Text Only The University of Iowa Office of University Relations News Services
The University of Iowa
Previous Issues Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday The University of Iowa News Services Home Services Contact us A-Z Search
The University of Iowa Office of University Relations News Services Office of University Relations
More Links
News Releases
UI in the News
UI this Week: Events
Sports
ArtsIowa
Calendars
Daily Iowan
UI Radio and Media
fyi
Subscribe to UI News
UI News Digest
@Iowa

UI in the News

May 2006


Having trouble finding something?
Click here to get hints.

Note: Clicking on links below opens story in separate browser window.

UI in the News Archives

  


Current News Highlights

Lie Study Puts Him In Limelight (Wall Street Journal, May 31)
Erik Lie had become accustomed to bored looks when discussing his academic research, which has addressed such weighty questions as, "which provides a stronger earnings signal in big corporate share buybacks, a Dutch auction or a fixed-price offering?" "Most people find most of the stuff I do very obscure," says the 37-year-old Norwegian, who teaches finance at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Not any more. The unassuming academic, who first came to the U.S. as a student in 1988, suddenly has become a minor celebrity in the financial world, thanks to a paper he published last year. It suggested companies might be backdating stock-option grant dates to enrich their senior executives. The study didn't name any firms, but it drew regulators' interest and proved prescient. In recent weeks, a growing options scandal has led to announcements of earnings restatements, resignations and expanding federal probes. About 20 companies are under the microscope of the Justice Department, the Securities and Exchange Commission or both.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114895205146965910.html

Alumna To Head Health Information Tech Office (Jackson County News, May 31)
Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski announced today that he has appointed Jody Pettit, M.D., to serve as Oregon's Health Information Technology Coordinator, and that Oregon will seek $26.5 million from Congress to pay for installation of electronic health records systems in more than 4,000 doctors' offices across the state. A board-certified internist, Pettit practices part-time as faculty with the Department of Medical Education at Providence Ambulatory Care and Education Center, the Department of Medicine Faculty Practice at St. Vincent's, and with Legacy Health Systems in Portland. She is also a clinical assistant professor at the OHSU Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology. She earned her medical degree from Medical College of Virginia. She holds a master's degree in health and wellness administration and a BS in general science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Portland, Ore. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of CAVEJUNCTIONNEWS.COM, GRANTSPASSNEWS.COM, NEWSASHLAND.COM, NEWSSHADYCOVE.COM, MEDFORDNEWS.COM, all in Oregon, as well as other media outlets.
http://www.jackson-county-news.com/articles/index.cfm?artOID=331002&cp=11757

Other Recent News Highlights

IEM Noted As Oldest, Best-Known (Kiplinger's Personal Finance, June 2006)
When you gather the opinions of the many, the consensus usually trumps the opinions of the few -- even renowned experts. That's the hypothesis behind the Efficient Market Theory, which holds that few people can consistently beat the market over time because prices already reflect investors' collective beliefs -- the basis of the hugely successful index-fund business. No wonder many smart people think "prediction markets" will spread through business, finance and, eventually, government. Perhaps the oldest and best-known example of a prediction market is the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS at the University of Iowa, which has prognosticated presidential elections -- better than the polls -- since 1988.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=3c5ea575d7b058d30d34735e8fbfab4c&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkVb&_md5=88c4228bc6a63bd099f61c6e27fbf814

UI Professors Capture Town History (Smithsonian, June 2006)
University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM writes about The Oxford Project, a collaborative effort between himself and Peter Feldstein, emeritus professor of art and art history. In summer 1984, Feldstein started a photography project in Oxford with a goal of capturing everyday photos of all 676 residents. Over three months, he photographed 670 people -- a unique portrait of an American town, as comprehensive as any ever attempted. Last year, Bloom suggested that Feldstein photograph the same people. Of course, many had died and some had moved away in the intervening 21 years. But most still live in Oxford. At last count, he had photographed more than 100 of them. Feldstein asked Bloom to join the project by gathering the stories of his photo subjects. Bloom has conducted dozens of interviews and writes, "There is a great deal of courage in what people say. The language of not just a few is pure poetry."
http://www.smithsonianmagazine.com/issues/2006/june/feldstein.php#related

Lie Study Proves Stock Option Backdating (Fortune, May 30)
A columnist writing about the growing backdating scandal says that the problem, in brief, is that executives at some companies were backdating their stock options to dates when the stock was at its low for the year or the quarter, tilting the odds of profiting on those options heavily in their favor. Backdating isn't necessarily illegal, but following the complicated rules would largely eliminate the advantages of doing it. As actually practiced, it was stealing, pure and simple. We might never have heard about this slimy behavior if a researcher at the University of Iowa, ERIK LIE, hadn't decided to study the behavior of stock prices before and after option grants. He wasn't the first. Other academic researchers had studied the phenomenon and found suspicious results. But none of the researchers had suggested that executives might be doing anything illicit or illegal. Then Lie conducted the mother of all stock option studies, looking at 5,977 option grants between 1992 and 2002. In his paper, published a year ago, he found the same suspicious results as earlier researchers, only more pronounced. Further slicing and dicing the data, he discovered that unless executives possessed truly extraordinary abilities to forecast precise overall market movements, they had to be backdating the grants.
http://money.cnn.com/2006/05/26/magazines/fortune/colvin_fortune_0612/

Jones Comment Cited In Electronic Voting Column (The Ledger, May 30)
Several Florida state legislators filed bills this year -- to no avail -- to require that touchscreen voting machines have the capability of producing a paper record of votes cast, but all of the "paper trail" bills introduced this session died in committee. Florida lawmakers apparently consider touch-screen voting machines tamper-proof. Somebody ought to tell that to officials in Pennsylvania, California, Iowa and other states that are facing imminent primary elections. Computer scientists say there are security flaws in the popular Diebold Election System touch-screen machines that make them vulnerable to the introduction of software that could distort the results. Said DOUGLAS W. JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa, "This is the barn door being wide open, while people were arguing over the lock on the front door." The Ledger is based in Lakeland, FL.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060530/NEWS/605300309/1036

Story Cites UI Anorexia Nervosa Study (Psychiatric Times, May 29)

A story about anorexia nervosa says that economic factors impacting relapse rates are the limits imposed by managed care organizations on hospital length-of-stays for patients with eating disorders. Studies from Australia and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA analyzing patients' body mass index (BMI) at discharge from inpatient treatment found that patients discharged with a BMI less than 19 had a significantly greater risk of relapse compared with those who had a BMI of 19 or above.
http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=175802428

Bowlsby: Naming Rights Not For Sale (Richmond Times Dispatch, May 29)
A columnist writing about the sacrifice made by UI legend Nile Kinnick points out that the University of Iowa is in the midst of an $86 million renovation to Kinnick Stadium. The naming rights for Kinnick Stadium, however, never were for sale. "I can't imagine his name being bundled with a corporate name or even with the name of an individual donor," said Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY. "He was a Heisman Trophy winner and a war hero. People think he would have been president or a senator. He was destined for greatness. I don't think those who might like to have their name up there with his would even suggest it."
http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD%2FMGArticle%2FRTD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1137836402968&path=!sports&s=1045855934844

Columnist Writes Of Kinnick's Valor (Providence Journal Bulletin, May 29)
Nile Kinnick didn't want to go to war. "I thank God," he said in his acceptance speech after being awarded the Heisman Trophy in 1939 as a member of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football team, "I was warring on the gridirons of the Midwest, and not on the battlefields of Europe. I can speak confidently and positively that the players of this country would much more, much rather, struggle and fight to win the Heisman award, than the Croix de Guerre." But, when the time came, he unhesitatingly answered his country's call to arms. This story was also published in the KNOXVILLE NEWS SENTINEL.
http://www.shns.com/shns/g_index2.cfm?action=detail&pk=DONALDSON29-05-29-06

Columnist Writes Abut Lie Backdating Study (Baltimore Sun, May 28)
A few years ago ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, analyzed a weird pattern in stock prices just before and after unscheduled option grants, that is, options not issued on predetermined dates but at the discretion of the company. Stocks were in the habit of plunging just before executives got grants -- thus giving the grants an abnormally low strike price. And stocks tended to rise sharply right after the grants, making them immediately valuable. Even if the executives didn't cash in the options for years, the low strike price made them much more lucrative than they otherwise would have been. Two explanations suggested themselves. Perhaps executives had suddenly become financial clairvoyants, able to consistently predict short-term stock increases. Or maybe they were manipulating the process. Both explanations might have seemed unlikely. Would executives owing a great fiduciary duty to shareholders game the system to the shareholders' detriment? Surely not. Can executives really predict the financial future when dozens of academic studies and a million floundering day traders have proven this impossible? Surely not. As Sherlock Holmes said, if you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, is the truth. In what turned out to be a brilliant piece of inductive reasoning (in which investigation of evidence leads to a broad theory, which can be tested by further evidence), Lie figured bosses must be backdating their options.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/bal-bz.hancock28may28001531,0,4521951.column

Poet Attended Writers' Workshop (Star Beacon, May 26)
Mary Quade's poetry is on the docket for presentation at the sixth biennial Writers and Their Friends literary gala June 3 at The Bolton Theatre in Cleveland. Twenty-six northeast Ohio writers were selected for the honor, which features their work in dramatic presentations by Cleveland celebrity artists. Quade has a master's of fine arts in English from The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The newspaper is based in Ohio. http://www.starbeacon.com/Currents/local_story_146091838?keyword=topstory

UI Alumna Cast in Play (Kansas City InfoZine, May 26)
Kansas City Repertory Theatre will complete its 2005-06 season with Room Service, the 1937 comedy by John Murray and Allen Boretz. Cheryl Graeff continues her work with the Rep as Christine Marlowe. She earned her MFA in acting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.infozine.com/news/stories/op/storiesView/sid/15314/

