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UI in the News

February, 2006

See UI in the New Archive Index


Club Picks Robinson's 'Gilead' (Minnesota Public Radio, Feb. 28)
When author MARILYNNE ROBINSON'S first novel came out more than 20 years ago, she was hailed as a strikingly original new voice. But since then, Robinson has been teaching at the University of Iowa and writing nonfiction. Her second novel, the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Gilead," is out in paperback. It's the latest selection in the Talking Volumes community book club. Critics say "Gilead" was worth the wait.
http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/02/27/mrobinson/

Buffet Addresses UI Students (JoongAng Daily Business Finance, Feb. 28)
For a stock market that thrives on positive assessments by foreign investors, it was one ringing endorsement. Warren Buffet, chief executive officer of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., told U.S. college students last month about his experience in investing in Korean stocks, and discussed those experiences in an upbeat tone that delighted local brokers. "I invested in Korea because there are many undervalued stocks and corporate data are readily available," Buffet told an audience of 100 students in master of business administration programs from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Tennessee. "For investors to gather corporate information, the Internet in Korea can be very helpful." The publication is based in South Korea.
http://joongangdaily.joins.com/200602/27/200602272231237179900090509052.html

UI Offers Graduate Classes At Sioux City Center (KELO-TV, Feb. 27)
More than 1,500 students are enrolled in classes through the Tri-State Graduate Center in Sioux City. It's an education hub that's connected with 13 colleges and universities in Iowa, South Dakota and Nebraska. Among the students is Brian Smith of Sioux Falls, S.D., who is seeking a master's in social work there. "I heard about the Sioux City program that had been set up by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last spring and applied just in time to get in," he said. KELO is based in Sioux Falls.
http://www.keloland.com/News/NewsDetail5442.cfm?Id=0,46303

McLeod Documentary Examines 'Copyright Criminals' (New York Times, Feb. 27)
A story about a documentary called "Copyright Criminals" says the film was produced by Atlanta artist Ben Franzen and KEMBREW MCLEOD, an assistant professor of communications studies at the University of Iowa. The film is about the rise of the sampling and remix culture. The pair interviewed musicians, artists, lawyers, scholars, music industry executives and others.
http://www.nytimes.com/cnet/CNET_2100-1025_3-6043247.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Fisher Comments On Tax Code Study (Florida Today, Feb. 27)
Florida has one of the nation's most "business-friendly" tax codes, a new study found. The Sunshine State ranked fourth -- behind only Wyoming, South Dakota and Alaska -- among the 50 states, according to the 2006 "State Business Tax Climate Index," being released today by the Tax Foundation, a nonprofit organization in Washington, D.C, that monitors fiscal policies. PETER FISHER, a professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa who has analyzed the foundation's widely circulated annual study, said the foundation appears to stand for "tax neutrality," but its actual agenda is low taxes. The study "has an aura of respectability and objectivity, and avoids the blatantly ideological arguments for smaller government and lower taxes," Fisher wrote. However, "the Tax Foundation argument makes it clear what it really thinks is important: low taxes, not neutral taxes," he added.
http://www.floridatoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060227/BUSINESS/602270320/1003

Wald Develops Infertility Treatment Tool (Ivanhoe, Feb. 27)
A new tool developed at the University of Iowa helps experts better predict outcomes of specific infertility treatments, allowing the doctor to choose the treatment method most likely to help the couple achieve pregnancy. The computation model, created by MOSHE WALD, M.D., an assistant professor of urology at the UI Roy J. and Lucille A Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City, applies when a woman's own eggs can be used for an advanced form of in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The model takes into consideration the woman's age, factors that cause the man's infertility, the choice of three different sperm retrieval methods and the choice of using fresh or frozen eggs. Ivanhoe is a web site covering medical breakthroughs, family health and issues important to women. It is based in Winter Park, Fla.
http://www.ivanhoe.com/channels/p_channelstory.cfm?storyid=13222

Prisinzano Comments On Drug Availability Via Web (The News Journal, Feb. 27)
A story about the suicide of a 17-year-old Delaware boy who had been using salvia divinorum, which contains the world's most potent natural hallucinogens, is as strong as LSD and is legal in most states, says that Mazatec Indians have used salvia divinorum to divine spiritual truths for hundreds or thousands of years. Outsiders discovered it in the 1960s, but it remained a relatively obscure drug until popularized on the Internet, beginning in the 1990s. It's now sold as live plants that can be grown indoors, dried leaves or liquid extracts, from tiny bags costing a few dollars to wholesale shipments for hundreds of dollars. "You type 'salvia divinorum' in a search engine and you get 10,000 hits, most of which are head shops on the Internet," said THOMAS E. PRISINZANO, a medical researcher at the University of Iowa. "That's not good. People are going to abuse it." The paper is based in Delaware.
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060226/NEWS/602260356/-1/NEWS01

