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 UI in the News

March, 2006

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UI Student Entrepreneurs Featured (Fortune Small Business, March 2006)
In an article about how students in universities are learning entrepreneurship, two UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students are featured. At 21, Diana Reed has already reached the pinnacle of one career. A senior at the University of Iowa, she is the Hawkeye Golden Girl, one of the top twirlers in the Big Ten. Besides four hours of baton practice a day, Reed runs Diana's Golden Twirlers, a for-profit school she started during her freshman year. One of her squads recently won the state twirling championship. A dual major in dance and business, Reed credits the four classes on entrepreneurship that she has taken at Iowa. "I learned how to think about twirling as a market, not just a sport," she says. "My career as a competitive twirler may be coming to an end, but I can see there's almost unlimited potential in the twirling market." Also featured is Megan Wettach, a 22-year-old junior and fashion major at the University of Iowa. In high school she opened a store to sell prom dresses in her hometown of Mount Pleasant, Iowa. Last semester, after taking a class in entrepreneurship, she began designing her own gowns, secured a $150,000 line of credit with a bank in Des Moines, signed a contract with an apparel maker in China and negotiated a deal to sell her dresses in Nordstrom. "My professors opened my eyes to the idea that I can be bigger than a little dress store in Iowa," Wettach says. "I can be a global force in fashion."
http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fsb/fsb_archive/2006/03/01/8370301/index.htm

Helms Comments On Bird Flu Vaccine (Marketplace, March 31)
GlaxoSmithKline is rushing to test two new vaccines for bird flu and a good vaccine could mean good profits for the company that develops it. GlaxoSmithKline is investing about $2 billion in new research and manufacturing to combat a possible pandemic flu. Infectious disease specialist Charles Helms of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA says there's something of a vaccine race under way. "The fact that the companies are geared up and working as hard as they are is to the benefit of everyone," he said. Marketplace is broadcast on public radio stations nationwide.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=6fd339eec76e11210f6a8d6e0d6a59bc&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVb&_md5=0df55296ae1d467c8663164f957c3011

Ceilley Comments On Lawsuit Against Sunscreen Makers (Foxnews.com, March 31)
A consumer lawsuit filed on Thursday accuses sunscreen makers of exposing millions of people to cancer and other dangers through false and misleading claims about the effectiveness of their products. It charges that makers of sunscreen inflate claims about their products' qualities, lulling consumers into a false sense of security over prolonged sun exposure. "I don't know if there is any credence to this lawsuit," says ROGER CEILLEY, M.D., a clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa in Iowa City and a spokesman for the American Academy of Dermatology. "Sunscreen is an important part of sun safety, but it's only a part of it," he says.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,190124,00.html

Hovencamp Comments On Washer Antitrust Issue (Detroit Free Press, March 31)
The 70 percent of the U.S. washing machine market that Whirlpool Corp. and Maytag Corp. control didn't prove an insurmountable obstacle to government approval for the creation of the world's largest appliance maker. Antitrust experts disputed any suggestion that the government's clearance of the combination showed a new leniency toward mergers. The current market share of Whirlpool and Maytag overstates their competitive advantage, said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa law school who has consulted for the states in the government's case against Microsoft Corp. "Market share could switch dramatically and in a fairly short time if the big customers can be induced to switch" to other brands, he said. "Then the market remains competitive, and Mom and Pop's Appliance Store is able to benefit from that." http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060331/BUSINESS07/603310444/1002

Sunscreen Makers Sued (Reuters, March 31)
A consumer lawsuit filed on Thursday accuses sunscreen makers of exposing millions of people to cancer and other dangers through false and misleading claims about the effectiveness of their products. It charges that makers of sunscreen inflate claims about their products' qualities, lulling consumers into a false sense of security over prolonged sun exposure. DR. ROGER CEILLEY, professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa and past president of the American Academy of Dermatology, said sunscreen provides important protection. "There is a lot of evidence that sunscreen helps prevent precancerous spots and skin cancer.... but it must be used properly along with other components of sun safety like clothing and staying out of the midday sun," he said. "It should never be used as an excuse to bake in the sun as long as possible." The article also appeared on the website of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=healthNews&storyID=2006-03-30T223309Z_01_N30331267_RTRIDST_0_HEALTH-SUNSCREEN-DC.XML&archived=False

IEM Co-Founder Forsythe Named Dean (St. Petersburg Times, March 31)
An Iowa professor known nationally for his work using financial markets to forecast elections will be the next dean of the University of South Florida's College of Business Administration. ROBERT FORSYTHE, 56, will take over July 1 from Robert Anderson, who is retiring, USF said Thursday. Forsythe is senior associate dean and holds the Leonard A. Hadley Chair in Leadership at the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business, where he is a former chairman of the economics department. Best known for his work as co-founder of the Iowa Electronic Market, Forsythe developed a program for trading futures contracts in world events.  The newspaper is based in Florida. http://www.sptimes.com/2006/03/31/Business/USF_names_new_busines.shtml

Business School Picks Forsythe As Dean (Tampa Tribune, March 31)
The University of South Florida picked an Iowa academic as its dean of the College of Business Administration. ROBERT FORSYTHE, the senior associate dean at the University of Iowa's College of Business, will take over the top spot at USF's business school, now held by retiring Robert Anderson, officials said Thursday. Forsythe, 56, has been at the University of Iowa since 1981 and is co-founder of Iowa Electronic Markets, a widely popular online system that lets people predict the outcome of political elections. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://news.tbo.com/news/metro/MGB4BLUXFLE.html

UI Student Cast On Reality Show (Detroit Free Press, March 31)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
student James Perkins, 22, an ace poker player, is paired with auto franchise heir on the new reality show "Survival of the Richest" on the WB network. http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060331/ENT03/603310341/1120

Mossman Book Noted (Colorado Springs Independent, March 31)
In 1972, a New York Times book reviewer lauded an extraordinary book by young Dow Mossman, a recent graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS’ WORKSHOP, calling it "[a] holy book [that] burns with a sacred Byzantine fire." Mark Moskowitz, a college student in Philadelphia, saw that review and bought the book but didn't read it until nearly 25 years later — an experience that was life-changing. The newspaper is based in Colorado. http://www.csindy.com/csindy/2006-03-30/fineprint.html

Hygienic Lab Funding On Track (WQAD-TV, March 31)
The Iowa Hygienic Laboratory could be in for some new digs. Area lawmakers say they're optimistic the University of Iowa will receive state funding to replace the lab, which was built in 1917. The House Appropriations Committee has approved a budget bill that includes $36 million dollars for the project. Senator Bob Dvorsky says it also appears to be on track in the Senate. The Coralville Democrat is co-chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Lab Director MARY GILCHRIST says the lab, originally built as a tuberculosis sanitarium, is inadequate for the new demands that a state public health lab faces, including the bird flu.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4708046&nav=1sW7

Dorfman: Retiring Academics Reluctant To Cut Ties (Chronicle, March 31)
A story about a growing number of retiring academics who are relocating from one college town to another quotes LORRIANE T. DORFMAN, a social-work professor at the University of Iowa, who has interviewed 450 professors nearing or in retirement. Dorfman notes that professors who have put in decades of work in one location may be reluctant to give up their local ties - and, in some cases, their local fame. "The identity piece is really important," Dorfman says. "This is who they are. If they leave the community, nobody knows who they are." Making new friends can be challenging for older people in new communities. And even those who move to be closer to family occasionally regret the move. "Sometimes they find that too much togetherness is not a good thing," Dorfman says.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i30/30b01401.htm

Lovaglia Discusses 'Flutie Effect' (Wall Street Journal, March 30)
The notion that athletic success helps a university -- the so-called Flutie effect, named for a bump in admissions and donations at Boston College after a Hail-Mary touchdown pass by quarterback Doug Flutie in 1984 -- is an open debate. Studies have shown a temporary jump in applications after a prominent sporting achievement, though not necessarily in the quality of students. Schools also have enjoyed some gains in fund raising, though for athletics only and not the university as a whole. "There is very little hard data on how much good this may or may not do," says MICHAEL LOVAGLIA, a University of Iowa sociology professor who has studied college sports and institutional prestige. But Prof. Lovaglia and others note that almost all schools mentioned in the Flutie-effect discussion already were known athletic quantities. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114368677774411934.html

Forsythe Named USF Business Dean (Tampa Bay Business Journal, March 30)
University of South Florida Provost Renu Khator has appointed ROBERT FORSYTHE as dean of the USF’s College of Business Administration college beginning July 1. Forsythe comes to USF from the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, where he has served as Leonard A. Hadley Chair in Leadership since 2000 and simultaneously as senior associate dean since 1998, a release said. Forsythe is a co-founder of the Iowa Electronic Markets, where he developed a program for trading in futures contracts on political and economic events over the Internet and has attracted national attention for his work in forecasting elections using financial markets. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://tampabay.bizjournals.com/tampabay/stories/2006/03/27/daily66.html?jst=b_ln_hl

Lovaglia Comments On ‘Flutie Effect’ (Wall Street Journal, March 30)
In the era of big-money college sports, George Mason is the unlikeliest school to reach basketball's promised land—the Final Four in the NCAA Tournamant. The 34-year-old state school plays in a second-tier athletic conference and before this month had never even won an NCAA tournament game. How George Mason capitalizes on its magical run promises to be a case study for higher education. Colleges and universities spend tens of millions of dollars hoping success on the football field or basketball court will yield better students, bigger donations and a heightened public image. But never before has a school with such little name recognition or athletic tradition ascended so unexpectedly to the national stage. The notion that athletic success helps a university -- the so-called Flutie effect, named for a bump in admissions and donations at Boston College after a Hail-Mary touchdown pass by quarterback Doug Flutie in 1984 -- is an open debate. Studies have shown a temporary jump in applications after a prominent sporting achievement, though not necessarily in the quality of students. Schools also have enjoyed some gains in fund raising, though for athletics only and not the university as a whole. "There is very little hard data on how much good this may or may not do," says MICHAEL LOVAGLIA, a University of Iowa sociology professor who has studied college sports and institutional prestige.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114368677774411934.html

Blind Pianist Is UI Alumna (The Decatur Daily, March 30)
The brightest star at tonight's Huntsville Symphony Orchestra concert at Princess Theatre Center for the Performing Arts will be the woman who sees with her fingers and plays from her heart. Debra Saylor, who has lived in Huntsville since 2003, is blind. She relies on her fingers, her emotions and her passion for music to mesmerize audiences and stir the soul. Saylor, who has a degree in piano and vocal performance from Clarke College in her native Iowa, earned a master's degree from The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1984. The newspaper is based in Alabama.
http://www.decaturdaily.com/decaturdaily/livingtoday/060330/saylor.shtml

UI Student Doesn’t Want To Teach In Iowa (Kansas City InfoZine, March 29)
Iowa is struggling to fill teaching positions in math and science in schools across the state, and about 2,000 of its 13,000 high school teachers are eligible to retire, according to the Iowa State Education Association, the state's largest teachers' union. Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack (D) currently is negotiating with the state Legislature on a sweeping education package that proposes $30 million annually for five years to raise state teacher salaries above the national average of $46,000.  Kimberly Stolba, a 21-year-old education student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said she's always wanted to be an elementary school teacher but already has decided against teaching in Iowa. The pay is too low and the requirements for getting a teaching license, such as compiling a massive portfolio of classroom activities, are too much work for too little reward, she said. Instead, she plans to look for a job in Illinois, where elementary school teachers make $12,500 more on average than in Iowa. "I'm looking in the Chicago suburbs because it's a much higher pay base, much better benefits and they pay for advanced education like a master's degree, which I'd never get in Iowa," Stolba said.
http://www.infozine.com/news/stories/op/storiesView/sid/13888/

