Having trouble finding something? Click here to get hints.

Note: Clicking on links below opens story in separate browser window.

UI Study Shows Why We Love Big Bills (New Kerala, Jan. 31)
A University of Iowa money study explores our preference for big bills over small ones -- and explains our marked reluctance to part with a larger bill. "The denomination in which money is held influences consumer spending," write researchers and UI graduate students HIMANSHU MISHRA, ARUL MISHRA, DANANJAY NAYAKANKUPPAM. They term the propensity to hold a single bill in higher regard "a bias for the whole." New Kerala is based in India. The same story appeared on the Web sites of UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL and PHYSORG.com.
http://www.newkerala.com/news.php?action=fullnews&id=97756

Latham Quoted In Story On Auto Industry Woes (Zimbabwe Chronicle, Jan. 31)
A story detailing the seeming collapse of the U.S. auto industry suggests that America's love affair with cars ended in the 1970s with the Oil Shock. Suddenly America -- and its cars -- were vulnerable. ROB LATHAM, a popular culture expert at the University of Iowa, was given his first car at the same time. "It was a 1963 Chevy Malibu convertible. I was 16 years old, driving this huge gas guzzler right through the middle of the oil crisis when you were only allowed to buy petrol every other day. It was nuts," he said. "I later wrapped it around a telephone pole, but I loved that car." He now drives a Subaru.
http://www.zimbabwechronicle.com/inside.aspx?sectid=1653&cat=2

Alumnus Discusses Mideast Politics (Racine Journal Times, Jan. 30)
Nathan Godley, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside, discusses the conflict between the Israelis and Palestinians. Godley is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.journaltimes.com/nucleus/index.php?itemid=3814

Redlawsk: 'Noncandidates' Try Not To Look Eager (Sacramento Bee, Jan. 30)
With just over 1,000 days remaining until Americans elect a new president, Iowa is producing a bumper crop of presidential wannabes -- all of whom are working hard not to look like presidential wannabes. Noncandidates abound. With the state's fabled caucuses still two years away in January 2008, the politicians are participating in a time-honored ritual, where they all insist they're not running, even as they try to charm seen-it-all Iowans in stops at farms and coffee shops. "No one wants to look too ambitious," said DAVID REDLAWSK, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "There's a real fear that you'll be tagged as jumping the gun." The paper is based in California.
http://www.sacbee.com/content/politics/nation/story/14132631p-14961576c.html

UI Leaders Express Concerns About Presidential Search (WQAD-TV, Jan. 30)
Campus leaders at the University of Iowa are speaking out about the search for the school's next president. They fear the Board of Regents won't let them have much say in the selection process, and will use a similar method to the one being used to replace Robert Koob at the University of Northern Iowa. That 13-member search committee is headed by regents president Michael Gartner and includes three other regents. Iowa campus leaders say the university has traditionally had several faculty, staff and students on the search committee. DAVID SKORTON is leaving Iowa to become president of Cornell University in New York. The regents will decide on a search committee during Wednesday's meeting in Ames. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4428168&nav=1sW7

UI Alumnus Named President Of Wabash College (Courier-Journal, Jan. 30)
Wabash College's board of trustees have chosen Patrick White to be the new president of the private liberal arts college for men. White, who will take over July 1, has been vice president and dean of faculty at St. Mary's College, a women's school in South Bend, since 2002. White, who graduated with honors from the University of Chicago in 1971, earned his master's and Ph.D. in English and American Literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper's based in Indiana. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the CRAWFORDSVILLE JOURNAL REVIEW and the FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL, both based in Indiana.
http://www.jconline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060130/NEWS05/601300330/1152

Baron Partner In Study On Views About Abortion (Innovations Report, Jan. 30)
People with strong views on abortion and other controversial issues tend to exaggerate differences of opinion they have with their opponents, a new University of Florida study finds. The research shows that the middle ground can be reached on intellectual terms but often is not because individuals view their opponents' arguments as attacks upon their core values and therefore themselves, said John Chambers, a UF psychology professor. The study surveyed 199 abortion-rights and anti-abortion students in an elementary psychology course at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. They were presented with two abortion-rights value issues -- women's reproductive rights and freedom from government interference in private lives -- and two anti-abortion issues -- the value of human life and a moral code of sexual conduct. The students were asked to rate their own opinions and to estimate that of the typical person with the opposite view. "To be sure, real differences of opinion existed between the groups," said Chambers, who did the research with ROBERT BARON, a University of Iowa psychologist and Mary Inman, a Hope College psychologist. "Compared to pro-life participants, pro-choice participants had more favorable personal attitudes toward the pro-choice issues and less favorable attitudes toward the pro-life issues, and vice versa." The publication is based in Germany.
http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/studies/report-54498.html

Paper Reviews Adams' 'Pathology Of Love' (New York Times, Jan. 30)
It would seem that in Iowa, where CHARLOTTE ADAMS is based, relationships are tempestuous. In five dances presented at the Joyce SoHo on Friday men and women struggled, combatively and tenderly, for the upper hand. There were no real winners in the dances, which highlighted movement phrases rather than fluid choreography. Ms. Adams, a dance faculty member at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, opened her program with "Blind Dogs Sing of Love," a work for seven from 2004 that features a painting by Margaret Wenk of a sword piercing a red heart. Dancers posed provocatively on a long wooden bench as Monteverdi selections played. The stage seemed to swarm with bodies, until dancers paired up; with arms and legs in sync, they spun and leapt into the air like water from a fountain. Hair flew. "The Pathology of Love," created by Ms. Adams in collaboration with the dancers Tony Orrico and Nicole Wong, was the most arresting work.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/30/arts/dance/30adam.html?_r=1

Climate Expert Spoke At UI (International Herald-Tribune, Jan. 29)
The top climate scientist at NASA says the Bush administration has tried to stop him from speaking out since he gave a lecture last month calling for prompt reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases linked to global warming. The scientist, James E. Hansen, longtime director of the agency's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, said in an interview that officials at NASA headquarters had ordered the public affairs staff to review his coming lectures, papers, postings on the Goddard Web site and requests for interviews from journalists. In 2001, Dr. Hansen was invited twice to brief Vice President Dick Cheney and other cabinet members on climate change. White House officials were interested in his findings showing that cleaning up soot, which also warms the atmosphere, was an effective and far easier first step than curbing carbon dioxide. He fell out of favor with the White House in 2004 after giving a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before the presidential election, in which he complained that government climate scientists were being muzzled and said he planned to vote for Senator John Kerry. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the INDEPENDENT ONLINE in South Africa, the SPARTANBURG (S.C.) HERALD-JOURNAL, OBSERVABILIS.COM in France, and many other media outlets.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/01/29/healthscience/web.0129nasafull.php

Latham Quoted In Story On Auto Industry Woes (The London Observer, Jan. 29)
A story detailing the seeming collapse of the U.S. auto industry suggests that America's love affair with cars ended in the 1970s with the Oil Shock. Suddenly America -- and its cars -- were vulnerable. ROB LATHAM, a popular culture expert at the University of Iowa, was given his first car at the same time. "It was a 1963 Chevy Malibu convertible. I was 16 years old, driving this huge gas guzzler right through the middle of the oil crisis when you were only allowed to buy petrol every other day. It was nuts," he said. "I later wrapped it around a telephone pole, but I loved that car." He now drives a Subaru. A version of the story also ran on the Websites AUTOBLOG in California and the MAIL & GUARDIAN ONLINE, South Africa.
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/world/story/0,,1697517,00.html

Alumnus First To Try 1918 Flu Experiment (New York Times Magazine, Jan. 29)
A story about the resurrection of the deadly 1918 influenza virus for research purposes says that in 1950, Johan Hultin, then a 25-year-old graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was searching for a Ph.D. topic when he heard a visiting virologist say that the only way to solve the mystery of the 1918 pandemic would be to recover the virus from a victim who had been buried in permafrost. Hultin suddenly had a topic. After some planning, he found what seemed like an ideal site in the remote settlement of Brevig Mission on Seward Peninsula in Alaska. In a mere five days in November 1918, 72 of the 80 residents of Brevig died and were later buried in a mass grave. Hultin arrived there alone, obtained permission to dig up the grave and after two days of hacking through frozen ground came across the preserved body of a little girl in a blue dress, red ribbons in her hair. He and some colleagues eventually found four more bodies and cut out samples of their pocked and peppered lungs, keeping them frozen with dry ice exuded from fire extinguishers.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/29/magazine/29flu.html

UI Sees Above-Average Graduation Rates (WQAD-TV, Jan. 28)
An annual report from the state Board of Regents says graduation rates at Iowa's three public universities exceed national averages. The report says graduation rates at Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are at record levels for students who entered school in 1999 and graduated in 2005. Iowa State had a record high 68 percent of students graduate within six years, while Iowa's record rate of 66 percent held steady. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4424747&nav=1sW7

Op-Ed Piece Mentions Reno UI Lecture (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Jan. 28)
An opinion piece says that former U.S. Attorney General was the distinguished lecturer recently at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she spoke about the urgent need for death-penalty reform in the United States.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/opinion/columnists/datelinedc/s_417927.html