Senate Leader Wants Regents Investigation (WQAD, May 26)
Iowa Senate Republican Leader Mary Lundby of Marion told the Cedar Rapids Gazette that once the Legislature's Oversight Committee finishes hearings into the pay scandal at a jobs training program, it will look at whether the Board of Regents, State of Iowa and its president, Michael Gartner regents and Gartner have overstepped their bounds and micromanaged the regents' institutions. Lundby says, in particular, the committee is interested in the University of Iowa, which is losing two top officials. President DAVID SKORTON is leaving to become president of Cornell University. Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY is the new athletic director at Stanford University. http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4953458&nav=1sW7

Students' Summer Finances Examined (Rockford Register Star, May 26)
As college tuitions continue to rise and postsecondary indebtedness is at one of its highest points, "saving" may just be the key word this summer for young adults. But putting a sound financial philosophy into play isn't easy, many young adults will tell you. On top of paying back student loans, the average college student owns from one to six credit cards. Justine Reynolds of Rockford, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sophomore, owns only a debit card, although she received credit card offers monthly on campus. And she plans to work 40 hours a week this summer so she can save up for next semester. Her father, Joe Reynolds, credits her for her wise spending habits. "She's very conscientious," he said, adding that her siblings in high school are "not as thrifty as she is." The newspaper is based in Illinois. http://www.rrstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060526/BUSINESS04/105260025

'Sun Rings' To Be Performed in Russia (Moscow Times, May 26)
Kronos Quartet, an unconventional string quartet that has won worldwide acclaim for its performances of contemporary music will present the Russian premiere of "Sun Rings," an 80-minute multimedia work by longtime Kronos collaborator Terry Riley, together with Russia's Sirin Choir. "Sun Rings" is divided into 10 movements and features both sounds and images from space, as well as a choir. Commissioned for Kronos by NASA, among others, it was premiered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in October 2002. http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2006/05/26/107.html

Lie Study Sparked Stock Options Investigation (CNN Money, May 25)
The Securities and Exchange Commission and prosecutors are investigating whether companies "back-dated" stock options for some employees, or retroactively changed the date an options grant was effective, to a date that led to a bigger windfall for those who held the options. The controversy started after ERIK LIE, associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, published a study in the journal Management Science in May 2005 noting that the granting of options to executives at several companies preceded big run-ups in the stock price. http://money.cnn.com/2006/05/25/technology/options_interview/index.htm?sec

Lie Assisted In Backdating Analysis (Bloomberg, May 25)
The practice of illegally awarding stock options to executives at artificially low prices has become the focus of the biggest U.S. investigation on corporate wrongdoing since the probe into illegal mutual-fund trading led to $4.3 billion in penalties. Companies ranging from tiny Nyfix Inc., a money-losing supplier of trading systems, to UnitedHealth Group Inc., a health insurer valued at $57 billion, may have defrauded investors by deliberately backdating option grants to coincide with low stock prices. The lower the price, the more an executive stands to make by exercising the options when the shares rise. While companies are allowed to award executive options at below-market prices, they must charge the difference in value against earnings and potentially lose the right to tax deductions on compensation exceeding $1 million. Backdating gives executives a similar benefit without the extra corporate costs. The Wall Street Journal drew attention to the possibility of illegal options backdating in a March 18 story that mentioned stocks including United Health and Dallas-based Affiliated Computer. With the help of University of Iowa associate professor ERIK LIE, the newspaper listed companies that made stock-option grants that were followed by large gains in share prices.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=a8KOBhPR_zGE&refer=us

Alumna Named Dean Of Arkansas Law School (Springdale Morning News, May 24)
Cynthia Nance said Tuesday she plans to continue the legacy of her predecessors when she becomes dean of the University of Arkansas School of Law on July 1. Nance, an associate professor of law specializing in labor issues, replaces Richard Atkinson, the charismatic dean who died Aug. 4, 2005, at age 58. Howard Brill has served the past academic year on an interim basis. Nance received a law degree and a master's degree in finance from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a bachelor's degree in economics from Chicago State University. She is a member of the American Bar Association and the Arkansas Bar Association, which named her the 2005 outstanding lawyer-citizen. The paper is based in Arkansas.
http://www.nwaonline.net/articles/2006/05/24/news/05fzualawdean.txt

UI Tests Water For County (Morris Daily Herald, May 24)
The Will County Health Department expects to have results shortly from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on the tritium testing program of the private drinking water wells in Godley, and will most likely make them public at the June 8 committee meeting. The county began the testing program after Exelon Nuclear made public a series of tritium-laced water leaks at Braidwood Generating Station at Braceville. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.morrisdailyherald.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=58&ArticleID=18396&TM=68597.86

Lie Discovered Options Backdating Pattern (National Public Radio, May 23)
The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is reportedly examining the timing of stock option awards by corporations. The SEC is concerned that some executives have been gaming the system by "backdating" their options to increase their value. ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, looked at 1,500 publicly traded companies and saw a pattern. "What I found was that they're marked by indexes. They also increased after stock option grants. So I said, well, that means either executives can actually predict how the whole market will do, or they're backdating their options," Lie said. Lie says despite the odds against such perfect timing, in some cases, as high as 100 million to one, he still had a hard time convincing anyone of what the data was showing. "There wasn't any anecdotal evidence out there. It took a long time before anybody detected any of these cases," he said. It isn't clear how many companies will be caught up in the probe. Lie says he wouldn't be surprised if as many as 10 percent of corporate stock options were backdated; though he says that will be difficult to prove.
For a transcript of the story see: http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7279efced15bae9cb121f5886ab1a223&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLzVlz-zSkVA&_md5=19070194db0dfa458104d5363219fcde

For audio see: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5424653

Lutz Book Reviewed (Sacramento Bee, May 23)
"Everyman is, or hopes to be, an idler." With these words of Samuel Johnson, TOM LUTZ begins his latest effort, "Doing Nothing: A History of Loafers, Loungers, Slackers, and Bums in America." This book is a fascinating -- although at times also frustrating -- analysis of both workers and slackers throughout the past 250 years of Anglo-American history. It begins as a small family story and then expands into a complex examination of the duality of work and leisure, including commentary from a variety of writers and intellectuals. Lutz teaches English at the University of Iowa. This article originally appeared May 23 in the CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR.
http://www.sacbee.com/24hour/entertainment/books/reviews/story/3293984p-12139151c.html

Lie Backdating Discovery Prompts Investigations (BusinessWeek, May 23)
After the greed and accounting saga of the late 1990s, the stock-options backdating scandal now pounding nearly two dozen companies might seem like little a footnote. But the story isn't over yet: Shareholders have already seen upward of $35 billion of stock market value evaporate at companies that have acknowledged investigations by the Securities & Exchange Commission, the U.S. Justice Department, or their own special committees. And stocks of another dozen or so companies have also been flagged as vulnerable to investigations by Wall Street analysts in a wave of new research reports. "This is still going to have implications for these companies," says ERIK LIE, the associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa who discovered evidence two years ago pointing to widespread backdating.
http://www.businessweek.com/investor/content/may2006/pi20060523_848601.htm

Lie Research Leads To SEC Scrutiny (Financial Times, May 23)
It cannot be often that U.S. authorities are prompted to scrutinize the accounting practices of scores of large U.S. companies as a result of research by a Norwegian academic in the corn-growing state of Iowa. But that appears to have been the effect ERIK LIE has had on the Securities and Exchange Commission, not to mention the U.S. attorney for the southern district of New York. Lie's research at the University of Iowa into stock options has prompted a widening probe into the possibility that companies may have back-dated the granting of stock options to senior executives. His research has shown that an unusually high number of executives benefited from the grant of options at the lowest possible strike price just before a surge in their companies' share prices. "It's good to get some recognition for some academic research," says Lie, speaking from his office at the University of Iowa. Versions of this story also appeared in MSNBC.COM and EURO2DAY (Greece).
http://news.ft.com/cms/s/241b6912-e9e8-11da-a33b-0000779e2340.html

Lutz Book Reviewed (Christian Science Monitor, May 23)
"Everyman is, or hopes to be, an idler." With these words of Samuel Johnson, TOM LUTZ begins his latest effort, "Doing Nothing: A History of Loafers, Loungers, Slackers, and Bums in America." This book is a fascinating -- although at times also frustrating -- analysis of both workers and slackers throughout the past 250 years of Anglo-American history. It begins as a small family story and then expands into a complex examination of the duality of work and leisure, including commentary from a variety of writers and intellectuals. Lutz teaches English at the University of Iowa.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0523/p14s03-bogn.html

Kaboli Study Shows Pharmacists' Role (United Press International, May 23)
U.S. hospital patients rarely have contact with the hospital pharmacists, but pharmacists are now helping patients understand and follow their drug regime. Getting hospital-based pharmacists out from "behind the counter" has resulted in healthcare teams reducing medication errors and problems, according to a University of Iowa and Department of Veterans Affairs review of previously published studies. "Pharmacists play an incredibly important role in caring for hospitalized patients in terms of medication safety and helping determine that patients are on the most appropriate medications," said PETER KABOLI, who led the review study and is an investigator with the Center for Research in the Implementation of Innovative Strategies at the Veterans Affairs Iowa City Health Care System and assistant professor of internal medicine in the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. The same story appeared on the Web site of EMAXHEALTH.COM and NEWS-MEDICAL.NET (Australia).
http://www.upi.com/ConsumerHealthDaily/view.php?StoryID=20060522-030958-5920r

UI Develops New, Faster Mumps Test (New York Times, May 23)
The state's mumps epidemic has given scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA an opportunity to test out some new technology. The University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory this month started using a new, modern mumps test -- a test the lab's staff helped to invent. The test checks for the presence of the mumps virus in saliva, and takes less than a day to perform, making it much quicker than older tests, which could take up to five days to determine if a person had the mumps. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the WASHINGTON POST, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, MIAMI HERALD, NEWSDAY, BALTIMORE SUN, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, SEATTLETIMES, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, CBSNEWS.COM, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, FORBES, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, WTOP-TV (Washington D.C.), WRAL-TV (Raleigh, N.C.), WESTFIELD WEEKLY NEWS (Canada) and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Mumps-Test.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

