacy group says new environmental data shows that factory farms in the state are releasing levels of ammonia above recommended safe health standards. ICCI said the data showed that levels of ammonia are consistently above the standard of 150 parts per billion recommended in a 2002 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA-Iowa State University air quality study. AgriNews is published in Minnesota.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/349284815055649.bsp

Alumnus Appointed To School Board (Beaverton Valley Times, Sept. 12)
Tom Quillin has been appointed to the school board in Beaverton, Ore. Quillin, a manager at Intel, earned his undergraduate degree in English from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.beavertonvalleytimes.com/news/story.php?story_id=115808353350268500

Alumnus is CommVault VP (Investor's Business Daily, September 12)
A profile of data protection software company CommVault notes that Alan Bunte, executive vice president and chief operating officer, has an MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.investors.com/editorial/IBDArticles.asp?artsec=26&issue=20060911

Bloom Discusses Lubavitcher Movement (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 11)
A story about the Chabad-Lubavitcher movement within Judaism points out that critics say the movement is clannish, with an unhealthy devotion to its late leader, David Eliezrie, viewed by some as the Messiah, and with overly aggressive tactics. "They have this sense of manifest destiny to promulgate, to proselytize, to spread the word everywhere, every day, throughout the world," said STEPHEN G. BLOOM, a University of Iowa journalism professor. His best-selling book, "Postville," chronicled the clash of cultures between residents of a small Iowa town and Lubavitchers who moved to the Midwest to operate a kosher slaughterhouse. "For them, this is a deadly serious holy war," he added.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-chabad11sep11,1,4233364.story

Nelson Released From Prison (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 11)
An Iowa City woman who stabbed her husband to death in 2001 was released from prison Monday after serving 3 1/2 years of a 10-year sentence and is now planning to live in Illinois. Phyllis Nelson, who was the wife of Richard Nelson, 54, executive dean of the Carver College of Medicine at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was convicted of voluntary manslaughter. The story also appeared on the Web site of the BELLEVILLE (IL) NEWS DEMOCRAT.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/illinois/chi-ap-il-nelsonreleased,1,3756723.story

Van Allen Remembered In Memorial Service (WQAD, Sept. 11)
James Van Allen will be remembered as one of America's greatest leaders in space exploration. Those who attended his memorial service Sunday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will remember him for his often comical idiosyncrasies, from smoking his pipe in non-smoking areas of the University of Iowa to gearing his car with a rope to start like a lawnmower on cold mornings. His son Peter told the more than 400 guests that his father was famous for his frugality. Van Allen, a space and physics scientist and longtime University of Iowa professor, died August 9th at the age of 91. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5391202&nav=1sW7Doua

Lie 'Getting A Little Tired' Of Backdating Scandal (Financial Times, Sept. 11)
"I'm getting a little tired of this backdating stuff," confesses ERIK LIE, assistant professor of finance at the University of Iowa. No wonder. Ever since the Norwegian academic was thrust into the spotlight six months ago as the author of ground-breaking research of stock options backdating, he has been become a reluctant star in the world of US corporate governance. (Registration required to access the article.)
https://registration.ft.com/registration/barrier?referer=http://search.ft.com/search
Results?queryTex=%22Erik+Lie%22&x=0&y=0&javascriptEnabled=true&location=http%
3A//www.ft.com/cms/s/a7610cc8-4131-11db-827f-0000779e2340.html

Folsom Discusses Whitman's Self-Reviews (International Herald Tribune, Sept. 11)
As Web communities mature into complicated structures where persistent identities - pseudonymous or not - become recognized and trusted within the group, writers are increasingly discouraged from trying to mask their identities for purposes of praising themselves or their work, a practice referred to as "sock puppetry." The writer of the article wonders whether authors famous before the Internet might have indulged in this practice were they still alive, including poet Walt Whitman, who was a prolific reviewer of his own work. ED FOLSOM, the Roy Carver professor of English at the University of Iowa and a director of the Walt Whitman online archive (whitmanarchive.org), pointed to one critic who, in 1856, condemned Whitman for setting himself up as "this rough-and-ready scorner of dishonesty," only to perpetrate "a lie and a sham" on his readers. The article originally ran in the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/09/11/bloomberg/web.0911link.php