Tussing Attended UI Writers' Workshop (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Feb. 26)
A story on Justin Tussing's debut novel, "The Best People in the World," says Tussing was born in Connecticut in 1970 and is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, which has honed the skills of Michael Cunningham, John Irving, Jane Smiley and Raymond Carver. A visiting professor of English at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Ore., Tussing has published short fiction in The New Yorker and literary magazines.
http://pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/entertainment/books/s_426952.html

Study: Windows Can Reduce Allergens (Clarion Ledger, Feb. 24)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have found Pella Designer Series windows featuring blinds protected between panes of glass can significantly reduce indoor airborne allergens. Research found windows with room-side blinds collected 200 times more indoor airborne allergens than the Designer Series products. The newspaper is based in Mississippi.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060224/FEAT03/602240376/1021

'Sun Rings' To Be Performed (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Feb. 24)
"Sun Rings," the multimedia extravaganza commissioned by NASA and composed by Terry Riley, will be performed Saturday night at the Masonic Auditorium as part of the Cleveland Museum of Art's Viva! and Gala Around Town series. The piece incorporates plasma waves recorded in space by University of Iowa physics and astronomy professor DONALD GURNETT.
http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/friday/1140774175306940.xml&coll=2

Sweatshop Workers Visit College Campuses (Scoop Independent News, Feb. 24)
United Students Against Sweatshops has organized a tour of college campuses where garment workers in Mexico and El Salvador speak about their experiences. Their factories have unionized and won worker rights and higher pay and benefits with help from the activism of U.S. students. The tour includes a stop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Feb. 24. The publication is based in New Zealand.
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL0602/S00293.htm

Vilsack Leads Trade Mission To India (WQAD-TV, Feb. 23)
Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack is scheduled to lead a 25-member delegation on a trip next month to explore trade opportunities in India. The governor's office says the delegation will meet with government officials, executives with technology companies, soy bean importers and education officials. Vilsack will be joined on the trip by his wife, Christie Vilsack, Democratic state Representative Swati Dandekar, of Marion, and officials with the Iowa Department of Economic Development, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and others. The TV station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4542690&nav=1sW7

Jones Electronic Voting Study Noted (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 23)
In a column (published in a blog) about problems with electronic voting, it's noted that DOUG JONES of the University of Iowa discovered a defect in Diebold source code for voting machines in 1997.
http://goldenstateblog.latimes.com/goldenstate/2006/02/golden_state_co_5.html

Borsellino, Basu Appear on 'Prairie Lights' (Editor and Publisher, Feb. 23)
Rob Borsellino and his wife Reka Basu, both columnists for the Des Moines Register, spoke on the "Live from Prairie Lights" program, broadcast on WSUI, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's public radio station. Borsellino spoke about his struggle with Lou Gehrig's Disease and Basu read from his newly released book, "So I'm Talk'n to This Guy." http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1002073819

Penn State Requests Increased Funding (Center Daily Times, Feb. 23)
Penn State President Graham Spanier had sought a nearly 10 percent increase in the university's state appropriation for the 2006-07 year, for a total of $354.4 million. Gov. Ed Rendell has proposed a 3.3 percent increase. If the state provides that much money, Spanier has said, Penn State will freeze tuition at 20 of its 21 undergraduate campuses. The tuition increase at University Park could be held to 5.9 percent, he has said. Average annual tuition at Penn State is about $11,000. State funding accounts for about 10 percent of the Penn State budget. In a two-hour hearing before the committee, Spanier repeatedly lamented the erosion of state support. Among state-affiliated universities nationwide, he said, Penn State maintains relatively low costs per student. But its students pay a bigger-than-average chunk of those expenses, Spanier said, because the state's contributions are relatively slim. Iowa, for instance, annually contributes more than $10,000 per student to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/centredaily/news/local/13938328.htm?source=rss&channel=centredaily_local

UI Law Graduate Campaigns For Judge Position (Southwest News-Herald, Feb. 23)
Diane Shelley is campaigning on the Southwest and South sides of Chicago to ask voters to elect her as judge for the Cook County Fifth Subcircuit. She received a B.A. degree in political science from the University of Illinois and a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper in based in Illinois.
http://www.swnewsherald.com/news_frontpage/2006/02/022306c_shelley.php

UI Student Ties Social Work To Mission (San Bernardino Sun,  Feb. 22)
Alex Avila, who has worked as cultural director at the Central City Lutheran Mission in San Bernardino, Calif. since 2000, is spending the semester at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, taking and teaching classes and building relationships he hopes will help San Bernardino in the future. The mission where Avila works began a cultural exchange program with the University of Iowa about five years ago. The idea is that people from both entities who wish to work in the nonprofit and social development fields can come together at either venue. Workers from the mission, like Avila, go to the university and take classes taught by some of the foremost professors in their fields, while students and professors from Iowa learn through working in San Bernardino and sharing ideas with veterans like Avila. The newspaper is based in California.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=462bbacde3ad76124ce8d476864d9ebc&_docnum=13&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVA&_md5=e23d84e91460c563fb51dd7157b24d3d

