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UI in the News

July, 2006

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Gill Study Finds Bird-Human Flu Transmission (National Geographic, July 31)
A duck hunter and two wildlife workers in Iowa have tested positive for a non-lethal form of avian flu, according to a team of U.S scientists. Their study is the first to suggest that bird flu can be transmitted to humans from wild birds. "We did not detect H5N1, the virus that has caused such a high death rate in the humans it has infected," said the study's lead author, JAMES GILL, who is a disease specialist at the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory in Iowa City. Instead the researchers found that the infection was caused by the H11 virus, a strain commonly found in ducks, geese, and shorebirds but not previously associated with human illness.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/07/060731-bird-flu.html

Kochanska Studies Delayed Gratification In Children (KGO TV, July 31)
Over-the-top teens like lazy A.J. Soprano and "Desperate Housewives" angst-ridden Andrew and impulsive Danielle reflect our culture's convictions that teens are angry, oversexed risk-takers. So 17-year-old Ali Nepola, who's at the top of her class, cross-country team captain, a competitive dancer, and popular and well behaved to boot, doesn't quite fit the stereotype. According to new research, Ali's self-control may be the key to her success. "She's got a lot of self-control and knows her limitations and knows her strengths and weaknesses," says Cathy Nepola, Ali's mom. GRAZYNA KOCHANSKA, a professor at the University of Iowa, has tracked Ali and more than 300 other kids for almost 20 years to gauge how their ability to delay gratification and exert self-control affects their lives. "Self-control is generally considered a very good thing," Kochanska says. "In our own research, this capacity has clearly been associated with positive aspects of social development." KGO is based in San Francisco.
http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=bizarre&id=4417428

Rowley Graduated From UI Law School (ECM Newspapers, July 31) The story profiles Coleen Rowley, who is running for the U.S. Congress in Minnesota's Second District. Rowley received her law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law. ECM newspapers is based in Coon Rapids, Minn.
http://www.hometownsource.com/capitol/2006/July/31coleenwhistle.html

Kochanska Studies Delayed Gratification In Children (ABC News, July 31)
Over-the-top teens like lazy A.J. Soprano and "Desperate Housewives" angst-ridden Andrew and impulsive Danielle reflect our culture's convictions that teens are angry, oversexed risk-takers. So 17-year-old Ali Nepola, who's at the top of her class, cross-country team captain, a competitive dancer, and popular and well behaved to boot, doesn't quite fit the stereotype. According to new research, Ali's self-control may be the key to her success. "She's got a lot of self-control and knows her limitations and knows her strengths and weaknesses," says Cathy Nepola, Ali's mom. GRAZYNA KOCHANSKA, a professor at the University of Iowa, has tracked Ali and more than 300 other kids for almost 20 years to gauge how their ability to delay gratification and exert self-control affects their lives. "Self-control is generally considered a very good thing," Kochanska says. "In our own research, this capacity has clearly been associated with positive aspects of social development."
http://www.abcnews.go.com/GMA/AmericanFamily/story?id=2248295&page=1

Fitzgerald Comments On Internships (Asbury Park Press, July 31)
College students in the midst of summer internships know that the seasonal experience presents a golden opportunity. Many students are probably devising plans on how they can parlay a short-term stint into long-term employment. Consider your internship as an "audition" of sorts, said DAVID FITZGERALD, director of the Washington Center internship program at the University of Iowa's Pomerantz Career Center. The goal is landing the "part" -- a full-time job. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060731/BUSINESS/607310395/1003

Thorne Leads Study Of East Chicago PCB Exposure (Gary Post Tribune, July 31)
A rural Iowa town doesn't look or smell like industrial East Chicago. But selected residents in Columbus Junction, Iowa, and East Chicago will begin participating later this year in a four-year research project. The study, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, will examine the residents' exposure to airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a former industrial lubricant. Previous studies have shown that some PCBs - there are more than 200 types of them, said PETER THORNE, a University of Iowa professor - move from river sediment into the air, and then can be deposited back into water or ground with rain. An environmental health professor, Thorne is leading the East Chicago study. By looking at exposure to airborne PCBs in East Chicago both before and after dredging begins, he said, the research could have implications for future dredging projects. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.post-trib.com/cgi-bin/pto-story/news/z1/07-31-06_z1_news_04.html

UI Professor Describes Backdating As Widespread (Seattle Times, July 31)
Stock options are part of the bedrock on which Silicon Valley is built. That bedrock is now cracking under the seismic pressure of the widening options-backdating scandal. Among the latest developments, federal prosecutors in San Francisco filed criminal charges against top executives at Brocade Communications Systems, while the Securities and Exchange Commission is likely to pursue civil cases. Meanwhile, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researcher who kicked off the scandal last year by pointing to possible backdating at a handful of companies has just announced new findings: Some 29 percent of 7,774 public companies he's examined - a total of 2,270 - are suspected of backdating.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2003164118_btview31.html

Journal Reporter On RAGBRAI Mentions UI (Wall Street Journal, July 30)
In a dispatch from Iowa by Journal reporter Dave Kansas, who rode in RAGBRAI this year, Kansas describes a stop Tuesday in Redfield and says that Iowa, especially western Iowa, is a kind of crossroads between the Big 10 and the Big 12. "The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is Big 10 and Iowa State is Big 12," Kansas writes. "In western and southern Iowa, Nebraska and Missouri pull folks toward the Big 12. As you cross the middle of the state, Wisconsin and Illinois pull folks toward the Big 10. Lots of ISU (Ames) shirts on the ride the last couple of days. I expect more Iowa Hawkeyes (Iowa City) as we get east of Des Moines and closer to Coralville. I, of course, am a lifelong Golden Gopher fan."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115362709634914679.html

UI Study: CAFO Workers Report Health Problems (Muskegon Chronicle, July 30)
Factory farms known as CAFOs -- concentrated animal feeding operations -- have increased some farmers' profits. A review of government documents and scientific studies, however, indicates CAFOs have caused a myriad of environmental, economic and social problems. Those problems include health risks. About one-third of people who work in CAFOs suffer "serious respiratory problems" from inhaling chemicals and microbes released into the air from liquid manure, according to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study. The paper is based in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/news/muchronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-9/1154349926316430.xml&coll=8

Iowa City Mayor Says City Ties To UI Strong (Lawrence Journal World, July 30)
A story about town and gown issues says that Midwestern university cities report different ways of keeping open the lines of communication. Mayor Ross Wilburn of Iowa City, Iowa, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said city and university leaders attend quarterly meetings, but the dialogue goes beyond that. He said he had a close personal relationship with recently departed university president David Skorton. When the nonprofit crisis center Wilburn runs celebrated its anniversary, Skorton was a guest speaker. "He called me Ross," he said. "I called him David." The paper is based in Kansas.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/jul/30/town_and_gown_issues/

Housing Story Cites UI (Lawrence Journal World, July 30)
No matter how you slice it, buying a home in Lawrence is more difficult than it is in many other Midwestern university cities. A Journal-World analysis of seven major Midwestern university cities found that Lawrence in 2005 had both the highest average selling price of a home and the largest gap between home prices and average incomes. The analysis found that in 2005, the average selling price for all Lawrence homes was $187,465. That was more than $7,000 higher than the next highest city on the list - Ames, Iowa, home to Iowa State University. Other Midwestern cities chosen for the comparison were Iowa City, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; Columbia, Mo., home to the University of Missouri; Stillwater, Okla., home to Oklahoma State University; Norman, Okla., home to the University of Oklahoma; and Manhattan, home to Kansas State University.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/jul/30/costly_housing/

Entrepreneur Camp Alumnus Returns To Volunteer (New York Times, July 30)
While many campers this summer are tying square knots, paddling canoes or weaving friendship bracelets, a growing number are instead drawing up business plans and generating personal budgets. At entrepreneur and finance camps from coast to coast, business is open. John DeAngelis, 15, is finding his own balance of leisure and business this summer. Based on the plans he wrote at YOUTH ENTREPRENEUR CAMP during the last two years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, John has started two services: selling people's items on eBay for a 25 percent commission, and converting VHS home movies to DVD. He estimates the ventures have netted him $2,000. This year John went back to camp, volunteering to help the 9-to-11-year-old group. He said that along with hanging out with his friends, playing golf and swimming, "working on business ideas is a great way to spend the summer." A version of the story also ran July 30 on the Website of the Taipei Times in Taiwan.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/30/business/yourmoney/30camp.html

Bloom Lends Words To Oxford Photographic Project (News-Leader, July 30)
For Peter Feldstein's "Oxford Project," he photographed all 676 residents in the tiny Iowa town two decades ago and has recently begun taking new photos of the residents who are still alive and he can track down. In the current phase of his project, Feldstein has added a new twist, thanks to the help of friend STEPHEN BLOOM, an author and journalism professor at the University of Iowa. Based on interviews, Bloom has crafted short narratives that lend a confessional, poetic and unvarnished dimension to the lives in Feldstein's then-and-now portraits. The paper is based in Missouri. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, WINNIPEG FREE PRESS in Canada, the BARRE MONTPELIER TIMES ARGUS in Vermont and many other media outlets.
http://www.news-leader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060730/ENTERTAINMENT/607300343/1005/ENTERTAINMENT

UI Students Cover Gaming Story (Columbia Journalism Review, July/August 2006)
Concerned that Iowa's media weren't covering the potential dark side of state-sanctioned gaming in the state, University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM turned his 12 masters students loose on Riverside, a tiny town soon to become home to Iowa's largest casino resort. Bloom's class began digging and uncovered a compelling story involving a high-powered lobbying firm, a bitterly divided community and a state addiction to gambling revenues. Dubbed the Riverside Project, the final product -- 20 stories and around 19,000 words -- ran on May 5 as a 24-page, ad-free tabloid insert in The Daily Iowan.
http://www.cjr.org/issues/2006/4/miner.asp

Bloom Discusses Casino Journalism Project (Nieman Reports, Summer 2006)
University of Iowa journalism professor and former Los Angeles Times reporter STEPHEN BLOOM discusses a project in which he assigned students in his master's degree class to do a series of investigative stories on the decision to locate one of Iowa's largest and newest casinos in the small town of Riverside. "As what Professor David Protess at Northwestern did with the Medill Innocence Project, 12 journalism students would spend 15 weeks reporting and writing on one issue," Bloom writes. "My hope was that we'd break new ground in a state fertile with unreported stories." Bloom also praises Bill Casey, publisher of The Daily Iowan, the UI student newspaper that agreed to run the stories.
http://www.nieman.harvard.edu/reports/06-2NRsummer/p72-0602-bloom.html

Former Economics Professor Laments UI Cutbacks (Chronicle, July 28)
The economics department at Washington University in St. Louis is not waiting for an invisible hand to move it up the rankings. With six new tenured professors coming onboard this fall and six additional hires anticipated within the next three years, the department believes it is on the rise. Stephen D. Williamson, 51, a financial economist who has worked at the Federal Reserve Bank and is the author of a macroeconomics textbook, was enticed by the resources available at Washington University. Lamenting cutbacks at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, his previous employer, he says, "The future appears to be in private education."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i47/47a00502.htm

Armstrong To Testify On Cancer Research (New York Times, July 28)
On Wednesday, cycling icon Lance Armstrong joined an estimated 20,000 cyclists pedaling 70 miles of the fourth leg of RAGBRAI, a summer bicycle ride that stretches across Iowa. Today, Armstrong will join Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., in testifying at a Senate field hearing on cancer research and funding hosted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. "Nobody in this audience can say they haven't been affected by cancer," said Armstrong, who set up the Lance Armstrong Foundation to raise money to find a cure. "This is the time to end the fight, this disease we know as cancer." The ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, WASHNGTON POST and the DAILY HERALD in Utah.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/sports/AP-CYC-Landis-Armstrong.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Wild Birds Can Spread Flu To Humans (CTV, July 28)
A study of duck hunters in Iowa is believed to be the first to show people can catch bird flu -- a non-threatening kind -- from wild birds. Previous cases of people being infected with any form of bird flu have involved domestic poultry, like chickens. The type of bird flu seen in the study is not H5N1, the deadly form that emerged in Asia, which has sparked concerns of a potential worldwide flu epidemic. Rather, it is H11N9, another form seen in ducks and other waterfowl that has not been associated with human illness. In the Iowa study, one hunter and two state environmental workers tested positive for the virus, though none of the three men got sick, said DR. JAMES GILL, the University of Iowa researcher who led the study. CTV is a Canadian broadcasting company. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE and WASHINGTON POST. http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20060728/bird_flu_060728/20060728?hub=SciTech