UI Noted In Column (Grand Forks Herald, May 23)
A columnist writes about anthropologist and Arctic explorer Vilhjalmer Stefansson, one of the University of North Dakota's most accomplished graduates. The column notes Stefansson also attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/living/14644405.htm

Redlawsk: Democrats Citing Ethanol To Woo Iowa (Times Record News, May 22)
At a breakfast speech Tuesday at the National Press Club, U.S. Sen. and expected presidential aspirant Hillary Clinton, 58, laid out a plan for adjusting U.S. energy policy to reduce foreign oil reliance and improve fuel efficiency. Her remarks covered everything from Saudi oil, to fuel economy in American cars, to coal, wind power and ethanol. DAVID REDLAWSK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said Clinton's speech may serve a dual purpose: helping other Democrats blame Republican leaders for high gas prices heading into this year's midterm elections while endearing Clinton to voters in Iowa, whose caucuses are the first key test for presidential candidates every four years, and where corn production makes the ethanol industry an important part of the economy. "We have what seems like dozens of candidates on both sides and they're all sort of jockeying with an eye to 'How well can we do in Iowa?'" Redlawsk said. "The issue of ethanol is an important one. There's an existing industry here with a decent number of jobs involved. It's becoming more and more important to the economic base here." The paper is based in Texas. The story also ran on the Website of the SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE.
http://www.timesrecordnews.com/trn/nw_washington/article/0,1891,TRN_5707_4721558,00.html

Lie Assists In Analysis (Pittsburgh Post Gazette, May 22)
Over the past two months, questions about the timing of executive options have rocked more than a dozen companies, leading to probes by board committees, securities regulators and federal prosecutors. Ten executives or directors at these companies have left their posts in recent weeks. Some 17 companies were spotlighted in a report issued last week by the Center for Financial Research and Analysis that found a high risk of "having backdated options." Now a fresh statistical examination by the Journal has turned up five additional companies with highly improbable patterns of options grants, similar to those of some companies already facing scrutiny from federal authorities. The methodology used by the Journal to detect highly improbable grant patterns was reviewed by David Yermack, an associate professor of finance at New York University's Stern School of Business, and by ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa. Both scholars have studied options timing. The story also appeared on the Web sites of the HARTFORD COURANT.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06142/692215-28.stm

Workshop Alumnus Scott Anderson Profiled (New York Times, May 22)
A profile of Scott Anderson, an alumnus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, whose novel "Moonlight Hotel," was recently published.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/22/books/22moon.html

Lie Assists In Analysis (Wall Street Journal, May 22)
Over the past two months, questions about the timing of executive options have rocked more than a dozen companies, leading to probes by board committees, securities regulators and federal prosecutors. Ten executives or directors at these companies have left their posts in recent weeks. Some 17 companies were spotlighted in a report issued last week by the Center for Financial Research and Analysis that found a high risk of "having backdated options." Now a fresh statistical examination by the Journal has turned up five additional companies with highly improbable patterns of options grants, similar to those of some companies already facing scrutiny from federal authorities. The methodology used by the Journal to detect highly improbable grant patterns was reviewed by David Yermack, an associate professor of finance at New York University's Stern School of Business, and by ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa. Both scholars have studied options timing.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114829946362059450.html

UI Uses New Mumps Test (WQAD, May 22)
The state's mumps epidemic has given scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA an opportunity to test out some new technology -- that they helped invent. The University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory this month started using a new, modern mumps test, which the lab's staff helped to create. The test checks for the presence of the mumps virus in saliva. It takes less than a day to perform -- far quicker than older tests, which could take up to five days.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4931404&nav=1sW7

Former UI Students Works To Recover (Chicago Sun-Times, May 21)
A story about a young local actor who is working to recover from two spinal strokes in 2003 that left him paralyzed from the neck down notes that he studied acting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/entertainment/sho-sunday-fine21.html

UI Student Avoids Sister With Mumps (Lawrence Journal World, May 21)
A columnist writes about his daughter's mumps and notes that her twin sister, who attends the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was "serious about protecting herself. She had just returned for the summer from the University of Iowa, which had a bigger mumps outbreak than KU."
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/may/21/mumps_phobia_spreads/?city_local

Prisinzano Describes Drug (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 21)
Salvia divinorum (pronounced SAL-vee-ah div-en-OR-um) is a recreational drug that people can obtain legally in Pennsylvania and most other states -- at least for now. The botanist who sells it on the Internet says it's a harmless way to meditate and clear the mind, but others say the drug is dangerous and gives users a potent hallucinogenic high comparable to LSD. The drug has been used for centuries by Mazateca Indians and shamanic healers as a meditative and healing tool, but was only discovered by outsiders in the 1960s. It remained relatively obscure until it hit the Internet in the 1990s. Thomas Prisinzano, a medical researcher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who has studied Salvia, said typing "Salvia" into an Internet search engine can yield 10,000 hits, most of which are for head shops -- places that sell pipes and tobacco. "That many hits means that people will start to abuse it," Prisinzano said. The drug does have legitimate research purposes. Prisinzano is studying whether the active ingredient in Salvia -- Salvinorin A -- could be used to create a nonaddictive painkiller. Researchers are trying to understand how Salvia produces hallucinations in the brain as a path to better understand Alzheimer's disease and other mental illnesses, Prisinzano said.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/cityregion/s_454832.html

Intern Wrote For UI Student Newspaper (Hamilton Spectator, May 20)
A columnist writing about the newspaper's new summer interns, notes that one of them, Laura Thompson graduated from the University of Toronto with a science degree rooted in biological anthropology and psychology, but her journalism career has included The Toronto Sun and The National Post. She also wrote for a student newspaper at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where a story she penned has been nominated for a Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Award.
http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=hamilton/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1148077817293&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1014656511815

Kerber Writes On Threats To Historical Documents (Chronicle, May 19)
LINDA K. KERBER
, professor of history at the University of Iowa and president of the American Historical Association, is the author of an article titled "Preserving the Nation's Memory." She writes that the National Archives and Records Administration has allowed some federal agencies to withdraw declassified documents from public view, the Smithsonian Institution has signed an agreement with Showtime Networks to create an on-demand cable-television channel, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation wants to search the papers of the late investigative journalist Jack Anderson. "Historians view them as three serious threats to the integrity of access to documents and artifacts of national importance," she says. http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i37/37b02001.htm

UI Alumna Faces Criticism At University For Deaf (Chronicle, May 19)
The president-designate of the world's only university for the deaf remains under siege, after weeks of protest by students and faculty members, some of whom claim she is not "deaf enough" for the job. Opponents say that at this critical point in deaf history, Gallaudet University needs a stronger advocate for the deaf than Jane K. Fernandes, the institution's provost, who is scheduled to become president in January. Gallaudet administrators and Ms. Fernandes herself say protestors fault her for having been educated in an "oral" environment, where intensive training in speaking and trying to understand speech through the use of hearing aids and lip reading were stressed. Ms. Fernandes learned American Sign Language only at the age of 23, when she was a Ph.D. student in comparative literature at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I met the first deaf person in my life who signed when I was 23," she said in an interview.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i37/37a00101.htm

Retiring Army Officer Honored (Sierra Vista Herald, May 19)
Calling Col. Kevin C. Peterson a warrior, officer, husband, father, "but most of all a great human being," Maj. Gen. Barbara Fast said it was time to say farewell to the man who served his country for more than three decades. Fast presented the colonel with his second Legion of Merit at a Thursday morning ceremony on Brown Parade Field. As part of the ceremony, the colonel was treated to a musical melody, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA "Fight Song," from his alma mater. The newspaper is based in Arizona.
http://www.svherald.com/articles/2006/05/19/local_news/news6.txt

Paradiso Comments On Study (United Press International, May 19)
Most people have little trouble reading another's body language but not so for the schizophrenic, a study says. Those afflicted with schizophrenia, even with mild-to-moderate symptoms and taking medications, have limited capacity to understand the meaning of posture or body movement before reacting socially, the report says. The patient's intelligence appears unrelated to inability to perceive body language "Many people with schizophrenia, including those who are very bright, remain awkward in social situations," DR. SERGIO PARADISO of the University of Iowa team that conducted the study, said. http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20060518-121632-5495r

School Nurse Featured (Lawrence Journal-World, May 19)
In this story, Lou Ann Wilcox tells what's it's like to be a school nurse at Kennedy School in Lawrence, Kan. A school nurse develops special relationships with students, she said. "In a hospital you have an incident, you take care of somebody and then they go," Wilcox said. "Here you get to know the families and the students. I really like that part of it." Wilcox graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1979. http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/may/19/school_nurse_dispenses_advice_first_aid_and_lot_lo/

Hygienic Lab Develops New Mumps Test (WQAD-TV, May 19)
The University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory in Iowa City has come up with a new way to test for mumps. Officials say it's five times faster than the standard method -- and that should come in handy as Iowa deals with the worst mumps epidemic in the U.S. in 20 years. Lab Director MARY GILCHRIST says the test -- Polymerase Chain Reaction test, or PCR -- can determine whether someone has the mumps within one day. That compares with five days for a culture test, which requires the lab to grow the virus. The television station is based in Moline, Ill. http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4925654&nav=1sW7

Lie Explains Stock Options (Wall Street Journal, May 19)
In this article, some common questions about stock options are answered in light of federal investigations into potential abuses involving backdating of options awards. Stock options are intended to tie the pay of CEOs and other employees to a company's performance: The options don't rise in value unless the company's share price also rises. Stock-options plans, which outline how many shares are to be granted as options and how they are awarded, are first put to a shareholder vote. Once approved, it is left to the compensation committee of the board to approve individual option grants. ERIK LIE, a University of Iowa associate professor of finance who has researched option grants, says that the board is supposed to make these decisions and make them independently of management. But he contends that in some cases, management may exert improper influence on these decisions. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114799722894957275.html?mod=article-outset-box