Skorton Wants Broader Review Of UI Smoking Ban (WQAD-TV, March 29)
The University of Iowa is considering more changes to its smoking policy. A ban is scheduled to take effect July 1 at University Hospitals. University President DAVID SKORTON has told a campus committee he wants a broader review of the smoking policy to consider future changes. One possibility is an outdoor smoking ban on campus. The committee plans to hold at least two forums in April, with a progress report in June. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4696122&nav=1sW7

Columnist: Freedman Was The 'Ultimate Mensch' (Rutland Herald, March 29)
Boston Globe columnist Sam Allis writes about the death earlier this month of JAMES O. FREEDMAN. "He was, to the world, James O. Freedman, former president of Dartmouth, former president of the University of Iowa, former dean of Penn Law School, former president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, former influential member of the American Jewish community, former influential defender of liberal arts education. All true, but what he really was the ultimate mensch." The paper is based in Vermont.
http://www.rutlandherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060329/NEWS/603290307/1039

Superman Actor Is Former UI Student (Zee News, March 29)
A profile of Brandon Routh, who will play Superman/Clark Kent in the movie "Superman Returns," notes that he spent one year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before deciding to pursue his acting career full time. The publication is based in India.
http://www.zeenews.com/articles.asp?aid=284665&sid=ENT&ssid=1

Judge Who Presided Over Murder Trial Speaks At UI (WQAD-TV, March 28)
A U.S. district judge spoke at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW about his experience presiding over the first capital punishment trials in Iowa in four decades. Judge Mark Bennett presided over the trials of Dustin Honkin and his girlfriend Angela Johnson. Both were convicted in the drug-related slayings of five people and sentenced to death. Bennett says the cases provided a challenge on a variety of levels -- professionally, personally and philosophically. As a former lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union, he says the cases conflicted with his opposition to capital punishment. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4694883&nav=1sW7

UI Alumni Take Enthusiasm To New Heights (WQAD-TV, March 28)
Illinois officials say only U.S. and state flags should ever fly above state buildings -- whether or not they're under construction. That clarification came after they ordered that an Iowa Hawkeyes flag be taken down from a state building under construction near the Lincoln Presidential Library. The flag was flying for at least several days last week before officials became aware of it and had it removed over the weekend. The Springfield building was once a train station and will eventually become the visitors' center for the presidential library and museum. A spokesman for the Illinois Capital Development Board -- which is overseeing the $12.5 million renovation -- says several construction workers attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4694752&nav=1sW7

Russi: iPODs Expand Knowledge Base (Wilmington News Journal, March 28)
An increasing number of professors at college campuses are experimenting with making lectures and study materials available to students via iPods and other MP3 players. They've become study aids for students, allowing them to fast-forward to a part of a lecture they may not have understood the first time or review complicated themes before exams. Students across the United States can download everything from instructions on how to perform an emergency medical procedure to a virtual architectural tour of campus. They also can be assigned to produce a podcast -- audio and video programming downloaded from the Internet to an iPod or similar device -- instead of writing a research paper. "It's just a further expansion of the knowledge base," says CHRIS RUSSI, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Iowa. He recently built a Web site that holds audio and video files of lectures. The News Journal is based in Delaware.
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060328/LIFE/603280322/-1/NEWS01

Ross: Check Prescriptions For Expiration Dates (Orlando Sentinel, March 28)
If you would never open your refrigerator and pop the top on the milk jug -- two weeks past its expiration date -- and chug it down, then why would you open your medicine cabinet and pop a pill that's two months -- or even two decades -- past its expiration date? MARY ROSS, pharmacy supervisor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, poses that question to make a point: Americans tend to take the expiration dates on their food products much more seriously than expiration dates on their prescription and over-the-counter drugs. "But, over time, the chemical makeup and potency of medications changes," Ross says. "Taking outdated medications may also mean you are taking a pill that is not going to help you. Many medications become ineffective past their expiration date. Heat, cold and moisture can also affect a medication's potency." Ross says this is why it's important to check the contents of your medicine cabinet regularly.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/lifestyle/orl-olddrugs06mar28,0,3197839.story?coll=orl-home-lifestyle

Regents To Appoint Interim President (WQAD-TV, March 28)
The regent heading the University of Iowa's presidential search says an interim leader should be named soon because the outgoing president has created a "power vacuum." DAVID SKORTON is leaving June 30 to become president of Cornell University. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4689155&nav=1sW7

Superman Actor Is Former UI Student (CNN, March 28)
A profile of Brandon Routh, who will play Superman/Clark Kent in the movie "Superman Returns," notes that he spent one year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before deciding to pursue his acting career full time.
http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Movies/03/27/film.supermanreturns.ap/

Frost Helps Reclaim Hurricane-Damaged Documents (Clarion-Ledger, March 27)
To GARY FROST, the stains and smudges left by Hurricane Katrina on the pages of a Civil War letter have done what historians can only dream of: Given an old relic a new story to tell. The four-page letter, written on blue hotel stationery by Jefferson Davis to then-U.S. President James K. Polk, had been among the rare manuscripts on display at Beauvoir, Davis' home, now a museum and library, in Biloxi. Like so much of the Gulf Coast, the 52-acre estate was no match for Katrina's fierce winds and tidal surge. The storm tore part of the mansion's roof, leveled buildings, obliterated the library pavilion and washed the letter and a dozen other artifacts on display in the library's first floor more than 700 feet away. Frost, a preservationist with the University of Iowa Library, volunteered his energy and expertise in the cleanup, and in doing so earned first crack at reclaiming Davis' damaged letter. Chemical poultices, cleansers and a handful of other tricks could only do so much to bring it back to its original condition, Frost said. The paper is based in Biloxi, Miss. A version of the story also ran on the Websites of the BILOXI SUN HERALD, also based in Mississippi, the TIMES PICAYUNE in New Orleans, KATC-TV in Louisiana and other media outlets.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060327/NEWS0110/603270333/1002

Cranberg's Report On Iraq Constitution Cited (Washington Times, March 27)
Columnist Nat Hentoff writes that with the disorganized Democrats looking hard for a clear issue to present to voters during the midterm elections and beyond, they might find a lifeline from Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who spoke in 1944 about "a second Bill of Rights under which a new basis for security and prosperity can be established for all - regardless of station, race or creed." Today's Democrats would have a very hard sell promoting all the elements of FDR's economic bill of rights. But the Democrats might invoke the spirit of FDR's message by showing how much of it has been adopted in the new Iraqi constitution, as reported by Gilbert Cranberg in the March 8 USA Today. Cranberg is a former editor of the opinion pages of The Des Moines Register, and he influenced many journalists, including me, with his historically grounded editorials and writings on the First Amendment. He also became an influential journalism professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://washingtontimes.com/op-ed/20060326-092757-2561r.htm

Fisher Calls Majority Of Incentives 'Waste Of Money' (MSNBC, March 26)
The U.S. Supreme Court heard a case this month challenging the use of tax incentives to lure industry, but the legal uncertainty hasn't stopped states from offering multimillion-dollar deals to corporations. Critics of incentives say other factors -- labor costs, worker skills and transportation, for example -- play a bigger role in location decisions, particularly when a company widens the search to include sites in other countries. Peter Enrich, who served as lead counsel for plaintiffs who challenged Ohio's investment tax credit, says the lost tax revenue strains the ability of states and localities to provide services. The lost revenue also puts more of the tax burden on small businesses and individual taxpayers, says Enrich, a law professor at Northeastern University in Boston. Plus, 90 percent of tax revenue lost to incentives is "a waste of the state's money" because the company "would have made the same location decision without the incentives," says PETER FISHER, professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/12033499/

Clarkson Comments On Pornography Class (Time, March 26)
A small but growing number of scholars are probing the aesthetic, societal and philosophical properties of pornography in academic departments ranging from literature to film, law to technology, anthropology to women's studies. Those specialists argue that graphic sexual imagery has become ubiquitous in society, so it's almost irresponsible not to teach young people how to deal with it. "I was amazed by how much the students knew about pornography but how little they knew how to think about it," says JAY CLARKSON, a graduate student in communications who introduced the University of Iowa's Pornography in Popular Culture class last fall. But although Clarkson and his peers may agree that porn studies have a place in the curriculum, they are divided over how far professors should go in teaching them. Do students really need to watch a couple copulating onscreen to understand why pornography turns people on? Or does a stimulating essay on the nature of desire provide just as much if not more insight?
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1176976,00.html

Schmidt, Rynes Studied Corporate Social Responsibility (USA Today, March 26)
Mattel is one of many U.S. corporations taking social responsibilities more seriously in foreign markets, from the rain forests of Asia to civil-war-torn Africa. As Yahoo, Google and other Internet giants face harsh criticism for their business practices in China, more companies realize it's smart business to be good corporate citizens in the exploding global economy. In 2004, business professors FRANK SCHMIDT and SARA RYNES at the University of Iowa looked at 52 studies on corporate social responsibility over 30 years. They found that well-run, profitable businesses also boasted solid social and environmental records. Versions of this story also ran on the Websites of LOUISVILLE BUSINESS FIRST in Kentucky, PACIFIC BUSINESS NEWS in Hawaii, the TAMPA BAY BUSINESS JOURNAL in Florida, the SAN ANTONIO BUSINESS JOURNAL in Texas, COLUMBUS BUSINESS FIRST in Ohio and many other media outlets. http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/2006-03-26-corporate-responsibility_x.htm

Investigation Into 1918 Flu Sparked At UI (The Olympian, March 26)
A story about research into the deadly 1918 flu virus discusses the important role played by retired scientist Johan Hultin, who came to the United States from Sweden in 1949 to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which had a highly regarded bacteriology department. The story says leading a virologist named William Hale visited the University of Iowa campus while Hultin was considering topics for his Ph.D. thesis. During the meal, someone asked Hale about the 1918 flu. Scientists knew little about what made the virus so deadly, Hale replied. The only way to learn more, he said, would be to unearth a flu victim frozen in permafrost decades earlier. The corpse might still contain the virus. Intrigued, Hultin seized upon the idea as his Ph.D. thesis. He enlisted the help of a paleontologist friend who located frozen bodies of Alaskan villagers who had died in a pandemic, and his quest began. The paper is based in Washington state. A version of the story also ran on the Websites of the CONTRA COSTA TIMES and MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD in California, the SALT LAKE (Utah) TRIBUNE and other media outlets.
http://159.54.227.3/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060326/NEWS/60326028

Columnist: Freedman Was The 'Ultimate Mensch' (Boston Globe, March 26)
Boston Globe columnist Sam Allis writes about the death earlier this month of JAMES O. FREEDMAN. "He was, to the world, James O. Freedman, former president of Dartmouth, former president of the University of Iowa, former dean of Penn Law School, former president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, former influential member of the American Jewish community, former influential defender of liberal arts education. All true, but what he really was the ultimate mensch."
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2006/03/26/the_ultimate_mensch/

Bill Would Allow Anonymous Donations To UI, ISU, UNI (WQAD-TV, March 25)
A bill that grants anonymity to university donors is among legislation affecting public access to records that has emerged from the Iowa Legislature. The bill passed in the Iowa House and awaits a vote in the Senate. It would allow donors to University of Northern Iowa, Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to remain anonymous. It would also put curbs on some of the access granted by an Iowa Supreme Court ruling in February 2005, which held that the endowment arms of Iowa's state universities are subject to state public records laws. http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4682100&nav=1sW7