Abdel-Malek's Virtual Soldier Program Spotlighted (Wired News, Feb. 22)
Digital humans. The very words conjure images of the polygon personas created for the next blockbuster by production houses like Industrial Light and Magic or Pixar Animation. But there is more to this technology than big-screen eye candy. Take Santos, for example. A virtual human, Santos may save corporations big money and help the military save lives. He's a creation of Virtual Soldier Research at the University of Iowa, and was built using algorithms combined with motion-capture data. He can be as tall or as short as his assignments dictate, and everything about Santos -- from his wire-frame skeleton to his muscle movements -- owes its existence to a scanned and digitized human volunteer. "Human modeling technology today is so refined, we can use it to test products before they're ever produced," said KARIM ABDEL-MALEK, professor of biomedical engineering and director of the Virtual Soldier Research program at Iowa.
http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,70253-0.html?tw=wn_technology_4

Watson Comments On Abnormal Behavior (San Diego Union Tribune, Feb. 22)
For 100 years, cloaked beneath its plain cover, the writers and editors of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology have debated the tumultuous state and nature of human deviance, constantly asking themselves: What constitutes abnormal behavior? What causes it? What should be done? "Psychology is the science of human behavior and the things that happen in the mind to create it," said DAVID WATSON, A professor of psychology at the University of Iowa and a former Journal editor. "It's a subject that fascinates almost everyone because we all have notions of what's normal and what's not."
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/science/20060222-9999-lz1c22abnorm.html

Duggan, Cmiel Cited In Column (Wednesday Journal, Feb. 22)
In a column, an editor of the paper recalls its co-founding 25 years ago by him and two former journalists of another paper, the Oak Park News, including ANNE DUGGAN, now an editor at the University of Iowa. The column also notes the recent death of Anne's husband, KEN CMIEL, who "was in his early 50s and was a long-time -- and judging from the obits, a much-loved--  history professor at the University of Iowa." The paper covers Oak Park and River Forest, Ill.
http://www.wednesdayjournalonline.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=11&ArticleID=3886&TM=2732.243

Klaus Talks Writing, Wiener Schnitzel (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 21)
CARL KLAUS
, a memoirist who has been acclaimed by publications ranging from Money magazine to the Christian Century, was in town recently from Iowa City, where he was the founding director of the University of Iowa's Nonfiction Writing Program. He had two goals. One was to give a lecture at DePaul University on the glories of accurate description of everyday life--the rising tomato vines in his back yard, the struggles of his retirement and, most recently, an agonizing loss. The other was to eat a final meal at Chicago's legendary the Berghoff restaurant, what he called "the last great German restaurant in the country."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0602210246feb21,1,3119187.story?coll=chi-newslocalchicago-hed

Weinstein Questions Health Care Standards Pact (New York Times, Feb. 21)
The American Medical Association has signed a pact with Congress promising to develop more than 100 standard measures of performance, which doctors will report to the federal government in an effort to improve the quality of care. The deal comes as the Bush administration pushes "pay for performance" arrangements with various health care providers in an effort to publicize their performance and link Medicare payment to quality. And it mirrors efforts in the private sector, where consumer groups, insurance companies and large employers who pay for health care are demanding more information on the quality of care. But Dr. STUART L. WEINSTEIN, a University of Iowa professor and president of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, said the timetable endorsed by the A.M.A. and Congressional leaders was unrealistic. "Performance measures need to be developed by specialty societies, then tested and validated, to confirm that they really affect patient care in a positive way," he said. A version of the article also ran on the Website of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/21/politics/21docs.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

UI's Kierscht Supports Proposed Privacy Law (WQAD-TV, Feb. 21)
People who donate to Iowa's public universities will be able to keep their names and their financial information under wraps under a proposed set of exceptions to the state's public records law. The legislation comes in the wake of an Iowa Supreme Court ruling last year requiring university foundations to open their records to the public. Backers of the new proposals include Chuck Kierscht of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Foundation. He says it's not an attempt to undermine the court's ruling -- but rather a narrow form of protection for records that donors expect to be kept confidential. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4529630&nav=1sW7

Alumnus Pens Column (American Chronicle, Feb. 21)
An op-ed column about numerous topics was written by Dale Netherton, who attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/viewArticle.asp?articleID=6049

Oregon Poet Laureate Named (Salem Statesman Journal, Feb. 20)
Lawson Inada of Medford has been named to a two-year appointment as the poet laureate of Oregon. Inada is an emeritus professor of writing at Southern Oregon University in Ashland, where he has taught since 1966. Inada studied writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before moving to Oregon. The newspaper is based in Oregon. http://www.statesmanjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060220/ENT/602200321/1059

