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UI in the News

November 2006

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Current News Highlights

Jones Notes Failed Vote Test (Southwest Florida Herald Tribune, Nov. 30)
Florida elections officials now have two mysteries to solve. Before figuring out what, if anything, went wrong in Sarasota County's Nov. 7 congressional election, state officials must determine what happened in a test conducted Tuesday. That test, a simulated election using state elections employees acting as voters, was supposed to help uncover any glitches with the county's electronic touch-screen voting machines. Instead, the Florida Division of Elections spent Wednesday studying the test results -- with limited success. Officials blamed human error for two of the 10 discrepancies in the tallies from the simulated election. But they couldn't explain the others, including five involving the disputed 13th Congressional District race, where Republican Vern Buchanan was certified the winner over Democrat Christine Jennings by fewer than 400 votes. The test was conducted using a script but using a script isn't the same as voting based on personal opinion, and similar mistakes have occurred in simulations in other states. "You lose focus after a few ballots," said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa who performed similar vote machine testing as an elections examiner for the state of Iowa. "It's really hard to follow a script and not make mistakes."
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061130/NEWS/611300364/1270/tbo01&source=TBO

Hogan Is Candidate For Delaware Presidency (Philadelphia Inquirer, Nov. 30)
Patrick Harker, dean of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, is among the candidates to replace David Roselle, president of the University of Delaware. Roselle has said he will retire May 1 after 17 years. Harker visited the Newark campus Nov. 15, and another candidate, MICHAEL J. HOGAN, executive vice president and provost at the University of Iowa, was there Nov. 20.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/business/16126858.htm

Abboud Honored For Contributions To Academic Medicine (News Rx, Nov. 30)
The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) awarded eight individuals, including five internists who are members of the American College of Physicians (ACP), for their outstanding contributions to academic medicine at the AAMC's 117th annual meeting in Seattle, Washington.  Among those honored was FRANCOIS ABBOUD, MD, MACP, who earned the AAMC Award for Distinguished Research in the Biomedical Sciences. Established in 1947, the award recognizes outstanding clinical or laboratory research conducted by a medical school faculty member. Abboud is a professor of internal medicine and of molecular physiology and biophysics, the Edith King Pearson Chair of Cardiovascular Research, and associate vice president for research at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. He is the former chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.
http://www.newsrx.com/articles/395066.html

UI Alumnus Nominated For Award (Austin Daily Herald, Nov. 30)
Attorney Craig Byram is being honored as one of 10 Outstanding Young Minnesotans. The Austin Jaycees nominated him for the award. Byram, 38, obtained his juris doctor in 1994 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW and his bachelor of science degree in philosophy from the UI in 1991. The newspaper serves Austin, Minn.
http://www.austindailyherald.com/articles/2006/11/30/news/news2.txt

Clark Comments On Contraceptive Use (Reuters Health, Nov. 30)
Contrary to its "black box" warning, using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) contraceptives for longer than two years does not substantially increase the risk of osteoporosis, according to a study. "Bone loss does not go on indefinitely, despite continued DMPA use," DR. M. KATHLEEN CLARK from the University of Iowa, Iowa City, told Reuters Health. "In fact, our data suggest that there is no additional spine loss and very little additional hip bone mineral density (BMD) loss beyond two years." DMPA contraceptives are given by monthly injections, and are often referred to by one brand name, Depo Provera.
http://www.reutershealth.com/archive/2006/11/30/eline/links/20061130elin031.html

Jones Suggests New Voting Technologies (Internetnews.com, Nov. 29)
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is recommending that the 2007 version of the Voluntary Voting Systems Guidelines (VVSG) decertify direct record electronic (DRE) machines. According to an NIST paper to be discussed at a meeting of election regulators at NIST headquarters in Gaithersburg, Md., on Dec. 4 and 5, DRE vote totals cannot be audited because the machines are not software independent. In other words, there is no means of verifying vote tallies other than by relying on the software that tabulated the results to begin with. DOUG JONES of the University of Iowa suggested that election officials consider implementing new technologies that enable independent auditing of votes. He pointed to a system devised by Ted Selker, co-director of the CalTech-MIT Voting Technology Project. "The state of the art systems aren't even on the market," Jones said.
http://www.internetnews.com/bus-news/article.php/3646231

McGehee Comments On Teen Driving Study (Bergen Record, Nov. 29)
A story about improving driving safety for high school students notes a research program by the University of Iowa, in which teens have a small camera installed behind their rear-view mirrors. The camera is always on, constantly recording like a TiVo box. "We've been quite surprised at the results we have seen so far," said DANIEL McGEHEE, director of the University of Iowa's Human Factors and Vehicle Safety Research Division. After the video and data are downloaded, McGehee and his fellow researchers send a compact disc weekly to parents who are asked to review with their children any recorded events. The Record is based in New Jersey. The same story appeared on the Web site of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, EAU CLAIRE (WI) LEADER TELEGRAM, WILMINGTON (NC) STAR, PORTSMOUTH (NH) HERALD, and PUEBLO (CO) CHIEFTAIN.
http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyOSZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NzAyNzg0NCZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTI=

CU: Driving Difficult For Parkinson's Patients (Reuters, Nov. 29)
Evidence continues to mount that people who suffer from Parkinson's disease may have trouble driving safely, particularly when faced with everyday distractions like talking to a passenger or on a cell phone. "Multitasking such as cell phone or passenger conversation puts drivers with Parkinson's disease at higher risk of driving errors than controls," Dr. ERGIN Y. CU of the University of Iowa and the VA Medical Center in Iowa City told Reuters Health.
http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/articlenews.aspx?type=healthNews&storyID=2006-11-29T183718Z_01_HAR967008_RTRIDST_0_HEALTH-DRIVING-PATIENTS-DC.XML&WTmodLoc=SciHealth-C4-Health-3

UI Presidential Search Summarized (Inside Higher Ed, Nov. 29)
A summary of the events surrounding the ongoing search for a new president at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA notes that ten months after David Skorton left for Cornell, the Board of Regents rejected four finalists put forth by a committee, then dissolved the committee; that the Faculty Senate, Staff Council and Student Government considered no-confidence votes before opting against them; that Gov. Tom Vilsack convened the contending parties in a closed-door session to work out their differences; that a new vice presidency to oversee the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS is being considered; and that Provost MIKE HOGAN is a finalist for the presidency at the University of Delaware.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/11/29/iowa

Other Recent News Highlights

UI Study Examined Infant Infections (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Nov. 28)
In this op-ed piece, it's noted that hospital infections account for an estimated 100,000 deaths every year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has chosen not to recommend a test that is essential to stop the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The blood-pressure cuffs that nurses wrap around patients' bare arms frequently carry live bacteria, including MRSA. In a recent study at a French teaching hospital, 77 percent of blood-pressure cuffs wheeled from room to room were contaminated. Another study linked contaminated blood-pressure cuffs to several infected infants in the nursery at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA hospital.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/editorialcommentary/story/9B05AA6F8F4DFA3D8625723400034FE0?OpenDocument

Kutcher Attended UI (News.com.au, Nov. 28)
As a young, lanky kid growing up in America's farming heartland of Iowa, Ashton Kutcher avoided swimming pools. As the years passed and he entered the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as a biochemical engineering major, he also avoided the pool. Nine years ago, Kutcher dropped out of university to become a model, which eventually led him to Hollywood and his breakthrough acting role in 1998 in the long-running television sitcom, "That '70s Show." To prepare for a role in "The Guardian" a film set in the world of the U.S. Coast Guard's heroic rescue swimmers, he had to train to be a elite swimmer. The news Web site is based in Australia.
http://www.news.com.au/entertainment/story/0,23663,20808452-5007181,00.html

Hogan Is Finalist For Delaware Position (The Intelligencer, Nov. 28)
Academic leaders from Pennsylvania and Iowa are finalists to replace David Roselle, the outgoing University of Delaware president who ranks as one of the highest-paid public university presidents. Roselle has said he will retire around May 1 after 17 years. MICHAEL J. HOGAN, executive vice president and provost at the University of Iowa, visited Delaware on Nov. 20, five days after Patrick Harker, dean of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, made his rounds of the Newark campus. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/103-11282006-748154.html

Canady Comments On Treatments (Atlanta Journal And Constitution, Nov. 28)
Personal misuse of super-strength botulinum toxin caused a Florida osteopath, his girlfriend, and two of his patients to become paralyzed and hospitalized for months in 2004. Details of the much-publicized incident -- which ended in the practitioner being sentenced to three years in prison -- are only now published in this week's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The incident does not reflect on the safety of standard treatments of Botox, stressed Dr. JOHN CANADY, a professor of plastic surgery at the University of Iowa and vice president of the American Academy of Plastic Surgeons. "This was clearly not Botox," Canady said. "More than 3 million people got Botox injections in 2005, which is the last year we have statistics on, and I don't believe any reaction such as this has been reported."
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/para/536207.html

UI Mentioned in List of Presidential Searches (The Advocate, Nov. 28)
Louisiana State University will compete with several Big Ten Conference schools and others in the market seeking a new president or chancellor. LSU System President William Jenkins announced his plans to retire earlier this year. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Indiana, Purdue University and Ohio State University are among those searching for new leaders. Others include Harvard University, University of California-Los Angeles, North Dakota University and the University of New Mexico. The newspaper is based in Baton Rouge, La. http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/4760301.html

UI Conducting Teen Driving Study (Belleville News Democrat, Nov. 28)
Researchers are using technology to help teens improve their driving habits, especially during their most dangerous first few hundred hours on the road. In the parking lot of a northeast Iowa high school, video highlights and other data are downloaded daily via wireless signals from cars driven by a group of 25 teens who have volunteered for a University of Iowa research program. As part of the study, the teens have had a small camera installed behind their rear-view mirrors. The camera is always on, constantly recording like a TiVo box. The video is only stored permanently if the car experiences G-forces beyond a preset limit, a condition triggered by excessive acceleration, deceleration or taking a curve too fast. When the limits are exceeded, 10 seconds of video is stored from before and after the incident. DANIEL MCGEHEE, director of the University of Iowa's Human Factors and Vehicle Safety Research Division, said that roughly two-thirds of the teens in the trial rarely drive aggressively enough to trigger the camera. Among the remainder of the group, he said, the cameras have helped reduce risky behavior by about 90 percent. The newspaper is based in Illinois. The article originally appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and also appeared in the READING EAGLE in Pennsylvania.
http://www.belleville.com/mld/belleville/news/nation/16112822.htm

Hogan Candidate for University of Delaware President (News-Journal, Nov. 28)
The University of Delaware's board of trustees has narrowed the field of candidates to replace longtime President David P. Roselle to at least two finalists who visited the university this month. Faculty, students and staff had the chance to meet with MICHAEL J. HOGAN, executive vice president and provost at the University of Iowa, on Nov. 20. Patrick Harker, dean of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, spent Nov. 15 on the Newark campus. The newspaper is based in Delaware. A similar article appeared in NEPA NEWS in Pennsylvania and on WMDT-TV in Maryland.
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2006611280356

UI Professor Researches Hormone Replacement (San Francisco Examiner, Nov. 27)
A University of Iowa researcher is investigating the benefits of hormone replacement in older men. MOSHE WALD recently published a review of testosterone replacement studies in the Journal of Andrology, which publishes research findings on male reproductive tracts. Wald believes that testosterone replacement therapy might improve bone mineral density, libido, erectile function, mood and muscle mass in men with low testosterone levels. The ASSOCIATED PRESS story also appeared on the website of WCCO-TV in Minnesota, the HERALD-SUN and WRAL-TV in North Carolina, the TRI-CITY HERALD in Washington, WASHINGTRON POST, NEW YORK TIMES, TIMES PICAYUNE in Louisiana, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, and several other publications.
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/ats-ap_health17nov27,0,1134917.story

