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UI in the News

June 2006

See UI in the New Archive Index

Johnson Comments On Hydration (Daily Bulletin, June 30)
Besides staying hydrated during the summer, health experts note, active people should take care to replenish their electrolytes -- particularly potassium, which Americans typically under consume. "You need to replace both water and salt when you exercise, and in that sense sports drinks can probably put you on the right track," says ALAN KIM JOHNSON, a research physiologist at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Ontario, Calif.
http://www.dailybulletin.com/health/ci_3979502

Actor Routh Attended UI (Contra Costa Times, June 30)
A story about "Superman Returns" actor Brandon Routh, notes that he initially set out to be a writer, studying for a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA while modeling and acting on the side to help pay the bills. But Routh left school to pursue acting in New York and later Hollywood. The newspaper is based in California. A version of this Associated Press article also appeared in SCREEN WEEKLY, the DAILY BULLETIN in Ontario, Calif. and the MONITOR in Texas. http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/entertainment/14938435.htm?source=rss&channel=cctimes_entertainment

Gates Foundation Awards Scholarship (WQAD-TV, June 30)
Bill Gates and his The Gates Foundation helps several Quad Cities organizations, and gave Davenport schools a boost. A scholarship awarded this year will allow a student to pursue pre-med studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill. http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5080516&nav=1sW7

UI Hosted Mathematics Competition (Worecester Telegram and Gazette, June 29)
A team of students from Central Massachusetts recently competed in the 32nd annual American Regions Mathematics League. The ARML competition was held simultaneously at the Pennsylvania State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Nevada at Las Vegas on June 2 and 3. The league started in 1976. A total of 113 teams representing 34 states, Ontario, the Philippines and Taiwan competed this year. The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.telegram.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060629/NEWS/606290783

Milch Earned MFA From UI (American Hertiage, June/July 2006)
David Milch has taken one of the most convoluted imaginable paths to success in television. Having earned an MFA in fiction at the Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, he went on to teach literature at Yale for nine years. Later, he wrote for "Hill Street Blues," proving that if television scripts were not actually literature, they could, at the least, be first-rate drama.
http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/web/20060608-deadwood-hbo-david-milch-television-westerns.shtml

'Superman' Routh Attended UI (Bay Area Recorder, June 29)
An article about Brandon Routh, who plays Superman in the new movie Superman Returns, notes that as an English major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Routh wanted to be a novelist or graphic designer. "I needed to make money. I was a poor college student. So I went to NYC for a modeling gig. I found a manager who told me to move to LA for modeling and acting. So I went to LA, intending to go for only three months. I ended up staying."
http://www.ebar.com/arts/art_article.php?sec=film&article=191

UI Student Routh Turned To Acting To Pay Bills (CNN.com, June 29)
A story about the new man of steel, "Superman Returns" actor Brandon Routh, says the Norwalk native's mother is a teacher, his father a carpenter, and both parents play music on the side. A bit of a singer, pianist and trumpet player himself, Routh initially set out to be a writer, studying for a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA while modeling and acting on the side to help pay the bills. But Routh left school to pursue acting in New York and later Hollywood, where he landed a recurring role on One Life to Live and had guest spots on such prime-time shows as Will & Grace and The Gilmore Girls. A version of this Associated Press article also appeared June 29 on the Web site of the BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD.
http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Movies/06/28/film.brandon.routh.ap/

Routh Attended UI, Pondered Writing (Wilmington Morning Star, June 28)
A story about this week's opening of the film "Superman Returns" says lead actor Brandon Routh spent a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studying English before leaving the school to pursue a modeling and acting career in New York. Says Routh: "I was going to be a novelist and possibly go into graphic design." The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.wilmingtonstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060628/NEWS/60627015/1050/FRONTPAGE&template=currents

Lutz's Book Exploring American Slacker Reviewed (Seattle Weekly, June 28)
TOM LUTZ's new study of the American slacker, "Doing Nothing," is described as a grand tour more than an incisive thesis. It begins with the author's 18-year-old son whose transformation from diligent student to couch potato causes Lutz to examine the Protestant work ethic's flip side. Why do we strive not to strive- and, more importantly, can it make us happy? It's sometimes hard to decide whether the author, an English professor at the University of Iowa, is trying to be scholarly or gently mocking his own scholarly impulses. ("We need, then, to tease the meaning of slackerism out of its many disguises and lacunae, if meaning is there to be had.") Yet in a way, that question only reinforces the point of the book: A healthy attitude about work, Lutz decides, must contain a mixture of irreverence and seriousness.
http://www.seattleweekly.com/arts/0626/lutz.php

UI Researchers To Study Children Bike Safety With Grant (WQAD-TV, June 28)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers are getting a federal grant to hopefully make biking safer for children. The research will be funded by a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Researchers say they will focus on two key aspects of how immature perceptual and motor skills effect road-crossing behavior and put children at risk for bicycle accidents. The research team will also look at a child's ability to adapt movement to changing circumstances. Statistics show bicycle crashes are the most common causes of severe injuries in late childhood and early adolescence. Figures also show cars and trucks are involved in about one-third of all bike related brain injuries and 90 percent of bike related fatalities. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5086066&nav=1sW7

Cassini Spacecraft Marks Mission Halfway Point (NewsBlaze, June 28)
As the Cassini spacecraft reaches the halfway mark in its four-year tour of the Saturn system, discoveries made during the first half of the mission have scientists revved up to find out what's in store for the second act. Cassini has been orbiting Saturn since June 30, 2004, studying the planet, its rings and moons. Later in July, navigators will begin to flip the spacecraft's orbit orientation with respect to the sun by nearly 180 degrees, resulting in a bird's-eye view of Saturn's glorious rings. This gradual transfer will take about one year. "One of the biggest mysteries confronting Cassini is the changes we've seen in Saturn's radio emissions," said Dr. BILL KURTH, Cassini scientist at the University of Iowa, Iowa City. "We've seen the radio period, the frequency of emissions that tell scientists how fast or slow the planet is rotating, change by as much as one percent (or a few minutes) over just 10 years, and we don't know why. Pinning down how long the day is on Saturn is key to understanding other things, such as wind speed." The publication is based in California.
http://newsblaze.com/story/20060627124954tsop.nb/newsblaze/TOPSTORY/Top-Story.html

Johnson: Replace Water And Salt In Hot Weather (Indianapolis Star, June 27)
In a story about staying hydrated in warm, summer weather, health experts note active people should take care to replenish their electrolytes -- particularly potassium, which Americans typically underconsume. "You need to replace both water and salt when you exercise, and in that sense sports drinks can probably put you on the right track," says ALAN KIM JOHNSON, a research physiologist at the University of Iowa. With too much fluid and not enough salt, he notes, an athlete can fall victim to hyponatremia, or over-hydration, a rare but potentially fatal condition characterized by swelling of the brain.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060627/LIVING01/606270313/1083

Hovenkamp: High Court Continues Trend (Philadelphia Inquirer, June 27)
Companies and business groups got most of what they sought in Chief Justice John Roberts's first U.S. Supreme Court term, including limits on antitrust and securities suits and the prospect of new caps on punitive damages next year. The high court last week wrapped up a 2005-06 business docket that also produced victories for companies on arbitration of customer disputes and corporate tax breaks. On antitrust law, three decisions continued a trend away from rigid prohibitions on corporate conduct and toward a more flexible, market-oriented approach. "This is a court that's proven not to be very sympathetic with antitrust claims that reach out very far," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust professor at the University of Iowa law school.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/business/14908709.htm

Weiler Comments On Driving With Medication (WCBS-TV, June 27)
Experts say drivers on over-the-counter medication is a growing problem. This upcoming holiday weekend, many drivers will have trouble behind the wheel because of the antihistamines in their over the counter allergy medication. Drowsiness, a side effect of some antihistamines, can send drivers for a loop. "Everybody should be aware of the problem, consumers who buy the products, those who sell the products," said JOHN WEILER, professor emeritus for the University of Iowa. He studied just how impaired motorists can become after taking just one antihistamine. Weiler said reaction times were noticeably slower, slower than those who had consumed alcohol. "People didn't know they were impaired," said Weiler. WCBS is based in New York City.
http://wcbstv.com/seenat11/local_story_177220402.html

Routh Returned For UI Homecoming (Orlando Sentinel, June 27)
The hoopla surrounding Norwalk native Brandon Routh's return to Iowa for the premiere of "Superman Returns" last week was a far cry from his last trip home, when he crashed on the floor of a friend's apartment during the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's homecoming last fall. Routh attended the UI for one year. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES, WASHINGTON POST, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, USA TODAY, BALTIMORE SUN, TORONTO SUN, EDMONTON SUN, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE REVIEW, LEXINGTON HERALD LEADER, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, TONIGHT (South Africa), MUNSTER (Ind.) TIMES, CBS NEWS, MSNBC and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/entertainment/sns-ap-people-brandon-routh,0,474250.story?coll=orl-entertainment-celeb

Arrest Made In Crash That Killed UI Students (WQAD-TV, June 26)
A Tabor man has been arrested for a March crash in western Iowa that killed two UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students. Rudolph Huebner is accused of driving drunk and faces five felony charges, including two counts of vehicular homicide. He's being held at Pottawattamie County Jail. Authorities say Huebner was driving 97 mph on March 18 before his vehicle hit and killed Brooke Walton of Cedar Falls and Mark McCloy of Indiana. Both victims were UI students. Pottawatamie County Investigator Leland Bennett says police found beer cans in Huebner's car and that Huebner's blood-alcohol level was more than twice the legal limit. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5077651&nav=1sW7