Reporter Chronicles RAGBRAI (Wall Street Journal, July 27)
A reporter keeping an account of his experiences during RAGBRAI, an annual event that's a combination of epic bike ride across Iowa and cheerful festival, notes that the final evening destination on the ride is in Coralville, which is near Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Hawkeyes.  http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115362709634914679-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Drivers Warned About Antihistamines (CBS 3, July 27)
Millions of people will hit the road this summer and some popular over-the-counter medications could be causing serious dangers that most drivers do not realize. Using a driving simulator, Professor JOHN WEILER at the University of Iowa studied how motorists can become impaired after taking just one antihistamine. Reaction times were noticeably slower than people consuming alcohol. "Everybody should be aware of the problem, consumers who buy the products, those who sell the products," Professor Weiler said. CBS 3 serves Philadelphia, Pa.
http://cbs3.com/seenon/local_story_208143854.html

Lie: Scandal, Not Rules, To End Backdating (San Francisco Chronicle, July 27)
The Securities and Exchange Commission approved rules on Wednesday that will force public companies to disclose in their proxy statements whether they are timing options grants to make them more lucrative to executives and other employees. The requirements were a late addition to a broad package of rules designed to beef up disclosure of executive compensation. The new rules, which take effect for proxy statements issued on or after Dec. 15, were originally proposed in late January, before the options scandal broke. Since then, about 80 companies have said they are being investigated for possible irregularities in the timing of their options grants. ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa professor whose research on options timing helped ignite the scandal, says there will be less backdating and spring-loading -- not because of the new rules, but "because of the media focus and the consequences the companies face. In the past, people were thinking they would get away with it. Now they're recognizing they won't get away with it."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/07/27/BUGK4K61N51.DTL

Flatte Comments On Microchip Research (United Press International, July 27)
U.S. scientists say they've directly imaged the interactions between two magnetic atoms less than one nanometer apart. Researchers at the University of Iowa, the University of Illinois-Champaign and Princeton University said their findings bring scientists one step closer toward realizing the goal of building a very advanced semiconductor computer chip. Such a chip would be based upon a property of the electron called spin and the related technology of spintronics, said MICHAEL FLATTE, a professor in the University of Iowa's Department of Physics and Astronomy. Small Times is a magazine and Web site covering business information and analysis about micro and nanotechnology. Versions of this article appeared July 27 on the Web sites of SMALL TIMES, MONSTERS AND CRITICS, and DAILY INDIA.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20060726-060608-2440r

DVD Tries To Make Lifelong Iowa Fans (Sports Illustrated On Campus, July 26)
The writer lists what she considers to be the "Top 10 most bizarre" examples of college memorabilia and merchandise, including in the No. 2 spot Team Baby Entertainment's DVD, which is designed to turn children into lifelong Hawkeye fans. The Baby Hawkeye DVD uses "officially licensed footage of Hawkeye sports, mascot, marching band and campus attractions to expose children to The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in an exciting, playful and educational manner," according to the company's Website.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/sioncampus/07/26/bizarro.merchandise/1.html

Lie Comments On New SEC Rules (U.S. News & World Report, July 26)
The Securities and Exchange Commission voted unanimously today to require that public companies explain in plain English and easy-to-read charts exactly how much their top five executives earn and to provide a single number that includes pensions, stock options, and benefits such as life insurance and moving subsidies. Until now, companies were often able to hide many aspects of their executives' pay packages. The values of retirement accounts and golden parachutes -- payments promised to executives who are let go -- were often buried in footnotes. Meanwhile, the SEC is looking into allegations that executives at as many as 80 companies may have secretly granted themselves valuable stock options by allowing themselves to buy stock in the future at an old, low stock price, a practice called "backdating." The changes were hailed as improvements by businesses as well as investor watchdogs. ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa economist whose research is credited with discovering the stock-options backdating scandals, said the new rules should reduce executives' opportunities to make improper option profits.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/biztech/articles/060726/26secweb.htm

Vargo Finds Chemicals In Town Water Supply (San Luis Obispo Tribune, July 25)
A new water quality analysis has found small amounts of anti-seizure and antibiotic medications in Los Osos, Calif.'s groundwater, which state regulators say is proof that pollution in the area comes from residents' septic tanks. A scientist involved in the study said the low levels of medication more than likely did not constitute a long-term health risk. But there are no federal guidelines that delineate what levels of the drugs are unsafe in drinking water. Another chemical used in hand soaps, triclosan, was also found, but the tests were inconclusive, according to JOHN VARGO, a professor at the University of Iowa who wrote an analysis of the tests. There are no guidelines as to how much of those drugs are allowed in drinking water, Vargo said. However, the level of NDMA was high enough that the district should inform its water customers, according to recommendations made by the state's Health Department. The Tribune is based in California.
http://www.sanluisobispo.com/mld/sanluisobispo/news/15115733.htm

Sindt Says She Told Bausch About Lens Findings (Wall Street Journal, July 26)
Two months ago, Bausch & Lomb Inc. issued a global recall of a new multipurpose contact-lens solution after it was linked to serious fungal eye infections in the U.S. and Asia. Two years ago, CHRISTINE SINDT, an assistant professor of clinical ophthalmology at the University of Iowa, informally tested three multipurpose contact-lens solutions on five volunteers in her office. She found that one solution -- ReNu with MoistureLoc -- produced "dramatic" corneal staining. Sindt, who received no external funding for her study, immediately called Bausch. She says she told Fred Edmunds, then director of professional relations: "I think you guys have a problem." Edmunds told her, she recalls, that what she had seen "wasn't a big deal." Edmunds couldn't be reached for comment. Bausch, which responded on behalf of its former employee, denies that Edmunds made the remarks. Bausch says that Sindt works closely with its contact-lens competitors, but acknowledged that she is working on a presentation for Bausch as well.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115387811312317374.html

Lie: Statistically Improbable Option Grants Not Backdated (CNet, July 26)
A Q&A on the growing scandal over the practice of backdating stock options says that ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa's College of Business, has evaluated thousands of option grants and found that it was statistically improbable for them not to have been backdated at many companies. A paper that Lie and Randall Heron, an associate professor at Indiana University's business school, published on July 14 estimates that 18.9 percent of unscheduled grants to top executives from 1996 through 2005 were backdated or manipulated. The pair estimates that 29.2 percent of firms manipulated grants to top executives at some point between 1996 and 2005. A version of the story also ran on the Website ZDNET.COM.
http://news.com.com/Behind+the+stock+options+uproar/2100-1014_3-6098457.html

Sa-Aadu Calls For Development Of Bond Market (Gye Nyame Concord, July 25)
A story about a workshop on bond market development and corporate credit risk analysis in Ghana reports that JAY SA-AADU, professor of finance at the University of Iowa and the seminar's resource person, said bonds constituted nearly two-thirds of the global market value of all securities. He said companies, government agencies and district assemblies should be encouraged to finance their development activities through bonds. The paper is based in Ghana.
http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/economy/artikel.php?ID=107873

Lie Study Revealed Back-dating Scandal (Forbes, July 25)
The stock options backdating scandal seems like it's growing every day. Dozens of companies have voluntarily disclosed that their stock option grants are under investigation, and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said last week that it has targeted more than 80 firms so far. But that's just the "tip of the iceberg," according to former SEC Chairman Harvey Pitt. Speaking in a live Forbes.com chat Monday afternoon, Pitt noted that there are 17,000 public companies, and the backdating scandal will probably implicate far more than 80 of them before it has run its course. Indeed, a new study estimates that 29.2 percent of firms manipulated grants to top executives between 1996 and 2005. The paper, by ERIK LIE at the University of Iowa and Randall A. Heron at Indiana University, found that technology companies, small firms and companies with volatile stock prices were most likely to backdate their option grants.
http://www.forbes.com/home/leadership/2006/07/24/leadership-brocade-backdating-cx_hc_0724stockscandalwhosnext.html

Gill: Test Shows Bird-to-Human Flu Transmission (Reuters, July 24)
A U.S. duck hunter and two state wildlife employees had evidence of an uncommon type of bird flu virus in their blood, researchers reported on Monday in one of the first studies to show that hunters might be at risk. The virus was H11N9, not known to be dangerous to humans and not related to the feared H5N1 virus circulating in wild and domestic birds and among some people, the researchers said. But their study, published in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases, shows that people who work with wildlife should take care. "To our knowledge, this study is the first to show direct transmission of influenza A viruses from wild birds to humans," Dr. JAMES GILL of the University of Iowa and colleagues wrote in their report. The same story appeared on the Web sites of STUFF (New Zealand) and the NEW ZEALAND HERALD.
http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=domesticNews&storyID=2006-07-24T222739Z_01_N24408420_RTRUKOC_0_US-BIRDFLU-HUNTERS.xml&archived=False

Peters Discusses "Fightin' Words" (Chicago Tribune, July 24)
A story about 'fightin' words' asks the question if everyone has a trigger that will set them off. JOHN DURHAM PETERS, communication studies professor at the University of Iowa, says, "Every human being has a button." Peters' latest book, "Courting the Abyss: Free Speech and the Liberal Tradition" (University of Chicago Press, 2005), deals with the tricky balance between allowing free speech while maintaining a civil society.  "It's good that we're sensitive enough to want to teach people not to be jerks," Peters says, "but it's bad that we're not tough enough to let public life get a little spicy and racy."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-0607240128jul24,1,4047020.story

Author, UI Alumna Profiled (Regina Leader Post, July 24)
A profile of author Rebecca Lee, an alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, whose new novel "The City is a Rising Tide," is set in her native Saskatchewan. The Leader Post is based in Saskatchewan.
http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/arts_life/story.html?id=2fb4f00f-537d-4a91-8879-e1314152bc79

Forkenbrock To Head Driving Study (Middletown Journal, July 24)
The federal government is putting $16.5 million into a study that might help Congress completely scrap its central source of funding for roads, the gas tax. Many policymakers view the gas tax as outdated, and would like to replace it with a mileage charge. In that study, 2,700 drivers in six cities, including North Carolina's Research Triangle, are slated to hit the road starting in October in cars with GPS monitors that record where they drive; the hope is to develop a system that bills for every mile driven, according to DAVID FORKENBROCK, a University of Iowa professor who is conducting the study. It would divide the mileage payments among the governments and companies that own those roads. The results of the four-year study go to Congress and to the secretaries of the Treasury and Transportation, Forkenbrock said. The paper is based in Ohio. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the OXFORD PRESS, the HAMILTON JOURNAL NEWS and the SPRINGFIELD NEWS SUN, all in Ohio; the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION and other media outlets.
http://www.middletownjournal.com/featr/content/shared/living/stories/ROADS_PRIVATE_0724_COX.html

Bechara Comments On Intuition Study (Lakeland Ledger, July 24)
A story about growing interest in the power of intuition says that Antoine Bechara, Ph.D., an associate professor of neurology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, developed a test in the early 1990s to figure out where hunches originate. The Iowa Gambling Task requires participants to play with four decks of cards that allow them to win or lose varying amounts of money. The decks are stacked in a complicated pattern: One deck has more losing cards, but grants larger wins, for example; another deck has more winning cards but doles out smaller amounts. At first, people think the decks are random. But, Bechara says, usually by the 40th card or so, the average participant can intuitively "feel" which deck is luckiest. "Knowledge accrues slowly, so you never discover all of a sudden which decks are good or bad," he says. The paper is based in Florida.
http://health.theledger.com/article/20060724/TOPSTORY/1100/-1/RSS2&source=RSS