Polumbaum: Mao More Farsighted Than Assumed (Asia News Network, Sept. 10)
Saturday is the 30th anniversary of the death of Mao Zedong, who founded the People's Republic of China on October 1, 1949 and led the nation for 27 years after that. Mao born on December 26, 1893 in Shaoshan village of Xiangtan County, Hunan Province is often lauded for uniting China after decades of misrule and internecine warlord rivalry, defending China's independence, and promoting sexual and social equality. Some foreigners with more exposure to China view Mao in that broader historical context. "My view now is that Mao had an exceedingly penetrating understanding of Chinese society and very high ideals for the creation of a self-sufficient nation with a spirit of co-operation," said JUDY POLUMBAUM, a journalism professor at the University of Iowa, who first came to China in spring 1975. "He was more farsighted than he is given credit for today."
http://www.asianewsnet.net/columnist.php?aid=4433

Strauss Comments On Accutane Study (Star Tribune, Sept. 10)
Accutane, the powerful acne drug already known to cause birth defects, seems to raise the risk for potential heart and liver problems more than doctors had expected, according to a new study. The findings came from lab tests on 13,772 patients taking the popular acne drug and underscore the need to closely monitor people taking isotretinoin, which is sold as Accutane and in three generic versions. Abnormal results for cholesterol and liver function were more common than expected. While those conditions can lead to problems over the long term, abnormal lab tests don't necessarily mean patients will develop heart or liver problems, said study co-author Dr. Lee Zane of the University of California, San Francisco. The study won't change medical practice because dermatologists already carefully test patients taking Accutane, said Dr. JOHN STRAUSS, professor emeritus at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Strauss is a former consultant for Roche Laboratories Inc., the maker of Accutane, he said. The paper is based in Jackson Hole, Wyo.
http://www.jacksonholestartrib.com/articles/2006/09/10/news/special/a21e0e91cfaef275872571d2005d35ef.txt

Edwards Attended Writers' Workshop (Arizona Daily Star, Sept. 10)
Memory Keepers Daughter, written by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop alumna KIM EDWARDS, has risen to No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list for paperback fiction. Edwards, an assistant professor of English at the University of Kentucky, has been receiving attention for the book. The novel takes place during a Lexington snowstorm in 1964 and concludes in 1989. Edwards says she picked the period to chronicle how attitudes about Down syndrome have changed.
http://www.azstarnet.com/accent/145796

Squire Comments On 2008 Primaries (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 10)
Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE, whose expertise is often tapped by the media when assessing Iowa presidential primaries, says Iowa is the ideal place for Connecticut Sen. Christopher Dodd to overcome image problems. "Because you have to visit all these local people and look them in the eye, and make yourself known, it can be easier," Squire said. "Most people wouldn't know their congressman if they passed him on the street."
http://newsblogs.chicagotribune.com/news_theswamp/2006/09/iowa_16_months_.html

Fuortes Supports Compensation For Beryllium Disease Victim (The Herald, Sept. 9)
A Florida woman's efforts to prove that her husband died of chemical exposure at a beryllium plant, and to receive compensation, found support from University of Iowa beryllium-disease expert LAWRENCE FUORTES. Fuortes found evidence of lung problems he believes are consistent with chronic beryllium disease, the article states. He also cited radiology reports from the Greenville, N.C. hospital where the husband died as descriptive of obstructive lung disease. Fuortes encouraged the family to pursue an appeal for compensation under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program. The Herald is published in Bradenton, Sarasota and Manatee, Fla.
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/news/local/15476207.htm