Actor Routh Left UI To Pursue Acting Career (Regina Leader-Post, June 26)
A story about Norwalk, Iowa native Brandon Routh, who will play the lead role in the new Superman movie, says that Routh left the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to become an actor in Los Angeles, and he had some early successes on television: a role on a short-lived series called "Odd Man Out," a recurring role in the night-time soap opera "Undressed." He went on to a steady role in "One Life to Life" as Seth Anderson; when that gig ended after a year, he won occasional parts on TV series and supplemented his income as a bartender at a bowling alley. The paper is based in Canada. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the OTTAWA CITIZEN, also based in Canada.
http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/arts_life/story.html?id=ea99c115-2785-4823-aafb-60ec6144aa34

Squire Offers Dems Advice On War Talk (Hartford Courant, June 26)
A story about what the paper called Congress's 2006 election debate over Iraq says the way for Democrats to frame the debate is to make withdrawal from Iraq part of the argument that President George Bush is incompetent, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "If you put everything on the war, and it's not as awful as it is now, you have problems," he said. "Democrats would be well advised to make a broad attack not just on the war, but on a number of things." The paper is based in Connecticut.
http://www.courant.com/news/nationworld/hc-iraqpols0625.artjun26,0,7651972.story?coll=hc-headlines-nationworld

Hovenkamp: High Court Continues Trend (Bloomberg, June 26)
Companies and business groups got most of what they sought in Chief Justice John Roberts's first U.S. Supreme Court term, including limits on antitrust and securities suits and the prospect of new caps on punitive damages next year. The high court last week wrapped up a 2005-06 business docket that also produced victories for companies on arbitration of customer disputes and corporate tax breaks. On antitrust law, three decisions continued a trend away from rigid prohibitions on corporate conduct and toward a more flexible, market-oriented approach. "This is a court that's proven not to be very sympathetic with antitrust claims that reach out very far,” said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust professor at the University of Iowa law school in Iowa City.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=aWDh6OhnaSZA&refer=us

Barta's Naming As UI AD Talk Of Banquet (Jackson Hole Star-Tribune, June 25)
A story about the Wyoming Sports Hall of Fame banquet in Casper, Wyo., says that much of the talk was about the announcement last week that University of Wyoming athletics director Gary Barta will take the same job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I didn't hear a lot of people (complaining) and hollering about it, which is good," said former Wyoming Sen. Alan Simpson. "I don't think they should be." Barta was introduced as the next Iowa athletics director at a press conference on Friday, after a month-long interview process and a week of speculation among UW fans about whether Barta would leave for the Big Ten school. Barta spent almost three years at Wyoming after taking over for the fired Lee Moon in October 2003. The paper is based in Wyoming.
http://www.jacksonholestartrib.com/articles/2006/06/25/sports/college/f308da5c754508bd87257198000946f7.txt

Actor Routh Studied English At UI (Boston Globe, June 25)
"Superman" Brandon Routh spent a year studying English at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before heading to Hollywood, where he appeared in television sitcoms “Will & Grace" and “The Gilmore Girls," the soap “One Life to Live," and MTV's “Undressed." He says off-screen he feels more like Clark Kent than Superman. "Clark is very excited to be alive and to be around Lois, and he starts to talk very fast," says Routh, whose conversation can easily speed up when he wants to make a point. "I kind of recognize those things about myself when I get excited. And I get kind of clumsy and goofy."
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2006/06/25/picking_up_the_mantle/?page=full

Lie: Backdating Sometimes Difficult To Detect (Worcester Telegram, June 25)
Pharmaceutical developer Sepracor Inc. has long rewarded its top executives with healthy salaries and stock options. Now, the company that plowed through years of losses before the asthma drug Xopenex and the insomnia treatment Lunesta pushed it to profitability in 2005 is among more than 30 companies nationwide under scrutiny from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission for the way those options were doled out. The unfolding national inquiry probes practices from the 1990s, when companies ramped up the use of stock options to attract, retain and reward managers. It has also spawned lawsuits alleging that some of those options were "backdated" to enrich executives -- potentially costing companies millions of dollars. As much as 10 percent of stock-option grants to executives nation-wide between 1996 and August 2002 may have been backdated, according to estimates made by ERIK LIE, an associate professor at the University of Iowa's business college who has studied backdating. Many of those cases may never come to light, he said. "It's hard to detect some of these patterns in some cases," Mr. Lie said. "Even if you backdate, it's not necessarily the case that the backdating is going to give rise to these very strong stock prices." The paper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.telegram.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060625/NEWS/606250449/1002

Brenzel Discusses Juvenile Sloth Discovery (WQAD-TV, June 24)
Researchers at the University of Iowa say the discovery of baby sloth bones will give some insight on the behavior and biology of the giant sloth. DAVID BRENZEL is the curator of the University of Iowa Museum of Natural History. He says the bones of the furry, plant-eating mammal that became extinct, were discovered near Shenandoah. Researchers found them near a site where almost 90 bones of an adult sloth were recovered. Because of the number of bones, Brenzel says it is probably the second-most-complete juvenile of the species ever found. He says the animals were once widespread, but the bones have always been rare. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5074273&nav=1sW7

Lie Responds To Comments On Blog (San Jose Mercury News, June 24)
Silicon Valley and the investment community are abuzz about the potential impact of investigations into whether companies improperly rigged the stock awards they gave to executives and some employees. Mukund Mohan, a 34-year-old sales and marketing executive, formed a San Jose consulting company to help companies grapple with the accounting, auditing and legal issues that arise from the stock option scandal. At the same time two months ago, he started a blog. One widely viewed blog post about the economic impact of the options scandal caught the attention of ERIK LIE, the associate professor at University of Iowa whose study last year on the timing of stock options grants sparked the interest of the SEC and other regulators. Lie made a few comments to elaborate on some of Mohan's posts. The paper is based in California. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the ST. PAUL PIONEER-PRESS in Minnesota.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/14893550.htm

Iowa Names Barta New Athletics Director (Pioneer Press, June 24)
The University of Iowa has hired Minneapolis native Gary Barta as its new athletics director, replacing BOB BOWLSBY. Barta, the athletics director at Wyoming, will begin his new duties Aug. 1 and will be paid an annual base salary of $295,000. Barta, 42, has been Wyoming's AD since September 2003. Earlier, he spent seven years as an associate AD at the University of Washington and served as the director of athletics development at the University of Northern Iowa from 1990-96. Barta is a graduate of North Dakota State, where he helped lead the school's football team to three NCAA Division II national championships. The paper is based in St. Paul, Minn. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the INDIANAPOLIS STAR, the BOSTON HERALD, and many other media outlets.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/sports/14890906.htm

Lawmakers Plan Hearings On Regents' Management Style (Chronicle, June 23)
The Iowa Legislature announced plans to hold hearings to determine whether an invasive style of management by the Iowa Board of Regents has driven away top university officials. Both the president of the University of Iowa, DAVID SKORTON, and the athletics director, BOB BOWLSBY, will leave for other institutions in July. Legislators expressed concern that the board was too involved with the day-to-day functioning of state universities, especially the University of Iowa. Hearings are scheduled for mid-July.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i42/42a02607.htm

Kansas Tuition Increased (Lawrence Journal-World, June 23)
The Kansas Board of Regents approved increasing tuition and fees at Kansas University to $6,152, more than double the rate five years ago. In advance of Thursday’s meeting, the Regents produced a report showing KU’s tuition in 2005-06 was below that of several surrounding institutions, including the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the University of Missouri-Columbia and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Kansas. http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/jun/23/regent_takes_tuition_stand/

Swimmer Wins Milk Mustache Contest (Arizona Republic, June 23)
Laura Mozdzen won a $7,500 scholarship by being one of 25 student-athletes chosen nationally to receive a Scholar Athlete Milk Mustache of the Year. Mozdzen received a swimming scholarship to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0623mozdzen.html

Lutz Book Studies Slackers (Ithaca Journal, June 23)
TOM LUTZ
, a University of Iowa professor, studied workplace low performers and put what he knows into a book, “Doing Nothing: A History of Loafers, Loungers, Slackers, and Bums in America.” Turns out the phenomenon can be traced to an article, “The Right to Be Lazy,” written in the late 1800s. And it stretches all the way to Japan, where slacker is pronounced “freetah.” Lutz described a sort of chicken-and-egg dilemma. The number of freetahs, gold-brickers, idlers, laggards, lollygaggers and faineants typically increases as companies struggle. “Anti-work attitudes are very prevalent during times of fundamental economic change,” he said. The newspaper is based in New York. The article also appeared in the ARIZONA REPUBLIC. http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060623/LIFESTYLE06/606230327

Stripper Writes Memoir (Bradenton Herald, June 23)
Diablo Cody turned her adventures as a stripper into a sharp and funny memoir, "Candy Girl," subtitled "A Year in the Life of an Unlikely Stripper." After a rollicking appearance on David Letterman's show (where he named "Candy Girl" the first pick of "Dave's Book Club"), Cody awaits a hoped-for start of production this fall on her movie script, "Juno." Cody attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, famous for its Writers' Workshop. The newspaper is based in Florida. http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/entertainment/14882030.htm

Missen Discusses Fulbright Experience (National Public Radio, June 22)
CLIFF MISSEN,
systems analyst and adjunct instructor, University of Iowa, discusses his experience as a Fulbright Scholar in Africa in 1998 and 1999 on the NPR program Talk Of The Nation.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5504011

Missen Taught In Nigeria (National Public Radio, June 22)
In addition to sending students to study abroad, the Fulbright Program also sends American academics: professors, associate professors and college instructors for research and educational experiences abroad. One of them, CLIFF MISSEN, was a Fulbright scholar to Nigeria in the 1998 and '99 school year. He's a systems analyst and adjunct instructor at the University of Iowa. “There's a vast difference between the way we think about teaching here and they teach there. The first time I offered a course, it was with only other professors in the course who wanted to learn computers,” he said. http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=34afea7015f92f0b817f7db8e04b0fdf&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkVb&_md5=60e20d3cbb18e93efc50545d2214ece6. Audio can be found at: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5504011