Lie: Backdating Findings 'Pretty Scary' (Wilmington Morning Star, July 24)
More than 2,000 companies appear to have used backdated stock options to sweeten their top executives' pay packages, according to a new study that suggests the practice is far more widespread than previously disclosed. An author of the study said the analysis suggested that the disclosures so far about backdated stock options may be just the tip of the iceberg. "It is pretty scary, and it's quite surprising to see," said ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. Lie said the findings were so surprising that he asked several colleagues to check his numbers. Together, they concluded that the numbers probably erred on the low side. The study by Lie and Randall Heron, of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University, was posted to a University of Iowa Web site. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.wilmingtonstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060723/NEWS/607230361/-1/State

'Candy Girl' Author Attended Workshop (Springfield Journal Register, July 23)
A story about Diablo Cody's memoir, "Candy Girl: A Year in the Life of an Unlikely Stripper" says Cody aspired to be a writer and attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, famous for its WRITERS' WORKSHOP, but hated academic life. "I could not get out of college soon enough," says Cody, who graduated in 2000. She eventually met her 35-year-old musician and graphic designer husband, Jon Busey-Hunt, on the Internet and moved to his hometown of Minneapolis in 2003. The Journal Register is based in Illinois. The same story appeared on the Web site of the BLOOMINGTON (Ill.) PANTAGRAPH.
http://www.sj-r.com/sections/news/stories/91615.asp

Blecher Discusses Lebanon Crisis (Pacifica Radio, July 23)
A special edition of Pacifica Radio's Sunday Salon program examines the growing crisis in Lebanon. Among the participants is ROBERT BLECHER, a fellow at the Center for Human Rights at the University of Iowa. This link is to an audio download.
http://www.pacifica.org/programs/sundaysalon/060723.html

Squire: Iowa Race Could Signal Trend (Fox News, July 23)
The number of political luminaries already flying into Iowa these days not only signifies an early start in the White House 2008 campaign, but also offers a clue into the sizzling race in Iowa's 1st Congressional District.  In the last month, following the contentious Iowa Democratic and Republican primaries, big shots like Vice President Dick Cheney, White House political adviser Karl Rove and prospective 2008 Democratic presidential contenders John Edwards and Sen. Evan Bayh of Indiana have come in to stump for the candidates in a northeastern Iowa district. According to analysts, the flow may not let up until November as this appears to be one of the most competitive races in the country, with no clear frontrunner in sight for the seat left vacant by Republican Rep. Jim Nussle, who is running for governor. "I think it's going to be tight right up to November," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, political science professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,205202,00.html

Lie: Backdating More Prevalent Among Small Companies (Business Times, July 23)
The U.S. corporate world is being roiled by a scandal on bloated stock-option payments that has its epicentre in the Silicon Valley but ripples nationwide with a threat of big-wig arrests. Allegations focus on options backdating, an obscure practice of manipulating the dates on an option that gives employees the right to buy shares at a set price to make the profits more lucrative. The practice was most prevalent among small and tech-sector companies and other enterprises with volatile stock prices, said the authors of the study, Randall Heron of Indiana University and ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa. The paper is based in Malaysia.
http://www.btimes.com.my/Current_News/BT/Monday/Corporate/BT578552.txt/Article/

Convington Comments On Protest Arrests (USA Today, July 23)
A story about the arrest of two Cedar Rapids teachers prior to a 2004 campaign stop at their school by President George Bush - one for wearing a Kerry-Edwards button and another for holding a sign that said "No More War" - says their experience is hardly unique. The ACLU has sued several presidents over attempts to silence opposition, as in 1997, when President Clinton tried to prevent protesters from lining his inaugural parade route. And during the tumultuous 1960s, it was not uncommon for hecklers and protesters to be whisked away or managed at a distance from rallies and events.  "In my mind, it all started with Nixon. He was the first presidential candidate to really make an effort to control their image and disrupt public interruption at events," said CARY COVINGTON, a political science professor at the University of Iowa.  The paper is based in Frankfort, Ind. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the WYOMING NEWS, the RUTLAND HERALD in Vermont, the CANTON (Ohio) REPOSITORY, THE TIMES in Frankfort, Ind., the COMMERCIAL APPEAL in Tennessee, CBS NEWS, the SACRAMENTO (Calif.) BEE, the KINDRED TIMES in Utah and many other media outlets.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-07-23-bush-protesters_x.htm

'Candy Girl' Author Attended Writers' Workshop (Portsmouth Herald-News, July 23)
A story about Diablo Cody's memoir, "Candy Girl: A Year in the Life of an Unlikely Stripper" says Cody aspired to be a writer and attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, famous for its WRITERS' WORKSHOP, but hated academic life. "I could not get out of college soon enough," says Cody, who graduated in 2000. She eventually met her 35-year-old musician and graphic designer husband, Jon Busey-Hunt, on the Internet and moved to his hometown of Minneapolis in 2003. The paper is based in New Hampshire. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the NASHUA (N.H.) TELEGRAPH.
http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/07232006/entertainment-a-jy23-diablocody-jy19.html

UI Press-Published 'Rooted' Reviewed (Chicago Sun-Times, July 23)
In "Rooted: Seven Midwest Writers of Place" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS) English professor David Pichaske trails modern authors who have made treks to the rural life.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/reed/cst-books-reed23.html

UI Professor Discovered Backdating (San Francisco Chronicle, July 22)
The feds have fired their first official salvo in the stock-options backdating scandal, filing criminal and civil charges against executives at San Jose's Brocade Communications Inc. on Thursday. SEC Chairman Christopher Cox used strong language at Thursday's announcement in San Francisco, saying backdating in many cases "makes a hash of (companies') financial statements" and is "poisonous" to efficient markets. Many other companies now in the spotlight have only been under scrutiny for a couple of months, so it may be quite awhile before they could be charged. The sheer weight of cases eventually could work to the advantage of companies that practiced backdating. Business professors at Indiana University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA estimate that about 29 percent of 7,774 U.S. companies may have backdated or otherwise manipulated their option grants from 1996 to 2002.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/07/22/BUGJ1K3JCL1.DTL

Weiler: Allergy Medications Slow Driver Response (CBS4Boston, July 21)
Drivers who are taking an allergy medication have noticeably slower reaction times than drivers who are not taking any medication, according to a recent test, prompting some safety consultants to push for more prominent warning labels, outlining a drug's effects, on medication bottles. "Everybody should be aware of the problem, consumers who buy the products, those who sell the products," said JOHN WEILER, a professor at the University of Iowa. Using a driving simulator, Weiler studied the impact of one antihistamine on drivers and found that their reaction times were noticeably slower than people who had not taken any medication. In fact, their reaction times were slower than people's who had consumed alcohol.
http://cbs4boston.com/specialreports/local_story_202192600.html

Lie Comments On Stock Option Probe (San Jose Mercury News, July 21)
On Thursday, the Securities and Exchange Commission said more than 80 companies are under investigation for rigging stock option prices, and nearly two dozen are based in Silicon Valley. But that could be just the tip of the iceberg.  Academic researchers estimate that 29 percent of companies issued tainted options to top executives from 1996 through 2005 -- even after tough reforms were enacted under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act in 2002. If they're right, that means more than 2,250 of the 8,000 companies they studied handed out dubious options. "That's more than they can handle'' at the SEC and Justice Department, said ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa who co-wrote the report. "I have a hard time just putting that number on my tongue." http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/business/personal_finance/investing/stock_options/15091824.htm

Stock Options Fraud Alleged (Washington Post, July 21)
Federal prosecutors yesterday filed the first criminal charges against a top executive who allegedly manipulated stock option awards in order to give his employees a bigger payday and conceal corporate expenses. The U.S. attorney's office in San Francisco, which a week ago formed a task force to probe corporate backdating of stock-option grants, in a criminal complaint accused former Brocade Communications Systems Inc. chief executive Gregory L. Reyes and former human resources executive Stephanie Jensen of securities fraud. An academic study released last week suggested that more than 29 percent of businesses may have tampered with stock grants from 1996 to 2005. Its authors, Indiana University professor Randall A. Heron and University of Iowa professor ERIK LIE, reported that they had uncovered a "higher frequency" of problems among technology companies, small businesses and ventures with volatile stock prices.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/07/20/AR2006072001833.html

Charges Filed In Stock Options Backdating Case (Los Angeles Times July, 21)
The U.S. attorney in San Francisco accused two former Brocade Communications Systems Inc. executives of routinely giving options to employees from 2000 to 2004 at terms that guaranteed an immediate paper gain for the recipients. University of Iowa Professor ERIK LIE, whose 2005 study pointed to widespread backdating of options, has estimated that hundreds of companies may have engaged in the practice as they sought to reward employees.
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-options21jul21,1,7246946.story?coll=la-headlines-business&track=crosspromo

Company Executives Charged With Fraud (USA Today, July 20)
Federal officials Thursday stepped up their nationwide investigations of suspected stock-option accounting abuses, charging former top executives of computer-networking firm Brocade Communications with fraud. The criminal indictment and civil complaint were among the first charges to be brought against executives in the widening crackdown by the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission on dozens of companies suspected of stock-option manipulation. A recent study by Indiana University and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA business professors found that 29 percent of 7,774 U.S. firms backdated or manipulated stock grants to executives from 1996 to 2002.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/regulation/2006-07-20-brocade-ceo-indicted_x.htm

More Companies Implicated In Options Scandal (Financial Times, July 21)
When finance professor ERIK LIE and a colleague at the University Of Iowa this week revealed that up to 2,000 US companies may be implicated in a widening stock options manipulation scandal, it was the first time anyone had put a hard number on the problem beyond already publicized cases. More than 60 companies are known to be under investigation by either the Securities and Exchange Commission, the justice department or, in many cases, both. At issue is whether companies or their executives backdated stock option awards to dates near historic lows in company share prices without properly disclosing and accounting for such moves, thus improperly enriching executives.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=8a8fc0709080b909fc8cab5c858f60b0&_docnum=29&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkVb&_md5=9fad58ff06d05fa304093dcc1a1051f7

Identity Theft Subject Of Boyle Book (Pasadena Weekly, July 20)
The main character of T.C. Boyle's latest novel, "Talk Talk," is a deaf woman named Dana Halter, who becomes a victim of identity theft. "I think we're all very horrified by the idea of identity theft more so than someone stealing our car, which is bad enough, because we want to distinguish ourselves, not be anonymous like the other 6.2 billion people in the world," Boyle said in a recent phone interview from Rhinebeck, NY, where he's promoting his latest work. "We are known by who we are and who our family connections are, and we try to protect that." Boyle earned a master's degree at the Iowa Writer's Workshop and a Ph.D., also at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The publication is based in California.
http://www.pasadenaweekly.com/article.php?id=3657&IssueNum=29

Gender Gap Narrows In Medical Journals (The Scientist, July 20)
Women are now heading a greater portion of original research papers in medical journals than they were in 1970, Harvard researchers report in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). However, the current rate of first-authorship by women -- nearly 30 percent -- remains significantly lower than the current rate of enrollment by women in medical school. Patricia Numann of SUNY Upstate Medical University and founder of the Association of Women Surgeons suggested that unconscious bias on the part of reviewers may account for the under-representation of female authors, since their names are not always blinded during review. Indeed, NANCY ANDREASEN at the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City told The Scientist that when she began her career in psychiatry, she used first initials when submitting papers to NEJM and Journal of the American Medical Association until she had developed a reputation in the field, out of concern that being a woman might lower her chances of getting published.
http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/23994/

Jazz Pianist Attended UI (Patriot-News, July 20)
Patricia Barber is a much- lauded musician and a recognized scholar. The jazz pianist and vocalist has eight albums to her credit and has won several Downbeat awards for interpreting jazz standards and creating highly original material of her own. She holds a master's degree in music from Northwestern University and studied piano and psychology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania. http://www.pennlive.com/entertainment/patriotnews/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/1153319115316820.xml&coll=1

Lie Study Kicked Off Backdating Scandal (Bradenton Herald, July 20)
In a column summarizing the backdating scandal so far, it's noted that a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researcher who kicked off the scandal last year by pointing to possible backdating at a handful of companies has just announced new findings: Some 29 percent of 7,774 public companies he's examined -- a total of 2,270 -- are suspected of backdating. The newspaper is based in Florida. The column which originally appeared in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, also appeared in the MYRTLE BEACH (S.C) SUN NEWS, the MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, THE DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota, and several other newspapers. http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/business/technology/15082407.htm