Lie Comments On Backdating Probe (Business Week, Nov. 27)
On Nov. 27, Affiliated Computer Services reported the results of an internal probe into the backdating of option grants at the Dallas technology services company. That, in and of itself, isn't so unusual. More than 200 companies have been touched by the scandal. What was surprising is that ACS's stock surged 6 percent on the news. What got investors' attention was the extent of the company's housecleaning. Experts say ACS's actions sent a clear and much-needed signal to investors: that the board was serious about cleaning up the backdating mess. "I think firing people is necessary in some cases," says ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa who conducted the original research that uncovered widespread options backdating. "You want shareholders to see that you're addressing the issues." http://www.businessweek.com/investor/content/nov2006/pi20061127_339769.htm

Parkinson's Disease Affects Driving Ability (Washington Times, Nov. 27)
Those with Parkinson's disease are more likely to make more safety mistakes during a U.S. driving test than those with no neurological disorders. The study involved an on-road driving test of 71 people with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease who were current drivers and 147 people of similar age with no neurological disorders. While distracted, 28 percent of those with Parkinson's disease made more driving safety mistakes than they did when they were not distracted, compared to 16 percent of those who did not have Parkinson's disease. Study leader DR. ERGUN UC of the University of Iowa noted Parkinson's tremors and difficulty with movement had less effect on driving ability than lesser known aspects of the disease such as effects on mental functioning, vision and sleep. The article also appeared in FORBES, the WASHINGTON POST, the AUSTIN-AMERICAN STATESMAN in Texas.
http://washingtontimes.com/upi/20061127-054106-1497r.htm

Researchers Suggest Livestock Lot Limits (KAAL-TV, Nov. 27)
A team of researchers looking at livestock operations in Iowa says the state should block construction of new operations to protect people's health.The scientists from North America and Europe also say the state eventually should limit how many animals can be in a given area. The group also supports local control of livestock farm permits.  The team, led by University of Iowa toxicologist PETER THORNE, held a summit on Iowa hog lots two years ago. The scientists' final report and recommendations have now been published in the latest online edition of Environmental Health Perspectives. The TV station serves the Austin, Minn. area. http://www.kaaltv.com/article/view/107196/

UI Research Identified Couples' Similarities (Santa Cruz Sentinel, Nov. 26)
Research about character similarities between husbands and wives among newlyweds, conducted by Dr. DAVID WATSON and associates at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, found: "A strong similarity in age, religiousness, and political orientation: moderate similarity in education and verbal intelligence; modest similarity in values; and little similarity in matrix reasoning, self- and spouse-rated personality, emotional experience and expression, and attachment." These findings were not due to the duration of the relationship. "Marital satisfaction primarily was a function of the rater's own traits and showed little relation to spousal similarity."
http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/archive/2006/November/26/style/stories/03style.htm

UI Writer's Romance Makes A Good Story (New York Times, Nov. 26)
Emily Barton, an alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, is getting married, and her romance has the elements of a good story. Barton is marrying Thomas Hopkins, who she met as a Harvard undergraduate. They now know that each had a crush on the other back then, but they were dating others. She graduated, and the two lost contact. Then in March of this year, Hopkins read a review of Barton's "Brookland" in The New Yorker and recognized the accompanying caricature. He went to one of her readings and waited in line for her to sign a copy of her book. With several people still behind him in line, the two chatted about the last 16 years. "Then I asked him out to lunch," she said. Her impulsive move caught Hopkins by surprise. "To be honest, I wasn't even thinking about dating," he said. "Because how could a woman this smart, talented and beautiful still be available?" She was, in fact. Less than three weeks after the book signing, Hopkins wrote in his diary, "It's not a question of if I'm going to ask Emily to marry me, it's just a matter of when."
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/26/fashion/weddings/26barton.html

UI Press Books Reviewed (International Herald Tribune, Nov. 26)
In the book business, short-story collections by emerging writers are a tough sell, and, as a result, debut collections by only a handful of new writers make their way to a wider reading public each year. "Fortunately university presses pick up the publishing slack and distribute collections by emerging writers, often in the form of prestigious awards. Most notable among these are the Iowa Short Fiction Award and the John Simmons Short Fiction Award, both given by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS and selected through the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. This year's winners were chosen by the short-story author George Saunders. They are 'Permanent Visitors' by Kevin Moffett and 'Things Kept, Things Left Behind' by Jim Tomlinson. ... These books also represent distinct stylistic voices from two generations (Moffett is 34, Tomlinson 65), providing readers with a window into Saunders's wide-ranging fictional aesthetic." This article was reprinted from the New York Times, a subscription site.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/11/26/features/booklun.php

"Song Doctor" Got Start At UI Hospitals (Lexington Herald-Leader, Nov. 26)
Dr. Sanford Archer, and ENT specialist, has become to go-to guy when University of Kentucky opera singers sufer a voice emergency. Talk to almost any singer in the UK voice department, and they'll have a story about how Archer nursed them back to health and the show went on. Archer became interested in the professional singing voice when he was a resident at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. "We just received equipment to do some voice analysis while I was there," Archer recalls. "I got to play with some of the equipment and work with some of the singers down there, and I was really fascinated by it."
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/entertainment/music/16081362.htm

UI Research Documented Storm Fears (WCMH-TV, Nov. 25)
Severe weather always seems to scare people, but a new report shows that some people may be taking fear of the weather too far. According to a psychological study conducted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 64 percent of people said a good storm gets their heart pounding. WCMH is located in Columbus, Oh.
http://wcmh.nbcweatherplus.com/weathernews/10381305/detail.html

Board of Regents Studies Retention of University Presidents (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 24)
Iowa has developed a reputation as a training ground for hotshot college chiefs who leave the state to run major research universities elsewhere. With the recent departure of yet another popular president at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, members of the state's Board of Regents, the news media, and even faculty members are arguing that the state should pay its college executives better. A report presented to the regents in August ranked Iowa State seventh for presidential compensation among the 11 institutions in its peer group, while the University of Iowa ranked second to last among the 12 universities in its peer group. Jenny Connolly, a three-year member of the Board of Regents, said the panel does not yet have a specific goal for where they would like the salary of the president of the University of Iowa to rank among peer institutions. "What we really want to do is be competitive," she said. "We have to figure out how."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i14/14b01101.htm

Multimedia Company Owned By UI Graduate (Washington Missourian, Nov. 24)
Fusion Media Works owner Don Hertz oversees corporate and broadcast production, including Web site design. His wife, Jeanie, does the event videography. Don Hertz earned a degree in film and video production from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper serves Washington, Mo.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=17509692&;BRD=1409&;PAG=461&;dept_id=33068&;rfi=6

UI Attack Helped Push New Law (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 24)
Congress approved legislation last week to stop the harassment of researchers who use animals in experiments and the vandalism of their laboratories and equipment. Among the reasons cited for the new law was a 2004 attack by animal rights extremists that caused $450,000 in damage at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i14/14a02801.htm

Card Stacker Attended UI (Santa Fe New Mexican, Nov. 24)
Professional card stacker Bryan Berg first set a Guinness World Record for a house of cards when he was a high school senior in Iowa. Personal appearances all over the country helped pay for his schooling at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and his master's degree in design from Harvard.
http://www.freenewmexican.com/news/52650.html

Charmichael Comments On Chinese Pollution (The Oregonian, Nov. 24)
The enormous dust clouds gather in the Gobi Desert. They sail on Siberian winds to China. They pick up mercury, aerosols and carbon monoxide spewed by Chinese coal plants and factories. Then every five or six days in spring, eastern China flushes like a gigantic toilet. The dust plumes, now as large as countries, ride high over the Pacific Ocean, pushing hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides and ozone - polluting the US West Coast and contributing to global warming. Yet it's all too easy to blame China for the mess. U.S. consumers, who buy China's goods and use far more resources than the Chinese, share responsibility. "Americans in our cleverness are not good Boy Scouts," says GREG CARMICHAEL, a University of Iowa atmospheric chemist, "because we've put the latrine upstream of the campsites." The Oregonian originates in Portland.
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/1164009308157330.xml&coll=7#continue

Wisconsin Lawsuit Settlement Recalls UI Case (AP, Nov. 23)
For two years, the University of Wisconsin's fundraising arm risked looking greedy as it fought for another $100,000 from the estate of a donor who meant to leave the money to his once-estranged daughter. Just as the state Supreme Court was ready to hear the case, the UW Foundation last month agreed to allow the estate of Harold Mennes to pay $100,000 to his daughter and $34,000 to her attorneys. The case highlights a dilemma for nonprofit groups: how hard to pursue money they believe is theirs. Push too hard and they risk antagonizing potential donors, but backing off might mean they lose money for their causes.The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's foundation was sued in 2003 after evicting a farmer to sell land expected to go down in value despite the donor's wishes the land not be sold for 10 years. This AP story ran in hundreds of media.
http://www.wthr.com/Global/story.asp?S=5722359&nav=menu188_2

UI Doctors Diagnosed Rare Condition (RedOrbit.com, Nov. 23)
Lucas Montgomery (now nine years old), the son on former Hawkeye running back Lew Montgomery, was afflicted with an array of puzzling symptoms at the age of four. After five years of medical frustrations, the staff at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics was able to solve the mystery, diagnosing him with Sanfilippo Syndrome, one of the most common forms of a devastating and largely mysterious disease known as Mucopolysaccharidoses, or MPS. The life-expectancy for patients afflicted with Sanfilippo Syndrome, according to the National MPS Society, is between 14 and 20 years of age. "When we got the news -- when we got the diagnosis -- we were like, 'Are you kidding me? How? Why?' I mean, you've got an average lifespan of 15? And you think, 'Well, gosh, he's nine now ... ," Lew said. "I want, so bad, just to be able to take some of the pain he's feeling." This story, which originated in the Waterloo Courier, was distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News.
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/742310/lew_family_fight_their_own_war_at_home/index.html?source=r_health

UI Research: Parkinson's Impairs Driving Safety (Yahoo News, Nov. 23)
People with Parkinson's disease have difficulty spotting traffic signs and roadside landmarks while driving, and are more likely to make safety errors on the road, a new study shows. People with Parkinson's often continue to drive, and some continue to drive well and safely, but there is currently no reliable way to test which ones will fare better behind the wheel, Dr. ERGUN UC of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, who is leading a five-year, National Institutes of Health-funded study of Parkinson's patients with the goal of developing a system to predict their driving abilities. This story, originating in Reuters, appeared in many media worldwide.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20061123/hl_nm/parkinsons_dc

UI Police Tip Leads To Arrests In Colorado (The Coloradoan, Nov. 23)
Police have broken up two marijuana growing operations in neighboring houses, but it is unclear if residents of the two homes were working together or separately to grow and distribute the drugs. Police got the tip for the first house from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Police Department in Iowa City, after they arrested the resident on an unrelated marijuana charge. The Coloraadan originates in Ft. Collins.
http://vh10228.moc.gbahn.net/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061123/NEWS01/611230331/1002

Columnist 'Applies' For UI Presidency (Inside Higher Ed, Nov. 22)
A columnist, tongue in cheek, writes that he his applying for the presidency of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, noting that the cornerstone of his offer is that he is the low bidder and willing to work for the low salaries paid to university presidents.
http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2006/11/22/sloane