New Analysis Supports UI Research On Option Backdating (Business Week, Sept. 8)
A Sept. 8 study by the Center for Financial Research & Analysis, a research service for institutional investors, found only nine companies that had any options grants suspiciously timed at stock price lows since new reporting regulations took effect in 2002. "The CFRA study was consistent with other studies from professors at the University of Michigan and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA."
http://www.businessweek.com/investor/content/sep2006/pi20060908_687749.htm?chan=top+news_top+news+index_businessweek+exclusives

UI Journalism Professor Assesses Mao's Legacy (China Daily, Sept. 8)
On the 30th anniversary of Mao Zedong death, academics continue to assess his impact. "My view now is that Mao had an exceedingly penetrating understanding of Chinese society and very high ideals for the creation of a self-sufficient nation with a spirit of co-operation," said JUDY POLUMBAUM, a journalism professor at the University of Iowa, who first came to China in spring 1975. "He was more farsighted than he is given credit for today."
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2006-09/09/content_685059.htm

UI Enrollment Up (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 8)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has slightly increased its enrollment this fall, while student populations have dropped at Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa, the schools announced Wednesday. Registration is required to read this story online.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=2237705

Lie Testifies To Senate About Backdating (The Standard, Sept. 8)
Members of Congress on Wednesday said they might seek to repeal a measure that was meant to put a lid on executive pay but may have instead triggered ever-richer stock option deals. At issue is a 1993 tax provision that barred companies from deducting salaries above $1 million as a business expense unless they were tied to performance. In response, many companies curtailed executive salaries and made up the difference with the stock option grants that are at the heart of an unfolding controversy. ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa who has done influential research on the matter, told a joint meeting of the U.S. Senate Banking and Finance Committees Wednesday that timing ploys appeared to be more common among technology firms, smaller companies and those with highly volatile stock prices. From 1996 to 2005, he said, 29 percent of a large sample of firms that granted options to top executives engaged in one or more forms of manipulation.

The Standard is published in China. The same story appeared on the Web site of KCPQ-TV.
http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?pp_cat=17&art_id=26819&sid=9781032&con_type=1&d_str=20060908

UI Student Opposes Facebook.com Updates (Pittsburgh Post Gazette, Sept 8)
A story about user backlash against new features on Facebook.com notes that a student at Northwestern University teamed up with a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to start a group called Students Against Facebook News Feed, which had amassed more than 330,000 members by yesterday afternoon. A subscription is required to view this site.

The same story appeared on the Web site of the CANTON (OH) REPOSITORY, ST. PETERSRBURG TIMES, ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, DAILY HERALD (IL) and the LOUISVILLE COURIER JOURNAL.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06250/719859-96.stm

Skorton Takes Over At Cornell (Newsday, Sept. 8)
A new administration is taking over at Cornell University. David Skorton became the college's 12th president at an inauguration ceremony on the Arts Quad. He replaces Hunter Rawlings, who served as interim president since last year. Before coming to New York, Skorton led the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web sites of NEWS 10 NOW (New York) and the STATEN ISLAND DAILY ADVOCATE.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newyork/ny-bc-ny--skortoninaugurati0907sep07,0,792426.story?coll=ny-region-apnewyork

Benson Wrote Nancy Drew Books (Deseret News, Sept. 8)
A review of the book "Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her," notes that the first person to write under the Carolyn Keene name was Mildred Wirt Benson, the first woman to get a journalism degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The News is published in Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,645199563,00.html

Alumnus Owns Real Estate Agency (Wichita Eagle, Sept. 8)
A story about the new owner of a local real estate agency, Dwyn Thudium, notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/business/15455518.htm

Alumna Wins Entrepreneur Grant (Wichita Eagle, Sept. 8)
A group of Kansas entrepreneurs who will receive access to venture capital, education and seed money to develop their businesses include Lisa Friis, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Kansas in Lawrence and partner in Sunflower Biotechnology Group LLC. Friis earned her Bachelor's degree in biomedical engineering and master's in mechanical engineering from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/business/15455505.htm