Brochu Explains Significance Of Dinosaur Tracks (Newsday, July 20)
Dinsosaur State Park in Connecticut is celebrating the 40th anniversary since the accidental discovery of a series of dinosaur tracks on a construction site that instead became the park site. Aside from being an educational tool for children, paleontologists say track sites like Dinosaur State Park offer insight into the social behavior of dinosaurs, a dimension that studying fossils can't provide. "Trackways are really important for understanding these animals as animals ... how they moved, how they interacted with animals and other species," said CHRISTOPHER BROCHU, paleontologist and assistant professor of Vertebrate Paleontology at the University of Iowa. "Trackways are a gold mine for that information." The same story appeared on the Web site of the BOSTON GLOBE, DANBURY (Conn.) NEWS TIMES and STAMFORD (Conn.) ADVOCATE.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/connecticut/ny-bc-ct--connplaces-dinosa0719jul19,0,4572685.story?coll=ny-region-apconnecticut

UI Researcher Kicked Off Backdating Scandal (San Jose Mercury News, July 20)
A columnist summarizes the backdating scandal so far, pointing out the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researcher who kicked off the scandal last year by pointing to possible backdating at a handful of companies has just announced new findings: Some 29 percent of 7,774 public companies he's examined -- a total of 2,270 -- are suspected of backdating. The same story appeared on the Web site of the KANSAS CITY STAR.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/columnists/15080780.htm

McNally Earned MFA From UI (Yes Weekly, July 20)
A column about John McNally, author of the novel "America's Report Card," points out that he has his MFA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Yes Weekly is based in Greensboro, NC.
http://www.yesweekly.com/main.asp?SectionID=5&SubSectionID=22&ArticleID=1514&TM=43985.71

Author, UI Graduate Cody Hated Academic Life (Chicago Tribune, June 19)
A story about author Diablo Cody, author of the memoir "Candy Girl: A Year in the Life of an Unlikely Stripper," points out that she attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, famous for its Writers' Workshop, but hated academic life. "I could not get out of college soon enough," says Cody, who graduated in 2000 and now lives in Minneapolis. The News Democrat is based in Illinois. The same story appeared on the Web site of the BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/illinois/chi-ap-il-books-diablocody,1,2195337.story

Lie Study Fueled Stock Option Probes (Christian Science Monitor, July 19)
This week, the chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) said the agency is poised to bring its first lawsuit "very soon" regarding the practice of so-called backdated options. ERIK LIE and Randall Heron, finance experts at the University of Iowa and Indiana University, crunched numbers that are fueling the current probes. Often, the option to buy shares will be granted to executives "at the money," at the current share price. If the stock rises, they can make a profit by exercising that option. The new study by Lie and Heron compares the timing of options with the behavior of stock prices, and concludes that the number of bargain options given to executives could not be mere coincidence. Instead, they argue that backdating has occurred, with boards dating the grants (after the fact) for optimal prices. "We estimate that 18.9 percent of unscheduled, at-the-money option grants to top executives during the period 1996-2005 were backdated or otherwise manipulated," the authors wrote in the study.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0719/p02s01-usju.html

Study Examines Relationships, Attraction (Sun-Star, July 19)
In a recent study, co-authors EVA KLOHNEN and SHANHONG LUO found people most attracted to secure romantic partners (supportive and confident in their relationships) as opposed to insecure partners (preoccupied, fearful or dismissing, and whose anxiety often centered around fears of abandonment, and thus avoid expressing emotions in a relationship). Klohnen and Luo are both researchers at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. The results, published in the October 2005 issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, also showed that when it comes to attraction towards insecurely attached partners, participants tended to be attracted to those whom they can identify with themselves. Attraction also occurs when a potential partner matches with one's actual or ideal self. "Attraction," says Klohnen, "is based on perceptions and not on who the person truly is." The publication is based in the Philippines.
http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/ceb/2006/07/19/life/confidence.compassion.keys.to.attraction.html

Gallup Started Poll At UI (Stoneham Sun, July 19)
In the coming months, countless political candidates across the nation will likely use one of the most reliable tools available to gauge their popularity among the electorate: the Gallup Poll. For more than 70 years, the brainchild of George Gallup has been utilized to predict winning political campaigns, study movie audiences and analyze the quality of life in other cultures. Interestingly, Gallup's amazing career emerged from humble beginnings. While at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the early 1920s, Gallup conducted what is considered the first poll in human history. The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www2.townonline.com/stoneham/opinion/view.bg?articleid=538516

Canadian Stock Options Face Scrutiny (Toronto Star, July 19)
Canadian stock options are going to come under more scrutiny, experts say, as regulators widen their investigation into backdated stock options in the United States. Dozens of U.S. companies are being investigated in connection with backdating, and Securities and Exchange Commissioner Roel Campos yesterday said the SEC will begin legal action on a major case in the next few days. On Saturday, two American university professors released a study suggesting that more than 2,000 U.S. companies used backdated stock options in the past decade. The study, by Randall Heron of Indiana University and ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa, estimates that nearly 30 per cent of companies examined have used backdated options.
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1153260642753&call_pageid=968350072197&col=969048863851

Lie Comments On "Spring-Loading" (International Herald Tribune, July 19)
Want to profit with chief executive officers? Then buy shares in their companies as soon as the CEOs are granted stock options. An investor who purchased shares of companies, including Advanced Micro Devices Inc. and Yahoo! Inc., after they disclosed options grants and sold the stock three months later could have beaten stock market benchmarks by 5.2 percentage points annually from mid-2002 through 2005, data compiled by Bloomberg show. Holding until 180 days after the grant beat the indexes by an average 4.2 percentage points, according to the study of 4,290 grants made by 1,700 companies. "If these grants are a heads-up that a stock will rise, then investors should pay attention," said Byron Wien, chief investment strategist at Pequot Capital Management in New York, which invests about $7 billion in assets. "We're all out to make a buck in the market." The outsized returns were led by gains in companies where CEOs were awarded options when stock prices were at their lows, the study found. At least 64 companies are facing investigations into whether they manipulated option awards to inflate their value. Investigators also are looking into "spring-loading," in which companies grant options before the release of good news. But ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa professor whose research helped prompt the current options probes, said in an interview that spring-loading probably happens less than backdating and succeeds infrequently because unexpected events can cancel out good news.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/07/18/bloomberg/bxinvest.php

Washington University Hires Economists (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, July 19)
Washington University's economics department has plenty of laurels to rest on, if it were so inclined. But with six new high-profile professors arriving this month, and recruiters trying to land a half-dozen more, the university is spending plenty of money to elevate the department's prestige. Online journalist David Warsh, writing on EconomicPrincipals.com, reports that the budget has been boosted by perhaps $10 million a year, with newcomers getting salary offers "said to be of $500,000 or more." The new hires are Costas Azariadis and David Levine from UCLA, Michele Boldrin from the University of Minnesota, Sebastian Galiani from the Universidad de San Andres in Argentina, Werner Ploberger from the University of Rochester and STEVE WILLIAMSON from the University of Iowa.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/business/columnists.nsf/davidnicklaus/
story/D19E0B908F8B1952862571B0000F08F7?OpenDocument

Film Based On Shooting At UI (China Daily, July 19)
Actor Liu Ye is best known for playing a self-sacrificing, loyal, introverted and nervous character. For example, the son of an old postman in the mountains in "Postman in the Mountain" (1999), the devoted and loyal gay student Lan Yu in "Lan Yu" (2001) and the young man Ma who keeps his love a secret because he knows his friend also loves the same woman in "Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress" (2002). No wonder then that Myriad Pictures picked him to play the brilliant but tragic student Liu Xing alongside well-known American actress Meryl Streep in "Dark Matter." The film is based on the true story of a disgruntled physics student from China, who shot and killed six people on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in 1991.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=0b72f0473f214b9a38bab149e9a1fbf7&_docnum=14&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=914c534166019d4b9d4d945e21517f6a

Wing Discusses Plight of Palestinian Women (Scoop, July 18)
ADRIEN WING
, a professor of law at the University of Iowa College of Law, discussed the plight of Palestinian women during the fighting in Lebanon, and during the civil strife between Hamas and Fatah, in a lecture at the University of Auckland. "Remote from the male geopolitics of the region, they are being shot at and intimidated while trying to take care of their families and keep people together. The psychological and emotional burden which women have to bear in these circumstances is often overlooked." Scoop is published in New Zealand.
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE0607/S00060.htm

Lie Releases New Stock Option Study (Evening Stardard, July 18)
Almost a third of U.S. companies that issue stock options have manipulated their grants to top executives at some point in the past decade, according to a new study by two finance professors. The growing scandal that some have said is the "next Enron" has seen 60 companies investigated by prosecutors. Apple Computer is the largest firm implicated although it has launched its own probe and is not under scrutiny by the authorities. ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa said he was reluctant to publish the number, as he knew it would create media interest but he was satisfied it was correct. Lie and Indiana University's Randall Heron are co-authors of three academic studies that helped expose the questionable timing of many options. Lie and Heron's latest study estimates that 29.2 percent  of the companies that were studied manipulated grants to top executives at some point between 1996 and 2005. The firms under study account for about 95 percent of those that grant options, Lie said. The newspaper is based in London, England.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=0b72f0473f214b9a38bab149e9a1fbf7&_docnum=18&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=4d75fb406ebd306f541016e95005950a

New Stock Option Study Involves 2,000 Companies (Yahoo!News, July 18)
The stock-option backdating scandal, while not particularly glamorous, is also weighing on the stock market. It might get worse before it gets better. Several news outlets reported recently that a new study by the finance professor who first brought the backdating issue to the attention of regulators has found that the scandal could extend far beyond the 60 or so companies currently involved and could encompass more than 2,000. University of Iowa Professor ERIK LIE's new study found that from 1996 to 2005, 29 percent of companies used backdated options and 14 percent of options granted to top executives during that period were backdated, numbers that widen the scope of this scandal by several orders of magnitude. Most of the suspicious activity occurred prior to 2002, when the Sarbanes-Oxley Act went into effect requiring companies to report stock-option grants within two days rather than 40.
http://biz.yahoo.com/indie/060718/105_id.html?.v=1

Federal Backdating Charges Coming (San Jose Mercury News, July 18)
The waiting game has begun. It appears it's now a question of when -- not if -- federal investigators will prosecute a top executive or a company in the scandal over the rigging of stock options. Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Christopher Cox told reporters in Washington on Monday that his agency is on the brink of filing a complaint over stock option abuses "very soon." Meanwhile in San Francisco, U.S. Attorney Kevin Ryan said a task force he announced last week is "looking very strongly and quickly" for signs of fraud. More than 29 percent of the nearly 8,000 companies they analyzed issued some form of tainted stock option to top executives from 1995 through 2005, according to a report released Saturday by ERIK LIE, an associate finance professor at the University of Iowa, and Randall A. Heron, an associate professor at the University of Indiana. If Lie and Heron are right -- and they think they're underestimating the abuses -- more than 2,250 companies rigged stock options. High-tech firms, smaller firms and firms with volatile stock prices had the highest frequency of abuse, they say.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/business/personal_finance/15063380.htm

Lie Study Leading To SEC Charges (CFO.com, July 18)
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Christopher Cox told reporters on Monday that the regulator will bring the first civil charges "very soon" in the stock options timing scandal, according to Reuters. Cox acknowledged that there are also criminal investigations being conducted by other federal regulators, but reportedly stressed, "I can only speak to the civil charges for which we are responsible, but I think, very soon." A new academic study, released earlier on Monday, concluded that 2,000 companies have used backdated stock options to sweeten their top executives' pay packages. The study, cited by the New York Times, was authored by ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, and Randall Heron, of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University.
http://www.cfo.com/article.cfm/7187071/c_7187234?f=home_todayinfinance