UI Researchers Find 'Katie Couric Effect' (Forbes, Nov. 22)
If you want to dress like a celebrity, you need only glance through the latest tabloid or star-studded fashion magazine. It's similarly easy to copy celebrity diets, exercise routines, vacation plans, homes and - increasingly -- medical treatments. In recent years the modern celebrity's job description has somehow expanded to include the role of health advocate. Stars have been making their private ailments public and raising the profiles of seemingly every disease under the sun. The impact can be powerful--millions of additional dollars donated for research, attention from policy-makers and increased public awareness. In the months after Katie Couric had a colonoscopy on NBC's Today show, nationwide rates for the test jumped more than 20 percent. Researchers for the University of Michigan Health System and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA called the phenomenon the "Katie Couric effect."
http://www.forbes.com/forbeslife/health/2006/11/21/celebrities-health-causes-forbeslife-health-cx_avd_1122medical.html

Law Alumnus Named Chicago Chief Of Staff (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 22)
Chicago attorney Lance C. Tyson has been selected as the chief of staff for Todd Stroger, president of the Cook County Board. Tyson received his law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0611220178nov22,1,6719110.story?coll=chi-newslocalchicago-hed

Medical School Alumnus Honored (Cincinnati Enquirer, Nov. 22)
For his tireless volunteer services to help people at risk for cardiovascular disease, Dr. Loren F. Hiratzka has been given an award for excellence. Dr. Hiratzka, of Norwood, is medical director of cardiac surgery for Tri-Health Inc., which includes Bethesda North and Good Samaritan Hospitals. Hiratzka is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine.
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061122/NEWS0105/611220417/1061/NEWS01

Canady Discusses Botox Misuse (Forbes, Nov. 21)
Personal misuse of super-strength botulinum toxin caused a Florida osteopath, his girlfriend, and two of his patients to become paralyzed and hospitalized for months in 2004. At the time of the incident, Bach McComb was an osteopathic physician who was continuing to practice in Oakland Park, Fla., after his license had been suspended. In the four cases described, McComb did not use a medical version of Allergan Inc.'s Botox. Instead, he mistakenly gave himself and the three others four to six injections of a preparation of paralyzing botulinum toxin that was 2,800 times stronger than that typically used on patients, according to the authors of the JAMA article. This formulation was only intended for laboratory work. The incident does not reflect on the safety of standard treatments of Botox, stressed Dr. JOHN CANADY, a professor of plastic surgery at the University of Iowa and vice president of the American Academy of Plastic Surgeons. "This was clearly not Botox," Canady said. "More than 3 million people got Botox injections in 2005, which is the last year we have statistics on, and I don't believe any reaction such as this has been reported." The same story appeared on the Web site of CBC News, WWAY-TV (North Carolina) and WFIE-TV (Indiana).
http://www.forbes.com/forbeslife/health/feeds/hscout/2006/11/21/hscout536207.html

Law Alumna Named Michigan Judge (Muskegon Chronicle, Nov. 21)
Maria Ladas Hoopes, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law, has been appointed a district court judge in Michigan. Hoopes, who graduated from the UI law school in 1992, is an attorney in North Muskegon, Mich.
http://www.mlive.com/news/muchronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-10/1164125798116100.xml&coll=8

Flagship Universities Graded on Access (Inside Higher Ed, Nov. 21)
Public flagship universities do a generally poor job of enrolling and educating underrepresented minority students and those from low-income families, and actually regressed rather than made progress on those fronts from 1995 to 2004, the Education Trust argues in a report, "Engines of Inequality" released Monday.

The report from Education Trust, a nonprofit group whose mission is advancing the interests of educationally disadvantaged students, grades 50 leading public universities and the group as a whole on their success (or, more often, their perceived lack of it) in enrolling low-income and minority students and in graduating minority students. The nonprofit group gave the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA a B in minority access, an F in low-income access, a C in minority student success and an overall grade of D.
http://insidehighered.com/news/2006/11/21/flagship

Wasserman Comments On Memory Studies (Arizona Republic, Nov. 20)
Two new studies by Tufts University shows that pigeons appear capable of previously unrecognized feats of memory and reasoning. The studies, published in the Nov. 8 Proceedings of the National Academies and an upcoming issue of Psychonomics Bulletin and Review, show that the birds can remember large numbers of pictures and recognize relationships among groups of images. The pigeons' memories were still outstripped by those of primates, according to the study, which also sought to compare primate and avian intelligence. Both species remembered images best when they'd learned them either early or late in their training. They also responded faster to an image when they remembered it than when they didn't, and they forgot old images at about the same rate. These patterns of remembering mimic human memory, said psychologist EDWARD A. WASSERMAN of the University of Iowa, who was not involved in the PNAS work but collaborated with Cook on the second study. The similarity could allow researchers to use the animals as models when studying human cognition or memory disorders. "This is a profound resemblance," Wasserman said. "The pigeons and the baboons seem to be performing the task in much the same way as people." The article originally appreared in the BOSTON GLOBE.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/1120sci-pigeons20-ON.html

Laptops Manufactured For Impoverished Children (NewsFactor Business Report, Nov. 20)
This week, One Laptop Per Child, the nonprofit organization helmed by famed technologist Nicholas Negroponte, past director of the MIT Media Lab, produced its first set of low-cost laptops for impoverished children. One Laptop Per Child expects two South American nations, Argentina and Brazil, two African nations, Libya and Nigeria, and one Asian nation, Thailand, to become its first customers with a total order of five million units. "I applaud anybody's attempt to look at this issue, and I certainly applaud the MIT group," said Caroline J. Tolbert, professor of political science at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and co-author of Virtual Inequality: Beyond the Digital Divide. But Tolbert noted that ultracheap laptops -- even for the world's poorest kids -- won't be enough to bridge the digital divide. "It's one thing to give people hardware and software," she said, "and it's another to create a literate nation that can use them."
http://business.newsfactor.com/story.xhtml?story_id=11000B9RODBK

Desmond Noted As 'Woman To Watch' (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 20)
In October, Laura Desmond was named chief executive of media-buying titan Starcom MediaVest the Americas, making her a key player on Madison Avenue as the industry grapples with a rapidly evolving digital world. Starcom, a unit of Paris-based Publicis Groupe, buys about $18 billion a year in media time for big-spending marketers such as Procter & Gamble and General Motors. Ms. Desmond was born in Iowa and graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Desmond was profiled in a "Women to Watch" list in the newspaper.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116379275528426583-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Sleep Specialist Trained At UI (Peru Tribune, Nov. 20)
Dukes Memorial Hospital has announced the addition of a second sleep specialist to its Sleep Center. Dr. Michael H. Levine completed his fellowship training in neurophysiology and sleep disorders at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Indiana. http://www.miamicountylife.com/articles/2006/11/20/local_news/local27.txt

Regents Restart UI President Search (Inside Higher Ed, Nov. 20)
The Iowa Board of Regents on Friday voted to restart the search for the president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and to abolish the search committee that had been named. Regents were apparently concerned that finalists being put forward lacked experience to manage the university's health science programs. At the UI, student and faculty groups were outraged, having participated at length in the search process to date.
http://insidehighered.com/news/2006/11/20/qt11/20

Regents May Have Violated Open Meetings Law (WQAD-TV, Nov. 20)
The Board of Regents is being accused of violating the state's Open Meetings Law while reviewing candidates for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's presidential post. Herb Strentz, founder of the Iowa Freedom of Information Council, says the regents met in closed session several times in the past week without announcing each meeting. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5704266&nav=1sW7

Wasserman: Pigeons, Baboons Mimic Human Memory (Boston Globe, Nov. 20)
Two new studies by Tufts University shows that pigeons appear capable of previously unrecognized feats of memory and reasoning. The studies, published in the Nov. 8 Proceedings of the National Academies and an upcoming issue of Psychonomics Bulletin and Review, show that the birds can remember large numbers of pictures and recognize relationships among groups of images. The pigeons' memories were still outstripped by those of primates, according to the study, which also sought to compare primate and avian intelligence. Both species remembered images best when they'd learned them either early or late in their training. They also responded faster to an image when they remembered it than when they didn't, and they forgot old images at about the same rate. These patterns of remembering mimic human memory, said psychologist EDWARD A. WASSERMAN of the University of Iowa, who was not involved in the PNAS work but collaborated with Cook on the second study. The similarity could allow researchers to use the animals as models when studying human cognition or memory disorders. "This is a profound resemblance," Wasserman said. "The pigeons and the baboons seem to be performing the task in much the same way as people."
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/health_science/articles/2006/11/20/pigeons_may_be_smarter_than_we_think/

Rego Comments On Poor Customer Service (WQAD-TV, Nov. 19)
Quad City shoppers say when it comes to shopping these days, that trip to the mall, hardware store or grocery store is hardly what it once was. LOPO REGO, a business professor at the University of Iowa and customer service expert, says that trend towards worse customer service is seen around the country. "Unfortunately, retailers and the economy overall does not push good customer service enough," said Rego. "It's the obvious place to cut costs." WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5705085

Lie, Not SOX, Discovered Backdating (Columbia Daily Herald, Nov. 19)
A columnist says that the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) law that requires stricter accounting reporting is costing business money and does no good, anyway, because the market is better at ferreting out corporate lawbreakers than laws. For example, it was University of Iowa professor ERIK LIE who recently discovered the backdating of stock options by certain companies, not SOX. The Daily Herald is based in Tennessee.
http://www.columbiadailyherald.com/articles/2006/11/19/opinion/02hart.txt

Deposed University President Attended UI (Boston Globe, Nov. 19)
A story about deposed Gallaudet University president Jane Kelleher Fernandes notes that she is an alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://news.bostonherald.com/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=168068&srvc=news

Alumnus Moves To Fort Wayne (Journal-Gazette, Nov. 19)
A story about people who move to Fort Wayne, IN, notes that Lynn Hoffman received her Master's in Library Science degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1995. The Journal-Gazette is published in Fort Wayne, Ind.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/living/16053035.htm

UI Conducting Teen Driving Study (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 19)
Researchers are using technology to help teens improve their driving habits, especially during their most dangerous first few hundred hours on the road. In the parking lot of a northeast Iowa high school, video highlights and other data are downloaded daily via wireless signals from cars driven by a group of 25 teens who have volunteered for a University of Iowa research program._As part of the study, the teens have had a small camera installed behind their rear-view mirrors. The camera is always on, constantly recording like a TiVo box._The video is only stored permanently if the car experiences G-forces beyond a preset limit, a condition triggered by excessive acceleration, deceleration or taking a curve too fast. When the limits are exceeded, 10 seconds of video is stored from before and after the incident. DANIEL MCGEHEE, director of the University of Iowa's Human Factors and Vehicle Safety Research Division, said that roughly two-thirds of the teens in the trial rarely drive aggressively enough to trigger the camera. Among the remainder of the group, he said, the cameras have helped reduce risky behavior by about 90 percent. More study is needed, but McGehee suspects that the cameras and more parental involvement will prove to be significantly more effective than "tattletale" technology such as GPS trackers._ "It takes a pretty motivated parent to look at that data and track the driving," he said. "But with the video, it's really clear what has just occurred."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0611190274nov19,1,4210373.story

Squire Comments On 2008 Presidential Race (La Presse, Nov. 18)
The 2008 presidential election has already begun with several candidates already positioning themselves in the race. PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa, says the nomination of a candidates party, a precondition to the race for the White House, requires much money and a large organization. Candidates must also begin their efforts two or three years in advance. With the Iowa caucuses 14 months away the first test of the electoral season, Squire said potential candidates travel there already, to make themselves known as well as to recruit supporters. The article, written in French appeared on the website Cyberpresse. http://www.cyberpresse.ca/article/20061118/CPMONDE/611180755&SearchID=73263552051524