Kerber Comments On History Job Market (Chronicle, Jan. 27)
A story suggests that the currently "hot" job market in the field of history may be short-lived. While the federal government's "Survey of Earned Doctorates" found that two-thirds of new Ph.D.'s awarded in history go to those who have studied North America and Europe, only about half of new jobs are in those specialties. As a sign that history positions in areas like Latin America and Africa are growing, the survey specified for the first time in 2004 how many people earned doctorates in those fields, rather than lumping them into a broader category. "You need to have a more full-service department now," says LINDA K. KERBER, president of the history association and head of the department at the University of Iowa. Jobs in the history of the Middle East are most likely on the rise because of political events, historians say, while those in Latin American history may reflect demand from an increasingly diverse student population. Over all, departments are taking a more global, non-Western view of the world and adding positions accordingly.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i21/21a01201.htm

Adams Presents Dance Suite (New York Times, Jan. 27)
CHARLOTTE ADAMS
, a choreographer who teaches dance at the University of Iowa, will present "Blind Dogs Sing of Love," a suite of dances that explore the mysteries and misunderstandings of the human heart, to music and sounds ranging from Bach and Mexican love songs to the mating calls of frogs and toads. The performance is Jan. 27 at Joyce SoHo.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/27/arts/dance/27danc.html?_r=1

Editorial Notes Jones’ Voting Investigation (Phoenix New Times, Jan. 26)
In an editorial about a challenged vote count in a 2004 Republican primary election for a seat in the Arizona Legislature, it’s noted that University Of Iowa computer science professor DOUGLAS JONES examined Maricopa County's voting machines in December and discovered serious problems. One of the nation's leading experts on voting-machine technology Jones discovered that the county's machines are not properly calibrated to consistently read votes. Jones says his tests revealed that any election within a 2 percent margin could be called into question. The newspaper is based in Arizona.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a0891e3de48efd85d1bdbe835f475f3c&_docnum=9&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=f2bdfc8bb72d7ec4b2bba7456fac2fe2

Actress’ Mother Attended UI (National Public Radio, Jan. 26)
Nia Long stars in the movie comedy “Big Momma's House 2” with Martin Lawrence. In an interview, she talked about her childhood in Iowa, an experience she says influenced her career in Hollywood. “I was born in Brooklyn. My family's from Trinidad and my mom, at 22 years old, single mother, we moved to Iowa City, Iowa, and she had a full scholarship there to go to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and then finally she got her master's there,” Long said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=bf70ecb20bc6ab076a3fcb9d5fb9bb0d&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=f351dd4b8d711c6db20baaed63afd9da

Brochu Comments On Fossil Discovery (New York Times, Jan. 26)
Scientists at the American Museum of Natural History have discovered a fossil in New Mexico that looks like a six-foot-long, two-legged dinosaur along the lines of a tyrannosaur or a velociraptor. But it is actually an ancient relative of today's alligators and crocodiles. The fossil, called Effigia, is a striking example of what biologists called convergence, when two lineages evolve the same body plan. "When I first saw the skull, I thought this can't be related to crocs," said DR. CHRISTOPHER BROCHU, an expert on crocodilian evolution at the University of Iowa. "But then I saw the ankle and said, 'Yep, it's a croc.' So ornithomimids were convergent on Effigia 80 million years later. There are only so many ways you can do something, and as a result you get this convergence." Dr. Brochu also said Effigia offered evidence that ancient relatives of crocodiles were much more diverse and dominant than thought. The article also appeared in the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/26/science/26croc.html?_r=2

UI Art Graduate's Exhibit Noted (Inside Bay Area, Jan. 26)
"Happy Wishes on Electricity" features new sculpture and digital drawings by San Francisco artist Andrew Kleindolph. It's on view at Santa Clara University through Feb. 3. He has a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DEPARTMENT OF ART AND ART HISTORY and a Master of Fine Arts in electronic art from Mills College in Oakland. The newspaper is based in San Francisco.
http://www.insidebayarea.com/ci_3439061?

Author Writes About Rural Life (Provincetown Banner, Jan. 26)
Charles McLeod may be a city boy, born and bred, but his writing finds its hometown somewhere down a lonely blacktop two-lane highway in the Dakotas. He will read from his series of short stories at the Fine Arts Work Center, (where he is a writing fellow this year) on Saturday. McLeod did his undergraduate studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.provincetownbanner.com/article/arts_article/_/36499/Arts/1/26/2006

Gartner Updates Legislators On Presidential Searches (WQAD-TV, Jan. 25)
The head of Iowa's Board of Regents says the University of Northern Iowa will have a new president by spring. Gartner, testifying to lawmakers in Des Moines, also addressed the presidential vacancy at the University of Iowa, though he had no timeline for naming a replacement. Gartner also told lawmakers he was surprised by the resignation of UI President DAVID SKORTON, who took the job in 2003. Skorton announced Friday that he would leave Iowa to become president of Cornell University in New York. Gartner says the board must plan a strategy for the school before seeking candidates. The television station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4411229&nav=1sW7

Baxter Coauthors Studies On Renewal Of Marriage Vows (The Ledger, Jan. 25)
A story examining why some married couples renew vows after many years together quotes the findings of two professors, one from the University of Iowa, who studied the phenomenon in studies published in 1995 and 2002. Dawn Braithwaite, a professor in communication studies at the University of Nebraska, and LESLIE BAXTER, a professor at the UI, interviewed couples who renewed their vows. The paper is based in Lakeland, Fla.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060125/NEWS/601250301/1021

Ahrens Comments On Fate Of Asthma Inhalers (CNNMoney.com, Jan. 24)
An FDA advisory committee voted to take away over-the-counter status for asthma inhalers that use the chemical epinephrine and an ozone-depleting propellant on Tuesday, but the vote is not a final decision. Some 3 to 5 percent of adults and 7 to 10 percent of children suffer from asthma, according to the National Institutes of Health. There are no epinephrine-based inhalers on the market that use hydrofluroalkane, or HFA, the environmentally friendly option of delivery, and there are no epinephrine-based inhalers available as a prescription. Prescription inhalers use albuterol as their active compound and HFA as a propellant. Albuterol is more effective in treating asthma, according to Dr. RICHARD AHRENS, allergist, pediatric pulmonologist, professor at the University of Iowa and former chair of the Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. So if the FDA decides to get rid of OTC epinephrine-based inhalers, what does these mean for asthmatics? "For patients who are receiving asthma care from physicians and using prescription inhalers, this means basically nothing, because they wouldn't be using this anyhow," said Ahrens. "But it does mean that people who, for whatever reasons, were treating their asthma on their own with OTC medications would no longer have this available."
http://money.cnn.com/2006/01/24/news/companies/inhaler/

Robinson Speaks at Maine Seminary Convocation (Bangor Daily News, Jan. 24)
Ministers lined up Monday to thank author MARILYNNE ROBINSON for her respective and realistic portrayal of their profession in her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "Gilead." Robinson, a professor at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, was the keynote speaker at the Bangor Theological Seminary's 101st Convocation held at the Hammond Street Congregational Church. Despite her own commitment to her faith, Robinson warned her audience Monday that it must be sensitive to the needs of the "unchurched." "We have got to be tenderly respectful of the unchurched because we have no idea what they are actually thinking," she said. "And sometimes the most moving, religious ideas that I hear come from people who have considered themselves to have no background in religion at all. "If the churches could find any way to give them what they hope for, they probably would come to church," she said. "What they don't find in churches, if they should ever wander into one, is anything to explain to them what it's all about. Because there's a [perception] that has seeped into some parts of the culture that we don't talk about ideas here."
http://www.bangornews.com/news/templates/?a=127624

UI Burn Center Finds Fewer Meth Burns (Spartanburg Herald Journal, Jan. 24)
While new regulations on over-the-counter drugs have reduced the number of home meth labs, officials in states with those laws are now worried about a new problem: the drop in home-cooked methamphetamine has been met by a new flood of crystal methamphetamine coming largely from Mexico. Sometimes called ice, crystal methamphetamine is far purer, and therefore even more highly addictive, than powdered home-cooked methamphetamine, a change that health officials say has led to greater risk of overdose. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Burn Center, which in 2004 spent $2.8 million treating people whose skin had been scorched off by the toxic chemicals used to make methamphetamine at home, says it now sees hardly any cases of that sort. Drug treatment centers, on the other hand, say they are treating just as many or more methamphetamine addicts. The Herald Journal is based in North Carolina. The same story appeared on the Web sites of THE OAKLAND (CA) TRIBUNE and other Bay Area newspapers.
http://www.goupstate.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060123/ZNYT02/601230383/1051/NEWS01

Kiss, Banfi Study ROS (Innovations Report, Jan. 24)
Though linked to aging and cancer, reactive oxygen species plays another role. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are normally produced as a product of metabolism, and, as their name implies, they are highly reactive with surrounding biological components. The work is reported in Current Biology by a team of researchers, including PETER KISS and BOTOND BANFI of the University of Iowa. Innovations Report is based in Germany.
http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/life_sciences/report-54262.html

Replacing Skorton to be Costly (WQAD-TV, Jan. 24)
The search for a new president at the University of Iowa could be costly. DAVID SKORTON has been named the president of Cornell University in New York. At Iowa, Skorton replaced Mary Sue Coleman three years ago, and the university spent nearly 200-thousand dollars during that search. The executive director of the Iowa Board of Regents says the school can expect to spend that amount again. WQAD is based in Moline, Il.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4401732&nav=1sW7

Reno Speaks at UI (WQAD-TV, Jan. 23)
Former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno is urging prosecutors to be more cautious to avoid wrongful convictions.  Reno, who was at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA yesterday, says lawyers need to be thorough, stay current on changing DNA technology and be aware of how mental illness effects investigations.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4396166&nav=1sW7