UI Grad Student Edits Literary Magazine (The Hook, May 18)
Ted Genoways, who is earning his Ph.D. in English at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review. After being nominated for six "Ellies," the magazine world's highest honor, the Review won two at the 41st annual National Magazine Awards held May 9 at the Lincoln Center in Washington, D.C. The newspaper is based in Charlottesville, Va. http://www.readthehook.com/stories/2006/05/18/hotseatgenoways.aspx

Nixon Comments On Safety System For Icy Roads (KARE-TV, May 18)
"SafeLane" is the giant Minnetonka-based conglomerate Cargill's new safety system for icy winter roads. The process begins by spreading a special epoxy polymer, which resembles road tar, over an existing roadway. Then, 3/8's of an inch of special dolomite limestone aggregate is laid on top. This can be done in summer months. When winter weather approaches, road crews soak the aggregate with whatever anti-icing liquid that they choose. Moisture and temperature trigger the chemical release. The idea is, as the temperature falls, the brine stored in the aggregate is released and lowers the freezing point of the road surface so that ice and snow can't accumulate. University of Iowa Engineer and paid independent consultant WILFRID NIXON says the SafeLane process doesn't actually do anything to melt the ice and snow. "That's correct. It's not there to melt. It's there to stop the snow and ice from sticking to the pavement and if you do that then the standard snow plow will clear if off just beautifully," he said.
http://www.kare11.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=125075

Alumnus Is Community College President Finalist (The New Mexican, May 18)
The search for a new president at Santa Fe Community College narrowed Wednesday to a field of five. The school's governing board released a list of finalists including Dr. James Fries of Santa Fe, the current executive director of GROW, the community college's fundraising arm. He served as the president of the College of Santa Fe for 14 years and interim president for New Mexico Highlands University. He holds a doctorate in physical chemistry from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.freenewmexican.com/news/43822.html

UI Among Universities Producing Own Drugs (South Bend Tribune, May 17)
Across the country, a handful of universities has quietly gone into the drug-manufacturing business. Many offer lower-cost drugs and placebos, hoping to spark more "off- label" studies such as the discovery that Botox not only stops wrinkles but prevents migraines. The nation's five university drug labs -- at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Maryland, as well as Purdue, Kentucky and Temple -- must meet FDA requirements for facilities that make medicine for human consumption. The FDA oversees the labs and is supposed to inspect them every two years. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060517/Lives08/605170517/-1/LIVES/CAT=Lives08

Federal Money Funds UI Diabetes Research Project (New York Times, May 16)
Across the country, health care officials who rely on federal money to help stem the growing epidemic of Type 2 diabetes say they have become increasingly frustrated and alarmed. Diabetes is the only major disease with a death rate that is still rising -- up 22 percent since 1990 -- and it has emerged as the leading cause of kidney failure, blindness and nontraumatic amputation. But public health experts inside and outside the world of diabetes care say federal spending on the disease has historically fallen short of what is needed. And now the government has cut diabetes funding in the budgets for this year and next, despite the explosive growth in a disease that now figures in the deaths of 225,000 Americans each year. One project dependent on federal funds is at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where researchers are trying to develop a continuous blood monitor that Type 1 diabetics could wear at night to avoid having to awaken repeatedly to check their sugar levels. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the AMHERST TIMES in New York.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/16/health/policy/16diabetes.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Andrejevic: 'Survivor' Hatch Gloated Too Much (Boston Globe, May 16)
It's no stretch, not even a small one, to suggest that fame sank Richard Hatch. Reality TV's most celebrated snake, who will be sentenced today for failing to pay taxes on the $1 million prize he won on the first "Survivor" series, might never have been targeted at all had he not been sure to generate a certain kind of attention. Even before he won "Survivor," Hatch emerged as one of the show's most distinct characters, known for his Machiavellian tendencies, his skill at catching fish and his penchant for walking around the island naked. His victory was seen as a triumph for connivers; fans debated whether he should be admired or despised. Still, six years after "Survivor I," it's worth considering why America took the news so gleefully. For reality stars, Hatch offers a special cautionary tale -- about the danger of a TV persona that sticks, and the public's capacity to hold a quasi-fictional grudge. If the aftermath of reality TV is hard to bear, the aftermath of the aftermath can be wicked. "We don't really like to see the scoundrel win and then gloat, which is basically what Hatch did. It offends our native sense of justice," says University of Iowa professor MARK ANDREJEVIC, the author of "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched." "We live in a world where lots of people who are kind of jerks do end up winning and gloating. Maybe TV is one of those places where we like to see them get punished."
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2006/05/16/for_hatch_fame_has_been_the_real_test_of_survival/

Federal Money Funds UI Diabetes Research Project (Deseret News, May 16)
Across the country, health care officials who rely on federal money to help stem the growing epidemic of Type 2 diabetes say they have become increasingly frustrated and alarmed. Diabetes is the only major disease with a death rate that is still rising -- up 22 percent since 1990 -- and it has emerged as the leading cause of kidney failure, blindness and nontraumatic amputation. But public health experts inside and outside the world of diabetes care say federal spending on the disease has historically fallen short of what is needed. And now the government has cut diabetes funding in the budgets for this year and next, despite the explosive growth in a disease that now figures in the deaths of 225,000 Americans each year. One project dependent on federal funds is at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where researchers are trying to develop a continuous blood monitor that Type 1 diabetics could wear at night to avoid having to awaken repeatedly to check their sugar levels.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,635207768,00.html

Dreher: Programs Need To Modernize (Providence Business Journal, May 16)
MELANIE C. DREHER
, dean of nursing at the University of Iowa, said that in the changing health care environment, nurses increasingly need the skills and expertise to treat "really complicated patients." But nursing schools haven't caught up with all the changes in medicine, Dreher said. Nursing has changed dramatically in the 35 years she's been a nurse educator, she said, but nursing programs haven't changed much. "We're amazingly conservative. Now we can't be conservative anymore," she said, "because this is the [nursing] shortage to end all shortages. This is permanent." http://www.pbn.com/contentmgr/showdetails.php/id/120880

UI Project Expanding (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 16)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's WiderNet Project -- a nonprofit effort to improve Internet access in Africa's developing nations -- is planning to expand its reach to countries like Bangladesh, Haiti and India. Since its founding in 2001, the project has provided hardware and computer training to about two dozen African universities and a number of secondary schools. The program has employed over 50 Iowa students, many of whom have traveled to nations like Nigeria and Uganda.
http://chronicle.com/wiredcampus/

Skorton: Humanities' Fate In Hands Of Presidents (Chronicle, May 15)
A joint convocation held by the American Council of Learned Societies and the Association of American Universities to assess the state of the humanities drew over 200 scholars and administrators -- as well as two prominent Congressional advocates for arts and letters -- to a hotel here in Philadelphia Friday. DAVID J. SKORTON, president of the University of Iowa, who will leave that position to become president of Cornell University on July 1, told of his efforts to promote the humanities at Iowa from the top down, including the declaration of a "year of the humanities" and his enlistment of scientists at the university to lobby for the humanities at the state and federal level. "The fate of the arts and humanities is in the hands of university presidents," he said.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2006/05/2006051506n.htm

Skorton Comments On State Of Humanities (Inside Higher Ed, May 15)
A story about Friday's convocation sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies and the Association of American Universities and held in Philadelphia said the event involved university presidents, provosts and professors - joined by representatives from humanities groups - talking big ideas and practical solutions in their state of the humanities addresses. Much of the discussion centered on how to attract broader public support for the humanities. DAVID J. SKORTON, the University of Iowa president who is about to take the reins of Cornell University, said Iowa recently instituted more than 35 grant projects that involved faculty, staff and students working with cultural institutions and agencies.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/05/15/humanities

Jones Comments On Election Fraud Coverage (Columbus Free Press, May 15)
An op-ed that ponders whether the major media will fully cover the electronic fraud issue said The New York Times "was sparked out of its stupor on May 11, after officials in California and Pennsylvania warned that Diebold touch-screen machines, slated to be used in upcoming primaries, were hopelessly compromised. Michael Shamos, a professor of computer science and Pittsburgh's high-tech Carnegie-Mellon University, called it 'the most severe security flaw ever discovered in a voting system.' DOUGLAS W. JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa, says 'this is a barn door being wide open, while people were arguing over the lock on the front door.'" The paper is based in Ohio.
http://www.freepress.org/departments/display/19/2006/1964

Alumnus Believes Coelbren Alphabet Found (Louisville Courier-Journal, May 15)
Jim Michael, president of the 140-member Ancient Kentucke Historical Association, has a theory that would -- if proved correct -- require the rewriting of some important texts of history and archaeology. His quest began in 1986 when Michael, a pre-med graduate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and then a medical representative for Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, was having lunch with several Kentucky doctors and pharmacists. One person mentioned mysterious inscriptions carved in rock shelters that he had seen in southeastern Kentucky. Within two years, Michael -- who lives in Louisville and is now 74 -- had photographed several of the strange etchings, or petroglyphs, in Kentucky and other states. He sent them to Harvard University researchers who said they were the Coelbren alphabet. Coelbren, believed by many to be an ancient Welsh or Druid alphabet, is one of the links that Michael believes will help conclusively prove that emigrants from ancient Britain inhabited much of the Ohio Valley and other regions of North America in the sixth century, hundreds of years before Columbus landed in the Americas. The paper is based in Kentucky.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20060514&Category=COLUMNISTS04&ArtNo=605140392&SectionCat=&Template=printart

Lie Comments On Possible Stock Manipulation (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, May 14)
Top executives at Engineered Support Systems Inc. routinely received stock options shortly before spikes in the company's share price, boosting the value of the options by millions of dollars. The Securities and Exchange Commission is undertaking a broad investigation into whether companies manipulated option grant dates to boost executive pay. It's not known whether the Cool Valley-based defense contractor is part of that probe. Most of Engineered Support's top management retired after the company was sold in January to DRS Technologies Inc. for nearly $2 billion. University of Iowa finance professor ERIK LIE said it's unlikely Engineered Support executives were just lucky in getting option grants at low points in stock market trade. "If you were to look at the large sample of firms, you would not find very many firms that had more advantageous outcomes, in terms of their choice of the grant dates," Lie told the Post-Dispatch. "In fact, Engineered Support would clearly be in the top 1 percent."
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/business/stories.nsf/0/A3C84C17CA660C7E8625716D000B2F67?OpenDocument