Editorial Congratulates Skorton (Ithaca Journal, Sept. 7)
An editorial congratulates new Cornell University President David Skorton on his inauguration Thursday. The editorial notes that being Cornell president is a daunting challenge, but Skorton has given every indication he is up to the job. The former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA president left behind a reputation as a bridge builder who was committed to making his school and its host community close partners. After his summer tour through the Ithaca area, the early diagnosis is that the new man on East Hill earned his Midwestern reputation.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060907/OPINION01/609070481/1014

Lie Testifies To Senate About Backdating (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 7)
Members of Congress on Wednesday said they might seek to repeal a measure that was meant to put a lid on executive pay but may have instead triggered ever-richer stock option deals. At issue is a 1993 tax provision that barred companies from deducting salaries above $1 million as a business expense unless they were tied to performance. In response, many companies curtailed executive salaries and made up the difference with the stock option grants that are at the heart of an unfolding controversy. ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa who has done influential research on the matter, told a joint meeting of the U.S. Senate Banking and Finance Committees Wednesday that timing ploys appeared to be more common among technology firms, smaller companies and those with highly volatile stock prices. From 1996 to 2005, he said, 29 percent of a large sample of firms that granted options to top executives engaged in one or more forms of manipulation. The same story also appeared on the Web sites of the SEATTLE TIMES and BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-options7sep07,1,5933939.story?coll=la-headlines-business

SEC Chair Cox Lauds Lie In Senate Testimony (Wall Street Journal, Sept. 7)
A transcript of the testimony to the U.S. Senate Banking and Finance Committees of Christopher Cox, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, who said the SEC has been working with ERIK LIE, professor of finance at the University of Iowa, to decipher data that showed the backdating scandal. Cox said that Lie's data showed that before 2003, a surprising number of companies seemed to have had an uncanny ability to choose grant dates that coincided with low stock prices. A subscription is required to view this site.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115755440342755146.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

Skorton To Be Inaugurated Cornell President (Ithaca Journal, Sept. 7)
David Skorton will be inaugurated as the new president of Cornell University in ceremonies today. Skorton is the former president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060907/NEWS01/609070462/1002/NEWS01

Students Start Independent Press In Iowa City (Pop Matters, Sept. 7)
A story about Iowa City-based Impetus Press notes that its founder, Jennifer Banash, is currently a doctoral candidate in the department of English at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, yet she is far from a traditional academic. In addition to her studies, she has written three novels during her time in Iowa, all of which do more to engage popular culture than academic discourse. Her partner Willy is an artist and bookmaker, studying at the prestigious CENTER FOR THE BOOK. Willy's great grandfather was John Farrar of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and Willy even interviewed for a position at this company until he realized that they didn't know how to pronounce his great grandfather's name correctly. He subsequently decided to venture into independent publishing and make a name for himself instead.
http://www.popmatters.com/books/features/060907-impetuspress.shtml

UI Student Opposes Facebook.com Updates (Wall Street Journal, Sept. 7)
A story about user backlash against new features on Facebook.com notes that a student at Northwestern University teamed up with a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to start a group called Students Against Facebook News Feed, which had amassed more than 330,000 members by yesterday afternoon. A subscription is required to view this site.
http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB115759058710755893-i4jFRCFn5i14BdOpPjTVr1yhLJM_20061007.html?mod=tff_main_tff_top

Playwright Fried Played Football At UI (ArtVoice, Sept. 7)
A story about Buffalo, NY, poet and playwright Emmanuel "Manny" Fried notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on a football scholarship but was dropped from the team after one year and lost his scholarship because he wasn't very good. He went on to major in theater at the university. ArtVoce is published in Buffalo, NY.
http://artvoice.com/issues/v5n36/renaissance_manny

Bloom, Feldstein Collaborated On Project (Artworks Magazine, September 2006)
"The Oxford Project" took root in 1984 when PETER FELDSTEIN, a native New Yorker, studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He decided to take a picture of everyone in Oxford, Iowa. He posted a sign reading "Free pictures." "I wanted to make it as democratic as possible," Feldstein says. He snapped pictures of the entire town. There were just a handful of those too sick, too young, or too old whom he didn't get. Two decades later, Feldstein got to talking with his University of Iowa buddy, journalism professor STEPHEN G. BLOOM, and "The Oxford Project" was reborn. The new idea was an exercise in time travel, an experiment with photography and the written word. Over the last few months, Feldstein has re-shot many of the portraits, Bloom has interviewed dozens of the subjects about their lives, and together they've turned the town's stories into art.
http://www.artworksmagazine.com/oxford.html