Hageman Is Pioneer In Gene Treatment For AMD (Science Magazine, March 24)
Until recently, researchers had few clues to what causes age-related macular degeneration (AMD). But a series of recent gene discoveries has gone a long way toward solving the mystery. The new links between AMD and the complement genes suggest that excessive inflammation resulting from uncontrolled complement activity underlies the vision-destroying changes that particularly strike the macula, the central region of the retina. The causes of AMD have been hard to pin down partly because the disease develops late in life, usually after age 60. In addition, AMD is a complex disease, caused by an interaction between multiple genes and environmental factors such as diet and smoking. That's made it hard to do studies aimed at tying particular gene variants to the disease. "Until last year, we just didn't have a clue about the etiology [of AMD]. It's been very frustrating," says GREGORY HAGEMAN of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, one of the field's pioneers.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/311/5768/1704

Bowlsby: UI Looking Into Allegations (MSNBC, March 24)
The University of Iowa is reviewing allegations that at least five of its football players received preferential treatment from a cell phone company employee who later received free tickets to the Outback Bowl. Iowa officials said the university will investigate the matter to see if the players received extra benefits. The initial investigation is expected to be completed within 30 days and reported to the Big Ten Conference. We don't even know who was involved yet. The first step is to find out who was involved,'' Iowa athletic director BOB BOWLSBY told The Associated Press on Thursday. "In the grand scheme of things, it's likely not all that serious.''
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/11994123/

UI College Is Consortium Partner (Birmingham Business Journal, March 24)
The University of Alabama at Birmingham has been chosen as one of 10 major U.S. medical centers to explore methods for improving current survival rates for cardiac arrest and severe trauma patients. The National Institutes of Health, along with other federal and Canadian agencies, have created the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium with initial funding of $50 million. Other participating medical centers include facilities associated with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, the Medical College of Wisconsin, the University of Ottowa/University of British Columbia, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, the Oregon Health and Science University, the University of California San Diego, the University of Washington and the University of Toronto. The paper is based in Alabama.
http://www.bizjournals.com/birmingham/stories/2006/03/20/daily32.html

Russi Comments On iPods (Arizona Republic, March 24)
An increasing number of professors college campuses are experimenting with making lectures and study materials available to students via iPods and other MP3 players. They become study aids for students, allowing them to fast-forward to a part of a lecture they may not have understood the first time or review complicated themes before exams. "It's just a further expansion of the knowledge base," says CHRIS RUSSI, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Iowa. He recently built a Web site that holds audio and visual files of lectures.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/business/articles/0325worklife-ipodstudy0325.html

Redlawsk Comments on Senior Voters (China Post, March 24)
Representative Leonard Boswell has two messages for the senior citizens living in his eastern Iowa district: The Republican Medicare prescription drug benefit is a disaster -- and they should sign up for it. Boswell's stance illustrates the great balancing act Democrats are planning for the November congressional elections. Iowa is a crucial testing ground for the Democratic effort to turn the tables on Republicans. Fifteen percent of the state's population is 65 or older, according to Census Bureau figures. It also is politically divided. Bush won the state in 2004 with 50 percent of the vote; in the previous four presidential elections, the state went Democratic. "Many seniors are confused and concerned, and in Iowa the Democrats' strategy is to tap into that to nullify some perceived advantages Republicans have had with seniors over the past couple of elections," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "The senior population is a significant and critical demographic here in a state that is essentially 50-50." The paper is based in Taiwan.
http://www.chinapost.com.tw/international/detail.asp?ID=79221&GRP=D

Superman Actor Attended UI (Sydney Morning Herald, March 24)
Overnight, Brandon Routh went from yet another struggling actor in Hollywood to superhero of superheroes, landing the role of mild-mannered Clark Kent and his caped alter ego in "Superman Returns," due in theaters June 30. Aiming to become a writer, Routh spent a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with the idea of modeling and acting on the side to pay for college. But those side gigs led him to New York City and later Hollywood.
http://www.smh.com.au/news/film/superman-returns-he-was-in-sydney/2006/03/23/1143083906615.html

Redlawsk Comments on Senior Voters (Bloomberg, March 24)
Representative Leonard Boswell has two messages for the senior citizens living in his eastern Iowa district: The Republican Medicare prescription drug benefit is a disaster -- and they should sign up for it. Boswell's stance illustrates the great balancing act Democrats are planning for the November congressional elections. Iowa is a crucial testing ground for the Democratic effort to turn the tables on Republicans. Fifteen percent of the state's population is 65 or older, according to Census Bureau figures. It also is politically divided. Bush won the state in 2004 with 50 percent of the vote; in the previous four presidential elections, the state went Democratic. “Many seniors are confused and concerned, and in Iowa the Democrats' strategy is to tap into that to nullify some perceived advantages Republicans have had with seniors over the past couple of elections,” said DAVID REDLAWSK, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. “The senior population is a significant and critical demographic here in a state that is essentially 50-50.” http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000087&sid=aAKJtulARTmU

Disabled Students Won’t Lose Apartments (Columbus Dispatch, March 24)
Disabled college students at Ohio State University relying on subsidized housing can stop worrying right now about being forced from their living quarters by a new federal law, lawmakers and Bush administration officials said yesterday. The situation was an unintended consequence of legislation aimed at cracking down on subsidized-housing abuse at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA involving student-athletes, some with affluent parents, on full scholarships who were living in Section 8 housing meant for low-income people. The newspaper is based in Ohio.
http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/03/24/2006032

UI Students Run Text Messaging Service (USA Today, March 24)
Two UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students are running a text message service that delivers information on specials at Iowa City bars. Ian Jacobsen and Kane Johnson have more than 300 customers, most of them fellow students, who receive ads on their wireless telephones about drink specials, food deals and admission discounts.

Actor Attended UI (Cape Times, March 24)
Overnight, Brandon Routh went from yet another struggling actor in Hollywood to landing the role of Clark Kent in "Superman Returns," due in theaters in June. Planning to become a writer, Routh spent a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with the idea of modeling and acting on the side to pay for college. These jobs led him to New York City and later Hollywood. The newspaper is based in South Africa. http://tonight.co.za/index.php?fArticleId=3172607&fSectionId=362&fSetId=216

UI Reviewing Allegations Against Football Players (USA Today, March 23)
University of Iowa officials are reviewing allegations against five football players over conduct that may have violated NCAA rules. The allegations say the players may have received preferential treatment in obtaining merchandise from a cellphone services provider, possibly for handing over tickets to the 2006 Outback Bowl. University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON and athletics director BOB BOWLSBY were informed of the allegations late Wednesday. They released a joint statement Thursday morning. "The allegations must be and will be treated with the utmost seriousness," the statement said. "We will move expeditiously to learn the facts of the situation so that the university and athletics department can determine the appropriate course of action." The officials said the university's Office of the General Counsel, along with the athletics department, will investigate the matter. The initial investigation is expected to be completed within 30 days. The Associated Press story also appeared on the websites of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and WOWT-TV in Nebraska. http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/football/bigten/2006-03-23-iowa-allegations_x.htm

Student Offered UI Scholarship (Chicago Sun-Times, March 23)
Allison Seymour applied to the University of Illinois business school, but school officials say even top students were denied after the school received the most applications ever and ended up admitting its most talented class ever. Business degrees, after a downswing, are extremely popular again. Seymour, who got scholarship offers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Indiana University, says she plans to attend the University of Wisconsin. http://www.suntimes.com/output/education/cst-nws-suofi24.html

Russi, Collins Comment On iPods (The Daily Advertiser, March 23)  
An increasing number of professors college campuses are experimenting with making lectures and study materials available to students via iPods and other MP3 players. They become study aids for students, allowing them to fast-forward to a part of a lecture they may not have understood the first time or review complicated themes before exams. "It's just a further expansion of the knowledge base," says CHRIS RUSSI, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Iowa. He recently built a Web site that holds audio and visual files of lectures. Skeptics hope the rush to experiment with iPods won't affect classroom teaching. "There is no substitute for the energy exchanged one-on-one in a living classroom," says DAVE COLLINS, a marketing lecturer at the University of Iowa. "I would compare it to listening to a CD or podcast of Dave Matthews as opposed to being at a concert." The newspaper is based in Lafayette, La. The article originally appeared in the DES MOINES REGISTER.
http://theadvertiser.gns.gannettonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060323/TECH01/602150474/1001/tech

Mascot Lawsuit Noted  (Detroit Free Press, March 23)
In 1999, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S Herky the Hawk mascot was smacked from behind by an Ohio State band member wielding a 3-foot foam banana in a football game at Columbus. Herky, aka Angela Anderson, sued OSU, citing "severe personal injuries, pain and suffering." She was awarded $25,000. http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060323/NEWS05/603230511/1001/NEWS

Friend Says Freedman 'Led By Moral Example' (Boston Globe, March 23)
In an op-ed article, David M. Shribman, former Washington bureau chief of the Globe and executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, remembers his friend, University of Iowa Emeritus President JAMES O. FREEDMAN, who died Tuesday, March 21, in Cambridge, Mass. Shribman writes that at both the UI and Dartmouth College, where Freedman served as president from 1987-1998, Freedman "led by moral example, by making people believe they could and should be better and raising the standards -- mostly by believing higher standards were better and by living himself at a very high standard." He also describes Freedman as a "big, quiet man, given to introspection, happiest in a big chair with a big book and a big chunk of time to read it. Freedman loved to read the way many of us love to eat. He didn't read to live. He lived to read."
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2006/03/23/the_freedman_style/

Russi, Collins Comment On iPods (Detroit Free Press, March 23)
An increasing number of professors at Duke and other college campuses are experimenting with making lectures and study materials available to students via iPods and other MP3 players. They become study aids for students, allowing them to fast-forward to a part of a lecture they may not have understood the first time or review complicated themes before exams. "It's just a further expansion of the knowledge base," says CHRIS RUSSI, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Iowa. He recently built a Web site that holds audio and visual files of lectures. Skeptics hope the rush to experiment with iPods won't affect classroom teaching. "There is no substitute for the energy exchanged one-on-one in a living classroom," says DAVE COLLINS, a marketing lecturer at the University of Iowa. "I would compare it to listening to a CD or podcast of Dave Matthews as opposed to being at a concert." The article originally appeared in the DES MOINES REGISTER.
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060323/NEWS11/60323003

Superman Actor Is Former UI Student (Seattle Post Intelligencer, March 22)
A profile of Brandon Routh, who will play Superman/Clark Kent in the movie "Superman Returns," notes that he spent one year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before deciding to pursue his acting career full time. The same story appeared on the Web sites of FOX NEWS and the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/movies/263659_supermanactor21.html

Former UI President Freedman Dies (New York Times, March 22)
James O. Freedman, a former president of Dartmouth College and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a forceful voice against anti-Semitism and other forms of intolerance on college campuses, died yesterday at his home in Cambridge, Mass. He was 70. Mr. Freedman was a strong advocate for a liberal education in an increasingly career-oriented world, but he gained his widest attention for speaking out against strains of prejudice and bigotry in the academic world.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/22/national/22freedman.html