Skorton: Cornell Contract Terms Still Being Worked Out (Chronicle, Jan. 23)
DAVID J. SKORTON
, president of the University of Iowa who is also a practicing cardiologist and jazz musician, will become the new president of Cornell University, Cornell's trustees announced on Saturday. Skorton, 56, has led Iowa since 2003 and holds academic appointments there in internal medicine, electrical and computer engineering, and biomedical engineering. He said that the terms of his contract at Cornell are still being worked out but that he expects to also hold academic appointments in biomedical engineering and internal medicine and pediatrics in his new job. His wife, ROBIN L. DAVISSON, has accepted academic appointments in the departments of biomedical sciences, and cell and developmental biology at Cornell. At Iowa, Davisson is an associate professor of anatomy and cell biology.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2006/01/2006012303n.htm

Skorton Named Cornell President (Inside Higher Ed, Jan. 23)
Cornell University announced on Saturday that DAVID J. SKORTON would be its next president. Skorton is currently president of the University of Iowa, where he has been a popular leader on the campus and a highly successful fund raiser off it. He has won praise in a long administrative career at Iowa and from Cornell's search committee for the breadth of his interests and his ability to see how the different parts of a university relate. Skorton is a medical scientist by training (his expertise is in cardiology and biomedical engineering), but he has pushed hard for the humanities and arts at Iowa. He has worked as a jazz musician, continues to study flute and saxophone and hosts a jazz radio show in Iowa City.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/01/23/skorton

Reno Speaks On DNA Technology At UI (WQAD-TV, Jan. 23)
Former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno is urging prosecutors to be more cautious to avoid wrongful convictions. Reno, who was at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA yesterday, says lawyers need to be thorough, stay current on changing DNA technology and be aware of how mental illness effects investigations. She says research has shown that intense public pressure, rushed investigations and reliance on testimony from dubious witnesses can give prosecutors a "tunnel vision" that has led to dozens of cases where the wrong person was convicted. Reno says if there is even one -- "it's too many." The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4396166&nav=1sW7

Cornell Community Gets Acquainted With Skorton (Ithaca Journal, Jan. 23)
Campus and community leaders got a first look at Cornell University's new president on Saturday, and although DAVID SKORTON's identity was still a new revelation, many gathered quick impressions of an approachable man and a promising leader. Charles Walcott, the dean of faculty at Cornell, said Skorton met with a group of faculty Saturday morning, and engaged in a "cordial, friendly and far-reaching conversation" that included Cornell's relationships with institutions abroad and issues related to diversity. "I think people felt that he was listening and thinking about the issues that were of concern," Walcott said. Skorton was named Cornell's 12th president Saturday afternoon, following a special meeting of the Board of Trustees, which voted unanimously to hire him. He is currently president of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, where civic leaders have lauded him for his involvement in economic development, civic engagement and equity in the area. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060123/NEWS01/601230314/1002

Skorton, Davisson Credit Cornell Career Program (Ithaca Journal, Jan. 23)
A story originally published in the Iowa City Press Citizen reports that University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON said Saturday that the chance to become president of Cornell University was impossible to turn down. Skorton, 56, was officially named the 12th president of Cornell University at a midday news conference Saturday on the school's campus. He will take over the presidency of the university on July 1. The "dual-career opportunity" for Skorton and his wife, ROBIN DAVISSON, a UI associate professor of anatomy and cell biology, was a major attraction, Skorton said after he attended a Cornell basketball game and a faculty chicken barbecue. "That's the honest answer, that this is an unusually distinguished institution that presented a very, very attractive opportunity and also offered a very attractive opportunity to my wife," Skorton said in a conference call with Iowa reporters. "It was not because of anything unattractive at the University of Iowa," he said. Skorton has been president of UI since March 2003. He has been at UI since 1980 as a faculty member. He planned on being back in Iowa City on Saturday night and at work today. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060123/NEWS01/601230318/1002

Cornell Makes Official Announcement On Skorton (Ithaca Journal, Jan. 23)
As expected, Cornell University on Saturday appointed DAVID. J. SKORTON as its 12th president. Currently the president of the University of Iowa, Skorton will take over at Cornell on July 1. Until then, Interim President Hunter R. Rawlings III -- who originally led Cornell from 1995 through 2003 and also preceded Skorton as a University of Iowa president -- will remain in office. "This is an emotional homecoming for us, an intellectual homecoming for us," Skorton said during a Saturday press conference, noting that he and his wife, researcher ROBIN DAVISSON, have colleagues at the Ithaca and New York City campuses. "Hunter Rawlings is the man who gave me my start in university administration and showed me the signposts along the way. So, it is a homecoming in that way as well." The paper is based in New York.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060123/NEWS01/601230313/1002

Skorton Named Cornell's 12th President (New York Post, Jan. 23)
Cornell University chose a cardiologist and leader in research ethics as its next president, only the 12th in the Ivy League school's history. DAVID SKORTON, president of the University of Iowa since 2003, said he had no grand plans for change yet, but would work to strengthen ties with the communities Cornell serves. Skorton will take office July 1, succeeding Jeffrey Lehman.
http://www.nypost.com/news/regionalnews/62058.htm

UI Burn Lab Sees Drop In Meth-Related Injuries (New York Times, Jan. 23)\
In the seven months since Iowa passed its law restricting cold medicines used to make methamphetamine, busts of homemade meth labs have dropped from 120 a month to just 20. People once terrified about the neighbor's house blowing up now walk up to the state's drug policy director, Marvin Van Haaften, at his local Wal-Mart to thank him for making them safer. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BURN CENTER, which in 2004 spent $2.8 million treating people whose skin had been scorched off by the toxic chemicals used to make meth at home, says it now sees hardly any such cases. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the BRADENTON HERALD in Florida.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/23/national/23meth.html?hp&ex=1137992400&en=b005ccf840ae1812&ei=5094&partner=homepage

Columnist Discusses Iowa Cloning Legislation (The Weekly Standard, Jan. 23)
In a column written by Wesley J. Smith, a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute and a special consultant to the Center for Bioethics and Culture, reports about the debate in Iowa over the state's cloning law. It quotes Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack's comment in his recent Condition of the State address that "Several years ago we limited medical research involving nuclear cell transplants [cloning] at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. At the time we never dreamt that new treatments dependent upon such transplants would be developed so quickly. Well, they have been, and as a result we should revisit our ban on nuclear cell transplants. We should remove the restrictions and allow life saving treatments to be administered to Iowans here in Iowa rather than forcing them to leave our state."
http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/006/599oxoqg.asp

Skorton Only 12th President In Cornell's History (CNN.com, Jan. 22)
Cornell University chose a cardiologist and leader in research ethics as its next president, only the 12th in the Ivy League school's 141-year history. DAVID SKORTON, president of the University of Iowa since 2003, said he had no immediate grand plans for change at Cornell but would work to strengthen its ties with the communities it serves. Skorton takes office July 1, succeeding Jeffrey Lehman, the first alumnus to guide the school. Lehman stepped down in June after less than two years, citing differences in strategic vision with the college's trustees. Former Cornell President Hunter Rawlings III, a past Iowa president who worked with Skorton, is serving as interim president. Skorton's wife, ROBIN DAVISSON, was appointed to faculty positions in the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine and Weill-Cornell Medical College. Versions of this story also ran on the Website of FORBES.COM, NEWSDAY, the WASHINGTON POST, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, LAS VEGAS SUN, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, and many other news outlets.
http://www.cnn.com/2006/EDUCATION/01/22/cornell.ap/

Skorton Outlines Initial Goals As Cornell President (Buffalo News, Jan. 22)
DAVID SKORTON, currently president of the University of Iowa, was chosen Saturday as Cornell University's new president by a unanimous vote by the school's board of trustees. Skorton, 56, said his first job will be to listen. "It's important that we develop interaction on issues. Presidents need to be in a listening mode when they are starting a new task . . . and I will be in a listening mode," he said after being introduced as the Ivy League school's 12th president. "I will have open meetings, open forums, an open-door policy and [be] calling bingo in the dorms at night, trying to get the students to talk to me and tell me what's really on their minds." He said he would similarly engage faculty and staff. Skorton officially takes office at Cornell on July 1, succeeding Jeffrey Lehmanm who announced in June that he was stepping down. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20060122/6016468.asp

Skorton: First Job Is To Listen (Auburn Citizen, Jan. 21)
DAVID SKORTON said his first job as Cornell University's new president will be to listen. "It's important that we develop interaction on issues. Presidents need to be in a listening mode when they are starting a new task ... and I will be in a listening mode," Skorton said Saturday after being introduced as the Ivy League school's 12th president. Skorton's wife, ROBIN DAVISSON, was appointed to faculty positions in the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine in Ithaca and at Weill-Cornell Medical College in New York City. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.auburnpub.com/articles/2006/01/22/news/local_news/news05.txt

Skorton Introduced As Cornell's New President (News 10 Now, Jan. 21)
Cornell University introduced its 12th president this weekend. DAVID SKORTON is a cardiologist, musician and research expert. He comes to Cornell from the University of Iowa, where he served as president for nearly three years. Skorton replaces interim president Hunter Rawlings III. Rawlings also served as president of Iowa University before coming to Cornell. The station is based in New York.
http://news10now.com/content/all_news/tompkinscortland_county/?ArID=57836&SecID=111