Lie To Testify Before Senate Committee (New York Times, Sept. 6)
A new study estimates that the stock options backdating scandal may cost shareholders hundreds of millions of dollars. The study was released on the eve of two Senate committee hearings that plan to examine the scope of the widening investigation into improper options practices. ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa finance professor whose research uncovered the options backdating, will testify before the Senate Banking Committee today.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/06/business/06options.html?_r=1&ref=business&oref=slogin

Schoen Studies State Eugenics Programs (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 6)
North Carolina officials have apologized for the state's eugenics program, which sterilized as many as 7,500 people between 1929 and 1975, most of them unknowingly. Many women still don't know whether they were affected. In North Carolina, the official records of the program are sealed in state archives. "It some states, it is much harder to track because the paperwork no longer exists," said JOHANNA SCHOEN, a University of Iowa professor who exposed the eugenics program in North Carolina while working on her doctoral dissertation. "I have come across several women who thought they were in the program and weren't. But that does not mean they were not sterilized, and it does not mean the state had nothing do with it," Schoen said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0609060234sep06,1,2637493.story?page=1&coll=chi-news-hed

Davidson Studies RNA Interference (The Independent, Sept. 6)
Imagine a treatment for cancer, a cure for infectious diseases such as Aids, or maybe an effective therapy for blindness or a lethal brain disease. Now imagine that one breakthrough is responsible for all this medical hope. The breakthrough is RNA interference (RNAi), which some scientists believe could be the biggest advance in healthcare since the development of antibiotics. There is barely an area of medicine that may not be touched by future advances in RNAi - a technique for switching off genes selectively and precisely. RNAi was only formally recognised in 1998 but over the past few years it has emerged as one of the hottest developments in the field of medical science. Professor BEVERLY DAVIDSON of the University of Iowa is using a specially adapted virus in her RNAi research. She is developing a technique of "infecting" certain parts of the brain with an "adeno-associated" virus. This is genetically modified to carry RNAi molecules into the brain. These are targeted to silence the mutated gene responsible for Huntington's disease - an inherited condition that leads to an appalling degeneration of the brain. THE INDEPENDENT is based in Britain.
http://news.independent.co.uk/world/science_technology/article1367543.ece

Bhattacharya Studies Phytosynthesis (Scientific American, Sept. 6)
Photosynthesis first arose in cyanobacteria, and scientists speculate that the progenitor to plant cells captured and incorporated these organisms. Millions of years of coevolution turned the once independent cyanobacteria into plastids--specialized cellular structures that are responsible for photosynthesis and have their own, highly edited genomes. Proof for this hypothesis has been lacking. But scientists studying a rare and novel amoeba--Paulinella chromatophora--have proven that it only recently captured its plastid and that this plastid shares much in common with its cyanobacterial ancestors. Biologist DEBASHISH BHATTACHARYA of the University of Iowa and his colleagues chose to study P. chromatophora because it is the only known organism that does not share the same plastid as all extant algae, plants and other photosynthetic organisms. Its plastid retains a distinct cell wall but divides at the same time as the host and cannot be grown independently. Bhattacharya's team generated a DNA library for the overall organism, isolating the genetic information of this unique plastid.
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa003&articleID=000ACE0C-E3F1-14FD-A33D83414B7F006D

UI Grad Named Chief Justice (Seattle Post Intelligencer, Sept. 6)
Marsha Ternus, an associate justice on the Iowa Supreme Court, will succeed Louis Lavaroto as chief justice when Lavaroto steps down later this month. Ternus, the first woman to become Iowa's chief justice, received her B.A. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the LOS ANGELES TIMES, NEWSDAY, BILOXI SUN HERALD, BRADENTON HERALD, LAKELAND (FL) LEDGER, FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, FOT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, WASHINGTON POST, FORBES, THE GUARDIAN (UK) and numerous other news organizations.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/national/1110AP_BRF_Iowa_Chief_Justice.html