Lightning Storm Observed On Saturn (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 18)
Researchers are tracking a gigantic storm on Saturn that is unleashing lightning bolts more than 1,000 times stronger than those found on Earth. Using instruments aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA spotted the storm on Jan. 23. Since then, researchers have recorded 35 consecutive episodes, each lasting about 10 hours. The story also appeared in the HERALD SUN, GOLD COAST BULLETIN, and THE ADVERTISER in Australia.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-sci-briefs18.3feb18,1,7128736.story?ctrack=1&cset=true

Cmeil Remembered (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 17)
KEN CMIEL
, 51, died Saturday, Feb. 4, in Iowa City of a previously undiagnosed brain tumor. His passions as a professor of history at the University of Iowa stretched from the emergence of the international human rights movement, to the artistry of Aretha Franklin, to the saga of one Chicago orphanage. A father of three and director of the university's Center for Human Rights, he happily juggled work and family -- sometimes almost literally. One academic colleague recalled seeing Mr. Cmiel follow a Chicago Bears football game while cradling his infant son in one arm and bouncing a daughter on his stomach, all while propping a journal of French political theory on one knee. "Ken was a pioneer in his field, but he was also an astoundingly unpretentious man," said LINDA KERBER, president of the American Historical Association, who taught with Mr. Cmiel at Iowa.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/obituaries/chi-0602170219feb17,1,7034092.story?coll=chi-newsobituaries-hed

Carmichael Tells Legislators About Ethanol (Farm and Ranch News, Feb. 16)
With education and ethanol the leading issues coming into the 2006 legislative session, perhaps it was fitting lawmakers recently invited college professors to lecture them on the facts and myths surrounding ethanol. The informational session was designed as a precursor to this year's planned debate of ways to promote the E10, E85 and biodiesel industries in the state. GREG CARMICHAEL, a professor of chemical and biochemical engineering at the University of Iowa, told lawmakers current and planned ethanol production should add up to 1.6 billion gallons by the end of 2006 as more plants come online. The magazine is based in North Dakota.
http://www.farmandranchguide.com/articles/2006/02/23/ag_news/regional_news/news19.txt

Palestinian Musician Touring U.S. (Reuters, Feb. 16)
Music is one of few certainties in the life of Ahmad Al-Khatib, a 31-year-old classically trained Palestinian musician touring the United States this month with the four-man Oriental Music Ensemble. Born in a refugee camp in Jordan, the accomplished oud player first saw his homeland in 1998 and has been working with the Jerusalem-based Palestinian National Conservatory of Music ever since, but Israel refused to renew his visa in 2002 and has no idea if or when he can return to the West Bank. "We are part of an institution that is changing the lives of people," said Khoury, who studied music at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the 1980s and now lives in Jerusalem. "If you look at what is open for Palestinian children ... There's not much." The article also appeared in the WASHINGTON POST, KINDRED TIMES in Utah.
http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=lifeAndLeisureNews&storyID=2006-02-16T131956Z_01_N09335417_RTRUKOC_0_US-ARTS-PALESTINIAN.xml&archived=False

Hansen's UI Talk Noted (Orlando Sentinel, Feb. 16)
A nasty little spat has arisen as a result of NASA's leading climate scientist, Dr. James Hansen, director of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), speaking out on the Bush administration's reluctance to begin imposing carbon-dioxide restrictions to help slow global warming. The first salvo by Hansen was fired on Oct. 26, 2004, when, speaking to an audience at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, he said, "In my more than three decades in government, I have never seen anything approaching the degree to which information flow from scientists to the public has been screened and controlled as it is now," referring to pressure he apparently has experienced from the administration. The issue has now surfaced again after a more recent lecture, and Hansen has said he will ignore NASA's restrictions on him. Those restrictions call for coordinating with NASA's public-affairs office, and getting management approval for any of his talks that touch on policy, as opposed to science. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/opinion/orl-warm1606feb16,0,3243435.story?coll=orl-opinion-headlines

Lightning Bolts Pummel Saturn (Detroit Free Press, Feb. 16)
Researchers are tracking a gigantic storm on Saturn that is unleashing lightning bolts more than 1,000 times stronger than those found on Earth. Using instruments aboard the international Cassini spacecraft, scientists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA first spotted the storm Jan. 23. Researchers recorded 35 consecutive episodes since the storm was first detected. The story also appeared on the websites of the PAKISTAN TIMES, CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING NETWORK and FOX NEWS.
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060216/NEWS07/602160559/1001/NEWS

Vailas Named Idaho State President (KIFI-TV, Feb. 16)
Dr. Arthur Vailas has been named president of Idaho State University, starting on July 1, 2006. He received his Ph.D. at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and his B.S. degree at the University of New Hampshire.
http://www.localnews8.com/news/local/2318641.html