UI Nets $1 Million To Support Lung Disease Research (WQAD-TV, Jan. 21)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will receive a $1 million dollar federal grant to support research on lung disease and heart and vascular disease. Iowa Senator Tom Harkin announced the funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Harkin, the ranking Democrat on the subcommittee that funds health and education, says the research will hopefully better scientific understanding and improve the quality of life for Iowans and others across the nation. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4393131&nav=1sW7

Iowa Citians Say They'll Miss Skorton (Ithaca Journal, Jan. 21)
Iowa City community leaders and residents were surprised and saddened by the news that University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON will depart later this year. "It's a total shock. I really thought Dave would be here until he retired. He was a great ambassador for the UI and Iowa City community," said Craig Gustaveson, president-elect of the Downtown Association. "He was so approachable," Gustaveson said. "That is one of the things I liked so much about him. It'll be hard to replace him." Skorton -- who has spent more than two decades at UI in various roles including professor, physician, vice president for research and external relations -- is well-known and well-liked in the Iowa City area. "He had tremendous vision and insight," said Iowa City Mayor Ross Wilburn. "He had a commitment to economic development, civic engagement and diversity." The paper is based in New York.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060121/NEWS01/601210336/1002

Virtual Hospital Offers Anxiety Disorder Tips (Forbes.com, Jan. 20)
According to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S VIRTUAL HOSPITAL site, anxiety disorders are among the most common forms of mental illness in the United States, affecting some 4 million people. If close friends or relatives have an anxiety disorder, here are suggested ways to help them cope: 1) be stable and consistent. Don't surprise the person; 2) Let the person set his own pace for recovery; 3) be patient and accepting; 4) Support the person as he moves forward in the recovery process.
http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/12/14/hscout529562.html

Voting Dispute Lawsuit Withdrawn (Arizona Republic, Jan. 20)
A state senator investigating a disputed election has withdrawn a lawsuit seeking access to the ballots, but he said he would file a new suit soon. Sen. Jack Harper, R-Surprise, said he decided to drop his suit in Superior Court after the Maricopa County Attorney's Office opposed his request for a continuance. The investigator, DOUGLAS JONES, and the circumstances of his hiring have brought criticism to Harper. The controversy concerns the September 2004 District 20 primary race, in which John McComish defeated Anton Orlich after a recount found more than 400 new votes and reversed the initial outcome. After the Senate refused to pay for Harper's investigation into the recount, Harper turned to the weekly newspaper New Times, which paid $3,000 for a University of Iowa computer-science expert to examine the results. http://www.azcentral.com/specials/special12//articles/0112capitol-harper12.html

UI Graduate Student Reads From Play (Independent Press, Jan. 20)
On Jan. 5, the January Roundtable Reading Series at Playwrights Theater, featured a reading of "Curious Father" by Madison native, Austin Bunn. The debut full-length play is about a married man who confronts his homosexuality. Bunn is currently a student in the masters in fine arts program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he is working towards an degree in playwriting. This spring, "Curious Father" was given a reading at the 2005 Iowa New Play Festival. The newspaper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/entertainment/independentpress/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/1135790435298100.xml&coll=18

Bell Comments On Music Therapy Device (Duluth News-Tribune, Jan. 20)
Jayne Standley of Florida State University devised a way for premature babies who need to nurse to be "rewarded" with music. She developed a computer-rigged and patented pacifier that triggers lullabies. The more the baby sucks the pacifier, the more frequently they hear music, and the more they suck. Dr. EDWARD BELL of Iowa Hospitals, neonatologist and previous Head of Neonatology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, called Standley's pacifier "very clever." "At the very least, it seems like an interesting research tool. It makes sense to use it in a clinical setting." The newspaper is based in Minnesota. The article also appeared in the MYRTLE BEACH (S.C) SUN NEWS, MACON TELEGRAPH and COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, and several other newspapers. http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/news/nation/13670639.htm

Organist Graduated From UI (Kennebec Journal, Jan. 20)
Penney Memorial United Baptist Church in Augusta raised $90,000 to renovate its 1926 Hall-Estey pipe organ. A rededication concert is being held Jan. 20 at the church. Featured organist Kevin Birch holds a doctor of musical arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper serves Augusta, Maine.
http://kennebecjournal.mainetoday.com/news/local/2346248.shtml

McGeehee Comments on Sensory Warnings (Discovery Channel, Jan. 19)
A vibrating seatbelt or a burst of peppermint scent could help improve a driver's concentration and reduce road accidents. Two studies, conducted by Oxford University researchers Charles Spence, who Cristy Ho, found that such multi-sensory warning signals significantly improved a drivers' reaction time to front- and rear-end collisions. "The thing that is interesting is that Spence adds the olfactory side of things to that equation. That's something we haven't explored much," said DANIEL MCGEHEE, director of the Human Factors and Vehicle Safety Research Division at the University of Iowa. According to McGehee, technology already exists, sensors and cameras, for example, that could be used to monitor a driver's attention or the driving conditions and then initiate the vibrations or the scent. http://dsc.discovery.com/news/briefs/20060116/tactilecar_tec.html

Forkenbrock Speaks About Road Taxes (RedNova.com, Jan. 19)
The Federal Highway Administration recently convened a roundtable of transportation finance and policy experts to discuss highway financing options. One specialized tax that has been used to finance highway improvements is the developer fee. "Many believe that it may be appropriate to require developers to pay at least part of the cost of providing local roads that serve their developments," said roundtable participant DAVID J. FORKENBROCK, director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa. http://www.redorbit.com/news/technology/362742/the_future_of_highway_financing/index.html?source=r_technology

Freedman Offers Suggestions On Nomination Hearings (New York Times, Jan. 18)
James O. Freedman, identified as president emeritus of Dartmouth College and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, offers in a letter to the editor two suggestions for "diminishing the tedium of Senate hearings on federal judicial nominations" (in reference to the recent Supreme Court justice nomination hearings on Samuel A. Alito Jr.): "Reduce the size of the Senate Judiciary Committee from 18 to 10 members; and locate the initial round(s) of questioning (before the senators take over) in a professional moderator not likely to be given to long patches of self-aggrandizing oratory. Jim Lehrer would be an excellent choice."
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/18/opinion/l18alito.html

Story On College Drinking Mentions UI (Detroit Free Press, Jan. 18)
A column titled "Five Things About Drinking" reports that the Princeton Review lists the nation's top party schools each year, based on student surveys about drinking, drug use, hours of daily study and the importance of the Greek system on campus. Of the 2005 Top 10 party schools, three were from the Big Ten: No. 1 University of Wisconsin, No. 6 Indiana University and No. 8 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060118/NEWS05/601180352/1007/NEWS

Author McGarrity Attended UI (Santa Fe New Mexican, Jan. 18)
A story on writer Michael McGarrity, whose 10th novel in the Kevin Kerney police mystery series is "Nothing But Trouble," says McGarrity studied psychology and English at San Jose State University and holds a master's degree in clinical social work from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.freenewmexican.com/news/38050.html

UI, ISU, UNI Hope To Attract More Out-Of-State Students (WQAD-TV, Jan. 17)
Iowa's public universities hope to boost tuition revenues by attracting more students outside the state. Non-resident tuition rates have increased sharply in recent years, accompanied by a decrease in out-of state students. The Iowa Board of Regents wants to curb tuition increases and get more nationwide consideration from high school graduates. Bob Downer, a regent from Iowa City, says the state can't grow by -- quote -- "throwing up a wall around it or digging a moat." Out-of-state undergraduates -- not including international students -- comprised 23 percent of the undergraduate enrollment last fall at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and University of Northern Iowa. That's up about 1 percent from fall 1995. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4375400&nav=1sW7

Jones Arizona Vote Controversy Continues (Arizona Republic, Jan. 17)
A Republican-controlled Senate Ethics Committee in Arizona dismissed a complaint against GOP Sen. Jack Harper on Monday, quashing a potential inquiry into his investigation of a legislative recount in a 2004 primary race. Harper's critics had said that it appeared he let a local newspaper get a scoop because it paid for the investigation. Harper has been trying to investigate the recount in the District 20 primary contest. New Times, a weekly newspaper, agreed to pay up to $3,000 for a University of Iowa computer-science expert to examine voting machines used in the race. The expert, DOUGLAS W. JONES, was allowed to inspect the machines last month as a result of Harper's subpoenas. The results of Jones' examination were first published Wednesday on the New Times Web site, about eight hours before senators received a copy of Jones' work.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/0117harper17.html

A version of the same story appeared in THE INDEPENDENT:
http://www.newszap.com/articles/2006/01/16/az/west_valley/si01.txt

UI Study Shows Drug May Help Gamblers (Wilmington News Journal, Jan. 17)
People who gamble pathologically aren't simply irresponsible or weak-willed. They may start playing with their money in a nonpathological way, go on to gamble more dangerously during periods of increased stress and then continue beyond the brink of control. Surprisingly, these difficulties may be more related to brain chemistry than anything else. Researchers have found that people with gambling problems may have differences in the way their brains use serotonin, endorphins and dopamine -- three neurotransmitters related to mood, pleasure and behavior. In fact, they noted that some people with Parkinson's disease (a disease related to dopamine deficiency) who received replacement dopamine began to develop gambling problems and other impulse-control difficulties. These cases led to a study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on the use of Welbutrin (medication that affects dopamine) and cognitive behavioral therapy to treat pathological gambling; the results have been promising. The News Journal is based in Delaware.
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060117/HEALTH/601170301/-1/NEWS01