Tennessee Williams' Time At UI Noted (Newark Star Ledger, May 13)
A story about a new collection of movies based on Tennessee Williams' plays from Warner Home Video discusses Williams' struggles with his family and his sexuality. After some early, panicky attempts at heterosexuality at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Williams realized it was men he loved; as his startlingly candid "Memoirs" makes clear, he soon made up for lost time. The paper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/columns/ledger/whitty/index.ssf?/base/columns-0/1147581576316100.xml&coll=1

Author Terrell Attended Writers' Workshop (Kansas City Star, May 13)
Whitney Terrell, who grew up in Kansas City, answered questions from FYI Book Club members following their discussion of his novel, "The Huntsman." A graduate of Princeton University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, Terrell lives in Kansas City with his wife and son.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/living/14565473.htm

UI Law Students Reduce Pollution (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 12)
A student group at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law used $425 raised at bake sales to buy a one-ton sulfur-dioxide pollution allowance in an annual Environmental Protection Agency auction last month. Sulfur-dioxide gas (SO2) is a major contributor to acid rain, atmospheric pollution, and respiratory problems. Its production is regulated by an EPA cap and trade system that allows manufacturers to buy rights to pollute. "We own the right to emit one ton of sulfur dioxide," says Harmony Mappes, co-president of the college's Environmental Law Society. The group will instead retire the credit from circulation. SO2 emission allowances are limited, notes Ms. Mappes, so "the more we take off the market, the more we effectively lower the cap," and the more expensive it is for companies to pollute.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i36/36a00803.htm

Walker Discuses Desensitization Protocol (MedIndia, May 12)
A study that is to be presented at the 29th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) says that following a methodical desensitization protocol might help patients who are allergic to anti-clotting medication that is vital to prevent the formation of new blockages in coronary stents. "Allergic reactions can be quite frightening to patients and physicians, and can lead to discontinuation of the medication," said the study's lead author, NICHOLAS E. WALKER, M.D., a cardiology fellow at the University of Iowa, Iowa City. "We showed we could successfully and safely desensitize patients who had just recently had a drug-eluting stent placed. That's a critical population to manage." The publication is based in India.
http://www.medindia.net/news/view_news_main.asp?x=10271

Judge: Negotiations Under Way In Lawsuits (WQAD-TV, May 12)
A judge says negotiations are under way in lawsuits filed by orphans who claim emotional damage after being part of a stuttering experiment at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA IN the 1930s. District Judge Thomas Horan canceled a hearing scheduled for today. He says he learned that lawyers representing some of the former test subjects and the Iowa attorney general's office are trying to resolve the cases without a long, costly trial. The lawsuits were filed by three former test subjects and three by estate representatives of those who have died. They seek unspecified damages to offset emotional, psychological and self-image problems caused by taking part in the 1939 study. The university apologized for the experiment in 2001. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4898326&nav=1sW7

UI Alumnus Honored (Press Republican, May 12)
The Alumni Association Clinton Community College in New York will present the 2006 Distinguished Alumni Award to Associate Professor in Art/Fine Arts Coordinator Mark Davison, who graduated from CCC in 1983 with an associate's degree in humanities and social science. He also has degrees from Plattsburgh State and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Plattsburgh, N.Y.
http://www.pressrepublican.com/Archive/2006/05_2006/051220069.htm

Book Describes Best Jobs (Ithaca Journal, May 12)
Mose Hayward has co-authored a book, "The Explosexuawesome Career Guide." Hayward uncovered the most envy-inducing jobs from around the planet and interviewed the people who do them. He included information on salaries and provides tips on how to land your dream career. Hayward is a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate who grew up in Iowa City. The newspaper is based in New York. http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060512/LIFESTYLE06/605120330/1046

Jones Emphasizes Voting Machine Security Risk (New York Times, May 12)
With primary election dates fast approaching in many states, officials in Pennsylvania and California issued urgent directives in recent days about a potential security risk in their Diebold Election Systems touch-screen voting machines. Officials from Diebold and from elections' offices in numerous states minimized the significance of the risk and emphasized that there were no signs that any touch-screen machines had been tampered with. But computer scientists said the problem might allow someone to tamper with a machine's software, some saying they preferred not to discuss the flaw at all for fear of offering a roadmap to a hacker. "This is the barn door being wide open, while people were arguing over the lock on the front door," said DOUGLAS W. JONES, a professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, a state where the primary is June 6. The article also appeared on the website of CNET NEWS. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/12/us/12vote.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Spider Dangerous To Humans (Daily Mail, May 12)
The brown recluse spider is extremely dangerous to humans. These spiders' bites are often implicated with necrotic skin lesions and can cause illness and other complications in humans, up to and including death in some cases. The life cycle of the brown recluse last up to two years, according to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study. The newspaper is based in Nevada, Missouri. http://www.nevadadailymail.com/story/1152415.html

Poet Leads Discussion On Robert Frost (County Courier, May 11)
Geof Hewitt, 62, a renowned poet, state poetry slam champion and juried writer with the Vermont Arts Council since 1971, leads a presentation and discussion on Robert Frost's work next Wednesday, May 17 at Pratt Hall in Montgomery. Hewitt holds degrees from Cornell University, Johns Hopkins and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Vermont. http://www.thecountycourier.com/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=2953&Itemid=

UI Study Confirms Safety Findings (Newsday, May 11)
A new study provides one of the most enthusiastic endorsements of electronic stability control, the anti-skid/anti-rollover system that is not required by law and which few buyers order if given a choice. Researchers at the University of Michigan, based on an analysis of eight years of government vehicle crash statistics, say the systems can reduce the chances of a fatal rollover crash by 73 percent in sport utility vehicles and 40 percent in passenger cars. Non-fatal loss-of-control crashes are reduced by 70 percent for SUVs and 55 percent for passenger cars, they said, and the benefits are even more dramatic in poor weather conditions. Similar conclusions have been reached by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Consumer Reports.
http://www.newsday.com/business/ny-bzslug4737210may11,0,3998711.story?coll=ny-business-print

Howard's Magnetic Surgery System Featured (49abcnews.com, May 11)
When Dr. MATTHEW HOWARD was in medical school 20 years ago, new ways to image the brain were just coming along. But during surgery, doctors had no way to take advantage of those images, so he set out to merge the images with magnetic controls, an idea that was ahead of its time. Dr. Howard originally envisioned the system for brain surgery and University of Iowa researchers pioneered using it for lung patients. Recently, they did the first magnetic lung navigation in the world. It took Dr. Howard and two colleagues more than a decade to invent it. The result was a Stereotaxis magnetic guidance system. "The last few years it's exploded," Howard said. "The systems are being installed in hospitals all over the world."
http://www.49abcnews.com/news/2006/may/10/magnetic_surgery_effective_treatment_rhythmic_hear/

Jones: Latest Diebold Flaw Is Most Worrisome Yet (The Argus, May 10)
Elections officials in several states are scrambling to understand and limit the risk from a "dangerous" security hole found in Diebold Election Systems Inc.'s ATM-like touch-screen voting machines. The hole is considered more worrisome than most security problems discovered on modern voting machines, such as weak encryption, easily pickable locks and use of the same, weak password nationwide. Armed with a little basic knowledge of Diebold voting systems and a standard component available at any computer store, someone with a minute or two of access to a Diebold touch screen could load virtually any software into the machine and disable it, redistribute votes or alter its performance in myriad ways. "This one is worse than any of the others I've seen. It's more fundamental," said DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa computer scientist and veteran voting-system examiner for the state of Iowa. "In the other ones, we've been arguing about the security of the locks on the front door," Jones said. "Now we find that there's no back door. This is the kind of thing where if the states don't get out in front of the hackers, there's a real threat." The Argus is based in California.
http://insidebayarea.com/argus/localnews/ci_3804675

Embattled Gallaudet President-Elect Is UI Alumna (ABC News, May 10)
Their protests don't sound like those on any other college campus, because many students at Gallaudet University, the nation's preeminent college for deaf and hearing-disabled students, have trouble speaking. But their message is nonetheless loud and clear: They oppose the board of trustees' unanimous selection for a new university president, the current provost Jane Fernandes. Students and faculty opposing Fernandes cite many reasons for their opposition -- a belief that not enough nonwhite candidates were seriously considered and Fernandes' management style among them. But also lurking beneath the surface are questions about what it means to be deaf. Fernandes, who is hearing impaired, is able to speak and didn't learn sign language until the age of 23. She did not attend Gallaudet, and earned a Ph.D. in comparative literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/WNT/story?id=1947073&page=1

Arndt: Meth Users Crash and Burn Fast (Montreal Gazette, May 10)
Drug treatment centers have seen a substantial rise in the number of people seeking help for methamphetamine abuse, a report released Thursday said. As trafficking in the highly addictive drug has spread across the country, the number of meth users admitted to substance abuse clinics more than quadrupled from 1993 to 2003, according to a review by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Part of the reason meth has become epidemic in some states, experts say, is that it's easy to make in illegal makeshift labs and extremely cheap compared to other drugs. "You get can get addicted to meth very quickly and the slide downward is much faster than drugs like alcohol, marijuana or heroin," said STEPHEN ARNDT, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and director of the Iowa Consortium for Substance Abuse Research and Evaluation. "These people crash and burn fast," Arndt said. "Health goes down, you're not eating, you're not sleeping. You're more likely to lose the car, lose the wife, lose the house and your job."
http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=4ea29d8e-a09a-4fc3-9d7a-b70b58d543ce&k=47185