Alumnus Sculpts Granite (Connecticut Business News, Sept. 6)
A profile of Connecticut sculptor Darrell Petit notes that earned his Master's in art and sculpture from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Petit specializes in sculpting granite.
http://www.conntact.com/article_page.lasso?id=40236

Students Struggle With 'Freshman 15' (Clarion Ledger, Sept. 5)
Many new college students struggle with the Freshman 15, which refers to weight gain typically found among first-year college students. Emileigh Barnes, a journalism major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said she's learned to better manage her weight after being forced to walk everywhere last year when she was without a car. But Barnes admits she struggles during harsh Iowa winters because her level of activity is zapped. "It's 1 in the morning, and they (your friends) want to order pizza. It's the first time in your life that you don't have your mother saying, 'Don't snack,' " Barnes said. The newspaper is based in Mississippi.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060905/HEALTH/609050336

Lie Stock Option Research Led To Investigations (Bradenton Herald, Sept. 5)
Currently more than 100 companies are under investigation by the Security and Exchange Commission for allegedly backdating stock options, and it has been reported that the FBI has more than 50 active cases it is investigating. We can thank the world of academia for helping bring this fraudulent practice to light. Research professors playing the role of the white knights on their trusty steeds have ridden to rescue the damsel in distress, in this case U.S. investors.  David Yermack, an associate professor at New York University's Stern School of Business, is credited with the earliest research on the subject. Randall Heron with the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University and ERIK LIE with the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa have also done their share in taking the cover off this fraudulent practice. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/business/15438726.htm

Author Attended Iowa Writers' Workshop (Los Angeles Times Sept. 5)
For author Gish Jen, Chinese Americans have gone from misfits to regular suburban teenagers to fully assimilated locals who don't speak Mandarin and who marry whites, and in the process, redefined the meaning of identity. A major theme in Jen's work is that identity is fluid and that traditional definitions of identity based on skin color and geographical origin no longer apply in today's America. Born to Chinese students who were studying in the United States, she was raised in Yonkers, N.Y., and upscale Scarsdale -- a "classic" pattern of immigrant upward mobility, she says -- then educated at Harvard University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.calendarlive.com/books/cl-et-gish5sep05,0,6675141.story?coll=cl-books-utility-right

Mural Artist Graduated from UI (Cleveland Jewish News, Sept. 5)
"Near and Far," an exhibit by mural artist Sally Price Ross, is on display at University Hospitals Humphrey Atrium Gallery in Cleveland through Oct. 27. Ross earned a master's degree in fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. There she received The Edwin Abbey Mural Painting Fellowship, which enabled her to travel through Mexico to study the history and variety of muralists in that country and also abroad.
http://www.clevelandjewishnews.com/articles/2006/09/01/features/arts/barts0901.txt

Polumbaum Arranges Olympics Volunteers (CCTV, Sept. 4)
JUDY POLUMBAUM,
a journalism professor at the University of Iowa is working to bring some of her students to work at the Games in Beijing as volunteers. She based her idea partly on the needs of the Games, which, according to Liu Qi, president of the Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will not be successful without the good and devoted work of the volunteers. But she has worked out the plan for her students' future career development as well. She has told quite a few of her friends that "I would particularly like to get freshmen and sophomores who are thinking about, ideally, journalism and either Asian languages or international studies," as she was quoted by the Daily Iowan, the school newspaper. She is certainly making some progress. On Tuesday, the Daily Iowan reported that "10 students will have the chance to attend the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, free of charge," thanks to Polumbaum. CCTV is an English language TV station in China.
http://www.cctv.com/program/worldinsight/20060904/102625.shtml