Bell Says Infant Music Experiment 'Very Clever' (Miami Herald, Jan. 17)
A professor at the University of Miami has developed a system in which infants can determine what music to listen to by how much they suck on a specially designed pacifier. Dr. EDWARD BELL of Iowa Hospitals, neonatologist and previous Head of Neonatology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, called the pacifier "very clever." "At the very least, it seems like an interesting research tool. It makes sense to use it in a clinical setting."
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/living/13636534.htm

Ross Advises On Drug Expiration Dates (Akron Beacon Journal, Jan. 17)
If you'd never open your refrigerator and pop the top on the milk jug -- two weeks past its expiration date -- and chug it down, then why would you open your medicine cabinet and pop a pill that's two months -- worse yet, two years -- past its expiration date? MARY ROSS, pharmacy supervisor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, poses that not-so-rhetorical question to make a point: People tend to take the expiration dates on their food products much more seriously than expiration dates on their prescription and over-the-counter drugs. "But, over time, the chemical makeup and potency of medications changes," Ross said. "Taking outdated medications may also mean you are taking a pill that is not going to help you. Many medications become ineffective past their expiration date. Heat, cold and moisture can also affect a medication's potency."
http://www.ohio.com/mld/beaconjournal/living/13643279.htm

Photos By Graduate On Exhibit (Monmouth Review Atlas, Jan. 17)
"Stealing Ireland," an exhibition of photographs by former Monmouth College visiting professor Dustin Morrow, will be on display Jan. 17 through Feb. 10 in the Len G. Everett Gallery in the college's Hewes Library. Taken throughout western Ireland over the past four years, the photographs capture a view of the Emerald Isle seldom seen by tourists. Morrow earned a masters of fine arts degree from the department of cinema and comparative literature at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Review Atlas is based in Illinois.
http://www.reviewatlas.com/articles/2006/01/16/news/local/news1.txt

Assouline Quoted In Story On Child Prodigy (The New Yorker, Jan. 16)
A feature on a young Nebraska child prodigy who committed suicide at the age of 14 says the boy's intelligence was tested using the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, Form L-M. But the story says the test has some critics, including SUSAN ASSOULINE, associate director of the gifted-education program at the University of Iowa, who says the test not only assesses higher scores; it tends to produce them. "The Form L-M uses children from several decades ago as its comparison group, so of course the scores are going to skew much higher if it's used on today's kids - every generation of children is more academically and environmentally advanced than the previous generation," Assouline said. "It's not a useful test in this day and age." (Link not available)

Ahrens Comments On Asthma Medications (CNN.com, Jan. 16)
The Federal Drug Administration may soon make a ruling about inhaled epinephrine-based asthma medications that may force them off the market. "Inhaled epinephrine does have some affect, but it is not anywhere near as effective as the [albuterol-based] prescription inhalers that provide the same kind of role," said Dr. RICHARD AHRENS, allergist, pediatric pulmonologist and professor at the University of Iowa. In fact, Ahrens and other allergists are worried that over-the-counter availability of epinephrine might be keeping asthmatics from seeking professional help in treating their extreme reactions to allergies, and that a ban might prompt them to seek real help. "[Epinephrine] may provide some benefit to patients, but when they start to have trouble, it really isn't effective and it may keep them from getting other care," said Ahrens, adding that epinephrine is a stimulant, resulting in rapid heart beat, sweating and "jitteriness."
http://money.cnn.com/2006/01/16/news/companies/asthma/

Fisher Development Research Cited (Lexington Herald Leader, Jan. 16)
A story about state-subsidized economic development giveaways points to research by University of Iowa economist PETER FISHER and others suggests that tax incentives used to woo new companies affect the location decision of a business less than 10 percent of the time. In the other 90 percent, companies accept incentives when they've already decided where to go based on business basics, such as the availability of a skilled work force or the cost of transporting goods.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/news/politics/13635984.htm

Hershey Studies J. Peterman (Express Times, Jan. 15)
Consumer catalogs have become big business in America, so much so they've even become a part of the pop culture, as the J. Peterman character on Seinfeld demonstrates. Even scholarly works have plumbed the depths of the catalog business. For example, ELEANOR HERSHEY, of the Department of English at the University of Iowa, wrote an academic paper, "It'll Always be Burma to Me: J. Peterman on Seinfeld." She ended it with, "America's fascination with the character of J. Peterman draws attention to the acceptance of First World power that continues to influence the most celebrated popular texts." The Express Times is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/living/expresstimes/index.ssf?/base/living-0/1137319623265160.xml&coll=2

UI Professor Comments On Office Gossip (Desert Morning News, Jan. 14)
A story about the pros and cons of office gossip cites a quote by JAY CHRISTENSEN-SZALANSKI from a Des Moines Register story last October. "I cannot see any beneficial reason to advocate the use of gossip in business," said Christensen-Szalanski, a professor in the department of management and organization at the University of Iowa. "You should certainly make sure that you're a source of information for (workers) so that they don't have to go to other places for it." The Morning News is based in Provo, Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,635175981,00.html

AIG Insurance Settlement Discussed (Marketplace, Jan. 13)
The New York attorney general filed a lawsuit against insurance company AIG last May alleging it manipulated its accounting to make their books look better than they really were. There was talk of a possible $1.5 billion settlement on Jan. 13. University of Iowa law Professor HILLARY SALE says that kind of money acts as a deterrent for future offenders and sends a message to investors. “A settlement of $1.5 billion, even if the agreement contains language that indicates that AIG is admitting no wrongdoing, is of such a significant size that it's hard for the average investor to believe, in fact, that no wrongdoing actually occurred,” she said. “Marketplace” is a business news show broadcast on public radio stations.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=c87cdd6aa578e26a20b60c7cb6feae57&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVb&_md5=e039c0fb851c2c7ed100095e1610a75b

Sayre Comments On Frey Book (Sydney Morning Herald, Jan. 13)
The Smoking Gun website reported some significant discrepancies in James Frey's memoir about addiction, "A Million Little Pieces." He has joined a line of memoir writers that stretches back through American history to one of its founding fathers, Benjamin Franklin. Franklin's autobiography, says Professor ROBERT SAYRE, omitted any reference to his children born out of wedlock. Further, "it certainly includes false or excessive representations, and omissions, if not fabrications." Sayre, professor of English at the University of Iowa, says there was a common thread that he could follow from "A Million Little Pieces" that wound its way deep into the American character. "There's so much emphasis in our culture on redemption," Sayre says. "We've always had lots of autobiographies about people's conversions. It strikes a big chord. It's a long historic theme in American culture. There's nothing that can pluck the heart strings like the story of a sinner redeemed." The newspaper is based in Australia. http://www.smh.com.au/news/books/have-i-got-a-story-for-you/2006/01/13/1137118969954.html?page=fullpage#contentSwap2

Jones Calls for Ballot Examination (Arizona Republic, Jan. 13)
A voting-technology expert is calling for the examination of ballots cast in an Arizona primary election, saying it is the only way to quell concerns that the ballots were tampered with. While the report gives support to those who have questioned the handling of the September 2004 recount, the circumstance of its release could mean trouble for the state senator who sponsored it. "Without empirical examination of a random sample of voted ballots, there is no way to decide between the hypothesis that ballots have been altered and the hypothesis that ballots were miscounted by poorly calibrated machines," University of Iowa Associate Professor DOUGLAS JONES wrote in a report released Thursday.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0113capitol-harper13.html

Murder Victim Remembered (Barrington Courier-Review, Jan. 13)
Family, friends, former teachers and co-workers will remember Nancy Palumbo, 42, as a loving sister and daughter, a loyal friend, a genuinely kind and welcoming person, a bright student, a committed caretaker and a devoted mother. Her husband, John Svenstrup, was charged with killing the former Barrington resident in late December. She attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she earned her undergraduate degree in biology in 1985. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/ba/01-12-06-794958.html

Doctors Develop Magnetic Surgery Technique (WIS-TV, Jan. 12)
Matthew Howard and two colleagues invented the Stereotaxis magnetic guidance system, which heart doctors use to treat heart rhythm problems. With a computer joystick, they maneuver the magnetized tip of a catheter inside the heart. The magnetic pull of giant magnets moving around the operating table keep the catheter in place. Howard originally envisioned the system for brain surgery and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers pioneered using it for lung patients. Recently, they did the first magnetic lung navigation in the world. The television station serves Columbia, S.C. http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S=4355290&nav=0RaP

Opera Singer Taught At UI (Roanoke Times, Jan. 12)
Radford University professor and contralto opera singer Clarity James has performed about everywhere an opera singer performs, from the Vienna Staatsoper to the Netherlands Opera to the Dallas and New York City Operas. She taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for four years and at Radford for 15 years. The newspaper is based in Virginia.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=54d96c92b7271b170b144d94faf1a469&_docnum=26&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkVA&_md5=bf40345a87224e6f26d4fe3ba103252b