Twin Cities Companies Cited For Backdating (St. Paul Pioneer Press, July 18)
Civil and criminal charges for stock-option practices could be coming soon. The Securities and Exchange Commission is poised to bring its first-ever case targeting abusive stock-option practices, an area where problems appear widespread, SEC Chairman Christopher Cox said Monday. "These are not merely episodic instances," Cox told reporters. Abuses such as backdating stock options appear to have been a "widespread problem" especially in the 1990s, according to Cox, who said the SEC will bring its first backdating case "very soon." Dozens of companies, including Minnetonka-based UnitedHealth Group, have acknowledged requests for information from regulators about their backdating practices. UnitedHealth, which launched an internal review of its options program, has warned that it may have to restate past earnings, erasing nearly $290 million. A report issued over the weekend found that more than 2,200 U.S. companies may have manipulated the timing of stock-option grants to executives between 1996 and 2005. The study was conducted by Randall Heron at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University, and ERIK LIE of the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/business/15060578.htm

Lie: Backdating Disclosures May Be Tip Of Iceberg (The State, July 18)
More than 2,000 companies appear to have used backdated stock options to sweeten their top executives pay packages, according to a new study that suggests the practice is far more widespread than previously disclosed. An author of the study said the analysis suggested that the disclosures so far about backdated stock options may be just the tip of the iceberg. It is pretty scary, and its quite surprising to see, said ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. Professor Lie said the findings were so surprising that he asked several colleagues to check his numbers. Together, they concluded that the numbers probably erred on the low side. The study by Professor Lie and Randall A. Heron, of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University, was posted Saturday to a University of Iowa Web site. The State is based in Columbia, SC. The same story appeared on the Web site of the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, TORONTO STAR and the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/business/15061801.htm

Columnist Cites Lie Study (New York Sun, July 18)
What is the real cost of the backdating scandal? It's the skidding back to "Go" on the path to rebuilding investor confidence. The fault lines between investors and managements created by the Enron, WorldCom, and Tyco scandals have only begun to close; new fissures have now opened in the wake of disclosures from more than 60 companies that their options grants were tainted. The bad news is that there is apparently a lot more to come. Hundreds of people listened in on a conference call last week hosted by Institutional Shareholder Services during which a University of Iowa professor, ERIK LIE, one of the leading academic authorities on the issue, suggested that as many as 1,000 companies may have engaged in backdating of options, or, to use his words "did something fishy." In an e-mail message, Lie said the number is actually closer to 2,000.
http://www.nysun.com/article/36195

Lie: Spring-loading Differs From Backdating (Bloomberg, July 18)
Want to profit with chief executive officers? Then buy shares in their companies as soon as the CEOs are granted stock options. An investor who purchased shares of companies, including Advanced Micro Devices Inc. and Yahoo! Inc., after they disclosed options grants and sold the stock three months later could have beaten stock market benchmarks by 5.2 percentage points annually from mid-2002 through 2005, data compiled by Bloomberg show. Holding until 180 days after the grant beat the indexes by an average 4.2 percentage points, according to the study of 4,290 grants made by 1,700 companies. "If these grants are a heads-up that a stock will rise, then investors should pay attention,'' said Byron Wien, chief investment strategist at Pequot Capital Management in New York, which invests about $7 billion in assets. ``We're all out to make a buck in the market.'' The outsized returns were led by gains in companies where CEOs were awarded options when stock prices were at their lows, the study found. At least 64 companies are facing investigations into whether they manipulated option awards to inflate their value. Investigators also are looking into ``spring-loading,'' in which companies grant options before the release of good news. But ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa professor whose research helped prompt the current options probes, said in an interview that spring-loading probably happens less than backdating and succeeds infrequently because unexpected events can cancel out good news.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=aBP3jZMggTEE&refer=us

Sindt: New Contact Lens Still Requires Sunglasses (USA Today, July 18)
One of the most intriguing new types of lenses is the new "sports-tinted" lens. The Nike Maxsight lens works like a pair of sunglasses but without the frames that can slip or fog up. The new lenses come in gray-green shade for golfers and amber shade for fast-moving sports like baseball or tennis. The lenses are larger than a typical soft contact lens and give the wearer's pupils an enlarged appearance. The lenses are not meant to replace sunglasses for everyday use because you still need sunglasses to protect the area around the eyes - not just the cornea - from the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays, says CHRISTINE SINDT, an optometrist and director of the contact lens service at the University of Iowa in Iowa City.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2006-07-17-lenses-cover_x.htm

UI Law Grad To Receive Agricultural Honor (Brownfield, July 18)
Neil Harl, Charles F. Curtis Distinguished Professor in Agriculture and emeritus professor of economics at Iowa State University, will be honored by the National Association of County Agricultural Agents (NACCA). Harl will receive the Service to American/World Agricultural award at the agent's annual meeting July 27th in Cincinnati, Ohio. Harl is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law. Brownfield is an agricultural magazine based in Missouri.
http://www.brownfieldnetwork.com/gestalt/go.cfm?objectid=7D9E091A-EE8D-98E0-C22FE434E7B8770E

Lie Comments On Extent Of Backdating (Wall Street Journal, July 17)
On the heels of the his announcing the formation of a stock options task force, the U.S. Attorney in San Francisco will likely soon indict a former Silicon Valley executive, reported Justin Scheck in The Recorder on Friday night. Gregory Reyes, the ex-CEO of Brocade Communications, is widely expected to be the first executive indicted in the options-timing investigations, reports Scheck. Meanwhile, a new study shows that more than 2,000 companies appear to have used backdated stock options to sweeten their top executives' pay packages, reports the New York Times. "It is pretty scary, and it's quite surprising to see," said ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa who did much of the initial work on options-timing and co-authored the most recent study. The new statistical analysis suggests the practice is even more widespread than previously disclosed.
http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2006/07/17/will-options-timing-investigations-soon-yield-first-indictment/trackback/

Lie: Backdating More Prevalent Than Thought (Financial Times, July 17)
The first civil charges to be filed in the growing US stock options backdating scandal are likely "very soon", Securities and Exchange Commission chairman Christopher Cox said on Monday. The development shows the speed at which the regulator is moving to address the practice, which has engulfed over 60 mainly technology companies. Separately, a study published at the weekend revealed that over 2,000 companies appear to have used backdated options to boost executives' income. ERIK LIE, whose research in 2004 into the subject was largely behind the current set of probes into the issue, said in a paper published by the University of Iowa that a new statistical analysis of the practice showed that it was far more common than initially thought. It said 29.2 percent of companies had used backdated options, while 13.6 percent of options awarded to executives between 1996 and 2000 had been manipulated of backdated.
http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/provider/providerarticle.asp?feed=FT&Date=20060717&ID=5871589

A separate story on the same topic appeared in REUTERS (July 17)

http://today.reuters.com/business/newsArticle.aspx?type=ousiv&storyID=2006-07-17T180832Z_01_N17286763_RTRIDST_0_BUSINESSPRO-FINANCIAL-OPTIONS-DC.XML

Lie: Backdating Disclosures May Be Tip Of Iceberg (New York Times, July 17)
More than 2,000 companies appear to have used backdated stock options to sweeten their top executives pay packages, according to a new study that suggests the practice is far more widespread than previously disclosed. An author of the study said the analysis suggested that the disclosures so far about backdated stock options may be just the tip of the iceberg. It is pretty scary, and its quite surprising to see, said ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. Professor Lie said the findings were so surprising that he asked several colleagues to check his numbers. Together, they concluded that the numbers probably erred on the low side. The study by Professor Lie and Randall A. Heron, of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University, was posted Saturday to a University of Iowa Web site. The Star News is based in North Carolina. The story also appeared on the Web sites of the LAKELAND (FL) LEDGER, WILMINGTON (NC) STAR NEWS, FIN FACTS (IRELAND), INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SHANGHAI DAILY (CHINA),
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/17/business/17options.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Prosecutors Plan To File First Backdating Charges (Bloomberg, July 17)
Regulators this week plan to file criminal charges in the first enforcement case to emerge from the current options scandal, two people with direct knowledge of the matter said. At least 12 more cases probably will follow, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the probes aren't public. More than 2,200 U.S. companies may have tampered with the timing of executive stock-option grants between 1996 and 2005, according to a study by researchers who helped set off the current wave of federal investigations. One of the researchers was ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=amjlgSJpdiww&refer=home

Media Obsession With Weather Increases Phobia? (The Times of London, July 17)
JOHN WESTEFELD
, a psychologist at the University of Iowa, says that some people are so afraid of bad weather that they are almost incapacitated at the thought of impending storms. Westefeld estimates that up to one in five people could be suffering from "severe weather phobia" (the severe refers to the weather rather than the phobia). In a recent short paper in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society he reported that, of a group of 139 people, about 20 percent confessed to a "moderate degree of fear" in the run-up to foul weather. Symptoms included dizziness, a sense of panic, quickened heart rate, loss of appetite, sleeplessness and the constant monitoring of weather reports. "This is not the normal, healthy worry most people have and which motivates them to prepare for a storm," Westefeld says. "They are really, really afraid." An earlier study by Westefeld uncovered phobics who wouldn't brave a storm even to collect their kids from school. He wonders whether the media's obsession with extreme weather is stoking anxiety.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,6-2273192,00.html

Andreasen Cites Bias (Philadelphia Inquirer, July 17)
Stanford University biologist Ben Barres -- who used to be Barbara -- said his experience as both a man and a woman had given him an intensely personal insight into the biases that make it harder for women to succeed in science. Barres'  commentary was published in the journal Nature. The scientist has also recently taken his argument to the highest reaches of American science, crusading to make access to prestigious awards more equitable. NANCY ANDREASEN, a well-known psychiatrist at the University of Iowa, agreed with Barres. She said it took her a long time to convince her husband that he got more respect when he approached an airline ticket counter than she did. When she stopped sending out research articles under her full name and used the initials N.C. Andreasen instead, she said, the acceptance rate of her publications soared. Andreasen, one of the comparatively few women who have won the National Medal of Science, said she is still regularly reminded she is female. "Often, I will be standing in a group of men, and another person will come up and say hello to all the men and just will not see me, because in a professional setting, men are not programmed to see women," she said. "Finally, one of the men will say, 'I guess you haven't met Nancy Andreasen,' and then the person will turn bright red and say, 'Oh Nancy, nice to see you!'" The newspaper is based in Kentucky. The same story appeared on the Web site of the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/living/health/15054093.htm

UI To Increase Presidential Salary (Columbus Dispatch, July 17)
A story about the presidential search at Ohio State University notes that among other presidential openings is the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, whose regents have said they plan to offer substantially more than the $309,250 their former president earned. Other schools in the search include Indiana University, the University of California at Los Angeles and Harvard University.
http://www.columbusdispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/07/17/20060717-A1-02.html

Graduate Elected President Of Bar Association (Daily Nation, July 17)
Angela McConney, a native of Barbados, has been elected president of the Massachusetts Black Bar Association. McConney is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law. The Daily Nation is based in Barbados.
http://www.nationnews.com/story/305687400129848.php

Lie Confident In Backdating Claims (Chicago Tribune, July 16)
Investors' faith in corporate accounting again is under siege. Over the last few months, more than 50 companies--most of them technology firms--have disclosed that they were under investigation by federal authorities for possibly manipulating executives' stock-option grants to boost the potential payoffs. The  possibility of widespread backdating of option awards was proposed by ERIK LIE, an associate professor with the University of Iowa's business college, in a May 2005 research paper. He looked at nearly 6,000 option awards from 1992 through 2002, using company disclosure reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. What he found was a pattern of abnormally large stock price gains immediately after unscheduled option grants--those that weren't awarded at the same time each year, he said. In an interview, Lie said he believed that many more companies were likely to be probed for backdating. "I'm quite confident we're talking about hundreds of companies that have done this," he said. The same story appeared on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN, HARTFORD COURANT, LOS ANGELES TIMES, AUSTIN (TX) AMERICAN STATESMAN
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0607160058jul16,1,2160092.story?coll=chi-business-hed