Thorne Urges Tighter Feedlot Regulations (Houston Chronicle, Nov. 18)
Growing so large that they are now called "factory farms," livestock feedlots are poorly regulated, pose health and ecological dangers and are responsible for a deteriorating quality of life in the United States' and Europe's farm regions, according to a series of studies published last week by scientists. Led by PETER THORNE, director of the University of Iowa's Environmental Health Sciences Research Center, researchers outlined the need for more stringent regulations and surveillance of water and air near feedlots. The same story appeared on the Web site of the ORLANDO SENTINEL.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/health/4344612.html

Rawlings Comments On Ivy League Football (New York Times, Nov. 17)
The Ivy League was once one of the nation's top college football conferences, but in 1981 it was bumped down to Division I-AA. While some disagree with the move, others support it. "In the largest football group, I see so many serious problems and a real loss of confidence in academic integrity," said Hunter R. Rawlings III, Cornell's president from 1995 to 2003 and the university's interim president in 2005-6. Rawlings was also president at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for seven years. "The Ivy League is better off making it clear what it values most," he said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/17/sports/ncaafootball/17ivy.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Professor Comments On Greek Life (Chronicle, Nov. 17)
In this article Susanna Ashton, associate professor of English at Clemson University, comments on the influence of fraternity and sorority members in her classroom. "Getting used to the role and influence that fraternity and sorority systems have on a campus is a hard task, and even after many years teaching at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where I earned my Ph.D., and also now at Clemson, I still find much of the 'Greek system' baffling."
http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2006/11/2006111701c/careers.html?top20

Studies Examine Feedlot Dangers (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 17)
Growing so large that they are now called factory farms, livestock feedlots are poorly regulated, pose health and ecological dangers and are responsible for deteriorating quality of life in America's and Europe's farm regions, according to a series of scientific studies published this week. Led by PETER THORNE, director of the University of Iowa's Environmental Health Sciences Research Center, the researchers outlined the need for more stringent regulations and surveillance of water and air near feedlots. "There was general agreement among all [the scientists] that the industrialization of livestock production over the past three decades has not been accompanied by commensurate modernization of regulations to protect the health of the public or natural, public-trust resources, particularly in the U.S.," wrote Thorne, a professor of toxicology and environmental engineering.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-na-livestock17nov17,1,3670425.story

Options Backdating Research Compared (New York Times, Nov. 17)
In a new study, researchers from Harvard, Cornell and Insead universities examined some 19,000 options grants at about 5,800 companies from 1996 to the end of 2005. They found evidence suggesting that nearly 12 percent, or about 720, of the companies appear to have made at least one options grant that occurred at the lowest price of the month because of manipulation. Still, the new figure is significantly smaller than the estimate that more than 2,000 companies, or 29.2 percent of companies in the study, engaged in backdating to sweeten their executives' pay. That finding, based on a similar data analysis, was released this summer by Randall Herron, an Indiana University finance professor, and ERIK LIE, a University of Iowa finance professor whose research is widely credited with provoking the inquiries into options grants. The study by Professors Herron and Lie found that the abuse was more prevalent in high-technology firms, where an estimated 32 percent of unscheduled grants were backdated; at other firms, an estimated 20 percent were backdated.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/17/business/17options.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

New Research Done On Stock Option Backdating (Washington Post, Nov. 17)
Companies that lacked a majority of independent board members and that had long-serving chief executives were more likely to award questionably timed stock options to senior executives, according to a study to be released today. The research, by a trio of business professors, suggests that recent stock-option abuses have their roots in broader corporate governance problems -- and not only at technology companies that have been a focus of a widening scandal over the backdating of option grants. Problems with stock options awards came to light with a 2005 report by the University of Iowa's ERIK LIE, who last summer published new research that said more than 2,000 companies had employed backdated stock options.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/11/16/AR2006111601738.html

New Option Timing Study Conducted (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 17)
Backdating of stock options was more likely to occur at companies that did not have independent board directors in the majority, according to a study being released today. Of the 5,800 companies examined, as many as 720 appear to have backdated the stock option grant dates to coincide with a low point in the stock price, thereby boosting the gains to executives who received the options. ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa whose study on backdating ignited the scandal this year, said his research indicated that 2,200 companies manipulated stock grants. But the two studies used different methods to identify cases of suspected backdating. Lucian Bebchuk, a Harvard professor and a coauthor of the new report. said his study was focused less on the number of companies that backdated options and more on the factors that might have allowed the practice to happen.
http://www.latimes.com/business/printedition/la-fi-options17nov17,1,3977352.story?coll=la-headlines-pe-business

Political Junkies Trade In E-Markets (Northwest Florida Daily News, Nov. 17)
Avowed political junkies around the world spent the past few weeks trading on increasingly popular online markets that allow people to invest in futures contracts based on election outcomes, just as investors use such contracts to bet on interest rates, the weather and pork bellies. In Alaska, retired grandmother Judy White licked her wounds after betting the wrong way in a political-futures market run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Iowa futures site was founded in 1988 as an educational experiment. It limits traders to a $500 initial account, though they can generate more by trading. More than $64,000 in congressional contracts traded there this year. The article originally appeared in the WALL STREET JOURNAL.
http://www.nwfdailynews.com/articleArchive/nov2006/wagerredblue.php

Rao Named Dean At Rochester Institute (Rochester Business Journal, Nov. 16)
Ashok Rao has been named for the E. Philip Saunders College of Business at Rochester Institute of Technology. Rao earned a master of science in electrical engineering and a doctorate in industrial and management engineering from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in New York.
http://www.rbj.net/sitetemplate1.cfm?neid=12

Hovenkamp: Law Shields Citgo From Suits (Bloomberg News, Nov. 16)
Citgo Petroleum Corp., the U.S. refining unit of Venezuela's state oil company, was sued by a group of customers who claim it conspired with OPEC to fix prices in the U.S. The suit, filed in federal court in Houston, claims Citgo sold gasoline, asphalt, lubricants, motor oil, petrochemicals and other refined products at anticompetitive prices as a result of Venezuela's membership in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Venezuela is the fifth-biggest producer in OPEC, which sets production ceilings for member states, resulting in higher oil prices. OPEC has been partially shielded from U.S. antitrust suits by the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, said HERB HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust law at the University of Iowa College of Law. That law, passed in 1976, blocks some suits against foreign governments. Federal courts also decline to consider cases that require them to interfere in the foreign policy of another country, he said.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601086&sid=aXJoZxc.DCpM&refer=news

Hosmanek Discusses Punishment Through Shame (China Daily, Nov. 15)
A story about punishing lawbreakers by publicly shaming them notes that there were similar laws in colonial America. However, University of Iowa business professor ANDREW HOSMANEK said there is an important difference between the shaming punishments of colonial America and those assigned in states today. "Early societies often had a 're-acceptance' ceremony to welcome the offender back into main society," says Hosmanek. "Contemporary punishments in America lack this."
http://21stcentury.chinadaily.com.cn/print.php?sid=27558

Maas Receives Gerontological Nursing Award (Medical News Today, Nov. 15)
The Gerontological Society of America has chosen MERIDEAN L. MAAS of the University of Iowa as the recipient of the 2006 Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Award. This distinguished honor, presented by GSA's Clinical Medicine section in collaboration with the John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing, is given to a member of the Society in recognition of outstanding and sustained contribution to geriatric nursing research.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=56681

Barkan Assesses Election Impact On India (Indian Express, Nov. 15)
In this opinion piece, JOEL BARKAN assesses what impact on India will be after the recent U.S. elections saw the Democrats winning the majority in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. "Will U.S. policy towards India change in any significant way? The answer is "no" because the same underlying forces that led to the steady warming of relations between India and the U.S. since the early '90s weren't altered by the election. India's rapid rate of economic development, which has in turn led to increases in both trade and investment between the two countries, is likely to continue. Democrats may block the renewal of Bush's authority to negotiate new trade legislation, and try to enact other measures to stop US companies from outsourcing work to other countries. Barkan is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Iowa and senior associate at Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C.
http://indianexpress.com/story/16623.html

Edwards Notes UI Poverty Speech (Charlie Rose Show, Nov. 14)
Former Democratic senator and 2004 Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards talked about poverty on the program and also about his new book, "Home: The Blueprints for Our Lives." "When I've gone to Iowa over the last couple of years, I've gone to community action centers, poverty centers, to see what kind of work is being done on the ground to fight poverty. I gave a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA just a few weeks ago on the issue (of poverty)," Edwards said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=dee96d9a09275430a44a761dfa2c19b9&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLzVlz-zSkVA&_md5=81d825b1af597b13f6f681db63adc63c

UI Study Finds Out How Infection Spread (New York Times, Nov. 14)
An op-ed column encouraging hospitals to more aggressively fight staph infections points out that such infections come from unusual places. The piece refers to a study that linked contaminated blood-pressure cuffs to several infected infants in the nursery at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA hospital.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/14/opinion/14mccaughey.html?em&ex=1163653200&en=edee180244ab7781&ei=5087%0A

Murray Comments On Trial (Philadelphia Inquirer, Nov. 14)
Five months after announcing a $39 million genetics project, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is fighting a potentially devastating lawsuit claiming its plans are based on stolen goods. An Icelandic company, deCODE genetics, has accused the hospital's project director and three other scientists of conspiring to steal the company's scientific assets. DeCODE has gathered genetic data on more than 100,000 Icelanders in a quest to tie genetics to risk for common illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease. It was a gamble that required years of investment in basic research with no guarantee that any marketable products would emerge. The hospital's new genomics center hopes to collect genetic data from 100,000 children to search for similar connections to obesity, diabetes, ADHD, asthma and several other conditions. Its plans hinged on the expertise of director Hakon Hakonarson and three other scientists -- all of whom left deCODE earlier this year amid complaints they could not get along with their former boss, deCODE CEO Kari Stefansson. Scientists outside the company see the suit as an unfortunate delay in the hospital's progress. "I think it would be a disappointment if it were held up," University of Iowa pediatrician JEFF MURRAY said. "Scientists and doctors are well motivated to take care of kids, but there are sometimes personal issues that get in the way."
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/living/health/15998117.htm

Hitlin: Some Racial Identity Is Fluid (New York Resident, Nov. 14)
A recent study by researchers at the University of Iowa, Miami University, and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that biracial adolescents tend to change how they self-identify over time. The researchers looked at how respondents described their race on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health over a period of five years. In the course of that time, the young adults' answers changed. "Ideas about race are not fixed," said STEVEN HITLIN, assistant professor of sociology at Iowa University and one of the authors of the study. Racial identity, he said, seems to be fluid.
http://70.47.124.114/node/362

Lie Initiated Stock Option Research (The Guardian, Nov. 14)
A scandal over improper share options sweeping American boardrooms has engulfed the biggest player yet, with the resignation of Bruce Karatz, a Californian housebuilding magnate whose name is synonymous with suburban living. Karatz, 61, quit yesterday after 34 years as chief executive of KB Home, where he earned $155m last year, making him America's second highest paid corporate boss. A furor over share options erupted in the spring when ERIK LIE, an associate professor at the University of Iowa, published research suggesting that scores of US executives had benefited from grants set on remarkably fortuitous dates - typically on annual, monthly or quarterly lows in the stock price - giving them bumper profits when the price rose. The article also appeared in THE AGE in Australia.
http://business.guardian.co.uk/story/0,,1947077,00.html