Pierce Case, UI Athletic Code Discussed (Chronicle, Jan. 13)
A story about how conduct codes are giving athletics directors more power to bench players who break the rules says the University of Iowa introduced a conduct code for athletes last fall following an incident that, officials there say, demonstrated the need for such a policy. In the fall of 2002, a student accused the basketball team's star player, Pierre Pierce, of sexual assault. The police later charged him with sexual abuse in the third degree. At the time, no formal rules governed Mr. Pierce's athletic eligibility, but ROBERT A. BOWLSBY II, Iowa's athletics director, imposed an interim suspension. The basketball team's head coach, STEVE ALFORD, publicly stated his belief that Mr. Pierce was innocent. Mr. Pierce rejoined the team the following season after pleading guilty to a lesser charge of "assault causing injury." A subsequent criminal investigation prompted the athletics department to kick Mr. Pierce off the team permanently last February. Meanwhile, WILLARD L. BOYD, Iowa's interim president in 2002, appointed an investigative committee to draw lessons from the initial Pierce incident.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i19/19a04301.htm

Author Attended Writers' Workshop (Albany Times Union, Jan. 12)
Jonah Lee was secretly buying property in Sheridan Hollow when he was murdered for standing in the way of a new parking garage. Sound plausible? It's a story line that blends pulp with policy in "The Long Stair," Kirby White's new murder mystery. The author, who is 69 and a longtime housing advocate and writer, toiled for years as an underpaid community developer in downtown Albany. White earned a master's degree in fine arts for fiction writing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, which over the years has drawn such esteemed place-based writers from Flannery O'Connor to Albany's William Kennedy. The newspaper is based in New York.
http://timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=438902&category=ALBANY&BCCode=&newsdate=1/12/2006

Jones Finds Voting Machine Problems (Phoenix New Times, Jan. 12)
An independent voting-technology expert has discovered widespread problems within the Maricopa County Elections Department that raise serious questions over the ability of voting officials in the nation's fourth-most-populous county to conduct fair and accurate elections. "Any election where the margin of victory is under two percent could be called into question," says University of Iowa computer science professor DOUGLAS JONES. Jones is one of the nation's top experts on voting-machine technology. He discovered the irregularities during an inspection of the county's vote-tabulation machinery late last month. "These problems," Jones says in an interview, "suggest a systemic problem with election administration" in Maricopa County and a failure by the state to properly oversee the county's handling of elections. The newspaper is based in Arizona.
http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/Issues/2006-01-12/news/dougherty.html

Doctors Group Rates Emergency Rooms (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 11)
The American College of Emergency Physicians gave Nebraska a C-minus and Iowa a C-plus in the report it released Tuesday in a first-ever report card on the state of emergency medicine in the United States. Both states took criticism for low numbers of board-certified emergency room doctors. The presidents of the group's Nebraska and Iowa chapters said recruiting and training emergency medicine physicians poses the greatest challenge in both of the largely rural states. The University of Nebraska Medical Center and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have started emergency medicine residency programs in the last several years. Those training programs should boost the number of ER doctors, they said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=f8ac8cc074ec6835df02868dc0c8568b&_docnum=29&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkVA&_md5=fb8312267b0dec01d239f7b0c375634c

Black Comments On 'Bag Lady' Syndrome (Bankrate.com, Jan. 11)
"Bag-lady syndrome" is a fear many women share that their financial security could disappear in a heartbeat, leaving them homeless, penniless and destitute. Despite its clinical-sounding nickname, bag-lady syndrome is not a true psychological condition at all, according to DONALD BLACK, M.D. and professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa. "I have seen a number of patients over the years with this fear, but they tend to have psychotic depression; they've become so depressed that they've developed delusions about having lost their belongings or having no money. You treat them and it goes away," he says.
http://www.bankrate.com/brm/news/pf/20060111a1.asp

Hovenkamp: Volvo Ruling To Have Impact (Arkansas Democrat Gazette, Jan. 11)
The U. S. Supreme Court on Tuesday overturned an Arkansas truck dealer's victory over Volvo's truck operations and sent the case back to a federal appeals court for more proceedings in a dispute over the varied discounts given to retailers. Reeder-Simco GMC Inc. of Fort Smith had sued Volvo Trucks in 2000, saying the manufacturer violated federal law by not giving it the same dealer discounts given to others. At the time, Volvo was trying to terminate its franchise agreement with Reeder-Simco because sales targets were not being met. The ruling is a victory for industries that backed Volvo in the case, including the oil and gas business. "It's going to have a big impact on distribution markets like this one, where you've got big equipment and a small number of bids," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust law at the University of Iowa. A version of the story also ran on the Websites of THE NEW YORK SUN and the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/Business/142290/

Robinson To Read In Idaho (Fort Wayne News Sentinel, Jan. 10)
A story about Pulitzer Prize-winning author MARILYNNE ROBINSON, who is scheduled to read from her latest novel, "Gilead," in Boise, Idaho, Jan. 17, says Robinson teaches writing at the University of Iowa's acclaimed Writers' Workshop. A version of the story also ran on the Website of THE IDAHO STATESMAN.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/13593729.htm

UI To Study Young Drivers (WQAD-TV, Jan. 10)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will conduct at study of new teen drivers using video cameras installed in cars. The study will record the actions of newly licensed drivers with cameras mounted near the rearview mirror. One camera will record what's going on in front of the car. The other will record the driver's action. The study will use volunteer students from the Clear Creek Amana school district. Researchers will use the recording to determine what the drivers did right, and what they did wrong. The goal of the study is to help improve the safety of young drivers, who are the most likely to have accidents. The study is funded by American Family Insurance. Researchers hope to expand the study to an urban area, such as the Twin Cities or Des Moines.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4343898&nav=1sW7

Gray Study Of Zoonotic Diseases Cited (MyDNA.com, Jan. 10)
Infectious diseases like AIDS, SARS, West Nile virus and bird flu are all known as zoonotic diseases. This means that they were at one time found only in animals, and they later spread to humans. While governments and health care agencies are scrambling to prepare for any potential outbreaks, the problem is likely to worsen, warns Andrew Cunningham, Ph.D., B.V.M.S., in a recent issue of the British Medical Journal. Virtually anyone who comes in contact with live animals or with animal remains is at risk for encountering disease. However, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, author GREGORY GRAY, M.D., of the University of Iowa, says there are certain groups at increased risk. The study found that people with increased exposure to pigs, such as veterinarians, farmers and meat processors, were more likely than the general population to be test seropositive for the virus that causes swine flu. MyDNA.com, a division of Revolution Health, is a leading eHealth portal, publishing consumer-centric health news, disease content, and genomic science information accessible on the Internet, and on wireless and telephony networks.
http://www.mydna.com/aboutus

Egyptian Writer Discusses Time With IWP (Al-Ahram, Jan. 10)
Mona Price, an Egyptian writer who took part in last summer's INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, recounts in a column a dispute she had with the IWP's director over her stated desire to visit a Native American reservation while in the United States. The publication is based in Cairo, Egypt.
http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2006/777/in2.htm

Ross Advises On Drug Expiration Dates (Indianapolis Star, Jan. 10)
If you'd never open your refrigerator and pop the top on the milk jug -- two weeks past its expiration date -- and chug it down, then why would you open your medicine cabinet and pop a pill that's two months -- worse yet, two years -- past its expiration date? MARY ROSS, pharmacy supervisor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, poses that not-so-rhetorical question to make a point: People tend to take the expiration dates on their food products much more seriously than expiration dates on their prescription and over-the-counter drugs. "But, over time, the chemical makeup and potency of medications changes," Ross said. "Taking outdated medications may also mean you are taking a pill that is not going to help you. Many medications become ineffective past their expiration date. Heat, cold and moisture can also affect a medication's potency."
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060110/LIVING01/601100340/1007/LIVING

Stem Cell Production Company Started At UI (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Jan. 10)
An eastern Iowa company has acquired a robotic machine designed to isolate stem cells from umbilical cord blood or adult blood that scientists said will provide endless research opportunities. Cellular Engineering Technologies Inc. bought the $50,000 Robosep machines on Dec. 29 and ran initial tests the same day. CET, founded in 2000 by its president and chief executive officer, Dr. Alan Moy, operated through the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA until July 2005. It then became an independent company and moved to Coralville. The Ledger is based in Illinois. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, WASHINGTON POST, NEWSDAY, CBSNEWS.com, BUSINESSWEEK, FORBES, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, BILOXI SUN (Miss.) HERALD, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, COLUMBUS (Ga.) ENQUIRER, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, PORTERSVILLE (Calif.) RECORD, DURANT (Okla.) DAILY DEMOCRAT, MEXICO (Mo.) LEDGER, CARTHAGE (Mo.) PRESS and BOONVILLE (Mo.) DAILY NEWS, and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.businessweek.com/ap/tech/D8F1H7007.htm?campaign_id=apn_tech_down&chan=tc

Chinese Executives Attend UI MBA Program (Business Week, Jan. 9)
In most cases the MBA programs attended by China's top students are very much the product of Western educational institutions, which in recent years have rushed to establish programs on the mainland. The idea: to tap into the enormous demand for talent created by China's white-hot economy. With many Chinese companies facing down global giants for the first time, businesses are sending managers to executive MBA programs by the truckload and giving them free rein to put what they learn to use. Even state-owned companies are getting into the act. Four managers from Jilin Grain Group, an import-export company, now attend executive MBA program in food and agribusiness offered by the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and the HENRY B. TIPPIE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT, and one of them used what he learned to overhaul Jilin's employee incentives.
http://www.businessweek.com/@@GFurcIQQ*OKHDQ4A/magazine/content/06_02/b3966074.htm