UI MBA Graduates' Salary Increases Noted (South China Morning Post, Sept. 4)
There are many reasons for doing an MBA. Some people want to change careers; others want to make that next move up the corporate ladder; yet others want to expand their managerial skills or build a broader professional network. But a key question that is sometimes overlooked is what kind of return you can expect on your investment. According to the Financial Times, salary increases for MBA graduates at top US business schools can be breathtaking. Three years after graduation, graduates of Brigham Young University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, both in the US, averaged increases of 157 and 160 per cent.
http://www.classifiedpost.com/jsarticle.php?lcid=HK.EN&artid=3000015016&arttype=POSTG&artsection=NEWSCENTRE&communitycode=

UI Graduate Conducts Orchestra (Minnesota Public Radio, Sept. 3)
While women have made great strides in corporate board rooms and other professions, they lag behind at the conductors' podium. But that's changing. The Bemidji Symphony Orchestra's new music director is Beverly Everett, a woman who's determined to help others break through the orchestral glass ceiling. She has a doctorate degree in conducting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She's the first woman to earn that degree in the school's 100 year history. Everett says she's still one of few women conductors in the country.
http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/08/24/bsoconductor/

UI Dance Student Performs (Beacon News, Sept. 3)
Several members of the Gold Star Dancers performed at Yorkville's Hometown Days Saturday. Gold Star student and a member of the national award-winning Performance Company, Amy Eckstrand, 18, of Yorkville, returned to dance with her team. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student plans to major in education and dance. "It could be very nicely related, teaching and dance," Gold Star Academy manager Colleen Beumel said. "Many of our teachers have done it. It would be nice to have her come back to be an instructor." The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/beaconnews/city/2_1_AU03_YORKFEST_S10903.htm

UI To Honor Teacher (Orlando Sentinel, Sept. 3)
Jianna Dalton of Rock Lake Middle School will be honored Oct. 14 by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Education for outstanding teaching. She was recommended for the award by a former student, Sarah Conner, who earned exceptional scores in the Belin-Blank Exceptional Student Talent Search. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/seminole/orl-sskul0306sep03,0,6575690.story?coll=orl-news-headlines-seminole

Pink Locker Room Controversy Noted (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 3)
Last year, the University of Illinois, along with 17 other schools, was placed on a list of institutions banned from hosting post-season NCAA events -- until they changed their mascot and eradicated use of its image. Indeed, eradicating school traditions is seen by many college sports fans as begging for bad luck. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, for decades visiting football players have been assigned a pink locker room inside Kinnick Stadium. When the school wanted to make the room even more Barbie-esque, critics pushed for a gender-neutral color. The mere suggestion of changing the paint sparked an outcry from Hawkeye fans around the world, who sent thousands of e-mails begging to keep the pink. (The school ultimately agreed, and painted everything from the urinals to the lockers a shade of Pepto-Bismol pink.)
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-na-illiniwek3sep03,1,5524991.story?coll=la-news-a_section&ctrack=1&cset=true

Tornado Listed In Severe Weather Summary (Weather Channel, Sept. 2)
In a summary of severe weather outbreaks in 2006, it's noted that on April 13, severe thunderstorms produced a tornado that ripped through eastern Iowa, including Iowa City and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus where significant damage occurred. The report appeared on YAHOO! News.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/wcom/20060902/we_wcom/early_severe_season_summary

Lasansky Work On Display (Washington Times, Sept. 2)
A number of major international financial institutions collect art at their Washington headquarters. Among the most remarkable collections is that of the Inter-American Development Bank, as its current "Selections From the IDB Art Collection" confirms. Colombian-born artist-architect Felix Angel -- a prominent Latin American art expert is presenting the show, which includes "Emiliano Zapata and Diego Bolivar, Our Grandchildren" by Argentina native Mauricio Lasansky, who is revered worldwide for establishing the experimental printmaking workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1945.
http://www.washtimes.com/entertainment/20060901-090824-7795r.htm