Author Taught At UI (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 14)
This review of  the book "Reading Like a Writer: A Guide for People Who Love Books and for Those Who Want to Write Them"  says author and teacher Francine Prose (whose novels include "Blue Angel" and "The Peaceable Kingdom") "has devoted her learning, hard-knock writer's experience and verbal charm to a labor of love and wonder. The result is engrossing: both light and erudite, daringly insightful and, in some places, bust-out-laughing funny. Prose's straightforward (though not simple) method is one she and others have honed over decades of teaching at such institutions as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Harvard."
http://www.calendarlive.com/books/reviews/cl-bk-maristed12nov12,0,3456307.htmlstory?coll=cl-books-reviews

Pink Locker Rooms Noted (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Nov. 14)
In the NCAA's Western Athletic Conference, the visitors' locker room must be painted the same color as the home teams'. The reason? Two schools outside the conference -- the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Colorado State University -- had painted their visiting locker rooms pink, believing that would turn the guests in cleats more passive. Turns out, there's something to that. Dr. Alexander Schauss, of the American Institute for Biosocial Research, has concluded that pink reduced antagonism in jails he examined, though it was only a short-term effect. "Even if a person tries to be angry or aggressive in the presence of pink, he  can't," Dr. Schauss said. "The heart muscles can't race fast enough. It's a tranquilizing color that saps your energy."
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06317/737952-294.stm

Study At UI Looked At Hospital Infections (New York Times, Nov. 14)
Hospital infections account for an estimated 100,000 deaths every year. In this opinion piece, it's noted that the the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which are calling for voluntary blood testing of all patients to stem the spread of AIDS, have chosen not to recommend a test that is essential to stop the spread of another killer sweeping through our nation's hospitals: M.R.S.A., or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.  The blood-pressure cuffs that nurses wrap around patients' bare arms frequently carry live bacteria, including M.R.S.A. In a recent study at a French teaching hospital, 77 percent of blood-pressure cuffs wheeled from room to room were contaminated. Another study linked contaminated blood-pressure cuffs to several infected infants in the nursery at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/14/opinion/14mccaughey.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Lie's Paper Exposed Stock Options Backdating (Fortune, Nov. 14)
In 2004 finance professor ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa noted that many options grants were timed to exploit marketwide price movements that no CEO could predict. "At least some of the official grant dates must have been set retroactively," Lie suggested in a paper. Fiddling with options grant dates retroactively and lying about it in corporate financial reports is clearly illegal. So Lie sent a copy of his paper to the SEC and the agency began sniffing around. The resulting backdating scandal has so far led to criminal charges at two companies and a paroxysm of what Stanford law professor and former SEC commissioner Joseph Grundfest calls "Maoist-style self-criticism" at many others, with more than 40 high-level executives losing their jobs. The article appeared on the website of CNN MONEY. http://money.cnn.com/2006/11/13/magazines/fortune/options_scandals.fortune/index.htm?section=money_latest

Murray Comments On Alleged Data Theft (United Press International, Nov. 13)
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has been accused by Icelandic company deCODE genetics of basing a major project on stolen information. The company has accused the project director at the hospital and three other scientists, all of whom are former deCODE employees, of conspiring to steal the company's scientific assets, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported Monday. Members of the scientific community have said they hope the suit does not delay the hospital's study."I think it would be a disappointment if it were held up," University of Iowa pediatrician JEFF MURRAY told the Inquirer. "Scientists and doctors are well motivated to take care of kids, but there are sometimes personal issues that get in the way." The original version of this article appeared in the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20061113-033511-6308r

Murray Comments On Research Legal Battle (Philadelphia Inquirer, Nov. 13)
Five months after announcing a $39 million genetics project, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is fighting a potentially devastating lawsuit claiming its plans are based on stolen goods. An Icelandic company, deCODE genetics, has accused the hospital's project director and three other scientists of conspiring to steal the company's scientific assets. The dispute results from several deCODE scientists who left the company to work at Children's. "I think it would be a disappointment if it were held up," UNIVERSITY OF IOWA pediatrician JEFF MURRAY said. "Scientists and doctors are well motivated to take care of kids, but there are sometimes personal issues that get in the way."
http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/news/15998117.htm?source=rss&channel=philly_news

Abboud Is Honored By AAMC (Medical News Today, Nov. 12)
FRANCOIS M. ABBOUD
has been honored with the Association of American Medical Colleges Award for Distinguished Research in the Biomedical Sciences. Established in 1947, the award recognizes outstanding clinical or laboratory research conducted by a medical school faculty member. Abboud is a professor of internal medicine and of molecular physiology and biophysics, the Edith King Pearson Chair of Cardiovascular Research, and associate vice president for research at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ROY J. AND LUCILLE A. CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. He is the former chair of the Department of Medicine.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=56187&nfid=mnf

Research At UI Studied Ad Placement (USNews, Nov. 12)
Companies pay top dollar to place advertisements in "premium" spots in the middle of magazine articles and TV shows. But that system may be inherently flawed, according to the September issue of the Journal of Consumer Research. In three studies asking undergrads to read short stories interspersed with ads, researchers from Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S HENRY B. TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS found that the more the students were absorbed in the narrative flow of a story, the more likely they were to resent the ads that disrupted it -- especially when the ads were relevant to the reader. In a twist, though, when those same ads were placed at the end of the stories, students projected positive feelings about the article they'd just read onto the products being advertised.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/biztech/articles/061112/20brief.htm

UI Press Publishes Doctors' Poems (Newsday, Nov. 12)
Walt Whitman's poems written during the Civil War are used to teach medical students around the country about the real spiritual and emotional core of medicine. In another trend that could be traced to Whitman, many physicians now write poems. All the major medical journals have regular poetry features and St. John's University English professor Angela Belli has assembled two anthologies of doctors' poems. The newest is "Primary Care: More Poems by Physicians," from UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. Newsday is published in New York.
http://www.newsday.com/news/columnists/ny-lfisle4968775nov12,0,151893.column

Jones Comments On E-Voting Problems (Bradenton Herald, Nov. 12)
There were thousands of "undervotes" in Sarasota County, Florida, in a tight congressional race, but no way to determine exactly what happened. "There's nothing in that after-the-fact printout that would disclose the presence of error in the vote-recording mechanism," said DOUGLAS JONES, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA computer science professor.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/news/nation/15992077.htm

Pansegrau Is Music Director Of Kansas City Ballet (Kansas City Star, Nov. 12)
Ramona Pansegrau, who got her start as an accompanist for the University of Iowa Dance Department, is now the first music director of the Kansas City Ballet. The Cedar Rapids native joins the Kansas City Ballet at a critical time, when the company is preparing to move into its new studios near Union Station and to begin performing in the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. One day at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA she spied an ad: The university DANCE DEPARTMENT needed a rehearsal pianist. She auditioned and got the job. "By the end of the week I was completely hooked," she said. Then in 1980, the Joffrey Ballet's rehearsal pianist fell ill, and Robert Joffrey asked her to tour with his company. Before she knew it, she was a ballet pianist.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/entertainment/columnists/paul_horsley/15973366.htm

DNA Detective Got Encouragement At UI (Register-Mail, Nov. 12)
FBI agent Melissa Smrz works with DNA, the so-called silent witness, to help solve violent crimes. Smrz has spent her 17-year career with the FBI examining forensic evidence to develop DNA profiles and then testifying in nearly 1,000 criminal cases. She was fascinated as a child by several crime cases of the time, including those of mass murderer Richard Speck in Chicago and the Charles Manson murders. She was encouraged by a forensic pathologist who was one of her professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Smrz and her daughter belong to a club for Iowa Hawkeye grads, and they meet to watch televised football and basketball games with other members. The Register-Mail is published in Galesburg, Ill.
http://www.register-mail.com/stories/111206/FEA_BBDI5RMQ.GID.shtml

Jones Comments On Florida 'Undervote" (CBS, Nov. 11)
The disputed race in Florida's 13th Congressional District, south of Tampa, is one place where the kind of machines used by 40% of American voters this week may have malfunctioned significantly enough to alter the outcome of a seat in Congress. More than 17,000 ballots recorded no vote in the contest, which was decided by fewer than 400 votes. "I'm suspicious. Something's funny. I wish knew what," says DOUG JONES, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA computer scientist and expert on voting machine technology. "It really does matter to all of us around the country who use touch screen machines why such a preposterously large percentage of the population didn't have their votes counted."
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/11/11/cbsnews_investigates/main2174376.shtml

Jones Comments on Florida Voting Pattern (Sarasota Herald Tribune, Nov. 10)
The unusually large number of undervotes in the District 13 congressional election was clustered in certain pockets of Sarasota County, but an explanation for the trend remained elusive Thursday. University of Iowa computer science professor DOUG JONES, a widely published expert on computer voting and security, said the undervote difference between the governor, Senate and congressional races indicates something went wrong in the District 13 contest.

Without more information, it would be difficult to pinpoint the problem, whether it was a computer glitch, a ballot design problem or something else, he said. "I want to get my hands on one of those machines," Jones said. The newspaper is based in Florida. http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061110/NEWS/611100370

Jones Comments On Apparent Florida Voting Machine Glitch (Miami Herald, Nov. 9)
The latest Florida election whodunit, replete with a razor-thin vote margin and a looming recount, played out here Wednesday as state and county officials were at a loss to explain why 18,382 votes weren't cast or recorded in the nationally watched congressional race to replace Katherine Harris. Already, the specter of the botched 2000 elections has gripped the area, owing to the mere mention of Harris, the former Florida secretary of state, as well as partisan battle cries, with Republican Vernon Buchanan saying it's time to move on after he claimed a 368-vote victory near 1 a.m. Wednesday. Democrat Christine Jennings said voters were ''victimized'' because the ''staggering number'' of so-called ''undervotes'' were disproportionately higher here compared with the other four counties in House District 13 and other races. More votes were recorded for the Hospital Board Southern District. "These numbers are strange, fishy,'' said DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa vote-machine expert who reviewed Miami-Dade's system in 2002. `There's really not a good reason that there were so many undervotes. The number is just too high.''
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/15965769.htm

Jones Comments On Voting Machine Oversight (St. Petersburg Times, Nov. 9)
On Tuesday night, the Pinellas County elections office in Florida needed eight private contractors to provide support for its electronic voting system. For the primary election, the number was 13. The dependence on outside contractors concerns voting integrity activists, who argue that election officials around the country have ceded control of the ballot box to private companies that are too free of public oversight. DOUGLAS JONES is a computer scientist at the University of Iowa with a national reputation in the debate over voting technology. For a decade, he sat on the Iowa board that certified the state's voting equipment. When a government hires a private contractor to build a road, Jones pointed out, it makes sure to have its own engineers on site. But when a state like Florida shields a voting machine company's trade secrets from view, such oversight becomes impossible, he said. "We hire the election system vendor to run the elections," Jones said. "And we don't have anyone locally with the knowledge to oversee the process."
http://www.sptimes.com/2006/11/09/Tampabay/Firm_s_role_in_voting.shtml

Squire: Clinton Has Baggage (Tucson Citizen, Nov. 9)
The election this week transformed not only Congress but the playing field for the 2008 presidential race. Two things didn't change: the contenders leading the polls on both sides. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., won a resounding re-election victory after raising nearly $40 million. Clinton isn't talking about her future, which is widely presumed to include a presidential bid but could involve a leadership role in the Democratic Senate. Some analysts praise her campaign skills but say they wouldn't be surprised if she chooses the latter, given the difficulties of a White House run. "She comes with baggage that no other candidate has and the ability to mobilize Republicans against her that none of the other Democrats can match," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. The same story appeared on the Web site of USA TODAY.
http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/daily/nationworld/32059.php