Kaaret Team Finds Medium-Sized Black Hole (USA Today, Jan. 9)
University of Iowa researchers have found a giant star orbiting a medium-sized black hole. They say they hope the discovery proves the existence of a new class of black hole and explains how they evolve. The researchers used a special X-ray telescope to find the star in the nearby starburst galaxy M82. The star is about 1,000 times larger than the sun. The team was led by PHILIP KAARET, associate professor in the university's physics and astronomy department. Other researchers include assistant professor CORNELIA LANG and student MELANIE SIMET, a senior from Cedar Falls. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the INTERNATIONAL REPORTER in India.
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2006-01-08-medium-black-holes_x.htm

Kaaret Team Black Hole Discovery Cited (Digital Silence, Jan. 9)
Scientists using NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer have found a doomed star orbiting what appears to be a medium-sized black hole -- a theorized "in-between" category of black hole that has eluded confirmation and frustrated scientists for more than a decade. With the discovery of the star and its orbital period, scientists are now one step away from measuring the mass of such a black hole, a step that would help verify its existence. The star's period and location already fit into the main theory of how these black holes could form. A team led by Prof. PHILIP KAARET of the University of Iowa, Iowa City, announced these results today in Science Express. The results will also appear in the Jan. 27 issue of Science. The paper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.d-silence.com/headlines/New%20Black%20Hole/22223

UI Has Counselors With Arts Knowledge (New York Times, Jan. 8)
Today, there are at least 40 degree-granting independent art academies and 2,000 four-year colleges and universities with art programs leading to a degree. For any college-bound student, many factors weigh in the decision of which school to select -- cost, distance from home, courses. But art students have an additional criterion: should they enroll in an art academy or university? In some ways, the experience is identical. Students at both take a mix of studio and academic courses from professional artists and scholars. But subtle and not-so-subtle differences can be found. For instance, in decades past, institutions like the Yale University School of Art had a reputation for giving their M.F.A. graduates a head start because of faculty members' gallery contacts. But the field has leveled out considerably. Cornell University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have hired career counselors with knowledge of performing and visual arts.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/08/education/guidance.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1136819601-nk1mO9Kl+tQbc2lgjstfaA

Pink Locker Room Debate Revisited (New York Times, Jan. 8)
In 1982, Coach Hayden Fry of the University of Iowa had the locker room for visiting football teams painted pink, figuring that the color might lull opponents into tamer play. The university itself took this one step further: in a recent renovation, it added toilets, urinals, carpeting and lockers in "dusky rose." But last term, ERIN BUZUVIS, a professor at Iowa's law school, complained that the locker room was "equivalent to painting the word 'sissy' or 'girlie man' all across the walls." She added, "What you're really saying is you're weak like a girl. That belittles every female athlete out there." Professor Buzuvis received much verbal abuse, including, she said, at least one death threat. JILL GAULDING, a colleague, came to her defense, telling a university committee studying compliance with N.C.A.A. standards, including sex equity, that the room "reinforces sexism and homophobia." But the room is still pink.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/08/education/edlife/pink.html

Fuortes To Lead Study Of Munitions Workers (WQAD-TV, Jan. 8)
Health and death records of more than 30,000 workers at the Iowa Army Ammunition  Plant will be examined by researchers in the University of Iowa College of Public Health. The study will determine if conventional weapons workers at the plant in southeast Iowa near Burlington have elevated rates of death or adverse health effects, such as cancer. Dr. LAURENCE FUORTES is a University of Iowa professor of occupational and environmental health. He says the first year of the study is funded by a $775,000 grant from the Department of Defense. The total project is expected to cost $5 million over five years. The ammunition plant in Middletown housed a secret federal nuclear weapons program, which was revealed after many former workers developed cancer. In 1975, production of nuclear weapons was transferred to Texas. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4334507&nav=1sW7

Author Godwin Attended Writers' Workshop (Charlotte Observer, Jan. 8)
A feature story on author Gail Godwin says that in 1966 she was admitted to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. She wrote her first novel, "The Perfectionists," under the tutelage of Kurt Vonnegut. In the 35 years since, Godwin has become widely regarded as one of America's best novelists. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/editorial/13576703.htm

Jones On Team Researching E-Voting Machines (BuzzFlash.com, Jan. 7)
After computer scientists raised serious concerns about the gross lack of security in touch screen computer voting machines after the November 2004 election, in August 2005 the National Science Foundation's Cyber Trust program awarded a team of computer science researchers $7.5 million to investigate ways to build trustworthy e-voting systems. The funded researchers are Prof. Avi Rubin, Drs. Drew Dean and Peter Neumann of SRI International; Prof. DOUG JONES of the University of Iowa; Profs. Dan Wallach and Michael Byrne of Rice University; Profs. Deirdre Mulligan and David Wagner of the University of California at Berkeley; and Profs. Dan Boneh and David Dill at Stanford University, along with numerous affiliates. BuzzFlash, based in Chicago, provides headlines, news, and commentary for -- according to its Website -- "a geographically diverse, politically-savvy, pro-democracy, anti-hypocrisy web community, reaching five million people a month and growing."
http://www.buzzflash.com/contributors/06/01/con06011.html

UI Teams Up For China Agribusiness MBA (Business Week Online, Dec. 6)
The Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) Executive MBA program in food and agribusiness -- offered in conjunction with the University of Iowa's HENRY B. TIPPIE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT and with Purdue University -- grew out of consulting work that the Franklin Institute of Management (FIM) did with food companies in China. With agribusiness growing even faster than the Chinese economy as a whole, FIM -- a Beijing-based executive-training company -- saw tremendous demand for an MBA program devoted solely to that sector. Chinese universities didn't have expertise in agribusiness, and agriculture universities lacked classes in general management, so FIM looked to the West, settling on the University of Iowa and Purdue, which FIM felt offered the best combination of strengths. Iowa and Purdue approached the CAAS in 2003, and a deal was struck.
http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/content/dec2005/bs2005126_7006.htm

Skorton Comments On International Summit (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 6)
More needs to be done to create openness and exchange between higher education in the United States and other nations, University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON said Thursday. Skorton spoke by telephone from Washington, where he was attending a two-day summit on international education. The event drew university and college presidents from all 50 states. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice spoke to the group about a new critical language initiative encouraging more Americans to become conversant in other languages, Skorton said. "Her remarks were encouraging . . . and in tune with concerns that I and other academics have, to use higher education to bring cultures together," he said. Skorton said he was encouraged by comments from Rice and President Bush. "If you go to school in another state, you learn a lot about people in that state and how they live; imagine how much more true that is if you study in a different culture," Skorton said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=2093950

Parrott Comments On HUD Closing Loophole (Chronicle, Jan. 6)
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development issued rules last week closing a loophole that had allowed students receiving housing stipends from colleges to live in federally subsidized housing intended for low-income families. The new rules, which were published last Friday in the Federal Register, carry out recent legislation sponsored by Sen. Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat. The legislation was a response to reports in the news media of abuses in federal housing-assistance programs by thousands of college students, including athletes on full scholarships who were receiving substantial room and board allowances. Under the new regulations, students must report parental income and any financial aid received in excess of tuition on their applications for housing assistance under a federal rent-subsidy program known as Section 8. "This is what we had hoped they would do all along," said STEVE PARROTT, director of university relations at the University of Iowa, adding that the university's provost and vice president for student services had been working with the federal agency for the last year to revise the public-housing regulations. "We don't tell any of our students where to live," said Mr. Parrott. But the university does intend to make students aware of the new eligibility restrictions, he said, and to "encourage students to understand and respect them."
http://chronicle.com/daily/2006/01/2006010602n.htm

Hein Comments On Study Of Premature Babies (Washington Times, Jan. 6)
Black premature baby girls born weighing 2.2 pounds or less are more than twice as likely to survive as white boys born at the same weight, a new study by University of Florida researchers has found. The study, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, also revealed that baby girls -- black and white alike -- had better survival prospects than boys when born weighing less than 2.2 pounds. Dr. HERMAN A. HEIN, professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa, said prior research has shown that black women tend to have more premature babies than women of other races. That is "possibly because their babies mature a little earlier and faster," which could explain why those infants have better odds of survival, he said.
http://washingtontimes.com/national/20060106-125034-4422r.htm

UI Ballet Accompanist Performing In Mumbai (Mumbai Mirror, Jan. 6)
Classical pianist and Iowa native Evelyn Dias is doing her doctorate in musicology while working as a ballet accompanist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DANCE FORUM. So, why is she performing for a select group of classical music lovers in Mumbai, whose numbers dwindle every day? You could call it sentiment... It's about her commitment to the city where she learnt how to coax out her first tune from the ivory keys of a piano from her teacher Norma Alphonso, at the age of six. The Mumbai Mirror is based in India.
http://www.mumbaimirror.com/nmirror/mmpaper.asp?sectid=10&articleid=152006213531375152006213515140

Kaaret, Colleagues Find Star Orbiting Black Hole (HappyNews.com, Jan. 5)
Scientists using NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer have found a doomed star orbiting what appears to be a medium-sized black hole, a theorized "in-between" category of black hole that has eluded confirmation and frustrated scientists for more than a decade. With the discovery of the star and its orbital period, scientists are now one step away from measuring the mass of such a black hole, a step which would help verify its existence. The star's period and location already fit into the main theory of how these black holes could form. A team led by Prof. PHILIP KAARET of the University of Iowa, Iowa City, announced these results today in Science Express. The results will also appear in the Jan. 27 issue of Science. Kaaret's group at the University of Iowa includes Prof. CORNELIA LANG and MELANIE SIMET, an undergraduate. A version of the story also ran on the Website of SPACEFLIGHT NOW and YAHOO! NEWS.
http://www.happynews.com/news/152006/star-reveals-evidence-for-new-kind-of-black-hole-.htm