Freedman Death Noted (Inside Higher Ed, March 22)
James O. Freedman, who served as president of Dartmouth College and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and who was a highly respected and eloquent advocate for the liberal arts, died Tuesday of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Freedman was credited with strengthening the intellectual climate at Dartmouth and bolstering its finances and its reputation.
http://insidehighered.com/news/2006/03/22/qt

Paper's Blog Marks Death Of Freedman (Wall Street Journal, March 22)
The newspaper's "law blog" notes the death of James O. Freedman, the former president of Dartmouth College and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. After graduating from Harvard College in 1953, Freedman dropped out of Harvard Law School to work as a reporter for New Hampshire's The Union Leader newspaper. He returned to law school, graduating from Yale, and then clerked for Thurgood Marshall, who at the time was a Second Circuit appeals court judge. After a brief stint at a New York law firm, Freedman took a job an assistant law professor at the University of Pennsylvania and later became dean of the law school. He was president of the University of Iowa before taking the job at Dartmouth.
http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2006/03/22/obituary-of-former-dartmouth-president-and-lawyer-james-freedman/

Freedman's Time As UI President Noted (Stamford Advocate, March 22)
James O. Freedman, 15th president of Dartmouth College, died Tuesday at age 70. Freedman spent most of his career in the Ivy League. He was educated at Harvard and Yale and became dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School. In 1981, Freedman was selected as the successor to retiring UNIVERSITY OF IOWA President Willard Boyd and became the 16th president in the university's history. He then spent 11 years as Dartmouth's president.
http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/news/local/state/hc-21203209.apds.m0045.bc-ct--obitmar21,0,7721688.story?coll=hc-headlines-local-wire

Cranberg's Report On Iraq Constitution Cited (Jewish World Review, March 22)
Columnist Nat Hentoff writes that with the disorganized Democrats looking hard for a clear issue to present to voters during the midterm elections and beyond, they might find a lifeline from Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who spoke in 1944 about "a second Bill of Rights under which a new basis for security and prosperity can be established for all - regardless of station, race or creed." Today's Democrats would have a very hard sell promoting all the elements of FDR's economic bill of rights. But the Democrats might invoke the spirit of FDR's message by showing how much of it has been adopted in the new Iraqi constitution, as reported by Gilbert Cranberg in the March 8 USA Today.  Cranberg is a former editor of the opinion pages of The Des Moines Register, and he influenced many journalists, including me, with his historically grounded editorials and writings on the First Amendment. He also became an influential journalism professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://jewishworldreview.com/cols/hentoff032206.asp

Freedman Death Coincides With Start Of UI Search (KTVO-TV, March 22)
On the same day the Iowa Board of Regents met in Ottumwa to discuss who would head the search for a new president of the University of Iowa, officials say a former president has died. Cancer took the life of James Oliver Freedman on Tuesday, he was 70. Freedman headed Iowa from 1982-1987. The station reports that Teresa A. Wahlert was named chairwoman of the search committee to name a replacement for outgoing president DAVID SKORTON. The station is based in Missouri.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/Global/story.asp?S=4663170&nav=1LFs

New 'Superman' Actor Attended UI (Relish, March 22)
A story about Iowa native and actor Brandon Routh, who is playing the lead role in the upcoming "Superman" movie, says Routh was raised in Iowa, about 100 miles from where George Reeves, the star of the 1950s television show Adventures of Superman, grew up, and spent a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with the idea of modeling and acting on the side to pay for college. But those side gigs led Routh to New York and later Hollywood, where he landed a recurring TV role in the soap opera One Life to Live and guest spots on such series as Will & Grace and The Gilmore Girls. Relish is a publication serving northwest North Carolina.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_RelishArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1137834858179&path=!entertainment!movies!&s=1037645508976

Klaus' Book Published By UI Press (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, March 21)
After the unexpected death of his wife of 35 years, University of Iowa English Professor CARL KLAUS coped with loss by writing a year's worth of letters to her. Fortunately for us, Carl Klaus, founding director of the University of Iowa's Nonfiction Writing Program and professor emeritus of English, has put his considerable skills to work on the page, packaged his efforts between the hard covers of a book and sent it out into the world. The book "Letters To Kate" is published by the University of Iowa Press.
http://www.startribune.com/384/story/321825.html

Paper: Freedman 'Widely Respected' (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 21)
The newspaper's "news blog" note the death of James O. Freedman who was president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA from 1982 to 1987 and president of Dartmouth College from 1987 to 1998. Beyond his service to those institutions, Mr. Freedman was a widely respected leader in American higher education, speaking out in particular for the values of a liberal education. He was also an occasional contributor to The Chronicle's opinion pages, and the paper offers links to a selection of his writings.
http://chronicle.com/news/article/146/james-freedman-1935-2006

UI Lecture Cited In NASA Scientist Story (KUTV-TV, March 21)
James Hansen, one of NASA's top climate scientists, believes the Bush Administration is trying to prevent government scientists from saying global warming is changing the earth's climate. He first made his claim over a year ago in a lecture at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. KUTV is based in Utah. The story also appeared on the Web site of WJZ-TV.
http://kutv.com/topstories/topstories_story_079234356.html

Black Study Links Gambling, Heredity (Haber Saglik, March 21)
According to a University of Iowa study, problem gambling runs in families and excessive drinking, drug disorders and antisocial personality disorders also run rampant in families with pathological gamblers. The study in the journal Psychiatry Research outlined researchers' findings and gives new insight into who may potentially suffer from these disorders. DONALD W. BLACK, professor of psychiatry in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine says, "Something is being passed along in these families that increases the persons' likelihood of engaging in impulsive and ultimately self-destructive behavior. In some persons, it manifests as substance abuse, in others as antisocial behavior, and in others gambling, and often the three are combined." Haber Saglik is based in Turkey. The same story appeared on the Web site of IVANHOE NEWS and FASHION MONITOR (Canada).
http://www.habersaglik.com/default.asp?Act=Dt&CatId=4&NwId=66772

Law Alumnus Named Hotel Company Executive (HospitalityNet, March 21)
Carlson Hotels Worldwide promoted Steve Mogck to executive vice president of Select Service Hotels for Carlson Hotels Worldwide. Mogck earned his law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://www.hospitalitynet.org/news/154000320/4026772.search?query=%22university+of+iowa%22

Hypnosis Used As Alternative To Sedation (Time, March 21)
Studies using advanced scanning technology have shed new light on how hypnosis works to block pain. In a report published two years ago in the journal Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, DR. SEBASTIAN SCHULZ-STÜBNER of the University of Iowa reported using heat-producing thermodes to measure the pain thresholds of 12 healthy volunteers ("painful" stimuli earning a rating of 8 or higher on a 10-point scale). When the participants were hypnotized and re-exposed to the thermodes, all 12 reported feeling significantly reduced pain (with ratings of 3 or lower) or no pain at all. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1174707,00.html?promoid=rss_health

Worms Used In Allergy Treatment (KARE-TV, March 21)
Early exposure to pets, peanuts and intestinal worms might actually be good for you, because they program the developing immune system to know the difference between real threats, such as germs, and Aunt Millie's cat. Scientists base this radical new thinking about human allergies on a deeper understanding of how the immune system works. Some doctors say worms might do something that allergy-causing substances won't do - broadly reset the immune system so that it no longer reacts to allergy-causing substances or attacks the body's tissues, as it does in Crohn's disease and Type I diabetes. Worms captured the imagination of Joel Weinstock of Tufts New England Medical Center imagination and that of his collaborator, DAVID ELLIOTT of the University of Iowa, because worm infections appear to regulate the immune system so that it functions normally. Weinstock, Elliott and other researchers believe that a low-grade infection with intestinal worms - pig whipworms because they can't reproduce in people - can restore the immune system's natural balance. The televsion station is based in Minneapolis, Minn. http://www.kare11.com/news/health/health_article.aspx?storyid=121185

Wahlert To Chair Presidential Search Committee (WQAD-TV, March 21)
A member of the Iowa Board of Regents will head the search for the next president at the University of Iowa. The regents have appointed Teresa Wahlert as chairwoman of the search committee to replace DAVID SKORTON. The regents say they'll select a vice chair from an on-campus group, an answer to some faculty's concerns about being left out of the process. Wahlert, who's also on the University of Northern Iowa's search committee, says the vice chair will provide input and advice from the campus perspective. The television station is based in Moline, Ill. http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4660940&nav=1sW7

Poet Attended Writers' Workshop (Daily Star, March 21)
In a review of a poetry collection titled "Forest in Cloud," it's noted that the collection includes pieces written by Hasna Moudud when she attended the WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Bangladesh.
http://www.thedailystar.net/2006/03/21/d603211503102.htm

Elliott's Work With Worms, Intestinal Ailments Cited (USA Today, March 20)
Early exposure to pets, peanuts and intestinal worms might actually be good for you, because they program the developing immune system to know the difference between real threats, such as germs, and Aunt Millie's cat. Scientists base this radical new thinking about human allergies on a deeper understanding of how the immune system works. Some doctors say worms might do something that allergy-causing substances won't do - broadly reset the immune system so that it no longer reacts to allergy-causing substances or attacks the body's tissues, as it does in Crohn's disease and Type I diabetes. "This is an exciting new area with potential for opening new therapeutic avenues for diseases that are hard to control and treat," says Joel Weinstock of Tufts New England Medical Center. Worms captured Weinstock's imagination and that of his collaborator, DAVID ELLIOTT of the University of Iowa, because worm infections appear to regulate the immune system so that it functions normally. Weinstock, Elliott and other researchers believe that a low-grade infection with intestinal worms - pig whipworms because they can't reproduce in people - can restore the immune system's natural balance.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2006-03-19-allergies-cover_x.htm

UI Study Cited In Cherry Dispute (Arizona Republic, March 20)
The cherry industry is marketing cherries as health food, trumpeting research showing they contain helpful antioxidants, along with testimonials from buyers. At the same time, the Food and Drug Administration has ordered 29 companies to stop making unproven claims that their cherry products treat or prevent disease. Studies funded partly by the industry and the USDA detected antioxidants in cherries, including anthocyanins, the compounds responsible for a fruit's color. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists documented the presence of perillyl alcohol. Versions of this Associated Press article appeared March19 and  20 on the websites of the CONCORD (N.H.) MONITOR, GAINESVILLE (Fla.) SUN, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, SEATTLE TIMES, BLOOMINGTON (Ill.) PANTAGRAPH, PUEBLO (Colo.) CHIEFTAIN, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, MIAMI HERALD, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, CBS NEWS, the TIMES-PICAYUNE in New Orleans, and many other news sources.
http://www.azcentral.com/health/news/articles/0320cherries.html

Auctioneer Has New Abode (Chicago Tribune, March 19)
Last December, auctioneer Sean Susanin traded the spectacular views of his apartment on the 59th floor of the Hancock Center for a third-floor walkup whose only range of vision is a drab industrial scene. Now he lives European-style, "above the store," his 13-year-old eponymous auction house at 900 S. Clinton St. in Southgate Market, a booming residential area in the South Loop. Susanin majored in communications and marketing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/home/chi-0603190340mar19,1,6278641.story

Hansen Talk at UI Noted (CBS News, March 19)
On “60 Minutes,” James Hansen, one of the world's leading researchers on global warming and head of NASA's top institute studying the climate, was interviewed. He says the Bush administration is restricting who he can talk to and editing what he can say. Hansen believes is that global warming is accelerating.  In a talk at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, he said this about the Bush administration. “I find a willingness to listen only to those portions of scientific results that fit predetermined, inflexible positions. This, I believe, is a recipe for environmental disasters.” Ever since he said that, NASA's been keeping an eye on Hansen, said “60 Minutes” co-host Scott Pelley.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=3cebc64a0f435ebb91612e070f54d71f&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=5647197d512f7fadd11f7389a6ee5e46