Squire: West Now Key For Democrats (Denver Post, Nov. 9)
Tuesday's election results suggest that Democrats might want to stop sipping sweet tea and start donning cowboy hats if they want to keep winning national elections because the West has become a key region in the party's quest for support. Political scientists said it does make sense for Democrats to stop trying to win over the Deep South and look at themes that have worked in the West. "Democrats can look to the mountain West as a place they might make a successful appeal more so than the Deep South," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, political science professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.denverpost.com/localpolitics/ci_4626584

UI Web Site Earns Mention (Business Intelligence Review, Nov. 9)
A columnist writing about electronic voting machines and their integrity points to a Web site run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA computer science department that points out he original 19th Century mechanical polling machines were among the most advanced developments of their time, and they weren't completely reliable either.
http://www.bireview.com/article.cfm?articleid=262

Some Use IEM To Bet On Elections (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 9)
In an election year full of talk, some people put their money where their mouths were. Avowed political junkies around the world spent the past few weeks trading on increasingly popular online markets that allow people to invest in futures contracts based on election outcomes, just as investors use such contracts to bet on interest rates, the weather and pork bellies. In Alaska, retired grandmother Judy White licked her wounds after betting the wrong way in a political-futures market run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116304173126218136.html?mod=election_primary_hs

Traders Watch IEM Before Elections (Pittsburgh Post Gazette, Nov. 9)
Avowed political junkies around the world spent the past few weeks trading on increasingly popular online markets that allow people to invest in futures contracts based on election outcomes, just as investors use such contracts to bet on interest rates, the weather and pork bellies. In Alaska, retired grandmother Judy White licked her wounds after betting the wrong way in a political-futures market run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Iowa futures site was founded in 1988 as an educational experiment. It limits traders to a $500 initial account, though they can generate more by trading. The article originally appeared in the WALL STREET JOURNAL.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06313/737015-96.stm

UI Writers To Read (Washington Post, Nov. 9)
Writers from the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM at the University of Iowa read from their works Nov. 16 in the Library of Congress, Madison Building.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/11/08/AR2006110800984.html

Police Chief Is UI Alumna (Jewish Review,  Nov. 9)
Portland Chief of Police Rosie Sizer will speak  Jan. 10 at the 2006-2007 American Jewish Committee luncheon lecture series in Portland, Ore. Sizer earned a bachelor's degree in history from Portland State University and a master's degree in history from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The publication is based in Portland, Ore. http://jewishreview.org/Archives/Article.php?Article=2006-11-15-2813

Lie Study Uncovered Options Backdating (Jerusalem Post, Nov. 9)
Options backdating is a brand new way to get executive compensation off the balance sheet. The detective work about backdating began with ERIC LIE, a finance professor from the University of Iowa who has studied options grants.In a 2005 paper, Lie observed that a remarkable number of options seemed to have been granted when the stock price was very low, thus giving the recipients huge upside. This could be due to luck, but Lie calculated that the odds against picking the price troughs so consistently was truly astronomical. http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1162378365874&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FShowFull

Robinson Book Reviewed (News Weekly, Nov. 9)
"The Death of Adam" is a series of essays, first published in 1998 but recently re-published by Picador (2005) in paperback. The essays can generally be described as religious and/or philosophical in nature, but they cover a vast territory - from Darwinism through to a commentary of Psalm Eight. The author of the book is MARILYNNE ROBINSON is teaches at the University of Iowa. In 2005, she received the Pulitzer Prize for her novel "Gilead." The magazine is published in Australia. http://www.newsweekly.com.au/articles/2006oct28_b2.html

Leach Defeated in Election (New York Times, Nov. 8)
Representative Jim Leach, a moderate Republican from Iowa City who had been in Congress for 30 years was defeated by Dave Loebsack, a professor of politics and international relations at Cornell College in Mount Vernon. Mr. Leach voted against the war in Iraq, but that was not enough to secure victory in the Second District, which includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/us/politics/09sbsmid.html?_r=1&adxnnl=1&oref=slogin&adxnnlx=1163174622-cPqAXm3rezncjOefLlmfJA

Griffith, Williams Launch Prostate Cancer Trial (NewsRX, Nov. 8)
A team of University of Iowa Health Care researchers has launched an important clinical trial of a novel therapeutic that may eventually lead to new treatments for men diagnosed with prostate cancer. The Ad5-TRAIL gene therapy for prostate cancer research trial is a Phase I study designed to test the optimal dosage at which the therapeutic agent can safely be given to patients. The clinical study is being co-led by THOMAS GRIFFITH, PhD, an associate professor in the Department of Urology, and RICHARD WILLIAMS, MD, the Rubin H. Flocks Chair in Urology and professor and head of the UI Department of Urology.  "This is the first use of this type of anti-cancer agent which was developed at the University of Iowa. This new gene therapy may help us successfully manage patients with high-risk prostate cancer," Griffith said. "Ideally, we hope to be able to say at the conclusion of this trial that this novel agent is safe and performs as intended by causing the death of prostate tumor cells with no harm to normal cells. However, being at the initial stages of the trial, it is premature to make any claims until the data is analyzed."
http://www.newsrx.com/articles/382994.html

Weinberger Quoted On Cystic Fibrosis Work (Pittsburgh Tribune Review, Nov. 8)
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh have found a specific target for new therapies to fight lung infections that shorten the lives of people with cystic fibrosis, the hospital announced Monday. A protein called interleukin-23, or IL-23, was pinpointed as the cause of inflammation in chronic lung infections. By developing drugs to fight this protein, researchers should be able to reduce lung damage from inflammation and prolong the lives of cystic fibrosis patients, which now average 36 1/2 years. It probably will take several years before the research done by Children's is translated into drugs to treat patients, said Dr. MILES WEINBERGER, director of the pediatric allergy and pulmonary division in Children's Hospital of Iowa at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He did not participate in the research.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/cityregion/s_478519.html

Jones Cited In Electronic Voting Column (Times of London, Nov. 8)
A columnist writing in favor of electronic voting says it will ensure a more open electoral process. He writes, as DOUGLAS W. JONES, professor of computer science at the University of Iowa and a leading proponent of e-voting, recently said, the difficulty in implementing electronic voting stations is convincing people it is a necessity to go against the status quo. "Much of the difficulty stems from the fundamental requirement that the election system be transparent," he said. Whether it's in Congo or in the United States, as Jones says, the trick is to design a system capable of convincing the losers that they've lost. That's easier said than done. It may take us a few more days before we can begin to identify the losers of the Senate race.
http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,19509-2443862,00.html

UI Vote Rally Noted (KFOX Radio, Nov. 8)
Young Americans voted in the largest numbers in at least 20 years in congressional elections, energized by the Iraq war and giving a boost to Democrats, pollsters said on Wednesday. About 24 percent of Americans under the age of 30, or at least 10 million young voters, cast ballots in Tuesday's elections that saw Democrats make big gains in Congress. That was up 4 percentage points from the last mid-term elections in 2002. both parties sought to rally young voters who turned out in record numbers in the 2004 presidential election. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, some students doubled as "Human Vote Billboards" with messages exhorting students to vote in the battleground state where Democrats won several races. "It went well," said Brant Miller, 24, at the University of Iowa. "We got a bunch of students to get out there and vote." KFOX is based in Texas. The same story appeared on the Web site of the TIMES OF INDIA, STUFF.NZ, MALAYSIA STAR and REUTERS INDIA.
http://www.kfox95.com/cc-common/news/sections/newsarticle.html?feed=104668&article=1512876

UI Presidential Search Heads To Chicago (WQAD-TV, Nov. 8)
The search for the next president at the University of Iowa is heading to Chicago. According to records, the university's search committee will interview about a dozen candidates in private on Saturday at an unnamed location.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5650776&nav=1sW7

IEM Trading Analyzed (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 7)
For some time, pundits have been predicting the House majority will go to he Democrats and the Senate will remain in Republican hands after Election Day votes are cast. Prices on political markets run by the Iowa Electronic Markets -- a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA marketplace where people bet on election winners -- seemed to be pointing in this split direction. Until this past Friday, traders didn't believe it with great certainty. The exchange gave heavy odds to bets on a Democratic House. It also gave heavy odds on a Republican Senate. But it showed that the odds of both a Democratic House and a Republican Senate were a little less than 50%. In other words, traders were betting some sort of surprise would prevent the exact split the pundits expected. Over the weekend, however, some of the uncertainty about the election appears to have been cleared up. With the latest round of polls confirming the prospects of a divided Congress, the odds of the Democrats and Republicans splitting the House and Senate rose to about 60% on the Iowa market. As the picture about the final outcome has become clearer, investors have become happier.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116286599714315169-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22university+of+iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

UI Study Shows Sarbanes-Oxley Lowers Cost (Forbes, Nov. 7)
A story about the London and New York stock exchanges shows that an extensive joint study of internal controls at 667 companies found that the Sarbanes-Oxley Act helped lower the cost of equity capital by 50 to 150 basis points. Among those universities performing the study was the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.forbes.com/home/business/2006/11/07/wall-street-london-biz-cx_lmd_1108exchanges.html

IEM: Democrats Take House, Republicans Senate (BusinessWeek, Nov. 7)
As time ticked dow to the first polls closing at 6 p.m. Eastern time Tuesday, investors were gearing up for the prospect of Democratic gains in the midterm congressional elections on Nov. 7. Fundamentals should continue to drive market action over the long run, but a surprise in tonight's results could carry a short-term impact, analysts say. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS were offering strong odds that Republicans will lose control of the House of Representatives but hold onto the Senate. In afternoon trading, prices on this UNIVERSITY OF IOWA futures market for betting on election results suggested an 82 percent chance Democrats will win the House and only a 31 percent chance Republicans would lose the Senate.
http://www.businessweek.com/investor/content/nov2006/pi20061107_833868.htm?chan=top+news_top+news+index_businessweek+exclusives

Lie Study Cited (Morningstar, Nov. 7)
Options backdating may still be occurring - despite measures intended to prevent it in the 2002 Sarbanes-Oxley Act - judging by recent news about companies that were tardy in filing forms disclosing options grants. Proxy advisory firm Glass Lewis & Co. LLC, in a report from Oct. 20, pointed to nine companies where there had been delays in filing Form 4 reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission and a material rise in the company's stock from the purported grant date to the disclosure date. The Glass Lewis report didn't contain actual evidence of options backdating or say that backdating necessarily occurred at the nine companies, but said "the lateness (of filing) itself is what creates the opportunity for backdating." The Glass Lewis report, which used three factors - delayed Form 4s, a rallying stock price and repeat offenses - to select the nine companies, drew from a surprisingly large universe: The report estimates that one-fifth of grants were filed late since Aug. 29, 2002, the day the Form 4 rule went into effect. Almost 10 percent were filed an entire month late. Those findings draw on a July 2006 study from Professor ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa and Professor Randy Heron of Indiana University.
http://news.morningstar.com/news/DJ/M11/D07/200611071604DOWJONESDJONLINE000858.html?Cat=Industrials

Ettinger Discusses Former UI Dentist (Winston Salem Journal, Nov. 7)
A profile of Dr. Catherine Watkins, a dentist who specializes in geriatric dentistry, includes a quote from RON TAYLOR, her former supervisor at the University of Iowa. "There are not that many people who have that kind of passion and the skills to go with it," Taylor said. The paper is based in North Carolina. http://www.wsjournal.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1149191551921&path=!business&s=1037645507703