Lie Paper Shows More Firms Backdated Options (Wall Street Journal, July 15)
Broadcom Corp. said it expects to take a charge against earnings going back to 2000 for at least $750 million, in one of the biggest restatements yet in the growing scandal over stock-options practices. Federal authorities are investigating more than 50 companies, including Broadcom, to determine whether options were illegally backdated or otherwise manipulated. The Irvine, Calif., chip maker joins about a dozen companies that are working on restatements because of errant accounting for their option grants to top executives and other employees. ERIK LIE, a University of Iowa business professor whose work helped fuel regulatory inquiries into backdating, is expected to release fresh research this weekend showing anomalies that suggest a huge cohort of companies may have played games with their options grants. In his new research paper, which analyzes options prices and share movements, Dr. Lie estimates that 29 percent of the nearly 8,000 firms studied had backdated or otherwise manipulated grants to top executives at some point between 1996 and 2005.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115287900455706888-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Lie Surprised By Backdating Re-statement (Orange County Register, July 15)
Broadcom Corp. will record more than $750 million in additional expenses dating back six years because it under-reported the cost of employee stock-option grants, the company said Friday. Broadcom's preliminary review determined that none of the company's top executives - co-founders Henry Samueli and Henry Nicholas, its two recent chief executives, Alan E. Ross and Scott McGregor, nor any board members - played a role in setting the timing or value of the options. Dozens of companies are under investigation for stock-option practices that benefited top executives. Analysts and Broadcom officials described the restatement as mostly an accounting issue, because few employees exercised their stock options. But ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa associate professor who pioneered research into corporate manipulation of stock-option costs, said Broadcom could face shareholder lawsuits and other legal challenges that will end up costing the company and its shareholders millions of dollars over time. Shareholder groups have filed three class-action lawsuits against Broadcom since June. "I was quite shocked at how large the number was," Lie said of the $750 million restatement.
http://www.ocregister.com/ocregister/money/homepage/article_1212354.php

UI To Help Indian Tribe's Dental Study (Rapid City Journal, July 15)
The Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairman's Health Board will work with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to conduct the Healthy Smiles Study, a study aimed at improving the dental health of Northern Plains American Indian children. CeCe Big Crow of Rapid City's AATCHB has been named director of the new study. Paid for through a three-year National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health grant, the research will focus on early childhood tooth decay. Many tribal children develop an aggressive form of tooth decay called rampant early childhood caries. Left untreated, it may affect a child's ability to learn, eat and speak properly. "This study will offer training and support in those strategies to participating communities," Big Crow said.
http://www.rapidcityjournal.com/articles/2006/07/15/news/local/news11.txt

Lie Gets His 15 Minutes Of Fame  (The Telegraph, July 14)
An influential finance professor said separately on Thursday that as many as 1,000 companies - far more than the roughly 60 known to be under scrutiny - appear to have manipulated stock option grant dates. University of Iowa Professor ERIK LIE said his research, examining 8,000 companies, suggests "at least 1,000 ... at some point manipulated or backdated their option grants." In a short sidebar, Lie says that the attention he's been getting as a result of his study is "my 15 minutes of fame." The Telegraph is based in the United Kingdom.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/main.jhtml?xml=/money/2006/07/15/cnfbi1

UI Gift To Establish Antitrust Professorship (Chronicle, July 14)
In its Gifts and Bequests column, the paper reports on a $1.5 million gift from Robert E. Youle to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FOUNDATION to establish a professorship in antitrust and trade regulation.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i45/45a04501.htm

Stock Option Investigation Announced (Santa Rosa Press Democrat, July 14)
Northern California's top federal prosecutor said Thursday he has formed a task force to investigate whether companies in Silicon Valley have committed fraud by improperly issuing employee stock options. The task force, formed by U.S. Attorney Kevin Ryan in San Francisco, is already investigating "several companies," Ryan said at a press conference. Formation of the task force, which is made up of four assistant U.S. attorneys and an undisclosed number of FBI agents, comes as more than 65 U.S. companies have said in recent days that they are under investigation for retroactively changing the date stock options were granted. ERIK LIE, an associate professor at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, studied 8,000 publicly traded companies and found that at least 1,600 of them, or 20 percent, appeared to engage in backdating or other suspicious behavior with the options they granted. The newspaper is based in California. http://www1.pressdemocrat.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060714/NEWS/607140365

Stock Option Task Force Formed (Los Angeles Times, July 14)
Northern California's top federal prosecutor said Thursday that he has formed a task force to investigate whether companies in Silicon Valley committed fraud by improperly issuing employee stock options. The statement by U.S. Atty. Kevin Ryan in San Francisco came after disclosures from more than 65 companies that they were under investigation for retroactively changing the date stock options were granted. University of Iowa Professor ERIK LIE said his latest research, examining 8,000 companies, suggested that "at least 1,000 ... at some point manipulated or backdated their option grants." He spoke on a conference call briefing held by Institutional Shareholder Services, which provides proxy voting and other corporate governance services for clients.  Lie is the author or co-author of several key academic studies that helped expose questionable options timing now at the center of a fast-spreading probe by federal authorities. A similar story was written by the REUTERS news service, appearing on the websites of the WASHINGTON POST, NEW YORK TIMES, and MSN MONEY. http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-wrap15.1jul14,1,1139292.story

Lie Study Found Stock Options Backdating (New York Times, July 14)
The FBI and federal prosecutors in San Francisco said Thursday that they are escalating their investigation into possibly illegal stock option backdating by area companies. U.S. Attorney Kevin Ryan announced that a new eight-person task force will try to determine whether Northern California companies retroactively changed the grant date of stock options with intent to defraud investors. ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa's business school, has evaluated thousands of option grants and found that for many companies, it was statistically improbable for them not to have been backdated. Lie estimates that at least 10 percent of option grants to chief executives between 1996 and August 2002 were backdated. Lie said in an interview on Thursday that three company features contribute to backdating. "Small firms tend to do it more than large firms," he said. "Firms with higher stock price volatility tend to do it more than others. Tech firms tend to do it more than others."
http://www.nytimes.com/cnet/CNET_2100-1014_3-6094136.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

UI To Study PCB Exposure (Times of Northwest Indiana, July 14)
Scientists with four major universities are teaming up for a comprehensive four-year study of polychlorinated biphenyls in the bodies of Twin City children -- and how they got there. Using sophisticated air monitoring equipment and regular testing of volunteer families' blood, researchers hope to learn about concentrations of PCBs in East Chicago residents, and consequences from exposure to the neurotoxic carcinogen. "The Chicago area is a major source of PCBs," said KERI MERCER, study coordinator, "We know the (PCB) level is high, but not where it's coming from. " The study will track 54 West Side Junior High School students and their mothers for four years, and compare the data with those from a similarly sized community in eastern Iowa which has no known sources of PCBs. "This is not a health study, it's an exposure study," said PETER THORNE, a University of Iowa environmental health scientist and principal investigator for the study. "We don't really know too much about airborne exposures." http://www.nwitimes.com/articles/2006/07/14/news/lake_county/5b4b9ee46986e96a862571ab000ff690.txt 

Fitzgerald Comments On Internships (Ithaca Journal, July 14)
College students in the midst of summer internships know that the seasonal experience presents a golden opportunity. Many students are probably devising plans on how they can parlay a short-term stint into long-term employment. Consider your internship as an "audition" of sorts, said DAVID FITZGERALD, director of the Washington Center internship program at the University of Iowa's Pomerantz Career Center. The goal is landing the "part" -- a full-time job. The newspaper is based in New York. http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060714/LIFESTYLE06/607140338/1046

Andreasen Cites Bias (Lexington Herald-Leader, July 13)
Stanford University biologist Ben Barres -- who used to be Barbara -- said his experience as both a man and a woman had given him an intensely personal insight into the biases that make it harder for women to succeed in science. Barres's commentary was published in the journal Nature. The scientist has also recently taken his argument to the highest reaches of American science, crusading to make access to prestigious awards more equitable. NANCY ANDREASEN, a well-known psychiatrist at the University of Iowa, agreed with Barres. She said it took her a long time to convince her husband that he got more respect when he approached an airline ticket counter than she did. When she stopped sending out research articles under her full name and used the initials N.C. Andreasen instead, she said, the acceptance rate of her publications soared. Andreasen, one of the comparatively few women who have won the National Medal of Science, said she is still regularly reminded she is female. "Often, I will be standing in a group of men, and another person will come up and say hello to all the men and just will not see me, because in a professional setting, men are not programmed to see women," she said. "Finally, one of the men will say, 'I guess you haven't met Nancy Andreasen,' and then the person will turn bright red and say, 'Oh Nancy, nice to see you!'" The newspaper is based in Kentucky. The article, which originally appeared in the WASHINGTON POST, also appeared in the CANTON REPOSITORY in Ohio. http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/news/nation/15035424.htm

Andreasen Cites Bias Against Female Scientists (Washington Post, July 13)
In a highly unusual critique published yesterday, the Stanford University biologist Ben Barres-- who used to be Barbara -- said his experience as both a man and a woman had given him an intensely personal insight into the biases that make it harder for women to succeed in science. Barres's commentary was published yesterday in the journal Nature. The scientist has also recently taken his argument to the highest reaches of American science, crusading to make access to prestigious awards more equitable. In an interview, NANCY ANDREASEN, a well-known psychiatrist at the University of Iowa, agreed with Barres. She said it took her a long time to convince her husband that he got more respect when he approached an airline ticket counter than she did. When she stopped sending out research articles under her full name and used the initials N.C. Andreasen instead, she said, the acceptance rate of her publications soared. Andreasen, one of the comparatively few women who have won the National Medal of Science, said she is still regularly reminded she is female. "Often, I will be standing in a group of men, and another person will come up and say hello to all the men and just will not see me, because in a professional setting, men are not programmed to see women," she said. "Finally, one of the men will say, 'I guess you haven't met Nancy Andreasen,' and then the person will turn bright red and say, 'Oh Nancy, nice to see you!'" http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/07/12/AR2006071201883.html

Scientists Discover The Cradle Of Nicotine Cravings (Navhind Times, July 13)
A new study has found that damage caused by a stroke to a specific part of the brain called the insular cortex can break the addiction to smoking. As a part of the research, ANTOINE BECHERA, of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, identified 14 patients who had quit smoking immediately after suffering from a stroke that had damaged their insular cortex. Bechera noted that the patients did not kick the habit due to health worries, but rather because they had lost all interest in cigarettes. A few had even stopped smoking completely. The newspaper is based in India.
http://www.navhindtimes.com/articles.php?Story_ID=071341

Routh Studied Scottish Lit At UI (Glasgow Daily Record, July 13)
Superman actor Brandon Routh has revealed his secret ambition -- to go up, up and ... the West Highland Way. The 27-year-old newcomer, who makes his big screen debut as the man of steel tomorrow, has revealed a secret passion for the Scottish Highlands. It comes from a year studying Scottish literature before he decided his future lay in acting. Routh revealed: "I studied literature for a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before I left to pursue acting. My favorite Scottish writer is Robert Burns. He was the one who stood out for me." Routh, who wanted to become a writer before landing his role as Superman and his alter ego journalist Clark Kent, says he was so seduced by the Bard's verse he wants to explore his homeland. "I really want to come to Scotland and walk the West Highland Way one day. The newspaper is based in Scotland.
http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/tm_objectid=17375964&method=full&siteid=66633&headline=up--up-and-the-west-highland-way--name_page.html

Lie Expects To Uncover More 'Backdating' (CNNMoney, July 12)
The list of companies being investigated in the stock-options saga grows longer by the day and could easily climb much higher, according to the professor whose research brought the issue to light. More than 50 companies are being investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission and federal prosecutors over whether they "backdated" or otherwise manipulated the dates they granted stock options to employees to make the options more lucrative, according to Reuters. And the number of companies that engaged in the practice could climb into the hundreds once more research is carried out, according to ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa. It was Lie's research that attracted media and regulatory attention to the problem when he published a study in the journal Management Science noting that the granting of options to executives at several companies preceded big run-ups in the stock price. "I am confident that the number of companies who have done this is much higher" than the number currently being investigated, said Lie, who plans to release new research in the coming weeks.
http://money.cnn.com/2006/07/12/technology/options_saga/