Squire Comments on Pataki Speech (New York Times, Jan. 5)
There was plenty in Governor George Pataki's 12th and last state of the state address to the New York Legislature to suggest that he was speaking, at least in part, to an audience outside of New York. The governor made a pitch for ethanol, an alternative fuel made from corn that is beloved in Iowa, which happens to also be the home of the first presidential caucus, and, judging by Governor Pataki's travel schedule, his new favorite state outside of New York. Although Mr. Pataki has spoken of ethanol in past addresses to the Legislature, his mention of it on Wednesday, combined with his recent trips to Iowa, spurred much talk. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa, said the line about ethanol "is probably more popular in Iowa than New York. I suspect he probably won't be alone in singing that tune," Professor Squire said. "Most farmers here are Republican, and it's a good constituency to address."
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/05/nyregion/metrocampaigns/05assess.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1136471786-ulTFCQXEjzPeCbUH+yv+9g

Jones Investigation Causes Controversy (East Valley Tribune, Jan. 5)
The ethics committee off the Arizona State Senate may look into a controversial election result and an agreement between a state senator and local alternative weekly newspaper to privately investigate the result.  The investigation is being conducted by University of Iowa professor DOUGLAS JONES. The East Valley Tribune is based in Arizona.
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/index.php?sty=56488

A story on the same topic appeared on the Web site of the ARIZONA REPUBLIC, based in Phoenix
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/0105harper05.html

A story on the same topic appeared on the Web site of the ARIZONA STAR, based in Tucson.
http://www.azstarnet.com/sn/hourlyupdate/109902.php

Alumnus, Jazz Pianist Profiled (Jazz Police, Jan. 5)
A profile of jazz pianist Patricia Barber mentions that she studied psychology and music at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before starting her career as a musician.
http://www.jazzpolice.com/content/view/4814/116/

UI Medical School Alumnus Retires (Arizona Daily Sun, Jan. 4)
After 32 years as a pediatrician in Flagstaff, Ariz., Dr. Kent Johnson retired at the end of December. Johnson, 64, saw his last patients Friday. He graduated in 1967 from medical school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper serves Flagstaff, Ariz. http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_includes/story.cfm?storyID=122368

Ross Advises On Drug Expiration Dates (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Jan. 4)
If you'd never open your refrigerator and pop the top on the milk jug -- two weeks past its expiration date -- and chug it down, then why would you open your medicine cabinet and pop a pill that's two months -- worse yet, two years -- past its expiration date? MARY ROSS, pharmacy supervisor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, poses that not-so-rhetorical question to make a point: People tend to take the expiration dates on their food products much more seriously than expiration dates on their prescription and over-the-counter drugs. "But, over time, the chemical makeup and potency of medications changes," Ross said. "Taking outdated medications may also mean you are taking a pill that is not going to help you. Many medications become ineffective past their expiration date. Heat, cold and moisture can also affect a medication's potency." http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=92a198f13eae67b9024a413105cca54e&_docnum=13&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=ac9286104d506d44b323a95726aeecac

Jones Noted As Top Athlete (The Steubenville Herald-Star, Jan. 3)
An article noting famous residents of Steubenville, Ohio points out that Calvin Jones attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA after graduation from Steubenville High School. He became the first African-American to win football's Outland Trophy and the first to appear on the cover of Sports Illustrated magazine. The newspaper is based in Ohio.
http://www.hsconnect.com/news/story/013202006_new01news010106.asp

Fisher Comments On Competitiveness Index (Milwaukee Journal Star, Jan. 3)
Wisconsin consistently ranks low compared to other states in regard to business incubation climate. A state competitiveness study that Beacon Hill Institute released last week confirmed that standing, ranking the state 46th out of 50 for its ability to mobilize investment financing and spawn businesses. Although Wisconsin ranks 19th in bank deposits per capita, it's 39th in venture capital per capita, according to data compiled by Beacon Hill. But some said rankings such as Beacon Hill's aren't good indicators of future economic development. "The Beacon Hill Competitiveness Index is a hopeless mishmash of causal and performance variables that render it useless as an overall predictor of anything," PETER FISHER, a professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa, says in a report for the Economic Policy Institute. http://www.jsonline.com/bym/news/jan06/382253.asp

Black: Gulf War Syndrome Persists After 10 Years (Kansas City Star, Jan. 3)
More than a decade after the Gulf War, veterans deployed to that war are still more likely to suffer from health problems. Researchers found that more than 28 percent of deployed Gulf War veterans suffered from a complex of unexplained symptoms called chronic multisymptom illness, or CMI, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Monday. That figure compares with almost 16 percent of nondeployed veterans with similar symptoms. The results of the study appear this month in the American Journal of Epidemiology. "It's a good news-bad news story," said Dr. DONALD W. BLACK, professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. "The good news is that fewer veterans report symptoms at 10 years (after the war). The bad news is that for many veterans the symptoms persist." The same story appeared on the Web site of the SPRINGFIELD (MO) TIMES LEADER and ST. LOUIS POST DISPATCH.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/local/13534809.htm

Ross: Check Expiration Dates on Drugs (Wilkes-Barre Times Leader, Jan. 3)
If you'd never open your refrigerator and pop the top on the milk jug - two weeks past its expiration date - and chug it down, then why would you open your medicine cabinet and pop a pill that's two months - worse yet, two years - past its expiration date? MARY ROSS, pharmacy supervisor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, poses that not-so-rhetorical question to make a point: People tend to take the expiration dates on their food products much more seriously than expiration dates on their prescription and over-the-counter drugs. "But, over time, the chemical makeup and potency of medications changes," Ross said. "Taking outdated medications may also mean you are taking a pill that is not going to help you. Many medications become ineffective past their expiration date. Heat, cold and moisture can also affect a medication's potency." The same story appeared on the Web site of the MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD and ARIZONA REPUBLIC.
http://www.timesleader.com/mld/timesleader/living/13537414.htm

UI Study Shows Heart Can Rule Mind (The Telegraph, Jan. 3)
Investing money, changing jobs, getting married: all big decisions that can mark a leap into the unknown. Now, a new brain-imaging study finds that the higher the level of uncertainty, the more likely it is that emotion and gut instinct, not logic, will rule. This insight into what goes on in the brain when decisions are made in the face of missing information sheds light on how people save for retirement, how companies price insurance and how countries evaluate risks, ranging from climate change to terrorist attack. The "unknown risk" center of the brain that acts when we face a decision laced with uncertainty has been pinpointed by "experimental economists" at the California Institute of Technology and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Telegraph is based in the United Kingdom.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/connected/main.jhtml?xml=/connected/2006/01/03/ecgutt03.xml&sSheet=/connected/2006/01/03/ixconn.html

Achepohl Collection Exhibited at Chicago Art Institute (ABCNews.com, Jan. 2)
There's a special exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, but don't look for the bright hues of the French Impressionism for which the museum is famous; the colors of these works are the muted earth tones of African mud and clay. The brightest splashes of color in "For Hearth and Altar: African Ceramics From The KEITH ACHEPOHL Collection" come from the huge accompanying photographs on the walls, which show African potters and the techniques they use to create earthenware. The exhibition consists of 125 pieces from the personal collection of Achepohl, a printmaker and professor emeritus at the University of Iowa who plans to donate many of them to the Art Institute.

Writer Received Numerous UI Degrees (Ft. Worth Star Telegram, Jan. 2)
A story about writer Yiyun Li says she first came to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to earn a Ph.D. in immunology, but switched to the Writers' Workshop after she discovered she loved writing and eventually earned her MFAs in fiction and creative non-fiction.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/13528742.htm

Blogger Turned Down UI Opportunity (Chicago Sun Times, Jan. 1)
A feature about blogger Mimi Smartypants points out she turned down an opportunity to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/pickett/cst-nws-lunch01.html

Jones Investigates E-Voting (The Chronogram, Dec. 31)
A story about possible security concerns in electronic voting points out that one DOUGLAS JONES of the University of Iowa, is investigating how public policy and technology can safeguard e-voting nationwide. The Chronogram is based in the Hudson Valley region of New York.
http://www.chronogram.com/issue/2006/01/news/

'Biggest Loser' Winner Recounts Time At UI (CNN, Dec. 30)
On the "Larry King Live" program, King interviewed Matt Hoover, the big winner of the reality hit "The Biggest Loser." Hoover went from 339 pounds to 182 pounds. "I went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to wrestle. I fully expected to be an All-American and national champion, never did, and that ate at me every day from the time I left school. I'm 12 hours short of a degree. I left school. I stopped wrestling and took off and that seemed to become my pattern," Hoover said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=fc6147a0cc28fdee4655551dd94533a3&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=1d2708e60ed45fd048c00cec300e7663

Law Alumnus Runs for Judgeship (Galesburg Register-Mail, Dec. 30)
Steve Watts, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law, is running for a judgeship in Knox County, Illinois.
http://www.register-mail.com/stories/123005/LOC_B8I5903G.GID.shtml