UI Alumna To Head Evaluation Of Latino News Coverage (MSNBC.com, March 19)
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists picked Arizona State University to evaluate the nation's coverage of Latino issues in leading news magazines. After a nationwide search for mass communication researchers, the group chose the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and assistant professor Dina Gavrilos to lead the project. Gavrilos' academic research focuses on news media coverage of minorities. In past analyses, she's found Latino stories, regardless of where they are published, fall on extreme ends of the spectrum. ASU and Gavrilos were picked for the project based on knowledge of the issues, among other factors. Before Gavrilos began teaching at ASU in 2003, she wrote her doctoral dissertation at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on how national and ethnic identities emerged in the news media in the context of bilingual language controversies.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/11920577/

Van Allen's Professional Demeanor Praised (Bergen Record, March 19)
James Hansen, a top NASA scientist and former Ridgewood resident, touched off a political ruckus in January when he told The New York Times that the Bush administration was trying to censor his public comments about global warming. In a Q & A with the paper, Hansen discusses the politics of science, the Bush administration and why he thinks humanity is running out of time to prevent an ecological crisis. The final question notes that he grew up in Iowa and studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA under legendary astrophysicist JAMES VAN ALLEN. Asked whether that background prepared him for public debates, Hansen said, "The example I gave of Van Allen's influence on students was his demeanor. He was just calm. He didn't get flustered. When I went to NASA, I heard that his proposal for an experiment on a mission to Jupiter was not selected because NASA headquarters was not very happy with him; he criticized NASA repeatedly for its emphasis on putting men in space instead of automated spacecraft. When I mentioned that to him in a letter, he just said, 'I know that my positions have not endeared me to people at NASA headquarters, but I take the position that I'm dealing with honorable men.' It's a good attitude." The newspaper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.bergen.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzOTcmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY4OTg1MzAmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkxNA==

Coach Elliott's Ties To UI Noted (San Diego Union Tribune, March 19)
A story about Bob Elliott, the new assistant head football coach at San Diego State University, notes his connections to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he spent 12 years as an assistant on coach Hayden Fry's staff.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/sports/aztecs/20060319-9999-lz1s19plan.html

UI Students Help Hurricane Victims Over Break (Contra Costa Times, March 19)
Some of the college students flocking to New Orleans and the Gulf Coast for spring break are not coming for the beaches, the booze or the all-night debauchery. But they are getting hot and sweaty nonetheless. Instead of stripping down to bathing suits and sunglasses, thousands of young people from across the country are putting on coveralls and goggles and gutting hurricane-blighted houses, repairing roofs and hauling away storm debris. "I figured this is one of the rare times I'll get to do something like this, to really help somebody," said Danielle VanEaton, a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who spent the first day of her first college spring break gutting a flooded home in New Orleans' hard-hit Ninth Ward. A version of this Associated Press article also appeared March 19 on the websites of the CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, FORT WORTH (Tex.) STAR-TELEGRAM, ARIZONA REPUBLIC, HELENA (Mont.) INDEPENDENT-RECORD and other news sources.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/14136523.htm

UI Alumnus Hung Hopes On UI Tournament Win (Denver Post, March 19)
It's NCAA tournament time, and, it seems, almost everyone has a bracket or two filled out. It's the ultimate office-betting event, fueled by the Internet. Office pools are legal in Colorado, as long as the organizer doesn't take a cut. Just keep the stakes modest and ensure it's a social event. Steve Ewalt, a sales representative who lives in Denver, is having a good time with the tournament. "I'm a big basketball fan," said Ewalt, who paid $10 for his bracket. "I've been doing it a long time." A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumnus, he'd like to see his alma mater go all the way, but he never picks the team to win the grand prize. "I don't want to jinx them. If I win, I win. It's just fun." Despite Ewalt's best efforts, his beloved Hawkeyes lost in the first round Friday.
http://www.denverpost.com/sports/ci_3614698

Mickle Tests Travel Speakers (Charlotte Observer, March 19)
For an expert opinion on travel speakers for MP3 players, ROD MICKLE, an audio engineer at the University of Iowa's Center for Media Production, tested several connected to an iPod in a soundproof music studio. The newspaper is based in North Carolina. The article originally appeared in the WALL STREET JOURNAL.
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/charlotte/business/14135254.htm?source=rss&channel=charlotte_business

Lie Study Helps Prompt Stock Option Probe (Wall Street Journal, March 18)
From the start of the tech-stock boom in the 1990s through the Sarbanes-Oxley corporate reform act of 2002, some CEOs reaped millions by landing stock options when they were most valuable. Suspecting such patterns aren't due to chance,  the Securities and Exchange Commission is examining whether some stock option grants carry favorable grant dates because they were backdated. The Journal's analysis of grant dates and stock movements suggests the problem may be broader. It identified several companies with wildly improbable option-grant patterns. The SEC's look at options timing was largely prompted by academic research that examined thousands of companies and found odd patterns of stock movement around the dates of grants. One study was by ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa. He found that share prices generally fell before option grants and rose afterward, with the result that recipients got options at favorable times. He concluded this was so unlikely to happen by chance that at least some grant dates had to have been filled in retroactively. In its analysis, the Journal asked Lie to supply list of companies that made stock-option grants that were followed by large gains in the stock price. The Journal article and Lie's study are also cited in a similar article in the TIMES OF LONDON. A subscription to the Wall Street Journal is required to read the article.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114265075068802118.html

Hankewich To Direct Symphony (Kansas City Star, March 18)
Timothy Hankewich, resident conductor of the Kansas City Symphony, has been appointed music director of the Cedar Rapids Symphony, the Iowa orchestra announced Thursday. The Cedar Rapids Symphony is a venerable ensemble of 83 musicians. It was founded in 1921 and has played an influential role in a region that includes Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.thestate.com/mld/kansascity/entertainment/14127717.htm?source=rss&channel=kansascity_entertainment

Hovenkamp Comments On Whirlpool-Maytag Deal (Bloomberg, March 17)
A story about the U.S. Justice Department's possible court challenge to Whirlpool Corp.'s proposed purchase of Maytag Corp. points out the government lost its last two court battles to stop mergers. In 2004, a U.S. judge in San Francisco rejected the Justice Department's request to block software maker Oracle Corp.'s $7.7 billion acquisition of PeopleSoft Inc. The Federal Trade Commission also lost an effort later that year to block Arch Coal Inc.'s $364 million acquisition of Triton Coal Co. in Wyoming's Powder River Basin. Those defeats have made the government cautious about challenging mergers, according to observers and antitrust experts. "Justice has been very gun shy about going into court" since the Oracle defeat, said HERB HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust at the University of Iowa's College of Law. He predicted "the tide will turn a little" and the government may be more aggressive in the Whirlpool case because recent Supreme Court decisions show deference to the government on antitrust issues.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=aV1PmzMGTLTU&refer=us

Gift Names Macular Degeneration Center (Wall Street Journal, March 17)
A story explains the reason behind the Carver family's recent $10 million gift to the University of Iowa to support and name the CARVER FAMILY CENTER FOR MACULAR DEGENERATION. A subscription to the Wall Street Journal is required to read the article.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114254962360900601.html

Mickle Tests Speaker System Quality (Wall Street Journal, March 17)
What's the best set of mini-speakers on the market? ROD MICKLE, an audio engineer at the University of Iowa's Center for Media Production, helps find out. A subscription to the Wall Street Journal is required to read the article.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114255479509200710.html

Black Study: Problem Gambling Runs In Families (Innovations Report, March 17)
Problem gambling runs in families according to a University of Iowa study published in the journal Psychiatry Research. The study also found an excess of alcoholism, drug disorders and antisocial personality disorder in families with pathological gamblers. This is the first study of its kind to include detailed family interviews of relatives of persons with pathological gambling, said DONALD W. BLACK, professor of psychiatry in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. "Something is being passed along in these families that increases the persons' likelihood of engaging in impulsive and ultimately self-destructive behavior. In some persons, it manifests as substance abuse, in others as antisocial behavior, and in others gambling, and often the three are combined," said Black, who has studied pathological gambling for the past eight years.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/studien/bericht-56805.html

NADS Cited In Story On Driver Distractions (Wired, March 17)
A story about driver distractions points out that car makers are adding more and more technological doodads faster than scientists can determine if they offer any kind of safety problem. A scientist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR explains that the problem isn't everyday driving. For most people, the average commute is rote - fire and forget, something you initiate by turning a key and then ignore till it's over. The trick is when the unexpected happens. That's when we need all of our cognitive and physical presence, and when you really don't want to be fussing with navigation software.
http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/14.03/start.html?pg=18

Wood's UI Faculty Membership Mentioned In Review (Washington Post, March 17)
A review of the exhibition "Grant Wood's Studio: Birthplace of the American Gothic" at Washington, D.C.'s Renwick Gallery points out that once one of Wood's faculty colleagues at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA leveled thinly veiled accusations of homosexuality at him.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?node=cityguide/profile&id=1119551&lat=38.8988000&lon=-77.0395000&displaySearchTerm=&displaySearchLocation=&nm=0&categories=Exhibits

Gilchrist: Mumps Outbreak From Rare Virus Strain (KTVO-TV, March 17)
Reported cases of mumps are on the rise in the Hawkeye State. So far this year, there are 60 reported cases, and the outbreak is believed to be from a rare strain of the virus. "The strain of the virus is called sero-type G, and that particular sero-type has been circulating in the United Kingdom for awhile," said Dr. MARY GILCHRIST with the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Hygienic Lab. KTVO is based in Kirksville, Mo.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/Global/story.asp?S=4643436&nav=1LFs

Budget Cuts Threaten UI College Prep Programs (WQAD-TV, March 17)
Several programs that help low-income students prepare for college could be at risk under proposed federal budget cuts. University officials say the programs include Upward Bound and Educational Talent Search. They have existed for decades at Iowa's three public universities and several of the state's smaller private colleges. The majority of their funding is supplied by grants from the U.S. Department of Education. It's funding that President Bush wants to eliminate next year to save more than $450 million annually. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Upward Bound serves about 100 students annually in cities like Fort Madison, Davenport, West Liberty and Muscatine. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4643416&nav=1sW7

Andrejevic Comments On Reality TV (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 17)
Some forms of surveillance make us feel secure against crime and harm. The intrusiveness of other forms of monitoring make us feel somehow diminished. But what about reality television -- the sort of surveillance to which many people willingly submit for notoriety and prizes? "One of the promised results of willing submission to being watched all the time is the ways in which one learns about oneself, grows, and changes, and finds ways to express oneself," said MARK ANDREJEVIC, an assistant professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa. "There's a reflexive element of seeing oneself through the eyes of others." http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i28/28a02401.htm

Hunter Is UI's New Business Dean (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 17)
WILLIAM C. HUNTER
, dean of the University of Connecticut School of Business, has been hired as the new dean of the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business. He will take over in July, replacing GARY C. FETHKE, who is returning to the faculty.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i28/28a01002.htm