Fitzgerald: Consider Internships 'Audition' For Job (Courier Post, July 12)
College students in the midst of summer internships know that the seasonal experience presents a golden opportunity. Many students are probably devising plans on how they can parlay a short-term stint into long-term employment. Consider your internship as an "audition" of sorts, said DAVID FITZGERALD, director of the Washington Center internship program at the University of Iowa's Pomerantz Career Center. The goal is landing the "part" -- a full-time job. The paper is based in Cherry Hill, N.J.
http://www.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060712/BUSINESS01/607120348/1003/BUSINESS

Daily Iowan Columnist Fired (Fox News, July 11)
Editors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's student newspaper the Daily Iowan have fired student columnist John Heineman after discovering his column advocating a minimum wage hike was lifted nearly word for word from a Democratic Party document. Heineman's July 10 column borrows liberally from a June 29 Democratic Policy Committee press release blasting Congress raising its own pay before bumping up the minimum wage. The cub reporter may have picked up the release in his role as a Washington intern for Iowa Republican Senator Charles Grassley, who ironically opposes a minimum wage hike. Heineman has since apologized, but is still encouraging students to write for the paper, calling it "truly a platform that can be used for positive change."
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,203041,00.html

Bechera Discusses Smoking And Strokes (Nature, July 11)
Strokes often change a person's character, depending on where the damage hits. Some may become more impulsive, others depressed. Now researchers have shown that damage to a small but very specific brain area can wipe out an addiction to smoking. ANTOINE BECHERA, of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, has identified 14 patients who all stopped smoking immediately after having a stroke that damaged their insular cortex. This seems to be not because they were concerned about their health, but because they had lost all interest in cigarettes, he told the Federation of Neuroscience Societies in Vienna this week. "One or two had even forgotten that they used to smoke," says Bechera. NATURE is based in the U.K.
http://www.nature.com/news/2006/060710/full/060710-2.html

Olshansky Comments On Data Release (Spartanburg Herald Journal, July 11)
Federal health officials expect today to publicly release records about tens of thousands of recent heart-defibrillator implants including data showing that about 4 percent of the patients had at least one complication during an implant. But the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has decided to withhold information identifying the doctors involved in those procedures. In a telephone interview, the agency's top official, Dr. Mark B. McClellan, said it had decided to do so for legal and policy reasons, including concerns about violating patient confidentiality. Some heart device specialists said they thought that Medicare officials should make the doctor and hospital data available to patients. But they added that such raw data, to be useful, would have to be adjusted to reflect factors like whether a doctor treated significantly sicker patients who would be prone to complications. "It's like any other product," said Dr. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, a heart-device specialist at the University of Iowa Hospitals in Iowa City. "You want to know about the doctors that kill people and about the doctors that hurt people." The Herald Journal is based in South Carolina. The same story appeared on the Web site of the WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR.
http://www.goupstate.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060710/ZNYT04/607100333/1051/NEWS01

Gurnett's Saturn Recordings 'Sun Rings' Basis (Rocky Mountain News, July 11)
A profile of composer Terry Riley and his piece Sun Rings refers to the pieces of interstellar white noise that make up the composition's foundation. The noise is from recordings of Saturn taken during a satellite fly-by and catalogued by DON GURNETT, professor of physics at the University of Iowa.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/music/article/0,2792,DRMN_54_4834659,00.html

Westefeld Researches Weather Phobias (ABC, July 11)
If the prospect of bad weather causes you to obsessively monitor weather reports and makes your heart pound, head spin and palms sweat, you could be suffering from severe weather phobia, psychologists say. In the first survey ever on this disorder, U.S. researchers have found that it's more than just "thunder phobia" or mild anxiety about tornadoes or hurricanes. They estimate one in five people could suffer from the condition. Severe weather phobics are truly panicked at the very thought of storms and can't function normally until the weather clears. "They get very afraid even when the possibility of severe weather is days away," says psychologist Professor JOHN WESTEFELD of the University of Iowa. This is not the normal, healthy worry most people have and which motivates them to prepare for a storm. "They are really, really afraid." ABC is the Australian Broadcasting Company, based in Australia.
http://abc.net.au/science/news/health/HealthRepublish_1683400.htm

Pierce Appears Before Parole Board (Chicago Tribune, July 11)
Former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball star Pierre Pierce, convicted last fall of assaulting and terrorizing his girlfriend, moved one step closer to an early release from prison Monday. In his first face-to-face meeting with the Iowa State Parole Board, Pierce, 23, won three of five votes required to be paroled from prison before his sentence expires. The former Hawkeye guard needs votes from all five members to qualify for parole. The panel told Pierce he would be informed of a decision within 30 days.
http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/highschool/boysbasketball/cs-060710pierce,0,5808909.story?coll=cs-hs-boysbasketball-print

New Movie Is Based On UI Shootings (Salt Lake Tribune, June 11)
A writer notes that a movie based on the murders of several UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students and employees by Gang Lu in 1991 is wrapping up filming in the Salt Lake City region. The movie stars Meryl Streep and Val Kilmer.
http://www.sltrib.com/healthscience/ci_4034801

Skorton Takes Over At Cornell (Ithaca Journal, July 11)
David Skorton spent his first day in his Cornell University office as Cornell president Monday. He is also entertaining offers from two Ithaca-area radio stations to host a jazz show. Skorton is the former president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A story on the same topic appeared on the Web site of NEWS 10 NOW, based in Syracuse, N.Y.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060711/NEWS01/607110314/1002

Olshansky Comments On Release Of Defibrillator Data (New York Times, July 10)
Federal health officials expect today to publicly release records about tens of thousands of recent heart-defibrillator implants including data showing that about 4 percent of the patients had at least one complication during an implant. But the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has decided to withhold information identifying the doctors involved in those procedures. In a telephone interview, the agency's top official, Dr. Mark B. McClellan, said it had decided to do so for legal and policy reasons, including concerns about violating patient confidentiality. Some heart device specialists said they thought that Medicare officials should make the doctor and hospital data available to patients. But they added that such raw data, to be useful, would have to be adjusted to reflect factors like whether a doctor treated significantly sicker patients who would be prone to complications. "It's like any other product," said Dr. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, a heart-device specialist at the University of Iowa Hospitals in Iowa City. "You want to know about the doctors that kill people and about the doctors that hurt people." The paper is based in Lakeland, Fla. A version of the story also ran on the Website of HABER SAGLIK in Turkey, the LEDGER in Lakeland, Fla., and other media outlets.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/10/business/10data.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Actor Routh Studied English At Iowa (Grand Forks Herald, July 10)
A story about the Iowa native who plays the lead role in the new movie "Superman Returns" says actor Brandon Routh studied English at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for one year. "I was going to be a novelist and possibly go into graphic design," Routh says. The paper is based in North Dakota.
http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/living/15003175.htm

UI Campus Heart Of Summer Jazz Festival (Jazz Police, July 10)
A glowing review of the Iowa City Jazz Festival says the annual event brings an average of 25,000 each summer to the heart of downtown and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus. Now held on the partially shaded lawn of the famed Pentacrest (the center of the U of I administration anchored by "Old Capitol"-Iowa's first statehouse), the festival has grown from a one-day local showcase in 1991 to a three-night/two-day jazz menagerie combining the highest level of international touring artists with local, college and high school bands, late night jams at the Sheraton Hotel, radio interviews, school clinics, and more. Based in Minnesota, Jazz Police provides news and information about jazz and travel across the country.
http://www.jazzpolice.com/content/view/6153/2/

UI Students Describe Stormy Voyage (The Weather Channel, July 9)
When Mike Green and Adam Codilis boarded the research ship Explorer in Vancouver, British Columbia, it was supposed to be a floating college, part of a program called Semester at Sea. The Explorer was its way to Pusan, South Korea. But as soon as the ship enters the open waters, it hits rough seas caused by several low-pressure areas. "Several times I was literally thrown off my feet and thrown across the cabin," Green said. At the time of the January 2005 voyage, Mike and Adam were second-semester juniors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. They grew up together in the Chicago suburb of Burr Ridge, Illinois.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=55a1f378d546167940e71c0b88ede7b0&_docnum=7&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVA&_md5=dfa53c3f65283f9b7029ed7574afe86e

Lie's 2005 Research Paper Examined Backdating (Los Angeles Times, July 9)
Investors' faith in corporate accounting again is under siege. Over the last few months, more than 50 companies - most of them technology firms - have disclosed that they were under investigation by federal authorities for possibly manipulating executives' stock option grants to boost the potential payoffs. The possibility of widespread backdating of option awards was proposed by ERIK LIE, an associate professor with the University of Iowa's college of business, in a May 2005 research paper. He looked at nearly 6,000 option awards from 1992 through 2002, using company disclosure reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. What he found, Lie said, was a pattern of abnormally large stock price gains immediately after unscheduled option grants - those that weren't awarded at the same time each year.
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-petruno9jul09,1,1216686,full.column?coll=la-utilities-business

Sale Comments On Company Revenue Disclosures (CNNMoney, July 9)
News Corp. shareholders learned how much revenue a closely watched Internet division would generate - if they were lucky enough to be invited to a meeting in Australia last week with Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch. Owners of the rest of the company's 3.2 billion outstanding shares were left in the dark until a day later, when UBS analyst Aryeh Bourkoff published a research note about the proceedings that was furnished to U.S.-based media. Global companies like News Corp. hold investor meetings around the world all the time. When companies disclose significant information at such meetings, they typically issue news releases or a regulatory filing simultaneously or immediately afterward to inform the public. "Most people cure these with 8-Ks," said HILLARY SALE, a corporate law and finance professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, referring to a type of regulatory filing for the disclosure of information that could be "material" to a company's prospects. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of WAVE-TV in Kentucky, KPLC-TV in Los Angeles, Calif., MSN MONEY, THE WASHINGTON POST, THE NEW YORK TIMES and other media outlets.
http://money.cnn.com/2006/07/08/news/companies/murdoch_reut/

Gurnett Space Sound Collection Spun Into Music (Denver Post, July 9)
Unlike chamber ensembles content to perform Beethoven, Brahms and Shostakovich, the Kronos Quartet has built an international career focusing on the new and different. But even this adventuresome foursome had never ventured into what "Star Trek" fans like to call the final frontier until it became involved with Terry Riley's "Sun Rings" - one of its most popular projects ever. The performance incorporates sounds from space collected by University of Iowa physicist DON GURNETT over a 40-year period as part of Voyager flights and other missions. In October 2002, "Sun Rings" debuted at the University of Iowa, and Kronos has done about 20 performances since in such cities as London, Moscow and Dresden, with more scheduled for South Korea and Australia. The paper is based in Colorado.
http://www.denverpost.com/entertainment/ci_4020931

Lie: Backdating Acceptable If Disclosed Up Front (Newark Star-Ledger, July 8)
Securities regulators and federal prosecutors have launched a wide- ranging examination into whether companies around the nation backdated option grants to give executives the opportunity for a bigger payday. Fifty companies, including Home Depot and Apple, have been caught up in various investigations. Randall Heron, an associate finance professor at Indiana University who has researched the issue, expects the number to go much higher. Backdating options can be acceptable conduct, as long as it is disclosed and companies account for it in both financial statements and for taxes, according to both Heron and ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa professor whose research raised questions on the practice. The paper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/business/ledger/index.ssf?/base/business-0/1152419634107890.xml&coll=1

DHHS: Doctoral Student Falsified Records (Insider Higher Ed, July 6)
A former doctoral student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA engaged in research misconduct by falsifying records included in work supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute and has agreed not to work on federal projects for three years, the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Research Integrity announced Wednesday. In a notice published in the Federal Register, the agency said that Lingjie Zhao, who is no longer enrolled at Iowa and could not be reached for comment, had doctored data and comments submitted for publication and to her dissertation committee.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/07/06/qt

Olshansky Comments On Stress, Heart Attack (ABCNews.com, July 6)
Ken Lay, who died last night of an apparent heart attack, was under a lot of strain and had been treated for heart disease for at least the last decade. There's a public perception that stress can cause heart disease, however, it's hard to prove a direct cause-and-effect link. The American Heart Association lists stress as a possible risk factor for heart attacks, but it's not one of the major known risk factors. "The reason that the [AHA] and others have not made depression and stress a risk factor for death after myocardial infarction [a heart attack] is that the whole concept of stress is very hard to define," said Dr. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, director of cardiac electrophysiology at the University of Iowa Hospitals. "What is stressful for one person may not be stressful for another person."
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=2156836&page=1