Jones Notes Touch-Screen Voting Problems (Tucson Citizen, June 22)
Touch-screen voting has become a touchstone for concerns about reliability, system failure, hacking and outright conspiracy to write election results into computer code. DOUGLAS JONES, an associate professor of computer sciences at the University of Iowa, got involved in the touch-screen voting controversy as an expert in computer security and a member of the Iowa Board of Election Examiners. Security is a major problem, he said. The machine is just part of what computer-voting critics call a larger problem: proprietary voting systems. The inner workings of these systems are secrets held by the company that builds them. "The proprietary issue makes it difficult for us to know what's going on," Jones said. "Every time you try to ask certain questions, you get back, 'I'm sorry, that's not publicly available.'" The newspaper is based in Arizona.
http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/daily/local/16741.php

District To Consider Withholding Class Rank (Northbrook Star, June 22)
Bright students who aren't at the top of their classes are helped when class rank is not a part of their college applications, Glenbrook high school counselors told the school board last week. A two-year study by District 225's counseling department found class rank can unfairly eliminate Glenbrook students from an institution's application process before other criteria, like ACT scores and grade point averages, are considered. The study was launched in the 2004-05 school year, at the same time Glenbrook stopped sending students' class rank with their applications to Indiana University. A higher percentage of Glenbrook applicants was accepted that year by Indiana, officials said. This year, class rank was withheld from transcripts sent to Bradley, Butler, Illinois State, Indiana, Vanderbilt and Washington (in St. Louis) universities as well as to the universities of Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin. At Glenbrook North, withholding class ranking was beneficial to students who applied to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Illinois and Indiana University and was neutral for students who applied to University of Wisconsin, Bradley and Illinois State universities, according to the study. Results were similar for Glenbrook South students, except those who applied to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Because their transcripts lacked class rank, nine students who would have gained automatic admission were put on a waiting list, and eventually eight were accepted, according to the district.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/nb/06-22-06-951888.html

Lynch Comments On AD Search (Jackson Hole Star Tribune, June 22)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is still searching for a new athletics director, an ongoing process that includes Wyoming athletics director Gary Barta. Barta told the Star-Tribune he interviewed with a 14-member Iowa search committee in Dallas last week, saying the interview was an opportunity he "just had to take." According to professor CHARLES LYNCH, an Iowa professor of epidemiology and the co-chair of the committee, the search is currently in the hands of GARY FETHKE, the interim president of the university. The committee members gave Fethke a short list of names that most impressed them after the interviews, though Lynch would not say who is on the list. Fethke will review the list and recommend a course of action, which could include a hire, more interviews with those on the short list, or a third option that would not bode well for Barta and the other candidates. "...(Fethke) could indicate to us, 'I want you to look further,'" Lynch said. "We actually have some additional candidates we could look at. Based on that, I have to tell people that to the best of my knowledge, we're not done interviewing yet. But we could be." Fethke and the search committee hope to have somebody in office by the time outgoing director BOB BOWLSBY departs for the same job at Stanford on July 9. A version of this article also appeared June 22 in the CASPAR (Wyo.) STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.jacksonholestartrib.com/articles/2006/06/22/sports/college/2e807a454e359f5e8725719500036242.txt

Kansas AD Considered UI Post (Lawrence Journal-World, June 22)
Kansas University athletic director Lew Perkins confirmed Wednesday he was contacted recently by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials about the Hawkeyes' vacant AD position. "It was flattering to be contacted," said Perkins, an Iowa graduate. "Obviously the University of Iowa is dear to my heart. I evaluated it. I took emotions out of it. This is where I want to be." Perkins, who is nearing completion of his third full year as Kansas AD, added: "We have a five-year strategic plan. I want to make sure we accomplish the plan, what we set out to do." Iowa is looking to replace BOB BOWLSBY, who will take over as Stanford's AD in July.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/jun/22/perkins_mulled_iowa_ad_opening/?sports

Ryan Concerned About Patients' Fertility Goals (UPI, June 22)
Many parents wish for twins via in vitro fertilization, but they are often unaware of the risks involved with twin pregnancy, according to a U.S. a study. "Along with many infertility specialists, we have been alarmed by the large numbers of twin pregnancies resulting from infertility treatment, and especially IVF," said Dr. GINNY RYAN, of the University of Iowa. "But we also noted that patients seemed much less concerned by twin pregnancies than we are and, indeed, many desire this outcome." The findings were presented at the 22nd annual conference of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Prague, Czech Republic.
http://www.upi.com/ConsumerHealthDaily/view.php?StoryID=20060621-060618-7352r

Kline Studied Asthma-Livestock Link (United Press International, June 21)
A University of Iowa study finds that large-scale livestock farms located near schools may pose asthma risks to the children. "Previous research has shown increased rates of asthma among children living in rural areas of Iowa and the United States," said JOEL KLINE, of the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. "Given that concentrated animal feeding operations release inflammatory substances that can affect the health of workers at these facilities and the air quality of nearby communities, we were interested in whether there was a connection between concentrated animal feeding operations and increased rates of asthma among kids in rural areas." The study, published in Chest, found the prevalence rate for physician-diagnosed asthma was 24.6 percent at the study school, compared to 11.7 percent at the control school.
http://www.upi.com/ConsumerHealthDaily/view.php?StoryID=20060621-042326-4949r

Columnist Questions Import Of Backdating (Wall Street Journal, June 21)
Missing in the uproar over alleged stock option backdating by companies, argues a Journal columnist, has been any cogent explanation of the possible reasons behind a practice apparently so widespread that companies must either have been sharing notes on it or have discovered it independently following some inner logic of corporate life. Also missing is any cogent explanation of why it's wrong. It took ERIK LIE, an economist at the University of Iowa, to show that the gains realized by executives at certain companies were conceivable only if option grants had been systematically retroactive to a recent low in the share price. His work was noticed by the Journal, which went about identifying some of the companies that engaged in apparent backdating. "His finding is revealing, but of what?" the columnist asks.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115085169575385877.html

Possible UI AD Replacements Listed (Jackson Hole Star Tribune, June 21)
Wyoming athletics director Gary Barta has been contacted by the University of Iowa as a candidate for the same job at that school, according to multiple sources. An Iowa search committee interviewed several candidates late last week in Dallas, according to the Des Moines Register. The Big Ten school has enlisted a 14-member committee to find a replacement for BOB BOWLSBY, who will leave the school July 9 to become the athletics director at Stanford. The Des Moines Register listed six possible candidates to replace Bowlsby: Barta, Toledo AD Mike O'Brien, Florida Atlantic AD Craig Angelos, Denver associate AD Peg Bradley-Doppes, Southwestern Conference commissioner Robert Vowels and South Florida AD Doug Woolard. The large search committee includes six former Iowa athletes, among others. Barta has connections to the state of Iowa and Bowlsby. Barta was hired as an assistant athletics director in 1990 at Northern Iowa, where Bowlsby was the athletics director from 1983-91. Bowlsby's replacement and Barta's former boss -- Chris Ritrievi -- is currently an associate athletics director for Wyoming's Mountain West Conference foe, Utah. The paper is based in Wyoming.
http://www.jacksonholestartrib.com/articles/2006/06/21/sports/college/bd4b796d0cff2457872571940005a49f.txt

'Man Of Steel' Routh Attended UI (Chronicle Herald, June 21)
A story about the new man of steel, "Superman Returns" actor Brandon Routh, says the Norwalk native's mother is a teacher, his father a carpenter, and both parents play music on the side. A bit of a singer, pianist and trumpet player himself, Routh initially set out to be a writer, studying for a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA while modeling and acting on the side to help pay the bills. But Routh left school to pursue acting in New York and later Hollywood, where he landed a recurring role on One Life to Live and had guest spots on such prime-time shows as Will & Grace and The Gilmore Girls. The paper is based in Canada.
http://thechronicleherald.ca/Entertainment/511484.html

Parsons Quoted About UI Press And 'Digitality' (Inside Higher Ed, June 21)
A columnist reporting on last week's Association of American University Presses conference in New Orleans, where he says there was seemingly endless talk about the digital revolution as it pertains to books and literature, said that after getting home he contacted one of the conference's participants, JOSEPH PARSONS, an acquisitions editor for the University of Iowa Press, to ask if that was just an oversight. Had academic digitality hit Iowa? "We routinely deal with electronic files, of course," he responded, "but the books we produce have been of the old-fashioned paper and ink variety.... When we contract with authors, we typically include digital rights as part of the standard agreement, but we haven't published anything suitable for an electronic book reader." He went on to mention, however, that print-on-demand was a ubiquitous and very reasonable option for small press runs.
http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2006/06/21/mclemee

UI Heart Valve Procedure Cost Range Cited (News and Observer, June 21)
Blue Ridge Paper Products in Canton is on the verge of signing a deal with Raleigh-based IndUShealth that would give Blue Ridge employees the option of going to India to receive care for company-insured medical procedures. Why would Blue Ridge want to do that? Simple -- money. Health care costs in India are routinely 80 percent cheaper than in the United States. What that means is that Blue Ridge could send an employee to New Delhi to fix a leaky heart valve for $28,000 tops. And that includes, travel, lodging, meals and recovery. Compare that to the $64,000 to $128,000 estimate he received from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the only American hospital Douglas found that would give him a quote. Still, saving the company money may not be enough incentive for some employees to fly halfway around the world for medical care, so Blue Ridge is considering a nice carrot: depositing up to 25 percent of the cost savings directly into the employee's pocket. The paper is based in Raleigh, N.C.
http://www.newsobserver.com/559/story/452757.html