Genetic Disorder Fading (Cayman Net News, Sept. 2)
The genetic disorder only found in the Cayman Islands, Cayman Ataxia, is gradually disappearing among the Caymanian population. But with transportation readily available and the growing trend of Caymanians marrying expatriates, the chances of having the disease or even being a carrier are gradually disappearing. Research started in 1976 and concluded in 2003 led to identifying the mutated gene that causes the disease, in a collaboration of scientists from three institutions including the University of Michigan, the University of Miami, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the National Human Genome Centre at Howard University. The website provides news for the Cayman Islands.
http://www.caymannetnews.com/cgi-script/csArticles/articles/000055/005521.htm

Internet Gambling Ban Urged (Knoxville News Sentinel, Sept. 1)
Sen. Bill Frist, R-Tenn., said he will support legislation to ban Internet gambling when Congress reconvenes. People attending a hearing, chaired by Rep. Jim Leach, R-Iowa, the sponsor of the House bill, urged Frist to push the Senate version of the bill. Former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and NFL football player Merton Hanks said he tried to avoid gamblers during his career, but that the popularity of online gambling is making it more difficult for current players. "I also hear from them that they are receiving increased pressure from another group of so-called supporters," said Hanks, now the NFL's senior manager of football operations. "While it remains a minority of the fans, today's players perceive it to be a growing threat." The newspaper is based in Tennessee.
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/national/article/0,1406,KNS_350_4961862,00.html

Lawn Mower Safety Encouraged (Orlando Sentinel, Sept. 1)
Patty Davis, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, a federal agency, said 30 percent of injuries that come from use of a walk-behind power lawn mower come from blade contact, Davis said. People should make a habit of looking for any debris that might be on their lawns before they start to mow, she said. Objects that get struck by the blade of a lawn mower can become projectiles that can travel up to 200 mph, according to a study on lawn-mower safety by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Florida. http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/volusia/orl-mbellybutton0106sep01,0,7953169.story

Levy Comments On Fluoride In Water (The Ledger, Sept. 1)
Many dentists consider the staining called dental fluorosis to be strictly a cosmetic concern because it's usually mild -- chalky streaks or splotches on one or more teeth. Still, a National Research Council (NRC) panel determined that about 10 percent of kids living in communities where the drinking water is close to the Environmental Protection Agency upper limit of safe exposure to fluoride, 4 mg/L, develop severe dental fluorosis; that means not only yellow and brown stains on their teeth but also pits in their enamel, increasing the risk of cavities. To prevent severe dental fluorosis, the NRC panel advised the EPA to lower the allowable amount of fluoride in drinking water. Concerns about relatively mild forms of fluorosis must be balanced against the benefits of the mineral, argues fluoride researcher STEVEN LEVY, DDS, of the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. But it's wrong to dismiss the streaks and splotches out of hand, he says, given how focused people are on the appearance of their teeth. Levy questions a common practice among many pediatricians and pediatric dentists: prescribing fluoride supplements to children who live in nonfluoridated communities. The newspaper is based in Lakeland, Fla.
http://health.theledger.com/article/20060901/TOPSTORY/1670

Young Driver Study Noted (KTTC-TV, Sept. 1)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are watching 25 young drivers in hopes of helping young people drive more safely. According to the Cedar Rapids Gazette, preliminary results from a study of in-car cameras watching 25 drivers have reduced risky behavior -- including cell phone use, traffic violations and taking corners too fast -- by more than 76 percent. Since March, the 16- and 17-year-old drivers have driven more than 100-thousand miles with cameras near the rearview mirrors. One points in front of the car watching the traffic. The other watches what's going on inside the car. The TV station is based in Rochester, Minn. The story also appeared on the website of WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill.
http://www.kttc.com/News/index.php?ID=6090

Rice Named CEO (Central Valley Business Times, Sept. 1)
The University of California/Davis Medical Center has named Ann Madden Rice, as its chief executive officer. Previously, Rice was chief operating officer at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Hospital and Clinics. The newspaper is based in California.
http://www.centralvalleybusinesstimes.com/stories/001/?ID=2900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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