Edelman Publishes New Book About Mothers (Los Angeles Times, May 10)
Hope Edelman, whose book "Motherless Daughters" topped the bestseller lists in 1994, has published a new book, "Motherless Mothers: How Mother Loss Shapes the Parents We Become." Filled with tales from the front lines of parenting, the book relies on surveys, interviews and anecdotes from Edelman's own life to track what happens to motherless women once they have their own children. Edelman is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Nonfiction Writing Program and continues to teach summer courses at UI.
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-motherless10may10,1,6315920.story

Jones: Latest Diebold Flaw Is Most Worrisome Yet (Alamada Times Star, May 10)
Elections officials in several states are scrambling to understand and limit the risk from a "dangerous" security hole found in Diebold Election Systems Inc.'s ATM-like touch-screen voting machines. The hole is considered more worrisome than most security problems discovered on modern voting machines, such as weak encryption, easily pickable locks and use of the same, weak password nationwide. Armed with a little basic knowledge of Diebold voting systems and a standard component available at any computer store, someone with a minute or two of access to a Diebold touch screen could load virtually any software into the machine and disable it, redistribute votes or alter its performance in myriad ways. "This one is worse than any of the others I've seen. It's more fundamental," said DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa computer scientist and veteran voting-system examiner for the state of Iowa. "In the other ones, we've been arguing about the security of the locks on the front door," Jones said. "Now we find that there's no back door. This is the kind of thing where if the states don't get out in front of the hackers, there's a real threat." The Times Star is based in California. This story also appeared on the Web sites of the CHICO ENTERPRISE RECORD and OROVILLE MERCURY REGISTER, both in California.
http://insidebayarea.com/timesstar/localnews/ci_3805089

Rosenthal: State CON Regulations Don't Affect Patients (RxPGNews.com, May 10)
People who have heart attacks are about 15 percent less likely to be treated with bypass surgery or angioplasty within the first few days of the incident in states with certificate of need (CON) regulatory programs. However, these patients are no more likely to experience adverse events, such as death, than patients who had heart attacks but were treated within the first days in states without CON. "The study implies that certificate of need programs, which require hospitals to obtain prior approval for establishing high-cost services, limit the growth of these services. In spite of limiting the diffusion of these services, CON regulations did not adversely affect patients," said GARY ROSENTHAL, M.D., the study's senior investigator and professor of internal medicine in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Caver College of Medicine. The same story appeared on the Web site eMaxHealth.com.
http://www.rxpgnews.com/medicalnews/healthcare/usa/article_4274.shtml

New Superman Was UI Student (Montreal Gazette, May 10)
Life is about to change in a super-sized way for Brandon Routh, the young actor chosen to don the iconic tights and cape of the Man of Steel. Superman Returns doesn't swoop into theatres until June 30 but already plenty of people are asking: Who's the guy taking over a role made famous by the late George Reeves and Christopher Reeves. Routh, 26, was born in Des Moines, Iowa, to parents Ron and Katie and grew up in nearby Norwalk. In high school, he was a popular athlete who was interested in the performing arts. In addition to starring in several school theatre productions, he played trumpet in the marching band and was proficient on the piano. During his years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Routh appeared in several shows at the Norwalk Theatre of Performing Arts.
http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/news/artslife/story.html?id=fd9537b0-2c8f-472a-bb8d-ee4cb03bdf37&k=69655

Pierce Must Pay Victim Counseling Costs (WQAD-TV, May 10)
Former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball player Pierre Pierce has been ordered to pay more than $2,600 in damages -- most of which will cover the counseling received by the ex-girlfriend he assaulted last year. Pierce, who was sentenced in October to two years in prison, must repay about 23 hundred to the state's crime victim compensation program. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4882665&nav=1sW7

Alumna Challenged At Gallaudet (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 9)
Faculty members of Gallaudet University approved on Monday night a motion of no confidence in Jane K. Fernandes, the embattled president-designate of the world's only university devoted to educating deaf students. Opponents say Ms. Fernandes, who is now the provost of the 1,900-student institution and is scheduled to become president in January, is not a strong enough advocate for deaf people at a time when their identity as a community is challenged. The opposition to Ms. Fernandes, who is deaf, has focused on her leadership style, which critics say has not been inclusive enough. Gallaudet administrators, and Ms. Fernandes herself, say the real problem is that she was brought up and educated in an "oral" environment, where intensive training in speaking and trying to understand speech through the use of hearing aids and lip reading were stressed. Ms. Fernandes learned American Sign Language -- considered a central element of deaf culture -- only at the age of 23, when she was a Ph.D. student in comparative literature at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2006/05/2006050901n.htm

Former UI Instructor Profiled (International Herald Tribune, May 9)
At 76, Hilma Wolitzer cannot afford another 12-year writer's block like the one that ended recently with the publication of "The Doctor's Daughter," her seventh novel. "If it takes me that long again," Wolitzer said, "either I'll be dead, my readers will be dead, or it'll be a double whammy." Wolitzer is a former instructor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/05/09/arts/wolitzer.php

Alumna Hired As Ames Superintendent (WQAD-TV, May 9)
Linda Beyea has been named superintendent of schools in Ames. She has a master's degree in music education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4876355&nav=1sW7

Jazz Playing Alumna Profiled (Jazz Police, May 9)
Jazz musician Patricia Barber is profiled. She studied psychology and classical music as a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before switching to jazz.
http://www.jazzpolice.com/content/view/5998/116/

Mass. Gov. Romney Visits UI (Salem News, May 8)
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney recently made a two-day swing through Iowa, where the potential Republican contender for president in 2008 was also expected to raise money for local Republicans, meet with key party activists and opinion makers and tout a new Massachusetts health care law at a meeting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Massachusetts. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill., WHDH-TV in Massachusetts, the BOSTON GLOBE and other media outlets.
http://www.ecnnews.com/cgi-bin/05/snstory.pl?-sec-News+1k589gO+fn-ma.romneystump.0508-20060508-

Biodiesel Producer Took Class At UI (MSNBC, May 8)
A story about how  biodiesel, a clean-burning substitute fuel for diesel engines made mostly from vegetable oil, is becoming more widely available, says Brian Kelly just obtained the necessary licenses for his company, East Bay Biofuels LLC, to start a biodiesel production plant in Richmond. Kelly's background in chemical processing led him into the biodiesel world when a friend asked if equipment he owned could be used to make the fuel. He took a weeklong class at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that covered everything about biodiesel, and read up on the industry before starting his business.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/12684184/

Former UI Engineering Dean Is College's First President (MSNBC, May 7)
The Olin College of Engineering in Needham, Mass., graduates its first class this year. The college's first hire was President Richard Miller, the dean of engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who then proceeded to put together an administration. "I thought this would be something of a utopia," he said. Miller, who had been frustrated by institutional barriers that prevent engineers from learning about business, set out to attract a faculty that shared his desire to break the mold. Risk-taking was a prerequisite, as made clear by Olin's no-tenure policy. Nevertheless, it has hired about 10 professors who have walked away from tenured positions or offers of tenure.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/12684159/

Missen Discusses eGranary (Hindu Business Line, May 7)
Controlling Internet content -- from the tedious process of putting up firewalls for every individual Web site to the even more tedious process of assigning a person to walk sternly up and down the corridor peering into screens -- is a tricky exercise in cyberspace. And quite often, students end up with limited access to the Internet at institutions offering connectivity. WiderNet Project, a service program at the University of Iowa has come up with a solution to this problem -- the eGranary. The eGranary is a digital library, an innocuous looking box, an external hard drive of sorts, into which the company has downloaded 250 GB of Internet content, while weeding out the unnecessary. The device is then plugged into a server and can be accessed by several computers through an intranet. The product was developed initially to bring connectivity to areas that did not have access to information. "One of our core missions is to `serve the information poor without making them too much poorer'," says CLIFF MISSEN, director, WiderNet. The paper is based in India.
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/ew/2006/05/08/stories/2006050800150300.htm
UI Alumna Works In Film (Kansas City Star, May 7)
A profile of 28-year-old Luci Harper, a freelance electrician/grip on film productions, says she grew up in Muscatine, Iowa, earned a degree in film production from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and moved to Kansas City five years ago.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/living/14492677.htm

Kerber Opposes Smithsonian Commercialism (Newark Star-Ledger, May 7)
No one can put a price tag on the Smithsonian -- and so far, no one has; there's no charge for admission. But now, 160 years after it was created by Congress for the "increase and diffusion of knowledge among men," this keeper of the national treasure is being accused of going commercial. Recent television and book deals giving special rights to business interests have prompted scholars, librarians, filmmakers and some members of Congress to complain that the Smithsonian is selling out to corporate America. "We fear that short-term commercial expediency is in danger of trumping the wider vision of the institution," said LINDA KERBER, president of the American Historical Association and a professor at the University of Iowa. "The boundaries are becoming confused," she said, between the public institution's role as a guardian of the nation's heritage and the private sector's business interests. The paper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-6/114697676299500.xml=1

Ex-UI Faculty Member Moves To Pain Center (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 6)
The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has established the Pittsburgh Center for Pain Research and recruited pain researcher Gerald Gebhart to direct the center. Gebhart is president-elect of the International Association for the Study of Pain and comes to Pitt from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He is one of the world's foremost specialists on visceral pain -- the pain people feel when their internal organs are damaged by trauma or disease, university officials said.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/cityregion/s_451177.html

Former Workshop Teacher Wolitzer Publishes Novel (New York Times, May 6)
A feature on 76-year-old writer Hilma Wolitzer, whose 12-year writer's block ended recently with the publication of "The Doctor's Daughter," her seventh novel, quotes Michael Cunningham, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, who was her student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Cunningham said the appeal of Ms. Wolitzer's novels was their ability to make the unremarkable seem remarkable. He compares her to Virginia Woolf and Grace Paley because all three "write about women's lives in ways that are profound and respectful," he said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/06/books/06bloc.html?_r=1=slogin=all