PDAs Popular With Administrators (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 17)
Administrators at many colleges are increasingly turning to personal digital assistant, or PDA, devices to help them do their jobs while they are away from their desks, whether in a meeting down the hall or on vacation half a world away. The hand-held devices, the digital equivalent of a personal assistant constantly delivering messages that demand a response, cause some people to work more, not less. "There is pressure," says DAVID J. SKORTON, president of the University of Iowa, "to never, ever be out of touch at all."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i28/28a04301.htm

Carver Donates $5 Million (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 17)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Foundation has received a $5 million donation from Lucille A. Carver for the Center for Macular Degeneration to establish a genetic-testing laboratory that plans to develop a test for every gene known to cause a hereditary eye disease. http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i28/28a06001.htm

Hunter To Replace Fethke As Tippie Dean (The Chronicle, March 16)
A round-up column notes that WILLIAM C. HUNTER of the University of Connecticut will replace GARY FETHKE as dean of the Tippie College of Business.
http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i28/28a01002.htm

Missen Discusses ‘Internet In A Box’ (The Hindu, March 16)
New resources are coming up to bridge the digital divide. These economically viable alternatives can cater to institutions lacking adequate Internet access. One such resource is the eGranary, a digital library project of the University of Iowa. Project Director CLIFF MISSEN was at the University of Madras on Monday to talk about the resource, which could provide access to millions of documents without an Internet connection. "We obtain permission from content owners and websites and compile them. At present, we have about three million documents in a 250 gigabyte external drive," said Missen. He described the project as "the Internet in a box". The Hindu is based in India.
http://www.hindu.com/2006/03/16/stories/2006031617270200.htm

Shullaw Discusses Proposed Donor Privacy Law (SPLC News Flash, March 16)
A story examining the tension between secrecy and the public's right to know points out that university foundations are increasingly reluctant to hand over documents and records related to their financial dealings, and in some cases, have sought proactive measures to protect their donors from open records requests. The fund-raising foundation for the University of Iowa in Iowa City proposed legislation last month that would amend Iowa's public records law to make some donor information confidential. SUSAN SHULLAW, spokeswoman for the University of Iowa Foundation in Iowa City, confirmed that legal counsel and lobbyists for the foundation drew up the proposed legislation earlier this year. SPLC News Flash is an online publication of the Student Press Law Center.
http://www.splc.org/newsflash.asp?id=1212&year=

UI Study Determines Problem Gambling Runs In Families (New Kerala, March 16)
A University of Iowa scientist says he has determined problem gambling runs in families. The study also found an excess of alcoholism, drug disorders and anti-social personality disorder in families with pathological gamblers. Psychiatry professor DONALD BLACK said the study is the first of its kind to include detailed family interviews of relatives of people suffering from pathological gambling. "Something is being passed along in these families that increases the persons' likelihood of engaging in impulsive and ultimately self-destructive behavior," said Black. "In some persons, it manifests as substance abuse, in others as anti-social behavior, and in others gambling, and often the three are combined." New Kerala is based in India. The same story appeared on the Web sites of DAILYINDIA, SCIENCE DAILY, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL and NEWS-MEDICAL.NET.
http://www.newkerala.com/news2.php?action=fullnews&id=26187

Russi, Collins Comment On iPods (USA Today, March 15)
An increasing number of professors at Duke and other college campuses are experimenting with making lectures and study materials available to students via iPods and other MP3 players. They become study aids for students, allowing them to fast-forward to a part of a lecture they may not have understood the first time or review complicated themes before exams. "It's just a further expansion of the knowledge base," says CHRIS RUSSI, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Iowa. He recently built a website that holds audio and visual files of lectures. Skeptics hope the rush to experiment with iPods won't affect classroom teaching. "There is no substitute for the energy exchanged one-on-one in a living classroom," says DAVE COLLINS, a marketing lecturer at the University of Iowa. "I would compare it to listening to a CD or podcast of Dave Matthews as opposed to being at a concert." http://www.usatoday.com/tech/products/2006-03-14-ipod-university_x.htm

Myriad Presidential Searches Noted (Chicago Tribune, March 15)
In any given year there are myriad presidential searches being conducted at universities, both public and private, because the average tenure for a university chief these days is a mere 6.6 years, according to an American Council on Education survey. Right now, for example, Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Northern Iowa, the University of Wyoming, Temple University, Northeastern University in Boston and Kent State University are gathering names and considering credentials.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/chi-0603150200mar15,1,7142255.story?coll=chi-leisuretempo-hed

UI To Test Bird Flu Vaccine (WQAD-TV, March 15)
The University of Iowa has a role in testing a bird flu vaccine additive to see if it can make the vaccine more effective. The university is one of six sites in the U.S. selected by the National Institutes of Health. Federal officials predict the virus could reach the continental U.S. in wild birds this year. Dr. PATRICIA WINOKUR is leading Iowa's portion of the study. She says researchers will see if the additive, aluminum hydroxide, can make the vaccine more potent, which could stretch the supply. The TV station is based in Moline, Ill.  http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4634177&nav=1sW7

Study Links Asthma To Antibiotics (Wall Street Journal, March 14)
Babies treated with antibiotics before their first birthdays are more likely to develop asthma, according to a study published today in the journal Chest. The study could shed light on the role that exposure to common microbes might play in the development of immune-response conditions such as asthma. Clean, germ-free living may actually leave children more susceptible to developing allergies and asthma, a theory known as the "hygiene hypothesis." "Children are being raised with far lower exposure to microbes and the products that (microbes) make," says JOEL KLINE, director of the University of Iowa Asthma Center in Iowa City. Exposure to microbes and their byproducts "appears to activate the immune system," says Dr. Kline.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114228613531396957-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Gantz Develops Improved Cochlear Implant (Newsday, March 14)
Cochlear implants may not be just for the profoundly deaf anymore: Iowa scientists are developing the next generation, a "hybrid implant" to combine the best of bionics with regular hearing aids for age-related hearing loss. If it works - and early study results are promising - it one day may help thousands of older Americans whose hearing is progressively fading. The key difference: Unlike regular cochlear implants, the hybrid model would let people keep their natural music appreciation even as it helps them hear speech more clearly again. How does it work? Like tuning a piano, says Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, an otolaryngologist at the University of Iowa who invented the hybrid model now being tested at 26 medical centers in the United States. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, OTTAWA (ON) CITIZEN, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, CASPER (WY) TRIBUNE, CULPEPPER (VA) STAR EXPONENT, WJLA-TV (D.C.), SAN LUIS OBISPO (CA) TRIBUNE, FORT WAYNE (IN) JOURNAL GAZETTE, FORBES, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, MIAMI HERALD, SACRAMENTO BEE, CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER, KANSAS CITY STAR, CBSNEWS.com, and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newyork/ny-bc-ny--healthbeat-better0313mar13,0,2269752.story?coll=ny-region-apnewyork

Marshall Study Shows Kids May Be Overfluoridated (Brocktown News, March 14)
While fluoride protects against cavities, some children may be getting too much of it via fluoridated beverages, and have the telltale white streaks on their teeth to prove it. A study of 408 Iowa children found that more than one in three showed such signs of dental fluorosis. Their fluoride sources included different types of beverages, such as infant formula and 100 percent fruit juice. In light of the findings, parents should "beware of the potential for the risk of fluorosis," study author Dr. TERESA A. MARSHALL, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa's College of Dentistry, said. Combining the fluoride in such beverages with the fluoride in toothpaste, supplements, and other sources may, in some cases, lead to mild fluorosis, such as that seen in the current study. The News is based in Nevada. The same story appeared on the Web sites of HealthSentinel.com, WESTFALL (ALBERTA) WEEKLY NEWS and REUTERS.com.
http://www.localnewsleader.com/brocktown/stories/index.php?action=fullnews&id=157121

Bloom Discusses Postville (Voice of America, March 14)
A story about the town of Postville, IA, mentions University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM, who wrote a book about the sudden influx of Orthodox Jews. It's called Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America. "They wear long, ankle-length outer garments called cassocks," he says. "They have long beards. Their heads are always covered. It was a totally different world for the Postville locals. It was almost as though someone had come in from outer space!" Although Mr. Bloom is Jewish, he won few friends among the Brooklyn transplants, for he wrote that the Jews snubbed efforts to fold them into the community. He calls Postville's culture shock a "civil war." "The Hassidim did not come to go to ice-cream socials," he says. "No way. They came for one strong, American reason, and there's nothing wrong with it: to make money." The same story appeared on the Web site of MEN'S DAILY NEWS.
http://www.voanews.com/english/AmericanLife/2006-03-13-voa32.cfm

IEM Noted As Prediction Market (New York Times, March 11)
Every year, as the Academy Awards approach, Michael J. Mauboussin, an adjunct professor at Columbia Business School, asks his students to vote for the winners in 12 categories, and he tallies the results and compares the students' predictions with the winners. This experiment is done to show the power of prediction markets, in which groups of people guess or bet on something, with the results aggregated into a consensus. Prediction markets, while not perfect, are surprisingly accurate -- certainly more accurate than individual experts or polls, research has found. The granddaddy of prediction markets, the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, which the University of Iowa has run since the late 1980's, allows people to make election predictions. The consensus almost always beats the polling data. In the last presidential election, for instance, it not only steadfastly predicted a Bush victory, but came within 1.1 percentage point of the actual result.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=9196cccc849a148b7170ab75c6901fe7&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=ace7494e70ad991f6bbfa5def86ab2d0

Study: Sports Drinks Cause Dental Erosion (FoxNews.com, March 10)
Gatorade erodes teeth faster than Coke, a new study shows. That doesn't mean that Gatorade and other sports drinks are necessarily harder on your teeth than are Coke and other soft drinks. But it may be a surprise that they aren't any better, either, says researcher LESLIE A. EHLEN, a student at the University of Iowa School of Dentistry. "I don't think everybody realizes how erosive these things are, especially Gatorade and Red Bull," Ehlen said. "People need to be aware that all sorts of beverages can be causing dental erosion." A similar study appeared on the website of KABC-TV in Los Angeles.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,187515,00.html

Merrill Reviews Book On Mystics (National Catholic Reporter, March 10)
CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, director of the University of Iowa International Writing Program and author most recently of "Things of the Hidden God: Journey to the Holy Mountain," reviews the book "Love Burning In The Soul: The Story Of The Christian Mystics, From Saint Paul To Thomas Merton," by James Harpur.
http://ncronline.org/NCR_Online/archives2/2006a/031006/031006p.htm

Heart Surgery Described (Ark Valley News, March 10)
Jerry Arehart recently underwent heart transplant surgery after a long history of heart problems 1987, Jerry was diagnosed with mitrovalve prolapse, caused by a childhood bout with rheumatic fever. Jerry underwent surgery at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to correct the defective heart valve. The corrections lasted for 16 years, far exceeding the doctors’ expectations. The newspaper serves Valley Center, Kan.
http://www.arkvalleynews.com/web/isite.dll?1141999454250

Watson Comments on Study of Psychology (Copley News Service, March 10)
For 100 years, cloaked beneath its plain cover, the writers and editors of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology have debated the tumultuous state and nature of human deviance, constantly asking themselves: What constitutes abnormal behavior? What causes it? What should be done? "Psychology is the science of human behavior and the things that happen in the mind to create it," said DAVID WATSON, a professor of psychology at the University of Iowa and a former Journal editor. "It's a subject that fascinates almost everyone because we all have notions of what's normal and what's not."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=aa4d5fdd2cf1b1875122c8c59a3d1e87&_docnum=9&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVA&_md5=766e713f17a284807c21d12505be6848