Lutz Book Examines Anti-Work Attitudes (Cherry Hill Courier Post, June 21)
TOM LUTZ, a University of Iowa professor, has studied workplace low performers and put what he knows into a book, "Doing Nothing: A History of Loafers, Loungers, Slackers, and Bums in America." Lutz traces the phenomenon to an article, "The Right to Be Lazy," written in the late 1800s. And it stretches all the way to Japan, where slacker is pronounced "freetah."  Lutz described a sort of chicken-and-egg dilemma. The number of freetahs, gold-brickers, idlers, laggards, lollygaggers and faineants (that's French) typically increases as companies struggle. "Anti-work attitudes are very prevalent during times of fundamental economic change," he said. The paper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060621/BUSINESS01/606210353/1003/BUSINESS

Squire: Connecticut Senate Race Important (Hartford Courant, June 20)
For Democratic activists around the country, Connecticut's U.S. Senate primary between Sen. Joseph Lieberman and Ned Lamont is not just a local contest between a veteran political figure and an aggressive newcomer; it's a crucial test of whether the left or the center has more influence in the national party. The race also hinges on the Iraq war, which Lamont opposes and Lieberman supports. A Lamont victory could help anti-war activists. "The public may not know all the ins and outs of the Lamont candidacy, even in Connecticut," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "But among people who follow the Democratic Party, this race is a big deal nationally."
http://www.courant.com/news/politics/hc-dems0620.artjun20,0,7450537.story?coll=hc-headlines-politics

SEC Expands Inquiry Into Backdating Scandal (Los Angeles Times, June 20)
In a broadening investigation, the Securities and Exchange Commission is examining whether companies timed stock option grants so executives would benefit from company news. The investigation stems from a report by University of Iowa professor ERIK LIE that found corporate executives were illegally backdating stock options to take advantage of increases in stock price.
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-options20jun20,1,7181410.story?coll=la-headlines-business

Alumna Interviews Alumnus Tom Arnold (Seattle Times, June 20)
Sandy Dunham, a University of Iowa alumna now working for the Seattle Times, interviewed UI alumnus Tom Arnold when he made an appearance recently in Seattle. The two knew each other as students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/artsentertainment/2003066683_tomarnold19.html

New Superman Was UI Student (MSNBC, June 20)
A profile of Brandon Routh, who stars as the Caped Crusader in the new Superman movie, notes that he was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for one year before leaving school to pursue his acting career. This story also appeared on the Web sites of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, LEXINGTON (Ky.) HERALD LEADER, REGINA (Saskatchewan) POST, CENTRE DAILY TIMES (Penn.), MACLEAN'S, MONTREAL GAZETTE and other news organizations.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/13424376/

Columnist Cites UI Study On Brain Damage, Risk (Montreal Gazette, June 19)
Risk aversion, or a fear of losses, is just as much of a problem as risk-seeking behavior. Risk avoidance leads investors to do things like leave their money in bank accounts, even though the best long-term returns are to be had in the stock market. The neurological underpinning of this kind of behavior was studied by another U.S. research team involving professors from Carnegie Mellon University, Stanford and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This study indicated that people with a particular type of brain damage made better investment decisions than normal people. The study, reported last year in the Wall Street Journal, found those with damage to the emotion-producing areas of the brain were more likely to take risk in an experiment designed to recreate the kind of choices investors face through coin tosses and a system of rewards. Normal people were more likely to avoid risk and performed worse in the experiment because fear played on their minds. Over time, they became more cautious and risk averse as they reacted to the previous round of coin tossing.
http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/columnists/story.html?id=5e8ae25c-593b-4d35-912d-999006ebefb4

Lie: More Backdating Revelations May Come (USNews & World Report, June 19)
You could make a fortune if you could place a bet now on last month's Kentucky Derby. Too bad you can't find a sucker dumb enough to take it. But many corporate executives have found a similar sure thing -- obtaining the right to buy company stock in the future at an old, lower price. Evidence is growing that dozens of executives have been enriching themselves by "backdating" their stock options to lock in low purchase prices from previous days or weeks. Although backdating per se is legal, the Securities and Exchange Commission and federal prosecutors are investigating companies' options practices because, in many cases, hiding or lying about backdating is illegal. There may be more revelations to come, say the two business professors who were instrumental in bringing the practice to light. ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa says that 13 percent of the reports supposed to be filed with the SEC within two days of an option grant are late. And those late filers' stocks, on average, happen to rise more than 7 percent in the 30 days following the date their option price was set. The odds that so many executives would get so lucky are infinitesimally low, concluded Lie and Randall Heron, an associate professor at Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/biztech/articles/060619/19options.htm

UI Partner In Study On Risk-Taking (Montreal Gazette, June 19)
Our brains seem to be wired to make investing mistakes, according to research from an emerging field of academic research called neuroeconomics. Risk aversion, or a fear of losses, is just as much of a problem as risk-seeking behavior. Risk avoidance leads investors to do things like leave their money in bank accounts, even though the best long-term returns are to be had in the stock market. The neurological underpinning of this kind of behavior was studied by a U.S. research team involving professors from Carnegie Mellon University, Stanford and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This study indicated that people with a particular type of brain damage made better investment decisions than normal people. The paper is based in Canada.
http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/business/story.html?id=5e8ae25c-593b-4d35-912d-999006ebefb4

Lie Was Suspicious Of Stock Option Timing (Santa Cruz Sentinel, June 18)
Executives at more than 40 publicly traded corporations are being investigated for a scam involving stock options. ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa, found that the timing of stock options issuance was too good to simply represent front-running. He hypothesized that executives were "back-dating" options. Instead of using the date of grant for options, executives used dates weeks or months before. The paper is based in California. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE.
http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/archive/2006/June/18/biz/stories/03biz.htm

Lie Research Led To SEC Investigations (Centre Daily Times, June 18)
More than 45 companies have disclosed that they are the subject of regulatory, criminal or internal probes into whether they tried to improperly inflate executives' pay through a practice known as backdating stock options, and experts say the number is likely to grow. ERIK LIE, one of two academics whose work led to the investigations of options backdating, said he has "very mixed feelings" about the results of his research. "Whenever we do research, we like for the research to be recognized," Lie, a finance professor at the University of Iowa, said in an interview. "On the other hand ... a lot of innocent people are being affected by this, shareholders and employees who might lose their jobs -- that's a sad side of it." The paper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/business/14839938.htm

UI 'Leader' Among Universities In Commissioning Art (Chronicle, June 16)
An opinion piece counters the argument that Western European nations care more about the arts than do Americans. The author, Tyler Cowen, a professor of economics and director of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, says that roughly two dozen universities are active in commissioning new artworks. The list includes Ohio State University, the University of California, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and the University of Michigan, all state institutions. "The University of Iowa is arguably the leader in this regard, having commissioned more than 80 works since 1986," Cowen says. "It put up $500,000 to sponsor a new production by the Joffrey Ballet."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i41/41b01301.htm

Murray Sees Value In 'Biobanks' Of Children's DNA (Science, June 16)
Joining a growing list of "biobank" projects around the world that aim to link genes and common diseases, researchers in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last week announced a plan to collect DNA from 100,000 people. This new project comes with a youthful twist: "The focus here is entirely on children," says study leader Hakon Hakonarson of the Children's Hospital in Philadelphia (CHOP). Ethical questions already swirl around existing biobanks, and the storage of children's DNA could raise new issues, notes pediatrician and medical ethicist Jeffrey Botkin of the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City. However, birth defects researcher JEFFREY MURRAY of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, who is not connected with the project, contends that a large children's DNA bank is needed and can be operated ethically and safely. "We'd be letting children down by not doing this," he adds.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/312/5780/1584a

Violence Discourages Alumnus In East Timor Clinic (Chicago Tribune, June 16)
Dan Murphy came to help East Timor's people as they built a nation, and watching the country's return to violence and chaos has been painful. The Iowa-born doctor opened a medical clinic in Dili in 1999, at the height of the scorched-earth aftermath of East Timor's independence ballot. It has given him a unique vantage point to follow the country's progress after decades of Indonesian rule. Despite his relaxed demeanor and informal bedside manner, Murphy has been dismayed as violence surged in the past month, with clashes between dismissed soldiers and loyalist forces that gave way to gang warfare. At least 30 people have been killed, and tens of thousands have been forced to flee. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate hopes the violence is an aberration, but he can't be sure. "I wish that this hadn't happened. This is a big setback for East Timor," Murphy said. "When you know the people, it hurts. These are people who have suffered enough."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0606160096jun16,1,4472511.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Alumnus Wins Goldsmith Achievement Award (Times Herald-Record, June 16)
Kurt Matzdorf, professor emeritus of gold and silversmithing and founder of the metals program in the art department at SUNY New Paltz, has been awarded the 2006 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of North American Goldsmiths. This is the society's highest award, which recognizes a lifetime of exceptional service to the metalsmith community. Matzdorf is nationally known for his ceremonial work, especially his 16 university maces, 20 presidential chains of office and 10 presidential medallions. He has exhibited in major public museums on both sides of the Atlantic, including Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Jewish Museum in Berlin. Matzdorf taught at SUNY New Paltz from 1957-85. He completed his undergraduate work in sculpture at London University and his master of fine arts in silversmithing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.recordonline.com/archive/2006/06/16/news_community-hmatzdorfbrf-06-16.html