Alumnus To Lecture On Hamilton (Grand Haven Tribune, July 7)
Jason Duncan, assistant professor of history at Aquinas College, will discuss "Alexander Hamilton: The Life of a Revolutionary American" July 10 at the Spring Lake District Library. Duncan worked in the U.S. House of Representatives for three years after earning a doctorate in history from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Michigan. http://www.grandhaventribune.com/paid/320001087607267.bsp

Law Alumna Heads Bar Association (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, July 7)
Pamela Meanes, a partner at Thompson Coburn, takes the helm of the Mound City Bar Association, the oldest black bar association west of the Mississippi River, at a time when law firms are under pressure from corporate clients to diversify their staffs. She earned her law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/business/stories.nsf/0/A582501A4BA6AB5D862571A30070AF58?OpenDocument

Sale Comments On Disclosure Filings (Reuters, June 6)
News Corp. shareholders learned how much revenue a closely watched Internet division would generate -- if they were lucky enough to be invited to a meeting in Australia last week with Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch. Owners of the rest of the company's 3.2 billion outstanding shares were left in the dark until a day later, when UBS analyst Aryeh Bourkoff published a research note about the proceedings that was furnished to U.S.-based media. Global companies like News Corp. hold investor meetings around the world all the time. When companies disclose significant information at such meetings, they typically issue news releases or a regulatory filing simultaneously or immediately afterward to inform the public. "Most people cure these with 8-Ks," said HILLARY SALE, a corporate law and finance professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, referring to a type of regulatory filing for the disclosure of information that could be "material" to a company's prospects. http://today.reuters.com/investing/financeArticle.aspx?type=governmentFilingsNews&storyID=2006-07-06T180722Z_01_N06358211_RTRIDST_0_COLUMN-LIFTING-SCHEDULED-WEEKLY-COLUMN.XML

Weather Phobia Studied At UI (Weather Channel, July 6)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA psychology professor says the weather frightens many of us. The professor studied 139 people and said 73 percent admitted to a moderate fear of weather. A third surveyed admitted to feeling helpless in the face of severe weather, 14 percent felt a shortness of breath, 16 percent were unable to eat and 6 percent were sick to their stomach. http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=552350de23d69ed99e7fb2ba9cd0ec34&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=b10281c40e5d3dc25f138fe0fc27073d

Westefeld Studies Weather Phobia (Live Science.com, July 6)
A new study led by psychologist JOHN WESTEFELD at the University of Iowa describes signs of severe-weather phobia. Of 139 people surveyed, 89 said a good storm sometimes or occasionally gets their heart pounding, and 65 said they panic now and then. Those truly frightened by weather are known to avoid picking their children up from school during a storm. Some just pick up and move to places they hope will be less stormy, Westefeld and his colleagues report.
http://www.livescience.com/forcesofnature/060705_storm_phobia.html

Alumnus Plans 1,599 Mile Jog Of Brooklyn (New York Daily News, July 5)
Brand new Brooklynite Gary Jarvis plans to jog all 1,599 miles of Kings County in the next two years -- and document it on his Web site, Runsbrooklyn.blogspot.com. "It's an absolutely fantastic way to get to know the place," said Jarvis, a former New Jersey telephone repairman who runs about 30 miles a week. Jarvis' mission began June 20 when he moved into his girlfriend's Park Slope pad after 10 years in Iowa City, where he studied history at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. While in Iowa, the avid marathon runner made a pact to jog the college town's 230 miles but neglected to chronicle the undertaking and the landmarks he discovered along the way. That won't happen again, he said. Each jog will culminate with Jarvis heading home and mapping his route, which he said will be chosen on a whim each morning when he heads out the door. He'll post the routes and his observations on the Web later in the day.
http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/432460p-364389c.html

Parole Hearing Today In Nelson Killing (WQAD-TV, July 5)
An Iowa City woman convicted of voluntary manslaughter in the 2001 death of her husband will ask the Iowa Board of Parole today to release her from prison. Phyllis Nelson was sentenced to five to 10 years in prison for the stabbing death of her husband, Richard Nelson, at his apartment in Cedar Rapids. He was a prominent pediatrician and dean of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's college of medicine. A parole hearing with three members of the board is slated for 1 p.m. at the women's prison in Mitchellville. According to court records, Nelson stabbed her husband with a paring knife after she confronted him about an affair. She claims she acted in self-defense and maintains the stabbing was an accident. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5113475&nav=1sW7

Company Renovating Kinnick (Twin Cities Finance and Commerce, July 5)
M.A. Mortenson's new Minnesota office leader says the firm won't neglect its smaller projects, even as it takes a run at high-profile work such as stadium projects for the Minnesota Twins and University of Minnesota. Mortenson's current workload includes a $90 million renovation of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S KINNICK STADIUM and a $250 million arena in Kansas City -- the Sprint Center - that's designed for a future NBA or NHL franchise. The Iowa project should be done by August, and the Sprint Center is set to open in October 2007. The paper is based in Minneapolis.
http://www.finance-commerce.com/item.cfm?recID=124827

Barrett Discusses Work On Historical Documents (WQAD-TV, July 5)
Special paper made at the University of Iowa Center for the Book is lying beneath such historical documents as the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights and the most-hailed of American documents -- the Constitution. Officials at the National Archives replaced the cases holding the documents during a renovation that spanned from 1999 to 2003. They contacted the Center for the Book to create the rare conservation paper that now rests beneath the Charters of Freedom. The special paper cushions the documents while its lighter color brightens them. Along with argon gas in the cases, the paper helps reduce moisture. TIMOTHY BARRETT was the director of the Center for the Book from 1996 to 2002. He and other workers and students at the center spent months developing the paper. He says they built a new press because of its large size, and created the sheets using textile-quality cotton normally used as thread. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5110886

UI Professor Backdating Findings Spur Investigations (MSN Money, July 4)
The steady drumbeat of U.S. companies caught up in a widening stock options backdating scandal continued this week as four companies said they were being investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission or federal prosecutors. Mercury Interactive, a California-based business software company, said three of its directors had offered to step aside after being told by the SEC it was considering a civil enforcement action against them for violations of federal securities laws. About 60 companies have said they are subject to government probes. Many are also conducting internal reviews. Mercury's stock options practices have been under SEC review since 2004, around the time when a wider SEC probe into the issue began. The inquiry widened three months ago after it emerged that a finance professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alerted the SEC to a suspicious pattern at dozens of companies showing a sharp rise in the share price after the backdating of an option. A version of the story also ran on the Website of MSNBC.
http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/provider/providerarticle.asp?feed=FT&Date=20060704&ID=5842287

Lie's Research Partner Discusses Backdating Issue (Washington Times, July 4)
Silicon Valley's long-running obsession with stock options is turning into a sordid affair. With each passing week, more companies in high-tech's heartland have become entangled in internal or government inquiries examining whether a few insiders rigged employee stock options to ensure larger windfalls without properly disclosing or accounting for the manipulation. The fallout threatens scores of companies with hefty bills to cover delinquent taxes, regulatory fines and shareholder lawsuits purporting financial deception. Criminal charges could be filed if federal prosecutors find evidence of deliberate fraud. So far, stock option probes have been disclosed by at least 57 companies, including 25 based in Silicon Valley or other parts of the San Francisco Bay area. Based on his research with University of Iowa professor ERIK LIE, Randall Heron, an Indiana University associate professor of finance whose research into deceptive option awards helped focus attention on the issue, predicts both numbers will quadruple by year's end.
http://washingtontimes.com/business/20060703-102602-9860r.htm

UI Research Vindicates Whistleblower (Buffalo News, July 3)
Curtis W. Lee was one of the first to complain about what is now one of Wall Street's hottest scandals, the backdating of stock options that gives more money to corporate officers than shareholders intended. Lee, a lawyer and former finance manager for National Fuel Gas Co., went public in 1999 with claims that three of the utility's top executives backdated stock options. National Fuel has never directly answered whether its executives backdated options, and the U.S. attorney dropped the case without charges after the death of the utility's compensation chairman. But in the process, Lee's career ended - he was fined more than $100,0000, lost his home and was ordered by a judge to get psychiatric counseling. The backdating scandal was uncovered by a researcher from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The News is based in Buffalo, N.Y.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20060702/1046830.asp

Baby Sloth Fossil Remains Found (Omaha World Herald, July 2)
More than 11,000 years ago, two giant sloths -- a mother and a child -- lay down together and died in what is now a creek bed near Shenandoah, Iowa.  That's the theory being proposed by researchers at the University of Iowa after finding the fossilized remains of a juvenile giant sloth just 10 feet from where adult sloth bones were found in 2001. Finding fossilized remains of adult and baby sloths so close together is unprecedented, said DAVID BRENZEL, curator of the University of Iowa Museum of Natural History. The rarity of such a discovery led them initially to "just put aside" a delicate neck bone they found when they were probing the clay near the site of the first sloth. "Lightning doesn't strike twice like that," Brenzel said. "These things are just so rare, why in heaven's name would you believe you had two?"
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=431e55d96e263d5231d7410752b810a8&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=a19db053f32268e6b10c547049bc9b7d

Lutz Book About Slackers Called Engaging (Philadelphia Inquirer, July 2)
"Hard work has a future," a slacker Web site announces, but "laziness pays off now." It's a sentiment with surprisingly deep roots in the United States, a nation renowned for its work ethic. Ever since the Industrial Revolution, according to TOM LUTZ, a professor of American literature at the University of Iowa, a shadow subculture has advanced a shirker ethic, which mourned a world destroyed by change, railed against regimentation, and praised anyone who took the time to soak up the sunshine, smell the roses, saunter, sit there, or sleep. Drawing on Rip Van Winkle, Bartleby the Scrivener, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Charlie Chaplin, Maynard G. Krebs, and Bart Simpson, "Doing Nothing" unearths this slacker tradition that, Lutz argues, has stimulated Americans to reassess the meaning of wage labor in their lives. Informative and engaging, "Doing Nothing" does make a compelling case for Americans' ambivalence about work.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/entertainment/books/14938812.htm

UI Gets Bike Safety Grant (Chicago Tribune, July 2)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study how immature perceptual and motor skills put children riding bicycles at risk to injury while crossing roads. The funding will support research on perceptual-motor skill development and how it can influence behavior. Bicycle crashes are the most common cause of severe injury in late childhood and early adolescence.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/automotive/chi-0607020040jul02,1,4077079.story

Lutz Comments On Anti-Work Ethic (Asheville Citizen Times, July 2)
TOM LUTZ, a University of Iowa professor, studied workplace low performers and put what he knows into a book, "Doing Nothing: A History of Loafers, Loungers, Slackers, and Bums in America." Turns out the phenomenon can be traced to an article, "The Right to Be Lazy," written in the late 1800s. And it stretches all the way to Japan, where slacker is pronounced "freetah." Lutz described a sort of chicken-and-egg dilemma. The number of freetahs, gold-brickers, idlers, laggards, lollygaggers and faineants (that's French) typically increases as companies struggle. "Anti-work attitudes are very prevalent during times of fundamental economic change," he said. As bosses come under more pressure from stockholders to cut fat and boost profits, they must be more willing to weed out the dead wood, says Murphy, because "if low performers start dictating the company's culture, productivity, quality and service will decline, and people will avoid your company like the plague."
http://www.citizen-times.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060702/BUSINESS/607020323/1122

Skorton Takes The Helm At Cornell (Ithaca Journal, July 1)
The Cornell University president's seat shifts today to David Skorton, the school's 12th leader, who arrives to high hopes and a steep learning curve. The university can be an immeasurably complex place, especially for anyone who must understand the institution writ large and represent it among alumni, legislators and the public. Skorton comes from the top post at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a major research school with nearly 30,000 students. A cardiologist and musician, he earned praise in his last job as an intellectual everyman, accessible administrator and well-loved figure on and off campus.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060701/NEWS01/607010313/1002

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