Ponseti Method For Clubfoot Described (WSOC-TV, Feb. 16)
One form of treatment for clubfoot is called the Ponseti method. The technique was developed by IGNACIO PONSETI of the University of Iowa. Instead of surgery, the Ponseti method uses gentle manipulation and casting to correct clubfoot. The ligaments and tendons of the affected foot are gently stretched and the bones are gradually moved into the correct alignment. A long-leg plaster cast is placed on the limb to hold the foot in position. Ponseti has been using his method for clubfoot for more than 50 years. Over time, he has fine-tuned the technique and improved outcomes. Research shows the Ponseti method is 90 to 95 percent effective in correcting clubfoot. WSOC is based in Charlotte, N.C.
http://www.wsoctv.com/health/7151636/detail.html

University Of Kansas Names Provost (Wichita Eagle, Feb. 15)
University of Kansas Chancellor Robert Hemenway on Wednesday named international scholar and University of Texas Dean Richard Lariviere its next provost. Lariviere received his bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and his doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania. The newspaper is based in Kansas. The article also appeared in the KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR; Topeka Capital Journal in Kansas; DALLAS MORNING NEWS, FORT WORTH  STAR TELEGRAM, DENTON RECORD CHRONICLE, KRIS-TV in Texas.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/news/state/13878839.htm

Gurnett Comments On Saturn's Storms (New Scientist, Feb. 15)
The most powerful lightning storm ever detected on Saturn has been captured by the Cassini spacecraft -- but scientists are still not sure what is causing it. Cassini's Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument captured the first radio noise from the storm on 23 January 2006. But the storm continued to rage and scientists have recorded at least 25 strong episodes of lightning activity since. "It is clear that this is the strongest lightning activity that we've seen with Cassini since it arrived at Saturn," says DONALD GURNETT at the University of Iowa, and RPWS principal investigator. "In fact, the flash rate even exceeds the rate observed by Voyager 1 back in 1980 and the intensities are at least as large, if not larger."
http://www.newscientistspace.com/article.ns?id=dn8726&feedId=cassini-huygens_rss20

Studies On Attraction Noted (Huntingtion Herald, Feb. 15)
In a column about scientific studies about love and attraction, it's noted that psychologists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA claim that people with similar attitudes and values find each other hot. The newspaper is based in Connecticut. The column also appeared in the EASTON COURIER and BRIDGEPORT NEWS, and several other community newspapers in Connecticut.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1346&dept_id=433122&newsid=16132646&PAG=461&rfi=9

Pascarella Assists In Education Study (Journal-Review, Feb. 15)
Wabash College officials chose Ivy Tech Community College, Lafayette, to participate in the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education. The study is sponsored and led by the Center of Inquiry in the Liberal Arts at Wabash. Ivy Tech is one of 18 institutions selected from a nationwide combination of 60 applicants, which included two- and four-year institutions. Researchers assisting with the study include a team from University of Iowa led by ERNEST T. PASCARELLA. The study's focus will be on seven outcomes associated with a liberal arts education that nurture wise citizenship, developing wisdom and preparing for citizenship. The study goals are to learn what teaching practices support liberal arts education, and to develop useful methods of assessing liberal arts education. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.journalreview.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=21297&TM=82277.98

Economic Development At UI Touted (WQAD-TV, Feb. 15)
Research at Iowa's three state-run universities is creating jobs and boosting the state's economy by millions of dollars every year. According to the Iowa Board of Regents, in the last fiscal year, Iowa companies earned more than $27 million from technologies licensed from Iowa State University, the University of Iowa and the University of Northern Iowa. University research was discussed today at a forum in Des Moines attended by school officials and business leaders -- some of whom said there is not enough incentive for developing technology at universities. MEREDITH HAY is the vice president for research at the University of Iowa. She says changes are beginning to occur. The university now guarantees the first 100 thousand dollars to the inventor of a new product or idea, and the filing of patents are now considered when a faculty member seeks a promotion. The TV station is based in Moline, Ill. http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4510014&nav=1sW7.

Idaho State President Named (KPVI, Feb. 15)
Arthur Vailas will be the new president of Idaho State University. Vailas, who got his Ph.D. at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, comes to Idaho State from the University of Houston. The television station is based in Idaho.
http://www.kpvi.com/index.cfm?page=nbcstories.cfm&ID=2728

Chinese Executive Earned MBA At UI (Financial Times, Feb. 15)
Many executives who left China to study and work overseas are now considering "swimming home" to take high-level positions at multinational companies. Haoyu Shen, a vice-president at American Express in New York, feels the allure of China's boom. Shen, 35, fits the profile. He was born in Shanghai, attended Renmin University in China and received his MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. After working for McKinsey, the management consultancy, as well as AmEx, Mr Shen says: "There is much more excitement in China and more upside than working in the US, but there is also more risk." He also acknowledges that "you can have a comfortable life in the US but unless you're really, really good, it is hard to advance professionally."
http://news.ft.com/cms/s/b574c360-9e91-11da-b641-0000779e2340.html