Skorton, Gartner Discuss Big 10 Channel (Fort Worth Star-Telegram,
June 16)
Big Ten TV could be coming to a cable box near you. According to the president of the Iowa Board of Regents, the Big Ten has explored the possibility of starting its own cable TV network. Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany confirmed in a Wednesday night phone interview with the Cedar Rapids Gazette that the league has considered forming a network that would broadcast Big Ten athletics. Board of Regents president Michael Gartner is a former president at NBC News. He told the Gazette that he was approached about the idea of starting a Big Ten network by outgoing University of Iowa president DAVID SKORTON, who asked him to speak with Delany. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, FLINT (Mich.) JOURNAL, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, and many other media outlets.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/sports/14827644.htm

Atchison Discusses UI Pandemic Response Plan (WQAD-TV, June 15)
A University of Iowa task group has come up with a plan to respond to an outbreak of the bird flu or other pandemic. The key elements focus on suspending classes and events, quarantining students to their dorms and maintaining order. It's based on an assumption that 15,000, or 35 percent, students, staff and faculty would become ill; 6,500, or 15 percent, would need to be hospitalized; and 860, or 2 percent, would die. CHRISTOPHER ATCHISON of the university's College of Public Health says the plan did raise questions, such as who would have the authority to cancel classes. While the president is considered the CEO, the school would also respond to the governor, the Board of Regents and health officials. The next step is presenting an implementation plan, including a budget.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5035879&nav=menu132_3

Livengood: Charities Must Keep Basics (Chronicle of Philanthropy, June 15)
Online giving to the nation's largest charities continued its steep climb in 2005, according to The Chronicle's seventh annual survey of online fund raising. Electronic gifts to the 167 organizations that provided data for this year's survey topped $911.9- million in 2005. Donations to the 162 groups that provided figures for 2004 and 2005 were up 148.1 percent, from $366.1-million to $908.4-million last year. Online gifts more than doubled at 55 of these charities, and 90 groups achieved increases of more than 50 percent. At the University of Iowa, Internet giving grew by more than 2,000 percent between 2001 and 2005; during 2005 the UI received $1.4 million in online contributions. A few charities are taking tentative steps to test newer technologies - such as text messaging and online audio broadcasts, often called "podcasts" - and their ability to attract new supporters. But while the whiz-bang features of new technologies are exciting, HILERY LIVENGOOD, director of Web strategies at the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, urges charities not to neglect the basics - like making sure that their home page prominently features a link to an online-donations section, that direct-mail appeals and telephone solicitations remind donors they can give online, and that the Web site describes how gifts are used. Small steps, when added up, can lead to a big payoff, says Livengood.
http://philanthropy.com/free/articles/v18/i17/17001901.htm

Lie: Sarbanes Oxley Having An Impact (San Jose Mercury News, June 15)
Under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act passed in the wake of scandals at Enron and WorldCom, companies must notify federal regulators about option grants within two days. The previous 45-day window gave companies the opportunity to grant options and then go back to pick prices right before a run-up in the stock. Sarbanes-Oxley is having an impact. Before its reforms were enacted, executives missed the deadline by nearly 20 weeks, Seyhun said. The average lag dropped from 18 business days in the first five months after Sarbanes-Oxley was enacted to eight days in 2004. ``We're getting on the right track. It's going down,'' said ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa who reached similar conclusions as the Michigan researchers in a separate study he co-wrote. ``That's not a trivial number, in my mind. That's one of 10 grants.'' This story also appeared on the Web site of the BRADENTON (FL) HERALD.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/14823191.htm

Sidel Quoted In Story About Late Vietnam Official (BBC, June 15)
A story about former Vietnam government official Le Mai, who died ten years ago, quotes from a Wall Street Journal op-ed column written by UI law professor MARK SIDEL that praises Mai for his willingness to open Vietnam to the rest of the world. The story appears on the BBC's Vietnamese language service and is written in Vietnamese.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/vietnamese/vietnam/story/2006/06/060613_lemai_tribute.shtml

Former UI Professors Inspire Theater Piece (Dallas Morning News, June 15)
For two boys growing up in countries that fought each other, war can seem similar.  That's what inspired When I Was a Child: a mix of history, dance, theater, music and film, filtered through the memories of Ted Perry, 69, an American, and Hans Breder, 71, a German. They grew up during World War II and met 38 years ago at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where they were professors. Mr. Perry now teaches film at a college in Vermont. Mr. Breder retired and lives in Iowa. The show opens Sunday at Dallas Children's Theater and is for kids 12 and older.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/fea/columnists/nchurnin/stories/DN-NFM_kidscover_0615liv.ART.State.Edition1.c5e79b.html

Routh Attended UI (Rediff, June 15)
A profile of Brandon Routh, who plays the Caped Crusader in the latest Superman movie, notes that he is a former student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Rediff is based in India.
http://specials.rediff.com/movies/2006/jun/15sld1.htm

UI Alumnus Treats Victims of East Timor Violence (New York Times, June 14)
Dan Murphy came to help East Timor's people as they built a nation, and watching the country's return to violence and chaos has been painful. The Iowa-born doctor opened a medical clinic in Dili in 1999, at the height of the scorched-earth aftermath of East Timor's independence ballot. It has given him a unique vantage point to follow the country's progress after decades of Indonesian rule. "I used to say things have improved; I'm not doing any more bullet wounds," the lanky 61-year-old told The Associated Press while examining a patient for a chest complaint. "But now we've seen more bullet wounds over the last couple of weeks, so that's a little bit disconcerting." The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate hopes the violence is an aberration, but he can't be sure. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, WASHINGTON POST, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, BILOXI SUN HERALD, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, CBS NEWS, FORBES, THE GUARDIAN (UK), and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/world/AP-East-Timor-US-Doctor.html

Lie Research Led To SEC Investigations (Newsday, June 14)
More than 45 companies have disclosed that they are the subject of regulatory, criminal or internal probes into whether they tried to improperly inflate executives' pay through a practice known as backdating stock options, and experts say the number is likely to grow. ERIK LIE, one of two academics whose work led to the investigations of options backdating, said he has "very mixed feelings" about the results of his research. "Whenever we do research, we like for the research to be recognized," Lie, a finance professor at the University of Iowa, said in an interview last week. "On the other hand ... a lot of innocent people are being affected by this, shareholders and employees who might lose their jobs -- that's a sad side of it." Research by Lie and Randall Heron, who teaches finance at Indiana University, inspired a Wall Street Journal story last March that questioned options-granting patterns at six companies, including Comverse, and sparked the federal and regulatory investigations.
http://www.newsday.com/business/ny-bzopt144780301jun14,0,952975.story?coll=ny-business-print

Jones: Machine Security Risks May Run High (Philadelphia Inquirer, June 14)
A column on the introduction at some polling places of electronic Sequoia Voting Systems machines, also called direct recording electronic (DRE) systems, says that Penny Venetis, codirector of the Rutgers Constitutional Law Clinic in Newark, N.J., testified before a judicial panel last month that the electronic voting machines operating in 20 of New Jersey's 21 counties were susceptible to technical glitches and manipulation, easily altering election results without anyone knowing. Venetis asked for a ban on DREs that could not provide a paper record. Lawsuits against DRE systems, including Sequoia, are piling up. One was filed in Colorado by a nonpartisan group of voters desperate to preserve the integrity of their votes. Expert testimony from computer-security specialists for the plaintiffs included DOUGLAS W. JONES, professor at the University of Iowa, who said: "Some of the security risks with these machines are so high that it is unconscionable that their manufacturers, who have known of the problems for years, have not taken the necessary steps to correct them."
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/local/states/new_jersey/14813225.htm

Altmaier, Dahm Comment On Investigation (Christian Science Monitor, June 13)
A story about the posting of photos of possible college athletic initiation scenes, or hazing, on Internet sites such as Facebook and BadJocks.com, reports that at the University of Iowa, a photo of freshmen baseball players surfaced on Facebook, showing them singing at a party in the nude, with baseball caps for fig leaves. The university concluded that hazing had not taken place. But the photo sparked intense discussions among players, coaches and faculty. "I can envision scenarios where it could have been hazing, which is why we took it so seriously," says Prof. ELIZABETH ALTMAIER, one of the investigators and a faculty representative to the NCAA. "We're not happy about it, but it could become one of the best educational things for all the student athletes," says the baseball coach, JACK DAHM. Participants felt remorse for making bad choices and attracting negative publicity, he adds. (The photo wasn't posted by a team member.) The story also ran on the Web site of USA TODAY.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0614/p16s01-legn.html

Sidel Remembers Vietnam Official (Wall Street Journal, June 13)
In a commentary piece, MARK SIDEL, professor of law at the University of Iowa, writes, "America's warming relationship with Vietnam owes much to a slight and smiling man who died a decade ago this month. Without Le Mai, Hanoi's former deputy foreign minister, the Communist country wouldn't be hosting U.S. President George Bush come November, nor as close as it is to joining the World Trade Organization. Yet Mai remains unknown to most people outside Vietnam."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115015356603678306.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

UI Acceleration Report Cited (Washington Post, June 13)
Few educators these days want to go back to the early 19th century, when often the only opportunities for learning were one-room schoolhouses or, if you were rich, private tutors. But a report from the University of Iowa says at least those students had no age and grade rules to hold them back. What was lost in the 20th century was "an appreciation for individual differences," scholars NICHOLAS COLANGELO, SUSAN G. ASSOULINE and MIRACA U.M. GROSS conclude in the report, "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students." Now, the report says, "America's school system keeps bright students in line by forcing them to learn in a lock-step manner with their classmates."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/06/12/AR2006061201009.html

Lie Uncovered Backdating Scandal (The Register, June 13)
Fund managers in the United States are asking 1,500 companies if they are likely to get dragged into the ever-growing investigation into backdating of share options. The scandal came to light after research by ERIK LIE, professor at the University of Iowa. He found backdating of options was more common before August 2002 when new SEC reporting regulations came into effect. The Register is based in the U.K.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/06/13/share_options_grow/