Author Boyle Attended UI Workshop (Santa Fe New Mexican, May 5)
A story about author T.C. Boyle says he grew up a disinterested student with musical aspirations who dabbled in writing at State University of New York at Potsdam's undergraduate program and got hooked. After a couple of lost years, he tore into the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP with renewed focus, eventually earning a doctorate in 19th-century British literature. That focus carried over to his professional life; a prolific writer, Boyle has published 17 novels and story collections (his 18th, "Talk Talk," is due in July), winning numerous awards including the PEN/Faulkner award for World's End (Viking, 1987).
http://www.freenewmexican.com/news/43287.html

Budget Cuts Threaten Beckermann Research Funding (Science, May 5)
Mechanical engineer CHRISTOPH BECKERMANN has developed software to help the U.S. metal-casting industry reduce waste and save energy by modeling how cracks form as the metal cools. At a time when politicians are demanding that the country become more energy efficient, the research by his 10-person team at the University of Iowa seems like a sure-fire winner. But the Bush Administration has proposed a 15 percent cut in the program Industries of the Future (IOF) that funds Beckermann and other researchers on projects including papermaking studies and combustion research. The cut is part of an $87 million bite the White House wants to take out of the $606 million program for efficiency research and technology at the Department of Energy, the latest twist in what supporters call a "death spiral" for a program that was once much larger.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/312/5774/675a

Low Turnout Noted For Mumps Vaccine (FoxNews.com, May 5)
As the number of mumps cases in Iowa climbed past 1,500 on Thursday, public health officials are seeing low turnout at free immunization clinics for young adults. Last week, the State of Iowa divvied up 25,000 doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine in 35 counties where colleges and universities are centered, but many in the targeted age group of 18 to 22 years old didn't show up for the shots. In Johnson County, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, public health officials told the Des Moines Register that just 262 doses of the 1,300 it received were used during the first clinic. The Associated Press story also appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES and MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,194360,00.html

Presidential Search Costs Compared (Clarion-Ledger, May 5)
The search for a presidential search at Mississippi State University cost $161,872. Similar searches recently at Southern Illinois University cost $161,000, and one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA cost $177,000, according to media reports. The newspaper is based in Mississippi.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060505/NEWS/605050357/1002/NEWS01

Artist Studied At UI (Princeton Packet, May 5)
Taking inspiration from the Bauhaus artists of pre-World War II Germany and the makers of the famed Nazca Lines of ancient Peru, Susan Hoenig's animal relief paintings merge seemingly contradictory movements separated by thousands of years and miles. After studying art at Bennington College in Vermont, she went on to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City to pursue a master of fine arts degree in painting. The newspaper is based in New Jersey. http://www.pacpub.com/site/myzwire.cfm?newsid=16576912&BRD=1091&PAG=461&dept_id=343157&rfi=6

Weinstein Writes Op-Ed On Tort Reform (UPI, May 5)
STUART L. WEINSTEIN, M.D., a practicing pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at the University of Iowa and chairman of Doctors for Medical Liability Reform, has written an editorial arguing that the time for tort reform is now. "Very soon, the Senate is scheduled to vote on vital legislation designed to stem the growing crisis in patient access to quality medical care in the United States," Weinstein writes. "The bill, S. 22, is called the 'Medical Care and Access Protection Act of 2006.' Its passage is crucial, because the crisis is deepening with every year and the future prognosis for U.S. medical care, if corrective measures are not soon taken, is grim."
http://www.upi.com/HealthBusiness/view.php?StoryID=20060505-104108-4903r

UI Study On Dental Corrosion Noted (ABC Online, May 4)
Cooked vegetables can be as acidic as tooth-eroding fizzy drinks, scientists warn. Eggplants, green capsicum and zucchini become more acidic when roasted in the oven, while red capsicum becomes heavily acidic when stewed, according to a study at Scotland's University of Dundee. Earlier this year, researchers presented research into the corrosive potential of acidic drinks at the American Association for Dental Research annual meeting in Florida. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found that drinks including fizzy drinks and apple juice can erode exposed root surfaces. The website features news from the Australian Broadcasting Co.
http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/health/HealthRepublish_1630447.htm

Former UI Professor's Marketing Study Noted (Business 2.0, May 4)
For a 1999 research paper, Baba Shiv, then an assistant professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, told two groups of experimental subjects that they would be participating in a memory study. He asked the first group to memorize a two-digit number; the second group got a seven-digit one. Then, before the subjects were asked to recall the numbers, Shiv offered them a choice: a scrumptious piece of chocolate cake or a healthy bowl of fruit salad. Remarkably, 63 percent of the subjects who were trying to memorize the longer number chose the cake, compared with 41 percent of those in the shorter-number group. "We distracted the cognitive side so that people were more likely to go with emotional impulses," Shiv says. He is now a marketing professor at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. http://biz.yahoo.com/hbusn/060504/050106_8375932.html?.v=1

Weinstein Comments On Malpractice Legislation (UPI, May 3)
A new bill unveiled Wednesday (May 3) in the U.S. Senate would limit medical malpractice awards for non-economic damages -- or intangible losses to a plaintiff known as "pain and suffering" -- to a maximum of $750,000. But the legislation -- dubbed the Medical Care Access Protection Act of 2006 -- also stipulates that a $750,000 award would have be spread out over multiple defendants, with the plaintiff limited to an award of $250,000 against any one doctor or healthcare institution. The legislation is modeled on a Texas tort reform law, which supporters say have sent malpractice insurance rates in that state plummeting 54 percent since the law's 2003 passage. University of Iowa physician STUART WEINSTEIN, chairman of the Washington, D.C-based group Doctors for Medical Liability Reform, told UPI that the changing medical landscape in Texas since passage of tort reform there is proof that the patient is the ultimate loser in a climate of out-of-control legal pay-outs. Weinstein, who is also president of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, noted that the number of orthopaedic physicians in Texas jumped from 1,790 in 2003 to 1,883 last year.
http://www.upi.com/HealthBusiness/view.php?StoryID=20060503-073005-6954r

Gurnett Comments On Saturn Rotation (New Scientist, May 3)
An estimate of how fast Saturn spins has been made using magnetic data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft -- but it is not the answer scientists were expecting. The most commonly cited figure for Saturn's rotation period -- 10 hours, 39 minutes and 22.4 seconds -- was derived in 1980 from Voyager observations of radio waves generated by solar radiation hitting the planet's atmosphere. Cassini has returned a result almost eight minutes longer. Giacomo Giampieri of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and colleagues examined data gathered over a 14-month period. "Nobody in their right mind could think the rotation rate of Saturn has changed so much in that period," says DONALD GURNETT, principal investigator for the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument at the University of Iowa.
http://www.newscientistspace.com/article/dn9100-saturns-rotation-puts-astronomers-in-a-spin.html

Author Cisneros Attended Writers' Workshop (Monterey Herald, May 3)
Sandra Cisneros sees herself as a sort of "illegal alien" of American literature. She's a graduate of the prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and the author of seven books, including "The House on Mango Street" -- often required reading in English classes. Yet despite being one of the first Latinas to thrust the Mexican-American voice and experience into popular literature, she feels as if she's not accepted or understood by the mainstream. "I really do feel that people are dismissive about contributions and experiences of people like me, or Maya Angelou or even Alice Walker. They might say they read my work, but they don't get it, they don't get me or what I'm trying to express," she said. The paper is based in California.
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/news/14488450.htm

UI Bids Farewell To Skorton, Davisson (Newsday, May 2)
The University of Iowa said goodbye to President DAVID SKORTON, who is leaving to take the top job at Cornell University. Colleagues, friends and students gathered Monday at the Levitt Center for University Advancement to shake Skorton's hand, or share a hug. Many stood in line for a half hour to talk with Skorton. Skorton's wife, ROBIN DAVISSON, a professor of anatomy and cell biology at Iowa, also is leaving. "You've been our family, all of you, and we are very deeply grateful for all of you," Davisson said. Skorton, 56, said he and Davisson would lease an Iowa City apartment for return visits, and said he was "seriously blown away" by the outpouring of support and thanks. Robert Downer, president pro tem of the state Board of Regents, said Skorton will be missed.  "Cornell's great gain -- or perhaps we should call it their coup -- is truly our great loss," Downer said.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newyork/ny-bc-ny--skortonfarewell0502may02,0,3540317.story?coll=ny-region-apnewyork

McCray Comments On Infant Immunization Study (Newsday, May 2)
Through a study of newborns' immune systems, doctors think they see a way to close the "window of vulnerability" that leaves infants dangerously susceptible to infections in the first two months of life. The researchers, at Children's Hospital in Boston, found that among 10 kinds of immune receptor molecules that sit on surfaces of white blood cells, one receptor can be activated earlier in life than expected. If doctors can reliably and safely stimulate that receptor, newborns may get an extra measure of protection through vaccination at birth. According to pediatric lung specialist Dr. PAUL McCRAY, at the University of Iowa, "What's exciting about this is that it may lead to a new way to perform immunizations that has advantages over existing technologies." But, he added, "it's admittedly speculation at this point."
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/ny-hsvacc024725650may02,0,2184443.story?coll=ny-health-print

Playwright Williams Left St. Louis For UI (St. Louis Post Dispatch, May 2)
A story about playwright and St. Louis native TENNESSEE WILLIAMS notes that he left the city to study playwrighting at the University of Iowa and never lived there again.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/movies/story/B498D78AEA84431B86257161007D5047?OpenDocument

Old Capitol To Reopen May 6 (Chicago Tribune, May 1)
The Old Capitol, a University of Iowa landmark, reopens to the public in Iowa City on May 6. The famed building and is fresh off a multimillion-dollar renovation that began even before a fire did significant damage to the building in November 2001. The renovations are the building's third major restoration, following projects in the 1920s and the 1970s. The Old Capitol is a National Historic Landmark and a large part of the University of Iowa. The Old Capitol's golden dome is on university letterhead, business cards and the school's Web site. "As corny as this may sound, its true that every day when I walk in from the parking lot, I look up at the dome and see the flag and think about how wonderful it is that we have this symbol," said University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/michigan/chi-ap-mi-oldcapitol,1,1318073.story