IEM Helps Gauge Public Opinion (The Tennessean, Nov. 7)
University of Iowa business professors in 1988 brainstormed ways to more accurately gauge public opinion and founded the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, program spokesman TOM SNEE said. The project sells shares in potential election outcomes and lets the "market" determine the price, he said. Shareholders can spend up to $500 in this cousin to online gambling. "People make different decisions because their money is at stake," Snee said. "If you want the Democrats to win, if it's a poll, you're going to say you're going to vote for the Democrat. But if you think the Republican is going to win, you're going to put your money on the Republican." Paul Rhode, economic historian at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, puts it another way. "You have a reward for stating your true and best opinion," he said. http://www.rctimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061107/NEWS0206/611070340/1303/MTCN03

Supreme Court To Hear Abortion Case (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 7)
Whether the partial birth abortion procedure, known medically as dilation and extraction or D&X, will be legal comes before the Supreme Court on Wednesday, the day after the midterm elections. Six years ago, the Supreme Court struck down Nebraska's ban on the procedure. The 5-4 majority, which included now-retired Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, said the ban violated a woman's right to abortion because it did not include a health exception. Dr. Leroy Carhart, an abortion doctor from Bellevue, Neb., had challenged the state law as unconstitutional. Carhart sued to challenge the law, and lower courts blocked it from taking effect. On Wednesday, the high court will debate the case, Gonzales vs. Carhart. DR. JILL VIBHAKAR, who teaches obstetrics at the University of Iowa and performs abortions at an independent clinic in Iowa City, is a plaintiff with Carhart in the suit before the court. She said the justices face the same issue Wednesday that they did when they threw out the Nebraska ban.  "Nothing has changed recently in medical practice. The only thing that has changed is that a moderate female justice has been replaced by a conservative male justice," Vibhakar said. The story also appeared on the website of KWBP-TV in Portland Ore.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-partial7nov07,0,7005894.story?coll=la-home-headlines

Weinberg Comments on Cystic Fibrosis Treatment (Pittsburg Tribune-Review, Nov. 7)
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh have found a specific target for new therapies to fight lung infections that shorten the lives of people with cystic fibrosis, the hospital announced Monday. A protein called interleukin-23, or IL-23, was pinpointed as the cause of inflammation in chronic lung infections. By developing drugs to fight this protein, researchers should be able to reduce lung damage from inflammation and prolong the lives of cystic fibrosis patients, which now average 36 1/2 years. It probably will take several years before the research done by Children's is translated into drugs to treat patients, said DR. MILES WEINBERGER, director of the pediatric allergy and pulmonary division in Children's Hospital of Iowa at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He did not participate in the research."The more we understand about cystic fibrosis, the better chance we have of coming up with effective therapies," he said. "It might be that they can come up with an anti-IL-23 that could have some clinical benefit for cystic fibrosis patients."
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/cityregion/s_478519.html

IEM Indicated Split Congress (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 7)
Pundits have been predicting the House majority will go to the Democrats and the Senate will remain in Republican hands after Election Day votes are cast. Prices on political markets run by the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS -- a University of Iowa marketplace where people bet on election winners -- seemed to be pointing in this split direction. Until this past Friday, traders didn't believe it with great certainty. The exchange gave heavy odds to bets on a Democratic House. It also gave heavy odds on a Republican Senate. But it showed that the odds of both a Democratic House and a Republican Senate were a little less than 50 percent . In other words, traders were betting some sort of surprise would prevent the exact split the pundits expected. Over the weekend, however, some of the uncertainty about the election appears to have been cleared up. With the latest round of polls confirming the prospects of a divided Congress, the odds of the Democrats and Republicans splitting the House and Senate rose to about 60% on the Iowa market.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116286599714315169-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Jones Researched Electronic Voting (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 7)
Douglas Jones an expert on election technology and security, began researching electronic voting in 1994. He has served as chairman of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems and was an observer in Kazakhstan's 2005 presidential election. In this article, the the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA computer scientist talks about the issues surrounding online voting. "If I had my druthers, we all would be voting on precinct-count, optical mark-sense ballots. They seem to offer the best combination of recountability, auditability, ease of use and ease of observing," Jones said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-0611070265nov07,1,3522739.story

IEM Noted As Prediction Market (Newsweek, Nov. 6)
Prediction markets have proven to be surprisingly accurate in predicting election results, more than polls.  One of the first markets was the small-sums IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, founded in 1988 and run by the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. The article appeared on the MSNBC.com website.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15594121/site/newsweek/

Obama Speaks in Iowa City (KFMB-TV, Nov. 6)
Illinois Sen. Barack Obama said Sunday he will give a presidential campaign "serious consideration" after midterm elections are over. The senator joined Iowa gubernatorial candidate Chet Culver Culver at an outdoor rally Sunday night near the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, speaking to more than 1,000 cheering activists. The TV station is based in San Diego, Calif. The Associated Press story also appeared in USA TODAY and the Washington Post.
http://www.kfmb.com/stories/story.69164.html

Squire Comments On Gentlemanly Iowa Race (LA Times, Nov. 6)
Iowa's second district congressional race between incumbent Republican Jim Leach and Democratic challenger Dave Loebsack attracting attention because it isn't a mudslinging brawl. "I can't imagine that there is another race in the country like it," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "As long as the national parties stay out of the race, voters in the 2nd District can enjoy that rarest of American political experiences: a competitive yet civil campaign. I don't think either candidate has it in him to get nasty."
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/politics/la-na-niceguys4nov04,1,4955870.story?track=crosspromo&coll=la-news-politics-national&ctrack=1&cset=true

Tolbert Comments On Long Ballots (Arizona Republic, Nov. 6)
Political scientists say there's no evidence that a long ballot spells doom for items at the end. CAROLINE TOLBERT, an associate professor of political science at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said research she has done shows that busy ballots tend to boost turnout. And, she added, there's no evidence that having a long list of "yes" and "no" questions to sort out triggers an automatic "no" response. Initiatives, as opposed to legislative referenda, tend to be controversial and have big-dollar campaigns, she said. That focuses voters' attention on those issues and helps them to form an opinion, rather than defaulting to a "no" vote.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/1106ballotfatigue1106.html

UI Residence Hall Students Choose Cage-Free Eggs (Inside Higher Ed, Nov. 6)
At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, students chose cage-free eggs after a successful trial run that started in the spring, deciding in October to put their money where their mouths are. The Associated Residence Halls, the student governing group for residential life, voted to support the continuing use of cage-free eggs on campus, a decision that will tack about $5 onto students' annual room and board bills, said STEVE PARROTT, a university spokesman. "That's certainly not an unreasonable amount to ask for so many benefits," said Will McBride, president of the university's Farm Animal Welfare Network and a first-year dental student who spearheaded the student movement as an undergraduate. "Cage production is by far one of the cruelest forms of factory farming that is practiced today."
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/11/06/cagefree

Rousseau Is UI Distinguished Alumnus (Jazz Police, Nov. 6)
Eugene Rousseau will be featured at the upcoming Twin Cities Saxophone Days. Rousseau co-founded the World Saxophone Congress in 1969 and has been president of both the North American Saxophone Alliance (1979-80) and the Comite International du Saxophone. In May 1998 he was honored as a Distinguished Alumnus by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he studied with HIMIE VOXMAN. Jazz Police originates in the Twin Cities.
http://www.jazzpolice.com/content/view/6473/53/

Tolbert Researches Impact Of Ballot Initiatives (Stateline.org, Nov. 6)
The impact of ballot initiatives on voter turnout is a hot topic of debate. CAROLINE TOLBERT, an associate professor of political science at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and Daniel Smith, an associate professor of political science at the University of Florida, have concluded from research covering the past 25 years that that, on average, each initiative on a state's ballot increases turnout by about 1.8 percent in midterm elections. The effect, however, levels off at four measures. Stateline.org originates in Washington D.C.
http://www.stateline.org/live/details/story?contentId=154857

Jones Comments On E-Voting Problems (InfoWorld, Nov. 6)
One of the biggest problem for e-voting, says DOUG JONES, a computer science professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who has studied e-voting machines, is that counties, which manage most of the elections nationwide, do not have the necessary managerial expertise. For example, states and counties rely on inadequate security documents written by the voting machine manufacturers. "You have to design the machines so things are so self-evident that learning is not necessary," Jones says. "Until then, you can expect a lot of problems and a lot of controversy." InfoWorld originates in the Netherlands.
http://www.infoworld.nl/idgns/bericht.phtml?id=002570DE00740E188825721C00087AA5

UI Researches Costs Of Aging Population (Contra Costa Times, Nov. 6)
As California and Bay Area baby boomers reach their golden years, the need for medical and nursing home care seems likely to increase. California's population of those 65 and older is expected to rapidly expand, leading to a doubling of the current 3.5 million older adults around the year 2025, according to a report from gerontologists at UC Berkeley, UCLA and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/local/states/california/15941089.htm

UI Market Demonstrates 'Wisdom of Crowds' (Spokesman Review, Nov. 6)
You don't have to look too hard to find Web sites that give ordinary folks the option of betting real or virtual money on U.S. elections. Since online gambling is illegal in the United States, some of those sites are offshore. One exception is the Iowa Electronic Markets, which allows low-stakes gambling on the U.S. elections. It's a good example of what people call the wisdom of crowds. The IEM, a nonprofit, allows gambling on the elections with each participant limited to $500. "It's not gambling since this is designated, formally, as a market," said TOM SNEE, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA communications specialist. Faculty from the school's TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS operate the site. The Spokesman Review is published in Washington State.
http://www.spokesmanreview.com/business/story.asp?ID=158253

UI Alumnus Wrote 'Kiss Of The Spiderwoman' (MSNBC, Nov. 5)
Leonard Schrader, who adapted the Argentine novel "Kiss of the Spider Woman" into an Academy Award-nominated film and co-wrote the critically praised "Mishima," has died at the age of 62. Schrader received a master's degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP, where he studied with Kurt Vonnegut. He was the brother of "Taxi Driver" screenwriter Paul Schrader. Other articles on Shrader's death appeared on the Websites of more than 100 other media worldwide.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15580064/

UI Press Book Recommended (bellaonline.com, Nov. 5)
A UI Press book is among floral books recommended for holiday giving: "Botanical Companions-a Memoir of Plants and Place," by Frieda E. Knobloch, part of the American Land and Life Series from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. "More than just a biography of two Rocky Mountain botanists - Aven Nelson and Ruth Ashton Nelson - this book is unique for the author adds elements of the memoir by sharing her experiences along with portions of her own journal along with letters she wrote to Ruth," the reviewer writes. "Those interested in nature and the environment would definitely treasure this book."
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art12379.asp

Edwards Is Rising Literary Star (Lexington Herald-Leader, Nov. 5)
With one of the year's bestsellers under her belt, Kim Edwards is a rising literary star. She graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she received a master of fine arts degree in fiction and a master of arts in linguistics. Her stories and essays have appeared in a range of periodicals, including Ploughshares, Zoetrope, Anteaus, Story and the Paris Review. They have won honors including a National Magazine Award for Excellence in Fiction and a Pushcart Prize, and have been anthologized in "The Best American Short Stories." Her story collection "The Secrets of a Fire King," was an alternate for the 1998 Pen/Hemingway Award. Edwards received a Whiting Writers' Award in 2002. "The Memory Keeper's Daughter" was selected for a Barnes & Noble Discovery Award.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/entertainment/15907487.htm