Gurnett Comments On Saturn Lightning Storm (New York Times, Feb. 15)
Researchers are tracking a gigantic storm on Saturn that is unleashing lightning bolts more than 1,000 times stronger than those found on Earth. Using instruments aboard the international Cassini spacecraft, scientists from the University of Iowa first spotted the storm on Jan. 23. But since the spacecraft was not in the right position to photograph the storm, scientists enlisted the help of amateur astronomers who confirmed a storm was raging in the ringed planet's southern hemisphere. "It is clear that this is the strongest lightning activity that we've seen yet with Cassini since it has arrived at Saturn," DONALD GURNETT of the University of Iowa said Tuesday. Researchers recorded 35 consecutive episodes since the storm was first detected. Each episode lasted about 10 hours. The station is based in Canada. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the ORLANDO (Fla.) TIMES, CTV in Canada, the AUBURN (N.Y.) CITIZEN, WYOMING NEWS, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, MUNSTER (Ind.) TIMES, ALBANY (N.Y.) TIMES UNION, the INDEPENDENT ONLINE in South Africa, PRAVDA in Russia, and many other media outlets.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/science/AP-Saturn-Storm.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Patchett Recalls Time At Writers' Workshop In Memoir (Aspen Times, Feb. 15)
A story about "Truth & Beauty," Ann Patchett's 2004 account of her friendship with fellow writer Lucy Grealy, says that most of the pair's friendship takes place as Patchett and Grealy work their way into and around the contemporary writing world, and it reveals much of that odd universe: time spent and misused at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's writing workshop and writer's retreats from Scotland to Cape Cod; experiencing acceptance and rejection from publishers and fellowship programs; going on book tours; struggling with ideas. The paper is based in Colorado.
http://www.aspentimes.com/article/20060215/AE/60215001

Kansas University Names UI Alumnus Provost (Lawrence Journal World, Feb. 15)
Richard Lariviere, a Sanskrit scholar and dean of liberal arts at the University of Texas at Austin, is Kansas University's new provost and executive vice chancellor. Lariviere, 56, will replace David Shulenburger, who is stepping down after 13 years in the seat. Lariviere's salary will be $278,000. An Illinois native, Lariviere is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Pennsylvania. The paper is based in Kansas.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/feb/15/ku_picks_texas_dean_provost/?ku_news

Hunnicutt's Kellogg Book Translated Into Norwegian (Fremover, Feb. 15)
The publication of a Norwegian translation of University of Iowa Professor BENJAMIN KLINE HUNNICUTT's book "Kellogg's Six-Hour Day" is being covered by a number of publications in Norway. The book explores the decision by W.K. Kellogg to replace the traditional three daily eight-hour shifts in his cereal plant with four six-hour shifts to give more workers employment after the Great Depression. Fremover is based in Norway. A version of the story also ran on the Website of KVINNEFRONTEN, also based in Norway.
http://www.fremover.no/debatt/leserinnlegg/article1913915.ece

UI Brain Injury Database Noted (Forbes.com, Feb. 14)
In this article about why people invest and how the brain deals with money, it's noted that Caltech economist Colin Camerer and colleagues used a database of patients with brain injuries kept by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.forbes.com/technology/2006/02/11/neuroeconomics-MRI-economics-cx_mh_money06_0214neuroeconomics.html

UI Study Documents Health Problems in Feed Operations (KTVO-TV, Feb. 14)
A story about the growth of confined animal feed operations (CAFOs) mentions that those who oppose them use a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study that examined the health affects of large feed lots. The report documents acute and chronic respiratory diseases among swine and poultry workers and for community residents exposure to complex mixture of particulates, gases and vapors with CAFO units. KTVO is based in Kirksville, MO.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/Global/story.asp?S=4491173&nav=1LFs

UI Study Shows Happy Relationships Reduce Tumors (WMTW-TV, Feb. 14)
Being in love could help a woman live longer. A study conducted by the University of Pittsburgh found that women in good marriages had a much lower risk of cardiovascular disease than those whose relationships were stressful. Also, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found that women in "satisfying" relationships being treated for ovarian cancer had more vigorous "natural killer" cell activity at the tumor site than those who did not have such a bond with someone. WMTW is based in Portland, ME.
http://www.wmtw.com/news/7011385/detail.html

UI Pressuring Coca-Cola To Investigate Attacks (Kansas City Star, Feb. 14)
A story alleges that Atlanta-based Coca-Cola' Colombian bottlers used right-wing gunmen to attack and kill unionists. As a result, a campaign is sweeping college campuses in the United States to ban the beverage giant's products from their campuses. Coca-Cola Co. denies the accusations, saying it is the target of a smear campaign run by professional agitators. Nonetheless, six institutions -- Duke University, Ohio State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of California system, Chicago's DePaul University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign -- have united to urge Coke to accede to an impartial study of the situation or face a boycott.