UI Safety Research Cited (Newsday, June 13)
As many as 10,000 fatal crashes a year could be prevented if all cars had electronic stability control, according to a new study being announced this morning by an insurance industry research group. The nonprofit Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, based in Arlington, Va., says stability control systems reduce the risk of fatal multiple-vehicle crashes by 32 percent and fatal single-vehicle crashes by 56 percent. The study is the latest of several to endorse the computer-controlled systems, which help prevent skids and rollovers by selectively braking one or more wheels. Similar conclusions have been reached in earlier studies by the insurance institute and by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Consumer Reports and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
http://www.newsday.com/business/ny-bzcars134779496jun13,0,6118867.story?coll=ny-business-print

UI's Schutte Benefited From Human Genome Project (Red Herring, June 12)
The last chapter of the 100 percent-finished version of the Human Genome Project was published in a recent issue of the journal Nature. It consisted of chromosome 1, the largest human chromosome of all. And as the one implicated in the most genetic diseases, chromosome 1 should prove the richest mining ground for biotech companies. "[The final sequence is] a catalyst for our gene discoveries," says BRIAN SCHUTTE, associate professor at the University of Iowa. He and his team localized the gene for a rare type of clefting disease to a region of the chromosome, but previously had no idea which genes lay in this region. He says the Human Genome Project's sequencing efforts greatly facilitated this achievement. The publication, based in Belmont, Calif., covers "The Business of Technology."
http://www.redherring.com/Article.aspx?a=17228&hed=Mapping+the+Last+Chromosome&sector=Industries&subsector=Biosciences

Surgeon Came From UI Hospitals (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, June 12)
Greg Gilliland might have the body of a 57-year-old, but for the past year, he's had a liver that's more than 30 years younger. A lot has changed since May 14, 2005, when the Hot Springs man became the first person to receive a liver transplant from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences hospital in Little Rock. On Sunday, he shared his story, and his gratitude, with other transplant recipients at the first anniversary celebration of UAMS' liver transplant program -- the only one of its kind in the state. In the inaugural year, 28 people received transplants. Gilliland's transplant was performed under the direction of Dr. Youmin Wu. Wu, who has performed about 800 transplants, came to UAMS from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL AND CLINICS, where he also initiated a liver transplant program.
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/157460/

Lie's Discovery Of Backdating Noted (The Street, June 12)
The recently unearthed options-backdating scandal, which has revived Main Street's skepticism into corporate accounting practices, centers on how certain companies priced options granted to their executives. And despite all the sharp pencils wielded by Wall Street's analyst community, it took an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa named ERIK LIE to uncover it. Employee stock options typically carry a strike price equivalent to the market price of the stock on the day they are granted. But more than a dozen companies so far have been identified as having suspiciously granted options on what turned out to be their stock's near-term or 52-week low. The accusation is that the companies set the strike price for the options after they were actually granted so as to take advantage of low prices, which yield a greater payout if the market value goes up.
http://www.thestreet.com/_googlen/funds/mutualfundmonday/10290980.html?cm_ven=GOOGLEN&cm_cat=FREE&cm_ite=NA

Skorton, Rawlings UI Tenure Noted (Ithaca Journal, June 12)
Plans for "fantastic" new facilities, a seemingly constant presence in national news stories and a faculty dedicated to intellectual collaboration across many disciplines are just some of the things Interim Cornell University President Hunter Rawlings gave as reasons to celebrate Cornell. At his final "State of the University" address, Rawlings was greeted with a standing ovation and rousing applause from the crowd of Cornell alumni gathered Saturday morning at Bartels Hall. The speech was just one of many events for alumni during Reunion Weekend on the Cornell campus. In July, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA President David Skorton, who was in attendance Saturday, will officially begin his tenure as 12th president of Cornell. Rawlings has been interim leader since Cornell's 11th president, Jeffrey Lehman, announced last June that he would resign after just two years in office. Rawlings, a classics professor, first served as Cornell's president from 1995-2002; he also came from the University of Iowa. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060612/NEWS01/606120324/1002

Mormon Trail Travelers Remembered In Hancher Service (Deseret News, June 12)
Nearly 2,600 members of the Latter-Day Saints gathered in HANCHER AUDITORIUM at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Sunday to remember the handcart pioneers who trudged 1,300 miles to the Salt Lake Valley in the 1850s along what became known as the Mormon Trail. President Gordon B. Hinckley told nearly 2,500 gathered in Hancher -- and thousands more via satellite and cable -- that "there is no chronicle of greater suffering and terrible experience than this chronicle. God bless their memories to those of us who live in comfort and ease." The paper is based in Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,640186283,00.html

UI Whipworm Treatment Research Cited (Detroit News, June 11)
The upside of Linda Mansfield's research is that it may lead to a new treatment for inflammatory bowel disease. The downside is that it would involve swallowing worm eggs. Mansfield is a professor of microbiology at Michigan State University who specializes in the study of parasites. She's also one of several researchers around the country looking at the use of threadlike intestinal parasites called whipworms to treat the disease, which can cause diarrhea, painful cramps and even intestinal bleeding. Mansfield wasn't the first to hit on that idea. A research team at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA already has tried treating human patients with a whipworm egg and Gatorade cocktail. Their results were promising. The station is based in San Diego, Calif. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of LEADING THE CHARGE (Australia), THE KINDRED TIMES (Utah) , JACKSON NEWS-TRIBUNE (Wyoming), KFMB-TV (California), NEWSDAY, and other media outlets.
http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060611/LIFESTYLE03/606110343/1040

Fisher Book On Enterprise Zones Noted (Maine Today, June 11)
Pine Tree Zones, which offer businesses a package of tax benefits for every new job created, have been a key component of Maine Gov. Baldacci's economic development strategy since the program began in 2004. Several business leaders say the zones "level the playing field" between Maine and other states. Nationally, the idea of using "enterprise zones" to attract business investment has been around since the early 1980s, and many states have embraced them. While championed by politicians, academics view them with skepticism. Studies show they have little, if any, effect on where businesses decide to locate, said PETER FISHER, a University of Iowa economics professor and co-author of the book, "State Enterprise Zone Programs: Have They Worked?" Typically, the programs are created to help depressed areas, but then political pressure causes them to spread over an entire state, he said. "Everyone wants a piece of the pie," he said.
http://business.mainetoday.com/news/060611pinetree.shtml

10 Percent Of Pre-2002 Options May Be Backdated (Baltimore Sun, June 11)
William McGuire probably deserves to be well-compensated for building UnitedHealthcare from next to nothing into a health care giant. But $1.5 billion? That number -- the value of McGuire's unexercised stock options -- could have become merely the flash point for another round of garden-variety hand wringing over excessive executive pay. But McGuire now stands accused in shareholder lawsuits of gaming his company's options program to ensure the maximum possible payout. Those claims might just become Exhibit A in a burgeoning scandal that could land as many executives in courtrooms as Enron, WorldCom, Tyco and Adelphia put together. McGuire is accused of backdating stock options -- a phrase likely to make the average reader's eyes glaze over. So think of it this way: The betting windows at Pimlico just reopened. If you bet on Barbaro, go on over and reclaim your money. ERIK LIE, a University of Iowa finance professor whose research was the basis for a run of Wall Street Journal articles exposing the practice, estimated last week in an interview with Bloomberg News that up to 10 percent of all option awards before 2002 may have been backdated.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/ideas/bal-id.options11jun11,0,4310754.story?coll=bal-ideas-headlines

Jones Comments On Electronic Voting Risks (Utah Daily Herald, June 11)
A story about the planned, first-time use of the Diebold AccuVote TSx electronic voting in Utah this month cites critics who say the machines are vulnerable to tampering. But even with a "perfect storm of corruption," one official said there are still paper records of votes that are verified by the voter. That paper record does a lot to increase vote security, said DOUGLAS JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. He also spent 10 years on the Iowa Board of Examiners for voting machines and systems. "That creates an incredible opportunity to ensure honesty," Jones said. "If the hand count doesn't match the machine count, something's wrong. They're not supposed to be different at all."
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/182019/3/

UI Study On Extroverts Cited (Pueblo Chieftain, June 10)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have learned that the structures of our brains -- and not our personal experiences -- determine whether we are introverts or extroverts. They found that introverts had more blood flow to the frontal lobes of their brains (which utilize "inward" activities such as remembering, problem solving and planning), and extroverts had more activity in the temporal lobes of their brains (which utilize "outward" sensual processes, such as listening, watching or driving). The paper is based in Colorado.
http://www.chieftain.com/life/1150007088/3

Nelson Wife Receives Parole Hearing (WQAD-TV, June 10)
The Iowa Board of Parole agreed Friday to conduct an interview with Phyllis Nelson, raising the possibility the convicted killer will be released from prison early. Nelson, of Iowa City, has been in the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women in Mitchellville since March 2003, when she was convicted of voluntary manslaughter in the stabbing death of her husband, Dr. Richard Nelson, in his Cedar Rapids apartment. The parole board will conduct an in-person interview with Nelson next month. Previous requests by Nelson to leave prison early have been denied. A prominent pediatrician and dean of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, Richard Nelson died of a single stab wound to the heart on the morning of December 12, 2001. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5014828&nav=1sW7

Romney Discusses Faith During UI Stop (Wall Street Journal, June 10)
A story about Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's discussion about his Mormon faith as he travels the country -- in what many see as an early indication he's considering a bid for president in the 2008 election -- said that in a meeting with College Republicans at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Bobby Kaufman, a student who heads the state's Federation of College Republicans, thanked Mr. Romney for the $1,000 check the governor's political action committee sent his father, State Rep. Jeff Kaufman, in 2004. But he also said he wanted to know the "correlation" between Mormons and conservative Christians. Romney flashed the broad smile that has helped earn him the nickname "Matinee Mitt" and replied: "Well, I personally believe that Jesus Christ is my savior."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114990369408976903.html