UI Electronic Markets Beat The Pundits (ABC News, Nov. 5)
New research casts doubts on the predictive powers of political pundits, especially in comparison to the often surprisingly accurate prediction "markets" run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and other organizations. In them, analysts can put at least a little bit of their money where their big mouths are. Such markets require clearly stated predictions. They bring the discipline of the market to forecasts that are often so nebulous as to be unfalsifiable. 
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/WhosCounting/story?id=2624127&page=1

Iowa Electronic Markets Predict Gridlock (Dallas News, Nov. 4)
Traders on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS - a futures market with a poll-beating reputation - are betting 77 percent on a Democratic takeover of the U.S. House of Representatives in next week's midterm election. The numbers also show Republicans retaining control of the Senate. For stock strategists and ordinary investors weighing the impact of elections on markets, that means investors are looking ahead to a divided government in Washington for at least the next two years. On Wall Street, that usually spells g-r-i-d-l-o-c-k. Versions of this article also appeared on the Websites of several other media outlets.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/bus/stories/1104dnbusElexMarkets.31b4eed.html

Jones Comments On Princeton E-Vote Study (Science News, Nov. 4)
A recent study by researchers at Princeton University demonstrated the vulnerability of e-voting machines to manipulation or sabotage by viruses. While the possibility of a voting-machine virus had been hypothesized by other researchers, the new study shows that the threat is real, comments computer scientist DOUGLAS W. JONES of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. "It's a demonstration that needed doing," he adds. And there are more potential problems: Election administrators typically upload tallies from computers to the Web for the public to see, notes Iowa's Jones. That practice may open them to attack from computer hackers prowling cyberspace. "If [attackers] infiltrated your system and put in software that can be switched on and off somehow, [incoming] messages as simple as 1 bit are a threat," Jones notes.
http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20061104/bob10.asp

Pelenski Comments On Ideological Use Of Icon (Russia Profile, Nov. 4)
Russia's National Unity Day combines historical, political and religious elements. The holiday, which marks Russian resistance to Polish-Lithuanian rule in the 17th century, is considered by the Orthodox Church to demonstrate to power of a famous icon, Our Lady of Kazan. JAROSLAW PELENSKI, who taught Russian history at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA until his retirement in 1998, argued 30 years ago that the Kazan icon "was employed for a variety of ideological purposes," including "as a spiritual weapon against Latinism during the Time of Troubles. The fact that the Icon of Our Lady of Kazan became the second most popular native icon of the Virgin Mary in Russia," he argues, "attests to its ideological-religious significance in the country's history."
http://www.russiaprofile.org/politics/2006/11/4/4660.wbp

Albright Comments On Knee Braces (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 4)
Knee braces have become popular in an attempt to prevent sports-related knee injuries. But the knee-brace business took a hit in the early 1990s, after the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons published research saying that the braces weren't worth the expense and in some cases caused additional harm. "A bunch of companies went bankrupt because of that," says JOHN ALBRIGHT, a former director of sports medicine at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Later studies, while still inconclusive, have led the academy to revise its view, finding that braces could be effective in preventing MCL injuries resulting from lateral blows to the knee.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116259178494313001.html

Jones Comments On E-Voting's Troubled History (CNN, Nov. 3)
Electronic voting machines have a troubled history. Global's touch-screen system, the AccuVote-TS, was flawed from the start. It had purchased the technology from a small company called I-Mark, whose founders had designed it as an unattended voting terminal that could be used in places like shopping malls or supermarkets. "The only problem was they weren't looking at security," says DOUGLAS JONES, a computer science professor at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who has been testing voting machines since 1994. That's not the only problem. Because there was little demand for touch-screen systems before 2001, Global hadn't spent much on software development. (Jones thinks they needed to start over.) So the system voters used in 2002 was bug-ridden. Diebold machines crashed early and often, and there was insufficient trained staff to cope with the inevitable problems. This story originated in Fortune magazine.
http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2006/11/13/8393084/index.htm?eref=money_topstories

Brown Comments On Driving With Cellphones (WQAD-TV, Nov. 3)
It's a phenomenon most drivers are guilty of-- picking up that cell phone (or worse yet-- texting) while behind the wheel of a moving car. But before thinking that quick chat or quicker message is harmless, a recent report out of the University of Utah urges drivers to think again. "Driving while on a cell phone is as bad as driving drunk," said TIMOTHY BROWN, a director of the National Advanced Driving Simulator on the University of Iowa. He and other researchers there have performed hundreds of tests, tests which support the Utah-study's theory that using a phone from behind the wheel basically acts like two or three alcoholic beverages. WQAD is based in Moline, IL.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5622491&nav=menu132_2

Men's Swimming Team Receives NCAA Sanctions (WQAD-TV, Nov 3)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA athletic department has been placed on probation by the NCAA for allowing ineligible students to compete on its men's swimming team from 2002-to-2004. WQAD is based in Moline, IL. A story on the same topic appeared on the Web site of INSIDE HIGHER ED.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5628699&nav=menu132_2

Former Faculty Member Honored In Kentucky (Lexington Herald Leader, Nov. 3)
The University of Kentucky recently established the Dr. Jacqueline A. Noonan Children's Miracle Network Endowed Chair in Pediatric Research. And today the university is holding the Dr. Jacqueline A. Noonan Symposium, "A Heart of Gold," at the Radisson Plaza Hotel in downtown Lexington. Today has also been declared Dr. Jacqueline A. Noonan Day in Kentucky. Noonan is a pioneer in pediatric cardiology, recognized as the discoverer of Noonan syndrome and the first to describe hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Later, after joining the faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she noticed that many children with certain congenital heart problems also demonstrated genetic characteristics such as short stature. Her description of the phenomenon became known as Noonan syndrome and now is recognized worldwide. Noonan has been at UK since 1961.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/news/state/15917468.htm

Alumnus Runs For Town Committee (Bergen Daily Record, Nov. 3)
A profile of the candidates running for the town committee in Long Hill, NJ, notes that one of the candidates, Len Hamilton, earned his B.S. in psychology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.dailyrecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061103/COMMUNITIES/611030358/1203/NEWS01

Exhibit of Alumna Work Opens In San Francisco (San Francisco Chronicle Nov. 3)
A profile of artist Maria Forde notes she has a degree in writing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. An exhibit of Forde's work opens in San Francisco this week.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/11/02/NSGMQKG3891.DTL&hw=university+of+iowa&sn=001&sc=1000

Gurnett Space Sounds Featured In Composition (Providence Journal, Nov. 2)
Glyph-like physics formulas flash across a 24-by-40-foot screen. A glowing orange planet swirls through space as hisses and whistles pulse in the background. Pictures of birds and fish appear as the voice of a woman intones a mantra for peace. These are the sights and sounds of avant-garde composer Terry Riley's Sun Rings, which can be seen and heard tomorrow night at Veterans Memorial Auditorium, the final offering in this year's FirstWorksProv festival in Providence. The 85-minute score will be performed by the cutting-edge Kronos Quartet, which has tackled some pretty far-out stuff over the years, but nothing quite so spacy as Riley's ode to humankind, a multimedia extravaganza that blends music for strings and singers with the celestial sounds of outer space. The space sounds in Sun Rings -- screeching whistles, sighs and booms -- were recorded by a device built by University of Iowa physics professor DONALD GURNETT, who for decades had designed recorders for NASA spacecraft.
http://www.projo.com/music/content/wk-kronos_11-02-06_8J2E73F.278876a.html

Umbach: Minority Faculty More Innovative In Teaching (Diverse.com, Nov. 2)
Faculty of color use more interesting ways of teaching at undergraduate institutions than their white peers, according to a study conducted by the University of Iowa. The study, "The Contribution of Faculty of Color to Undergraduate Education," used data from a 2003 survey of 13,499 faculty at 134 predominantly white colleges and universities. Dr. PAUL D. UMBACH, an assistant professor of higher education and the study's author, says faculty of color use more innovative techniques and interact more frequently with students than their white counterparts. "An increased diversity among faculty also leads to an increased use of effective educational practices," he says.
http://diverseeducation.com/artman/publish/article_6617.shtml

Iowa Electronic Markets Predict Democratic Win (New York Sun, Nov. 2)
Gamblers are increasing their bets that Democrats will be redecorating the leadership offices in the U.S. House of Representatives next year. On the Iowa Electronic Markets, run by the business school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Democratic chances of taking over the House were 74 percent, up from 43 percent at the beginning of the month, and 33 percent of taking the Senate. IEM put the probability of Democrats controlling both chambers yesterday at 25 percent, up from 14 percent Oct. 1.This story also appeared in the FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM.
http://www.nysun.com/article/42786

Alumnus Interviews For Town Manager (MetroWest Daily News,
Nov. 2)
A story about Michael Hartman, a candidate for the town manager position in Hopkinton, MA, notes that he has a master's degree in public administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Daily News is based in Massachusetts.
http://www3.metrowestdailynews.com/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=144337

Alumnus Is New Librarian (Alamogordo Daily News, Nov. 2)
A story about Dan Kammer, the new librarian at the Townsend Library at New Mexico State University-Alamogordo, notes that he received his master's degree in mathematics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.alamogordonews.com/features/ci_4589065

IEM Cited In Election Story (The Standard, Nov. 1)
A story about how a possible Democratic takeover of the U.S. House of Representatives will affect Hong Kong mentions the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Iowa Electronic Market as a source of information about possible election outcomes. The Standard is based in Hong Kong.
http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?pp_cat=15&art_id=30831&sid=10640524&con_type=1

Squire Comments On Hunter Candidacy (San Diego Voice, Nov. 1)
U.S. Rep. Duncan Hunter of California announced Monday that he will run for president in 2008 in what observers are calling a long-shot bid for his party's nomination. "He's coming in late and he's coming in not as a known quantity so it really is a problem for him," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.voiceofsandiego.org/articles/2006/11/01/government/874hunter.txt

Wolitzer Taught Creative Writing At UI (Jupiter-Courier, Nov. 1)
Author Hilma Wolitzer was inspired by the feminist movement and authors like Jane Austen, who illustrated that family life is a legitimate literary subject. "What happens in people's kitchens and bedrooms is as important as what goes on in board rooms and war rooms," said Wolitzer. She began her career as a novelist at the age of 44, referring to herself as "the great middle-aged hope." "What other job can you start so late in life, yet live so many parallel lives?" said Wolitzer. Wolitzer continued to examine the theme of the American family in the novels "Heart," "Ending," and "Tunnel of Love," and taught creative writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, New York University and Columbia University. This story appeared in three Scripps newspapers in Florida.
http://www.tcpalm.com/tcp/books/article/0,,TCP_1164_5107676,00.html

Iowa Electronic Markets Predict Democratic Win (Bloomberg.com, Nov. 1)
Gamblers are increasing their bets that Democrats will be redecorating the leadership offices in the U.S. House of Representatives next year. On the Iowa Electronic Markets, run by the business school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Democratic chances of taking over the House were 74 percent, up from 43 percent at the beginning of the month, and 33 percent of taking the Senate. IEM put the probability of Democrats controlling both chambers yesterday at 25 percent, up from 14 percent Oct. 1.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601170&sid=aS6rty0V7uio&refer=special_report

Jones Comments On E-Vote Vulnerability (Coastal Post, November issue)
After California and Pennsylvania warned that their Diebold touch-screen voting machines were "hopelessly compromised," DOUGLAS W. JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa, said, "This is a barn door being wide open, while people were arguing over the lock on the front door." The Coast Post is a monthly published in Marin Country, Cal.
http://www.coastalpost.com/06/11/24.html

 

 

 

 

 

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