The same story appeared on the Web sites of the BALTIMORE SUN, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS, BRADENTON HERALD, LEXINGTON HERALD LEADER, COLUMBUS (GA) LEADGER ENQUIRER, CENTER DAILY TIMES (PA), GRAND FORKS HERALD, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/world/13868481.htm

UI, UW-Madison Salaries Compared (Racine Journal-Times, Feb. 14)
A story about legislative criticism of high salaries paid to University of Wisconsin administrators mentions that the top job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA paid $287,000-still almost $40,000 a year more than that paid for the top job at Madison.
http://www.journaltimes.com/articles/2006/02/13/opinion/iq_3900013.txt

Klohnen Attraction Research Cited (Live Science.com, Feb. 13)
A story about the physiology of love and attraction notes that it probably comes as little surprise people are drawn to individuals with similar attitudes and values, as psychologist EVA KLOHNEN at the University of Iowa found in a 2005 study of newlywed couples. These characteristics are highly visible and accessible to others and can play a role in initial attraction.
http://www.livescience.com/humanbiology/060213_attraction_rules.html

Altman Makes Use Of Wax-Cylinder Recordings (Wall Street Journal, Feb. 13)
A story about the growing number of historical material being transferred to the Web says that last November, 5,000 digitized wax-cylinder recordings dating back to 1895 were posted online by the Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project at the University of California at Santa Barbara. RICK ALTMAN, a professor of cinema and comparative literature at the University of Iowa, says that the digitized cylinders have been a blessing for his research work. He recently downloaded routines by Russell Hunting, a comedian around the turn of the 20th century whose recordings, until now, were nearly inaccessible.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB113943350619368700.html

UI Pressuring Coca-Cola To Investigate Attacks (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 13)
A story alleges that Atlanta-based Coca-Cola' Colombian bottlers used right-wing gunmen to attack and kill unionists. As a result, a campaign is sweeping college campuses in the United States to ban the beverage giant's products from their campuses. Coca-Cola Co. denies the accusations, saying it is the target of a smear campaign run by professional agitators. Nonetheless, six institutions -- Duke University, Ohio State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of California system, Chicago's DePaul University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign -- have united to urge Coke to accede to an impartial study of the situation or face a boycott.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0602130151feb13,1,4022911.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

UI Seashore Hall Break-In Recalled (Kindred Times, Feb. 13)
Iowa State University is working to safeguard the genetic material of what scientists there say is an irreplaceable collection of research chickens. To ensure the research lines are not lost or destroyed, the university has stockpiled 300 sperm samples from its roosters at a U.S. Department of Agriculture research center in Colorado. The previous year, animal rights activists broke into a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA laboratory, freeing laboratory mice and rats and destroying data. The center's research projects include examining chickens' resistance to disease, response to vaccinations, growth and skeletal strength. The paper is based in Utah. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the BROCKTON NEWS in Nevada, JACKSON NEWS-TRIBUNE in Wyoming, PIERCELAND HERALD in Canada, LEADING THE CHARGE in Australia and other media outlets.
http://www.localnewsleader.com/kindred/stories/index.php?action=fullnews&id=141830

Berry Comments On Lack Of All-Black Casts On TV (TV Week, Feb. 13)
A story says that there are few TV dramas with an all-black cast, along the lines of Showtime's "Soul Food," that have ever appeared as a series on prime-time network television ---even though sitcoms with all-black casts are prevalent and have been around since the 1950s. That's because "It is part of the comfort zone for mainstream America to have black people make them laugh," said VENISE BERRY, an associate professor at the University of Iowa who teaches a course on African Americans and TV. "To have them have serious emotions, cry and feel anger [over a black story line] is not as comfortable, and I think producers don't believe they can get the kind of crossover audience they need to sell that kind of show."
http://www.tvweek.com/article.cms?articleId=29369

Presidential Candidates Visit Iowa (Contra Costa Times, Feb. 12)
Iowa's fabled caucuses won't be held until January 2008. But the time-honored ritual featuring politicians who all insist they're not running yet even as they go to great lengths to woo Iowans at stops on farms and in coffee shops is well underway. "No one wants to look too ambitious," said DAVID REDLAWSK, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "There's a real fear that you'll be tagged as jumping the gun." The paper is based in California.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/local/states/california/13854426.htm