UI Alumna Describes Student Loan Debt Burden (CNN, May 1)
Mayrose Wegmann, 25, should have been starting on her dream career as a political consultant by now. And saving toward her first home. Instead, Wegmann, who graduated with a degree in political science and journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 2004 and moved to Washington, D.C., is working at a non-profit because it pays significantly more than entry-level politics work. And she won't even consider buying a home for several more years. In fact, she won't consider much except how to meet the $300 a month she owes on her $34,000 student loan balance.  "The school debt makes you decide [about your career] based on the money factor. Not based on what you want to do," said Wegmann. The Class of 2006, set to graduate this month, will soon be in the same boat.
http://money.cnn.com/2006/05/01/pf/college/reverse_dowry/?cnn=yes

Skorton To Be Inaugurated In Fall (Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, May 1)
DAVID J. SKORTON will be inaugurated as Cornell University's 12th president in an open-air ceremony this fall. The Ivy League university in Ithaca announced today that Skorton's installation will take place Sept. 7, on Cornell's historic Arts Quad. Skorton, 56, is currently president of the University of Iowa. The same story appeared on the Web sites of WQAD-TV, ITHACA JOURNAL, STATEN ISLAND ADVANCE, WCAX-TV and WSTM-TV.
http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060501/NEWS01/605020306/1002/NEWS

UI Tiny Baby Registry Cited (KNBC-TV, May 1)
The smallest surviving baby ever born at West Hills Hospital and Medical Center in California was set to go home this week, officials said on Monday. Alexandra Freeman weighed 360 grams, or 12 ounces -- the size of a soda can -- at the time of her birth in January, according to the hospital. The baby girl now weighs slightly more than four pounds and no longer requires supplemental oxygen. According to a registry produced by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Department of Pediatrics, Alexandra is the smallest baby born in Los Angeles County and the third smallest born in California over the past six years. KNBC is based in Los Angeles.
http://www.nbc4.tv/news/9140949/detail.html

Illinois School Honors Former UI Professor (Monmouth Review Atlas, May 1)
The Monmouth-Roseville schools will honor former students during the Hall of Achievement/Distinguished Service Awards Induction Ceremony. Among those honored will be Dr. John Hoyt, who was on the teaching staff at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine, where he also served as an anesthesiologist. The Review Atlas is based in Illinois.
http://www.reviewatlas.com/articles/2006/05/01/news/local/news4.txt

Squire Comments On Feingold's UI Visit (Capital Times, May 1)
A story about a recent visit to Iowa by possible presidential aspirant and U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.) says Feingold ducked the question of whether he will run for president while speaking at the University of Iowa. "I'll think about it later," he said. Among Iowa political observers, the most frequent comparison for Feingold is to 2004 contender Howard Dean. Feingold is tapping into the same anti-war sentiment, and is a hit among those who, in Feingold's words, "want us to stand up for something we believe in." But, after an initial surge, Dean finished third in the state's 2004 caucuses, a result -- some say -- of a campaign organization that was lacking in a state where that can be as important as the message. "The audience they're really trying to reach right now are the people they can entice to work for them on their campaign," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Organization is critical," he said. "It's heightened this time because it looks like there will be a large field of candidates." The Capital Times is based in Madison.
http://www.madison.com/tct/mad/topstories/index.php?ntid=82220&ntpid=1

Former President Coleman Donates To Old Cap (WLNS-TV, May 1)
Iowa University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman has opened her checkbook to help preserve a piece of Iowa history. She and husband Kenneth pledged $5,000 to kickstart a fund-raising campaign to renovate the Old Capitol in Iowa City. It's the state's first Capitol building and part of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where Coleman was president before taking over at Michigan. The Old Capitol first opened in 1842 and is scheduled to reopen on Saturday. The station is based in Michigan. A version of the story also ran on the Websites of WOOD-TV, THE FLINT JOURNAL and MLIVE.COM, all in Michigan.
http://www.wlns.com/Global/story.asp?S=4840084&nav=0RbQ

Skorton Comments On Old Cap Reopening (WQAD-TV, May 1)
It's been more than four years since the public has been able to climb the reverse spiral staircase of Iowa's first capitol. That wait is expected to end next Saturday, when Iowa's Old Capitol reopens to the public in Iowa City. The Old Capitol is fresh off a multi-million-dollar renovation that began even before a fire did significant damage to the building in November 2001. The renovations are the building's third major restoration, following projects in the 1920s and the 1970s. The Old Capitol -- a National Historic Landmark -- is a large part of the University of Iowa. The golden dome is on university letterhead, business cards and the school's Web site. University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON says he's pleased to have the Old Capitol restored and says it is a wonderful symbol of the university.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4839093&nav=1sW7

Squire Comments On Feingold UI Visit (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, April 30)
A story about a recent visit to Iowa by possible presidential aspirant and U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.) says Feingold ducked the question of whether he will run for president while speaking at the University of Iowa. "I'll think about it later," he said. Among Iowa political observers, the most frequent comparison for Feingold is to 2004 contender Howard Dean. Feingold is tapping into the same anti-war sentiment, and is a hit among those who, in Feingold's words, "want us to stand up for something we believe in." But, after an initial surge, Dean finished third in the state's 2004 caucuses, a result -- some say -- of a campaign organization that was lacking in a state where that can be as important as the message. "The audience they're really trying to reach right now are the people they can entice to work for them on their campaign," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Organization is critical," he said. "It's heightened this time because it looks like there will be a large field of candidates."
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=419945

Poet Wright's UI Connection Noted (Lexington Herald-Leader, April 30)
It's amazing that a mere 37 pages can contain the soul and structure of more than one world, but Charles Wright's "The Wrong End of the Rainbow" published by Louisville's Sarabande Books, autopsies the core of our collective universe. Wright's Appalachian heritage (he was born in Tennessee and raised there and in North Carolina), his stints at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Rome, his work for the Army Intelligence Service and his career as a prominent professor and poet at prestigious universities in the United States and Italy prepared him to view the world up close as well as to discern the bigger picture. The paper is based in Kentucky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/entertainment/books/14448311.htm

UI Alumnus Celebrates Store Purchase (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, April 30)
Jeff Noddle, CEO of the Super Valu grocery company was ready to pounce when the opportunity to buy Albertson's highest performing stores presented itself.  Several weeks after the announcement that the competitor was putting itself up for sale, Noddle would pop champagne corks at a surprise celebration with some of his senior managers to toast their $12.4 billion deal. It landed most of Albertson's highest-performing grocery stores, doubled Supervalu's annual revenue to $44 billion and fundamentally changed the corporate profile of the 135-year-old Eden Prairie-based grocer and wholesaler. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1969.
http://www.startribune.com/535/story/400994.html

Weinstein Comments On Medical Liability Bill (Washington Times, April 29)
STUART WEINSTEIN, Ignacio V. Ponseti Chair and professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, wrote a commentary addressing the impact of a Senate vote on S.22, The Medical Care and Access Protection Act of 2006, which addresses the issue of fixing the medical liability system. "How that vote turns out will determine whether millions of Americans continue to have access to quality medical care, or if excessive litigation and meritless lawsuits force many of our most highly trained doctors to cut back on "high-risk," lifesaving procedures -- or even abandon the practice of medicine," he said in the commentary. http://www.washingtontimes.com/commentary/20060429-084940-5697r.htm

Drew Author Keene Attended UI (American Heritage, April 29)
Edward Stratemeyer, who died 12 days after the first book about his creation, super girl sleuth Nancy Drew, was published, was replaced by two separate women writers: Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, the new head of the Stratemeyer Syndicate, and Mildred Wirt Benson, the ghostwriter behind most of the early mysteries. Together, Adams and Benson were Carolyn Keene, the author listed in the Library of Congress as Nancy Drew's author. Their differing visions of Nancy would eventually be reflected in two versions of the series. Benson, a Midwesterner who was the first woman to get a master's of journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, worked as a reporter (primarily at the Toledo Blade) from graduation until till the day she died at the age of 96. http://www.americanheritage.com/people/articles/web/20060429-nancy-drew-mysteries-carolyn-keene-edward-stratemeyer-bobbsey-twins-tom-swift-agatha-christie-harriet-adams-mildred-wirt-benson-hardy-boys.shtml

Bowlsby Formally Introduced At Stanford (San Francisco Chronicle, April 29)
Stanford baseball coach Mark Marquess and women's basketball coach Tara VanDerveer don't really know new athletic director BOB BOWLSBY. But the best measure of their confidence that Stanford hired the right person to be their new boss is the reaction of people who are well acquainted with Bowlsby, who is leaving the University of Iowa to come to the Farm. "I talked to (Iowa women's basketball coach) LISA BLUDER, and let's put it this way, she's sad," VanDerveer said Friday. "I think that's a good sign." Bowlsby was formally introduced at Stanford on Friday morning, he and his wife, Candice, coming to town for a couple of days to begin laying the groundwork for a big transition. Bowlsby, who has lived and worked in Iowa for most of his life, said he anticipates a little culture shock, already accomplished by a quick look at the real estate section of the newspaper.
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/chronicle/archive/2006/04/29/SPGOIIHMHB1.DTL

Irish Comments On Article About Lawns (New York Times, April 29)
ERIN IRISH, a biology professor at the University of Iowa who has done research in plant developmental biology, writes in a letter to the editor regarding an April 24 article titled "A Greener Way to Cut the Grass Runs Afoul of a Powerful Lobby" that another way to reduce pollution from lawn mowers is to keep small lawns, which can be easily maintained with a reel mower. "Cutting my lawn with a reel mower takes under an hour, uses no fuel (other than my breakfast), gives off no pollution, and best of all, when a neighbor stops to chat, as soon as I stop pushing the mower, it is silent!" she writes.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/29/opinion/l29lawn.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

top

 

The University of Iowa All rights reserved copyright 2006