Lie Backdating Study Cited (The Tennessean, June 9)
At least 20 publicly traded companies have confirmed that they are under scrutiny by the Securities and Exchange Commission or state U.S. attorneys offices for backdating stock options, which is a technical way to shovel obscene amounts of money at the boss without being detected. A study by ERIK LIE, associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, and the Wall Street Journal sparked the SEC's interest in backdating. The study found numerous instances of companies that awarded their executives stock options that were dated at or near the stock's lowest point, guaranteeing a sizable payoff for the holder. If the option was intentionally backdated, it's not an option: It's an outright gift. Lie believes that as much as 10 percent of corporate stock options granted in the past several years were backdated. The article also appeared June 9 on the website of the ROBERTSON COUNTY TIMES in Tennessee.
http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060609/OPINION01/606090372/1008

UI Architecture Impresses Visitor (The Chattanoogan, June 9)
A travel columnist writes about his trip to visit family in Iowa, where "the majority of the weekend was filled with a very hip graduation ceremony" at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA over in Iowa City. "First off, let me tell you that the campus in Iowa City is an absolute knockout," he writes. "There is some first-rate architecture that comes complete with a serious WOW factor. The picturesque Iowa River runs next to the campus and the university has taken advantage of the setting to place tree-lined walking paths that hug the river." He recommends that architecture buffs check out the new Art and Art History Building and notes that in the summer aspiring writers can spend a week or weekend at the UI's Summer Writing Festival. The newspaper is based in Tennessee.
http://www.chattanoogan.com/articles/article_87263.asp

Wisconsin Tuition Compared To UI (Janesville Gazette, June 9)
The University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents approved a 6.8 percent tuition increase. Even with the tuition increase, UW-Madison would still have the second-lowest tuition for resident undergraduates in the Big Ten Conference, behind the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the board reported. The newspaper is based in Wisconsin. A version of this story also appeared on CBS-5, based in Green Bay, Wis., DULUTH NEWS-TRIBUNE, PIONEER PRESS in Minn., CHIPPEWA (Wis.) HERALD and the GREEN BAY (Wis.) PRESS-GAZETTE.
http://www.gazetteextra.com/uwtuition060906.asp

UI Presidential Search Noted (Columbus Dispatch, June 9)
A story about Ohio State University beginning a search for a new president, following the announcement by Karen A. Holbrook that she will retire next June, notes that the OSU post is one of a few large-university vacancies at the moment. The others include Harvard University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Indiana University.
http://www.columbusdispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/06/09/20060609-E1-03.html

Oakes: Consolidation Not Best For All Borrowers (BusinessWeek, June 8)
Student loan borrowers are being bombarded with letters and e-mails urging them to consolidate their loans. And with federal student loan rates poised to go up by nearly 2 percentage points on July 1, consolidation may seem like a no-brainer but may not be the right decision for everyone. Direct Loan schools -- which account for about 35 percent of loan volume in the United States and get their funding for students taking out loans from the U.S. Department of Education instead of a non-governmental company -- give borrowers an upfront interest rebate of 1.5 percent. "Many of the private bank consolidation lenders have been soliciting consolidation from our students and they usually don't touch on the fact that we'll give you this benefit," says BETH OAKES, associate director of financial aid at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- a Direct Loan school. Oakes is not promoting consolidation, though she says it "makes sense" in some cases.
http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/content/jun2006/bs20060608_244691.htm

Decker Discusses MBA Career Services (BusinessWeek, June 8)
Kathie Decker knows the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MBA Career Services better than anyone else -- she has worked there for more than 15 years. Seven years ago, she started Iowa's Competitive Prep course, an intensive for-credit class that teaches students all they need to know to start the best careers possible. It has been a model for many other schools.
http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/content/jun2006/bs2006068_6109.htm

Alumnus Exhibits Film Images (Kansas City Star, June 8)
In his exhibit "Cutting Room," at the Leedy-Voulkos Art Center, Virginia-based artist Jamie Boling's expansive canvases recall larger-than-life images on a movie screen, re-creating film stills. Boling earned master's degreefrom the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/entertainment/visual_arts/14762652.htm?source=rss&channel=kansascity_visual_arts

Medical Student Awarded Fellowship (Rockford Register Star June 8)
Shaival Shah, a student at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, has been awarded the Doris Duke Fellowship was designed to encourage medical students to pursue careers in clinical research.  Shah will do his research at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. During the fellowship, Shah will track research patients who are involved in clinical trials. He will help professional researchers as they gather more information about medical mysteries. The newspaper is based in Illinois. http://www.rrstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060608/NEWS06/106080037/1154

Lie: 10 Percent Of Pre-Rule Stock Options Backdated (Chicago Tribune, June 7)
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Christopher Cox said Tuesday that the growing number of companies under investigation for possible manipulation of stock-option grants is "of serious concern" to the agency. At least 34 companies have disclosed criminal, regulatory or internal probes into whether they manipulated or falsified dates on options awards to benefit top executives. More than a dozen executives, including five chief executives, have lost their jobs at the companies after investigators questioned dates of option grants. ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa finance professor who helped spark the investigations, has said as many as 10 percent of all stock options granted before the rules were tightened in 2002 were backdated. A version of the story also ran on the Website of BLOOMBERG NEWS.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0606070231jun07,1,7014351.story?coll=chi-business-hed

UI Alumnus Is Finalist For CR City Manager (Casper Star-Tribune, June 7)
Casper city manager Tom Forslund is one of five finalists for the city manager position in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. According to Cedar Rapids TV station KCRG, Forslund and four others will be in Cedar Rapids on June 16 and 17 for interviews and tours of the city. Forslund has been the city manager in Casper since 1988. He earned his bachelor's degree in political science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City in 1973 and his master's degree from the University of Missouri in 1977. The paper is based in Wyoming.
http://www.casperstartribune.net/articles/2006/06/07/news/casper/3f41d525c712533f87257185000a96fd.txt

Science Fair Winners to Work In Cancer Lab (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, June 6)
Champlin Park High School students Richie and Ryan Huynh, who live in Brooklyn Park and will be seniors next year, took third place in the team category at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Indianapolis last month. Their research was on Alzheimer's disease. For this summer, the Huynh brothers have been accepted for a six-week research opportunity at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where they will work in the cancer lab.
http://www.startribune.com/142/story/472419.html

Tate Gives Back Car Won With Ace (ESPN.com, June 6)
University of Iowa quarterback DREW TATE hit a hole-in-one at a charity golf tournament on Friday, a feat entitling him to $25,000 toward the purchase of a new car, which he hoped to cash in for a Harley Davidson. But Tate's visions of a thundering down Iowa highways on two wheels were short-lived. Iowa Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY, who was present for the tournament, let Tate know that he couldn't accept the prize. That would be against NCAA regulations, since Tate, the 2004 all-Big Ten quarterback, has a year of eligibility left.
http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id=2471422

Former UI Professor Researches Tropical Island (New York Times, June 6)
In 1979, two ecologists at Midwestern universities who knew each other only through their research came up with an audacious plan. They wanted exclusive rights to the top of Barro Colorado, a six-square-mile research island that had become one of the most studied spots on earth. The island, a biological reserve in the Panama Canal, was administered by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, so the two scientists, Robin Foster, then at the University of Chicago, and Stephen P. Hubbell, then at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, approached the institute's director, Ira Rubinoff, and proposed mapping and measuring every tree every five years to monitor population changes and to test conflicting theories about diversity in tropical forests. Their audacity lay in their asking to bar all other scientific inquiries from their plot, to prevent tiny seedlings from being squashed by scholarly boots. "I wasn't happy about that," Dr. Rubinoff recalled, but after hearing their argument, he agreed. They paced out a parcel of 50 hectares (about 124 acres), which the next year became the first in a global network of plots where scientists now track the fate of three million jungle trees. The network is run by the Center for Tropical Forest Science, created at the institute in 1990, and it coordinates 17 other plots -- now called "earth observatories" -- in Africa, Asia and Latin America, with more to come.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/06/science/earth/06tree.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

UI Changes NADS Leadership (WQAD-TV, June 5)
The NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR at the University of Iowa is in for an overhaul. Officials say the machine that recreates the effects of driving has sputtered, losing more than $7 million dollars in the past two years. In an effort to stop the skid, the university has changed leadership and moved the program into the engineering college. The simulator was expected to be the ultimate virtual proving ground for the auto industry and the government. Elly Martin of the National Transportation Traffic Safety Administration says the federal government, which bankrolled most of the project, won't rescue the university if the simulator continues to run in the red. Iowa beat out five other schools to operate the simulator. The project, which was plagued by delays and cost overruns, was billed as the best in the world when it opened in 2001. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4988737&nav=1sW7

Officials Say Review Should Focus On UI (WQAD-TV, June 5)
Officials say an investigation into whether the Iowa Board of Regents micromanaged the state's universities should focus solely on the University of Iowa -- and not Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa. A legislative committee plans to investigate whether interference and tension prompted the resignations of Iowa's president and athletic director. Iowa State President Gregory Geoffroy and former Northern Iowa President Robert Koob says there's been no micromanaging at their schools. Senate Republican President Mary Lundy of Marion has said the Legislature's Oversight Committee will look at whether the regents and its president, Michael Gartner, overstepped their bounds. Iowa President DAVID SKORTON, who left last week for Cornell University, and A-D BOB BOWLSBY, who's leaving for Stanford University, declined to comment. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4988315&nav=1sW7