UI Study Examines Tooth Enamel Damage (WIS-TV, March 9)
With soda sales on the decrease and sports drinks sales on the rise, many who are turning to sports drinks as a "healthier" option may not like the latest medical news. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA measured the effect of various sugared beverages on tooth enamel. They found Gatorade caused the most enamel erosion, followed by Red Bull and Coke, with Diet Coke and apple juice causing the least amount of damage out of the group. The television station is based in South Carolina. http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S=4610365&nav=0RaP

Study Suggests Popular Drinks Cause Tooth Damage (WKYT-TV, March 9)
A new study suggests the acid in popular refreshments can cause dental damage, too. Just one day's worth of soaking in Gatorade, Red Bull or Coke ate into the hard enamel surface of teeth, according to a study by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers. But another expert said the study's design was "too simplistic" and not reflective of daily exposure to liquids by teeth. The television station is based in Kentucky. http://www.wkyt.com/Global/story.asp?S=4609393&nav=6uyu

Beverage Association Responds to Tooth Decay Study (NBC 5, March 9)
In a statement the American Beverage Association Statement responded to a recent study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA linking dental enamel and root surface erosion to popular U.S. beverages, saying it “does not reflect real world situations and fails to incorporate many factors. The study placed extracted teeth in containers filled with various beverages for a 25-hour period. However, a more credible study would examine live subjects and more realistic, everyday behaviors.” The television station is based in Dallas/Ft. Worth, Tex.
http://www.nbc5i.com/news/7856363/detail.html

UI Part of Ethanol Research Team (United Press International, March 9)
Iowa State University scientists say they are working to create chemical catalysts that would increase the yield of fermentable sugars from corn. Brent Shanks, an Iowa State associate professor of chemical and biological engineering, says such chemical catalysts might boost ethanol production by as much as 15 percent.The research is supported by grants of $305,000 from the National Science Foundation, $200,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and $162,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy. The research team also includes scientists from Trinity University in San Antonio, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Purdue University.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20060309-033153-2873r

Former UI Receiver Pleads Not Guilty In Shooting (KETV, March 8)
A former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football player pleaded not guilty Wednesday morning to attempted voluntary manslaughter in connection with the shooting of an unarmed airman that was captured on videotape. Deputy Ivory James Webb requested that his bail be reduced from $100,000 to $50,000 but the judge refused, saying it was already below the normal amount. Webb is the first officer in San Bernardino, Calif.'s history to be charged as a result of an on-duty shooting. The television station is based in Omaha, Neb. A similar article appeared in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS in California.
http://www.ketv.com/news/7819799/detail.html?rss=oma&psp=news

'Rain Forest' Project Is Described (Wall Street Journal, March 8)
This article describes the funding troubles of a man-made, indoor, 4.5 acre "rain forest" now called the Environmental Project that  was first proposed in Coralville, a thriving Eastern Iowa community near the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Six Iowa cities, including Dubuque, Des Moines and Coralville, are in the now running for the project.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114187377486193364-search.html

VanderVelde Comments On Dred Scott's Wife (Kansas City Star, March 8)
Little is known about Dred Scott's wife, Harriet, other than she was likely the force behind the St. Louis slave couple's unsuccessful legal quest for freedom, which triggered the Civil War. Now, new insights about Harriet Scott are helping to fill in the gaps of her story. According to her biographer, University of Iowa law professor LEA VANDERVELDE, Harriet was a generation younger than her husband, Dred, and would have had reason to pursue freedom through the courts. Dred Scott died a year after the Supreme Court held in 1857 that he could not sue for his freedom in federal court, worsening tensions between slaveholders and abolitionists. A version of the story also ran on the Website of WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/local/14039345.htm

Former Hawkeye Pierce In Correctional Facility (Chicago Sun-Times, March 8)
Pierre Pierce lives in a four-man, dorm-like room, perhaps not unlike the one he resided in at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He still plays basketball, although Pierce won't be making the trip with the Hawkeyes to Indianapolis for the Big Ten Tournament, which opens today. Pierce only can sit and struggle with what might have been, whether it was continuing a stellar career at Iowa or opting for the NBA after his junior season last year as he had planned. His current campus is 40 miles south of Iowa City on the grounds of the Mt. Pleasant Correctional Facility. It's a three-story, red-brick facility that houses 1,000 men and 100 women -- 30 percent over its official capacity. Pierce, 22, is serving a two-year sentence after pleading guilty last year to third-degree burglary, a felony, and assault with intent to commit sexual abuse, false imprisonment and fourth-degree criminal mischief, all misdemeanors. The victim was a former girlfriend.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/campus/cst-spt-pierce09.html

Dew's Wife Named Salem Academy President (Winston-Salem Journal, March 8)
A story about Salem Academy and College's announcement yesterday that it has selected Susan Pauly, currently vice president for academic affairs and dean of Mount Mercy College in Cedar Rapids, as its 19th president, says that Pauly flew from Cedar Rapids on Monday, arriving in Winston-Salem about midnight. Her husband, STEPHEN DEW, is the coordinator of library services for distance education at the University of Iowa. He will quit his job and look for one in North Carolina.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1137834578461&path=!localnews!education!&s=

Law May Evict Disabled Student (Columbus Dispatch, March 8)
Joy Bechtol, a disabled student at Ohio State University, worries that a new law aimed at cracking down on abuses of subsidized housing by student-athletes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will ruin her dream of graduating from college, becoming a dietitian and living a full, independent life. She lives in a federally subsidized apartment, but some fear the legislation could wind up forcing out Bechtol and other disabled students at the complex. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, a prominent advocate for the disabled, wrote the legislation

He and federal officials charged with overseeing the new law acknowledge there is a problem but say they are working to ensure that Bechtol and other disabled students are not displaced. http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=651ba9ea51a36bb6a80a5597ff548ec3&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVA&_md5=d49447501021ccdf1e62b86a8ce737cd

Thorne Comments on Farm Emissions (National Public Radio, March 7)
Federal environmental officials are starting to monitor a source of air pollution in that they largely ignored in the past: farms. As part of a legal settlement, the Environmental Protection Agency will test emissions on chicken and hog farms. PETER THORNE, a professor of Environmental Health at the University of Iowa, says these emissions can pose a health risk. Particulates can include animal dander, bacteria and viruses. And the danger posed by gases like hydrogen sulfite and ammonia is even clearer. "At these lower levels of exposure, such as we're talking about in the rural environment, they're likely to be more subtle -- subtle neurological problems, some aggravation of lung, particularly in susceptible individuals such as young children, or people with asthma," Thorne said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=fd2d02a04c4d0ffc08bd0a815562f118&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVA&_md5=5ad415e75226fac763c3e0421f2dfa11

UI Researchers Find Macular Degeneration Genes (News-medical.net, March 7)
According to new research in the United States, the most common form of blindness in the elderly, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), can be attributed to just two genes that trigger the condition. The scientists say that as many as three out of four patients with AMD have mutations in one or both key genes. AMD affects one in 10 people aged over 60 in the U.S. and 74 per cent of patients with the disabling condition apparently have such genetic mutations. The research team, which includes scientists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, for viruses and bacteria that might be the culprits.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=16399

D.A. To Decide On Case Involving Ex-UI Athlete (Los Angeles Times, March 7)
San Bernardino County Dist. Atty. Michael A. Ramos is expected to announce today whether he will file charges against a sheriff's deputy involved in the videotaped shooting of an Air Force police officer after a high-speed chase in Chino. On Monday, the wife of the wounded airman urged the district attorney to prosecute Deputy Ivory John Webb Jr. The deputy, who was placed on administrative leave after the shooting, also is a former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA wide receiver who played in the 1982 Rose Bowl.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/california/la-me-highspeed7mar07,1,2667839.story?coll=la-headlines-pe-california

Latham Using 'Brokeback' In Class (Fort Wayne Journal Sentinel, March 7)
A number of academics, entrepreneurs, singers and others have turned to the Oscar-nominated film "Brokeback Mountain" as the tie-in for a variety of projects. ROB LATHAM, an associate professor of English and American studies at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, plans to use the original story, the screenplay and the film in an introductory course on sexuality he has been teaching for the last three years. "I needed something that would center our discussions, which tend to be too abstract," said Latham, who is also the director of the sexuality studies program at the university. "I would screen the movie fairly early in the term and use it as a way of unpacking some of the ideas we deal with."
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/14037788.htm

Former UI Receiver Charged In Shooting (Los Angeles Times, March 7)
A San Bernardino County sheriff's deputy who shot a suspect three times while being videotaped was charged today with attempted voluntary manslaughter and faces 18 1/2 years in prison. San Bernardino County Dist. Atty. Michael A. Ramos announced that charges have been filed against Deputy Ivory Webb Jr. Webb shot Elio Carrion, an Air Force police officer who had served in Iraq, after a high-speed chase that ended in Chino. Carrion was a passenger in the vehicle. Webb, who was placed on paid administrative leave after the shooting, is a former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA wide receiver who played in the 1982 Rose Bowl. A version of the story also ran on the Websites of KTLA-TV 5, in California.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-030706shooting_lat,0,480649.story?coll=la-story-footer

Hunter Named Dean Of Tippie College Of Business (WQAD-TV, March 6)
The University of Iowa has hired a new dean to lead the Tippie College of Business. William C. Hunter will take over the business school's top administrative post in July. He succeeds GARY FETHKE, who will step down from the deanship on July 1 and return to the faculty. Hunter is the dean and distinguished professor of finance at the University of Connecticut School of Business and a former senior vice president at the Federal Reserve Bank in Chicago. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4591542&nav=1sW7

Schoenbaum Reviews Mussolini Book (International Herald Tribune, Marcy 6)
DAVID SCHOENBAUM, the author of "Hitler's Social Revolution," teaches history at the University of Iowa. He reviewed "Mussolini's Italy Life Under the Fascist Dictatorship, 1915-1945" by R.J.B. Bosworth. "Preceded by his major studies of the Italian dictatorship and its dictator, Benito Mussolini, Mr. Bosworth's retrospective of the country's experience with both is shrewd, lucid, exhaustively documented and totally unsentimental. But among its greatest virtues is his eye for what made Italian Fascism Italian," Schoenbaum wrote.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/03/06/features/bookmar.php

UI Participating In Bird Flu Study (Baltimore Sun, March 6)
University of Maryland researchers will begin testing a bird flu vaccine combined with a common additive later this month to see if it will prompt an immune response with a single smaller dose. Previous tests have found the vaccine is safe, but requires at least two large doses to prompt a moderate immune response. The researchers hope the addition of aluminum hydroxide, which is currently added to the tetanus vaccine and others, will improve the immune response enough that one smaller dose will be needed. A part of the trial is being conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web site of WJZ-TV.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/health/bal-avian0306,0,2936333.story?coll=bal-local-headlines

Skorton Speaks On Presidents' Changing Role (USNews & World Report, March 6)
A story about the changing role of university presidents quotes University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON, who will take over at Cornell University in July. Skorton says that today's "presidents aren't functioning as the public intellectuals they were in days gone by."
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/news/articles/060306/6summers.htm

Van Allen's Nevada Medal Recounted (Reno Gazette Journal, March 6)
A story about the latest recipient of the Desert Research Institute's Nevada Medal for contributions to science includes a sidebar listing past recipients. In 1990, the recipient was JAMES A. VAN ALLEN, University of Iowa; discoverer of the "Van Allen Radiation Belt" surrounding the Earth and a pioneer in the use of unmanned probes for space exploration. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the LAS VEGAS SUN.
http://news.rgj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060306/NEWS07/603060321/1002