Lie Discovery Of Backdating By Companies Noted (Times Online, June 5)
The conviction of Enron's top two bosses was supposed to draw a line under one of the blackest periods in American business history. But a new scandal is brewing that threatens once again to expose widespread greed and fraud. Almost 20 companies are being investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Justice Department amid estimates that one in 10 top American executives may have taken part in the scam. The scandal was uncovered by ERIK  LIE, a 37-year-old Norwegian and associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa. Lie was researching a theory that share-option grants prompted executives to take on more risk to boost their businesses. What he found was that in a large number of cases they were virtually eliminating risk when it came to their own options. The paper is based in the UK.
http://business.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,13129-2209355,00.html

UI Study On Obesity Among Urbanites Cited (CNN International, June 5)
There is no polite way to say this: Americans are fat, and they're getting fatter. More than 60 million Americans are obese, up from 23 million in 1980. Another 28 million are expected to join their ranks by 2013. Forget the stereotypes: It's not just people in low-income neighborhoods who are packing on the pounds at McDonald's. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have found that obesity rates are rising most rapidly among urbanites who earn $60,000 or more per year. Heretofore, the main business response to this overwhelming demographic trend has been the $49 billion weight-loss industry. But now a much broader segment of corporate America has begun to see the nation's fattening for what it is: a potentially powerful driver of consumer demand across a wide swath of the economy. Just as baby boomers have driven business and shaped the economy during the past half century, the "plus-size" population is likely to dictate marketing trends through much of the 21st. Already, greater girth is forcing American business to rethink -- albeit carefully -- the way it designs and sells everything from sofas and toilets to clothes.
http://money.cnn.com/2006/06/02/technology/business2_fatamerica0605/

Illinois Chemical Supply Company Eyes Iowa City, UI (News-Gazette, June 4)
William Boulanger decided Champaign-Urbana was the ideal place to start his chemical supply company. In 2002, the research chemist did so with the establishment of Obiter Research. Today, the company employs 11 people at EnterpriseWorks and the Technology Commercialization Building, both on the University of Illinois campus. Now the company is making preparations to expand. But it's no longer a sure thing the expansion will come in Champaign. Last week, the company's business manager, Theron Sands, said Obiter is considering moving either to Champaign's Apollo Industrial Subdivision or to Iowa City, Iowa. A decision is expected within a month. Sands said it might be beneficial for Obiter to be near pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities close to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "We're scheduled to make a decision June 16, but that's likely to be pushed off to June 23," he said Wednesday. "We're waiting for incentives from both states." According to Jeanne Gustafson, president of the Champaign County Economic Development Corp., Iowa has offered $1.3 million in incentives. In some cases, Illinois may not be able to match those, she said. The paper covers Urbana and Champaign, Ill.
http://www.news-gazette.com/news/2006/06/04/million_question_champaign_or_iowa_city

UI's Use Of Cage-Free Eggs Noted (Hagerstown Morning Herald, June 4)
A column touting eggs produced by cage-free hens says that nearly 90 schools have enacted policies to eliminate or greatly decrease their use of eggs from caged hens, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Maryland.
http://www.herald-mail.com/?module=displaystory&story_id=139343&format=html

Critic Praises McLeese Book On The MC5 (Chicago Sun-Times, June 4)
A review of several books about rock music includes one by former Sun-Times rock critic DON MCLEESE on the Motor City 5 titled "Kick Out the Jams." McLeese, now a journalism professor at the University of Iowa, uses the first person with good reason, recalling the MC5's trip to Chicago for an ill-fated performance timed to the Democratic National Convention in 1968, when he was 18.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/derogatis/sho-sunday-dero04.html

Author Holleran Attended Writers' Workshop (New York Times, June 3)
Mary Todd Lincoln seems an unlikely muse for a writer whose first book, "Dancer From the Dance," published in 1978, remains one of the most famous novels in modern gay literature. But the widowed Mrs. Lincoln is the presiding spirit in Andrew Holleran's novel "Grief." Holleran is "a cult hero for gay people," said Edmund White, the writer and a friend of Holleran's since the 1970s. "Dancer From the Dance," White said, is the "ultimate picture of gay life in New York -- the book F. Scott Fitzgerald would have written if he had written about gay life." Though Holleran's novels feature different protagonists and make no reference to one another, they form an autobiographical series based on the details of his life. He was born in 1943 and spent much of his childhood in Aruba before going to Harvard. In Holleran's senior year, the novelist and short-story writer Peter Taylor came to teach creative writing, and to postpone "the horror of law school," Holleran followed him to the University of IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, before returning East to law school at the University of Pennsylvania. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the DETROIT NEWS.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/03/books/03holl.html

UI Signs New Contract With Ferentz (Houston Chronicle, June 3)
The University of Iowa raised the salary of coach KIRK FERENTZ on Friday in a deal that makes him one of the nation's highest-paid college football coaches. Ferentz, who has led the Hawkeyes to two Big Ten titles and four consecutive January bowl games, was given a new contract that boosts his annual salary to $2.84 million from $1.44 million, with a one-time payment of $1.4 million. Versions of the story ran on the Websites of many other media outlets as well.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/college/3924212.html

Ciochon Comments On Indonesian Hobbit People (Science, June 2)
The battle of the hobbits is heating up. Two weeks ago, skeptics argued that fossils found on the island of Flores in Indonesia were simply diseased modern humans rather than a dwarf species evolved from an early Homo ancestor, as its discoverers had claimed. Now the discovery team fires back. In this week's issue of Nature, they argue that stone tools associated with Homo floresiensis resemble newly discovered tools from a much more ancient nearby site, suggesting cultural continuity over hundreds of thousands of years. The tool data "establish an independent source of evidence linking late Pleistocene Homo floresiensis with an early Pleistocene progenitor," says RUSSELL CIOCHON of the University of Iowa. But some caution that the tools are so simple that inferences of cultural continuity may not be warranted, and a few skeptics question the dates.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/312/5778/1293a

UI Press Publishes Book Of Manly Poems (Salon, June 2)
An essay about contemporary manliness discusses the book "Manthology: Poems on the Male Experience," published recently by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. Registration is required to enter this site.
http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/2006/06/02/maddox_qa/index_np.html

Alumnus Leads Taiwan Dance Company (Northwest Indiana Times, June 2)
This is a profile of the Cloud Gate Dance Theater, a company from Taiwan that encourages its dancers to use their bodies for pure expression over storytelling. The group's founder and artistic director is Lin Hwai-min, who studied dance as a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://nwitimes.com/articles/2006/06/02/entertainment/entertainment/009bad668293e7e48625717f005e0a09.txt

Alumna Lives In Marfa, Texas (Seattle Times, June 2)
A travel story about the small town of Marfa, Texas, quotes local resident and historian Cecelia Thompson, who has a Ph.D. in drama from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/traveloutdoors/2003033197_marfa04.html

Brown Comments On Laptops (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 2)
Professors worry that as wireless networks and laptops become ubiquitous, students will direct about as much attention to the front of the room as airline passengers do to a flight attendant reviewing safety information. To keep students focused on class, some professors now ban laptops from their classrooms, arguing that the devices are just too much of a temptation. A few colleges have set up systems that let professors switch off classroom Internet access during some sessions. KENNETH G. BROWN, associate professor at the University of Iowa's business school, recently asked the technology staff there to install an Internet kill switch in classrooms. "I don't want to ban laptops across the board because increasingly we have a lot of students who are using laptops to take notes, and they seem to get some real advantage out of that," he says. But he says he is concerned about the distractions the Internet can allow. He would ask a student reading a newspaper to put it down, he says, but he has no way of knowing whether a student with a laptop is taking notes or reading an online paper. "As more and more laptops come in," he says, "I'd like to have the ability to have the same level of control that I have over people reading the newspapers."
http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i39/39a02701.htm

Former UI Student Wins Friendship Award (Rockford Register Star, June 1)
Rockford native Ben Hecht's volunteer work has blossomed into an award-winning friendship. Hecht recently won the 2006 Volvo For Life Friendship Award in honor of the relationship he developed with Matt Rohret through Best Buddies Iowa. The not-for-profit group improves the quality of life for people with mental retardation by setting them up for one-on-one friendships. A 2002 graduate of Rockford Lutheran High School, Hecht was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA when he heard of the Best Buddies program about two years ago. He was looking for a chance to volunteer when a friend recommended the organization.
http://www.rrstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060601/NEWS06/106010010/1154/NEWS

Lie: 10 Percent Of Options Backdated (Financial Times, June 1)
Every day this week as the Enron headlines have receded, corporate America has watched a steady drip-drip of news coming from another enfolding scandal: stock options backdating. The issue has now spread beyond the executive suite after McAfee, a software antivirus specialist, on Tuesday fired its general counsel after finding an "improper episode" as part of an internal review of prior stock options policies. For investors, Wall Street analysts, corporate governance specialists and companies themselves, the question is how far this could spread. ERIK LIE, associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, believes that up to 10 per cent of US corporate stock options were backdated. His research was a leading factor in sparking a series of company probes by the U.S. attorney and the Securities and Exchange Commission. The article also was published June 1 on EURO2DAY.com, msnMONEY.com and MSNBC.
http://news.ft.com/cms/s/88217da0-f0f2-11da-9338-0000779e2340.html

Polumbaum Writes About Newspaper's Early Days (China Daily, May 31) JUDY POLUMBAUM, University of Iowa professor of journalism, writes about her experience as one of the first foreign copy editors at China Daily, China's first daily newspaper in English. "I was fortunate to be part of that sometimes frustrating, often exhausting, but also exhilarating inaugural year," she writes.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/cndy/2006-05/31/content_604769.htm

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