UI Part Of Research Team Exploring Macular Degeneration (The Times, March 6)
Three out of four cases of a disease that is the commonest cause of blindness   among the elderly are triggered by just two genes, according to research that promises new ways of treating fading sight. Scientists in the United States have discovered that 74 percent of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which affects one in 10 people aged over 60, have mutations in one or both key genes. The findings suggest new targets for drugs that might slow or even prevent the progressive damage to the retina that occurs in AMD, which has irreversibly blinded an estimated 50 million people worldwide and which currently affects 500,000 people in Britain. The research team, which includes scientists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is now searching for viruses and bacteria that might be responsible. The paper is based in the U.K.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2071832,00.html

Author Received Immunology Degree At UI (Contra Costa Times, March 5)
A story about Oakland, Calif.-based author Yiyun Li says the 33-year-old creative-writing teacher on tenure track at Mills College has just been nominated for a Kiriyama Prize -- one of the $15,000 literary plums awarded annually for books that enhance understanding of countries on the Pacific Rim. Her achievement, reviewed on these pages last September, was "A Thousand Years of Good Prayers" (Random House, $21.95), a short-story collection themed to the upheavals in human lives wrought by the Cultural Revolution in her native China. A selection from the book will be included in Houghton Mifflin's upcoming "The Best American Short Stories of 2006." Li came to this country in 1996, got a degree in immunology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and was working on a Ph.D. in physics when she switched to creative writing and earned two MFAs. Published in The New Yorker and the Paris Review, she has won the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award and both the Pushcart Prize and the Plimpton Prize for New Writers (in 2004). The paper is based in California.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/local/states/california/14023358.htm

Parent Of Deceased UI Student Settles Suit With Bars (WQAD-TV, March 5)
The father of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student who died after a beating has settled with one of the Iowa City bars he sued for serving alcohol to his son's attacker. Paul Kearney, of Marion, reached a settlement Friday with The Union Bar. A claim against Vito's is still pending in court. Kearney sued for the wrongful death of his son, Michael. He sought $1.3 million from the two bars for serving Daniel Corbett, of Arlington Heights, Ill., on New Year's Eve 2003. Police say Corbett, now 23, was not provoked when he attacked 22-year-old Michael Kearney and slammed his head into a concrete wall. Corbett faced 50 years in prison for second-degree murder, but he pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter and was sentenced to 10 years. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4586050&nav=1sW7

Arndt Explains Why Meth So Harmful (Branson Daily News, March 4)
On Thursday, as part of the USA Patriot Act, the Senate passed legislation requiring medications with pseudoephedrine to be placed behind store counters in an effort to make it more difficult for meth abusers to use. Part of the reason meth has become an epidemic in some states, experts say, is that it's easy to make in illegal, makeshift labs and extremely cheap compared to other drugs. "You get can get addicted to meth very quickly and the slide downward is much faster than drugs like alcohol, marijuana or heroin," said STEPHAN ARNDT, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and director of the Iowa Consortium for Substance Abuse Research and Evaluation. Health declines fast, Arndt said. "You're not eating, you're not sleeping. You're more likely to lose the car, lose the wife, lose the house and your job." The paper is based in Missouri. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT GAZETTE.
http://www.bransondailynews.com/story.php?storyID=444

Arndt Comments On Meth Addiction (Philadelphia Inquirer, March 3)
Drug-treatment centers have seen a substantial rise in the number of people seeking help for methamphetamine abuse, a report released yesterday said.As trafficking in the highly addictive drug has spread across the country, the number of meth users admitted to substance-abuse clinics more than quadrupled from 1993 to 2003, according to a review by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Part of the reason meth has become epidemic in some states, experts say, is that it is easy to make in illegal makeshift labs and is extremely cheap compared with other drugs. "You get can get addicted to meth very quickly, and the slide downward is much faster than drugs like alcohol, marijuana or heroin," said STEPHAN ARNDT, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa. "These people crash and burn fast," Arndt said. The Associated Press article also appeared in THE OLYPMIAN in Washington, NEW YORK TIMES, WASHINGTON POST, HONULULU ADVERTISER, COLUMBIA MISSIOURIAN, SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN, CONTRA COSTA TIMES in California, and several other publications. http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/inquirer/news/nation/14004115.htm

NADS Conducted Research About Older Drivers (RedNova.com, March 3)
Academic institutions across the country are engaged in studies and research projects concerning older drivers and road users. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, researchers are using a National Advanced Driving Simulator to conduct validation research on simulated driving performance by older drivers and other motorists. http://www.redorbit.com/news/technology/413479/
the_older_driver_comes_of_age/index.html?source=r_technology

Poet Receives Accolade (Akron Beacon Journal, March 3)
Poet Rita Dove received the 2006 Common Wealth Award of Distinguished Service. Dove, 53, is one of five people who received the international honor for exceptional achievement. She received a Pulitzer Prize in 1987, was poet laureate of the United States, and has a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and 21 honorary doctorates. Now she is poet laureate of Virginia and teaches creative writing at the University of Virginia at Charlottesville. The newspaper is based in Ohio. http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/ohio/news/14007004.htm?

UI Alumnus Announces Candidacy (San Mateo County Times, March 3)
Kevin Hearle hasn't campaigned since he ran for student body president of his high school 30 years ago. But on Thursday, the San Mateo poet and scholar stood in front of San Francisco City Hall and announced his intention to run in the June 6 Democratic primary for Congress. He has a bachelor's degree in English from Stanford and a master's in English from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He earned his doctorate degree in literature from UC Santa Cruz. The newspaper is based in California. http://www.insidebayarea.com/ci_3565366?

Lack Of African-American TV Dramas Noted (Courier-Journal, March 3)
In a television column, a writer poses this question: why have there been so few black dramas while there have been so many African-American comedies? It's because the mainstream audience is more comfortable laughing along with Bill Cosby or Bernie Mac, says a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor who teaches a course on African Americans and television. He told TelevisionWeek that white audiences have more trouble identifying with black performers in emotional roles and situations. The newspaper is based in Louisville, Ky.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=
/20060303/COLUMNISTS15/603030317/10

Presidential Search Discussed At Forum (WQAD-TV, March 3)
The Iowa Board of Regents says faculty at the University of Iowa will have a role in choosing their next president -- but they won't necessarily get prime spots on the search committee. DAVID SKORTON is leaving Iowa to become president of Cornell University in New York. The regents are deciding how the search for Skorton's replacement will be carried out and who will sit on the search committee. During a forum in Iowa City last night, some regents suggested Iowa faculty may be asked to serve as advisers to the committee, which has traditionally been comprised of school staff. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4579619&nav=1sW7

Schoenbaum Reviews Mussolini Book (New York Times, March 3)
DAVID SCHOENBAUM, the author of "Hitler's Social Revolution," teaches history at the University of Iowa. He reviewed “Mussolini's Italy Life Under the Fascist Dictatorship, 1915-1945” by R.J.B. Bosworth. “Preceded by his major studies of the Italian dictatorship and its dictator, Benito Mussolini, Mr. Bosworth's retrospective of the country's experience with both is shrewd, lucid, exhaustively documented and totally unsentimental. But among its greatest virtues is his eye for what made Italian Fascism Italian,” Shoenbaum wrote.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/03/books/03Book.html?

Skorton States View On President-Faculty Relationship (Chronicle, March 3)
A story about the resignation last week of Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers says the episode raises questions about whether an outspoken president can ever lead the nation's most famous university. People inside Harvard and out wondered about the power afforded faculty members at Harvard. For in the end, it was professors' vociferous complaints that brought down Summers. Despite his apparent contrition over his clashes with the faculty, some wonder what Summers's downfall says about higher education's appetite for a president who makes hard judgments and says what he thinks. When presidents say or do things that campus constituencies don't particularly like, presidents need to take those viewpoints into account and, in many cases, respond, says DAVID J. SKORTON, president of the University of Iowa, who was recently appointed president of Cornell University. But sometimes, he adds, the president needs to take a stance, no matter whom it offends. "The university is built around the people at the university," he says. "It's rude not to be responsive. Presidents who are open and honest need to make it clear under what situations there is healthy input into a decision and make it clear when a decision has to be made regardless of pushback."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i26/26a01001.htm

Conductor Earned Music Degree From UI (Roanoke Times, March 2)
James Glazebrook, conductor of the Roanoke Youth Symphony, has been cultivating a younger generation of classical music enthusiasts throughout his decades-long career. The symphony was founded in 1956 and is widely considered to be the only professional orchestral training for young musicians in Southwest Virginia. Glazebrook earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees in music from San Diego State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Virginia. http://www.roanoke.com/news/nrv/wb/54934

Hemley Comments On Literary Prizes (Bankrate.com, March 2)
When it comes at the right time, in the right conditions, a literary prize can be a financial windfall. When someone wins a huge literary prize, the little things change, too. "You know you've hit it big when you have an agent solely for your readings," says ROBIN HEMLEY, director of the Nonfiction Writing Program at the University of Iowa, which has graduated literary stars like Guggenheim winner Jo Ann Beard. "I don't know that it's based so much on winning a major award unless one also has some business savvy."
http://biz.yahoo.com/brn/060302/17524.html?.v=1

Fisher Tax Break Research Noted (Business Week Online, March 2)
Every year, U.S. companies collect billions of dollars worth of tax breaks from states and cities anxious to lure jobs and investment to their regions. Critics argue that these tax breaks are largely a zero-sum game that distorts business location decisions because any economic gain is offset by losses to other states. Such subsidies, they say, actually inflict long-term damage on local business climates by undercutting the tax base that supports good schools, roads, and other infrastructure. In fact, 96 percent of state and local investment tax breaks go to companies that locate their new facilities right where they had chosen in the first place, according to studies by PETER S. FISHER, a professor of urban planning at the University of Iowa.
http://asia.news.yahoo.com/060302/7/2gq7j.html

Gymnastics Coach Honored (Jersey Journal, March 1)
Twenty-one new members will be inducted into the Hudson County (New Jersey) Hall of Fame on March 23. Among the inductees is West New York native and former Penn State gymnastics coach Gene Wettstone, who captured nine NCAA championships during his storied 39-year coaching career. Wettstone, 93, won three national titles (all-around, horizontal bars, pommel horse) while at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/sports/jjournal/index.ssf?
/base/sports-0/1141208027137400.xml&coll=3

Skorton Leaving UI (Cherry Hill Courier Post, March 1)
A career column about a survey by Salary.com showing nearly seven in 10 American workers are trying for a new job mentions in passing that University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON recently was hired as the next president of Cornell University. The paper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/
article?AID=/20060301/BUSINESS01/603010386/1003/BUSINESS

Latham Using 'Brokeback' In Class On Sexuality (Los Angeles Times, March 1)
A number of academics, entrepreneurs, singers and others have turned to the Oscar-nominated film "Brokeback Mountain" as the tie-in for a variety of projects. ROB LATHAM, an associate professor of English and American studies at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, plans to use the original story, the screenplay and the film in an introductory course on sexuality he has been teaching for the last three years. "I needed something that would center our discussions, which tend to be too abstract," said Latham, who is also the director of the sexuality studies program at the university. "I would screen the movie fairly early in the term and use it as a way of unpacking some of the ideas we deal with."
http://www.latimes.com/business/custom/
admark/la-et-brokeback1mar01,1,2798827.story?coll
=la-headlines-business-advert

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