UI Mentioned In Story On Sheriff's Pot Proposal (Zeenews.com, Feb. 12)
An Iowa sheriff's decision to hand out tickets instead of arrests for small amounts of marijuana invited a lawmaker's slap that it would be simpler to ban rock concerts and football games. Johnson County Sheriff Lonny Pulkrabek, whose jurisdiction includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, told a legislative committee he would treat possession of small amounts of marijuana like a traffic violation, allowing hundreds of students arrested each year to graduate without a criminal record. "The guy that's carrying 50 bales of marijuana ... that's a different animal," Pulkrabek said, adding he favored rounding up intoxicated people in a locked "detox center" in lieu of the crowded jail. But Republican legislator Clel Baudler, a former state trooper, shot down the notion as sending the wrong message to drug users and abusers. The publication is based in India.
http://www.zeenews.com/znnew/articles.asp?aid=275083&ssid=68&sid=LIF

Redlawsk: Fallon In Top Tier Of Governor Candidates (Boston Globe, Feb. 12)
A story on Ed Fallon, a seven-term Democratic state representative in Iowa who is campaigning this year for governor in the Hawkeye state, quotes DAVID REDLAWSK, an associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa, as saying Fallon is in what is generally considered to be the top tier of four candidates among the seven candidates vying for their party's nomination.
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2006/02/12/hes_running_for_governor____of_iowa/?page=full

Andreasen's 'The Creating Brain' Excerpted (Chronicle, Feb. 10)
The paper ran an excerpt from "The Creating Brain: The Neuroscience of Genius," by NANCY C. ANDREASEN, chair in psychiatry at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and director of the MIND Institute at the University of New Mexico.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i23/23b00201.htm

UI Lab Break-In Noted (WJLA-TV, Feb. 10)
To ensure the research lines are not lost or destroyed, the university has stockpiled 300 sperm samples from its roosters at a U.S. Department of Agriculture research center in Colorado. The move came after two tornadoes touched down in Ames last fall. The twisters came close to the university, but did not heavily damage any campus property. The previous year, animal rights activists broke into a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA laboratory, freeing laboratory mice and rats and destroying data. The television station is based in Washington D.C. The Associated Press article also appeared in the FORT WORTH (Tex.) STAR TELEGRAM, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, REDNOVA.COM, WASHINGTON POST, CHICAGO TRIBUNE and the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.wjla.com/news/stories/0206/301687.html

Baseball Lore Listed on Website (Philadelphia Inquirer, Feb. 10)
Sean Forman was working toward his doctorate in applied mathematics at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA during the winter of 1999-2000. The subject matter was coming rather easily to him -- numbers always have - and his adviser had gone off to Italy. Forman found himself with some free time and no direct supervision and created Baseball-Reference.com. If a statistic or piece of information exists, Forman's voluminous Web site will likely have it or provide a link to a resource that does. http://www.macon.com/mld/philly/sports/baseball/13825218.htm?source=rss&channel=philly_baseball

Presidential Candidates Visit Iowa (Scripps Howard News Service, Feb. 10)
Iowa’s fabled caucuses won't be held until January 2008. But the time-honored ritual featuring politicians who all insist they're not running yet even as they go to great lengths to woo Iowans at stops on farms and in coffee shops is well underway. "No one wants to look too ambitious," said DAVID REDLAWSK, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "There's a real fear that you'll be tagged as jumping the gun." The article originally appeared in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE and also appeared in the KNOXVILLE (Tenn.) NEWS SENTINEL.
http://www.shns.com/shns/g_index2.cfm?action=detail&pk=IOWA-02-10-06

Graduate Named to School Business Official Post (Morris Daily Herald, Feb. 9
Dr. Michael Jacoby, superintendent of schools for the Geneva School District, has been named executive director of the Illinois Association of School Business Officials. Jacoby holds an undergraduate degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a Masters of Science in Education degree from Illinois State University and a Doctor of Education degree in Educational Administration from Northern Illinois University. The newspaper is based in Illinois. http://www.morrisdailyherald.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=58&ArticleID=17132&TM=53603.63

Author Describes International Writing Program (Vietnam News, Feb. 9)
Writer Van Cam Hai recently was invited to take part in the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM. “The IWP has been held with a view to inviting writers from around the world to gather at the University of Iowa, which has one of the best literature programs in the US. The writers introduce literary works and share knowledge and suggestions on improving writing techniques,” he said. “Introducing my poetry and literature in the US and other countries does not affirm the value of my works. But I feel more connected to mankind through the IWP.”
http://vietnamnews.vnagency.com.vn/showarticle.php?num=01INT090206

Sheriff's Comments Criticized (Reuters, Feb. 9)
An Iowa sheriff's decision to hand out tickets instead of arrests for small amounts of marijuana invited a lawmaker's slap that it would be simpler to ban rock concerts and football games. Johnson County Sheriff Lonny Pulkrabek, whose jurisdiction includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, told a legislative committee he would treat possession of small amounts of marijuana like a traffic violation, allowing hundreds of students arrested each year to graduate without a criminal record. But Republican legislator Clel Baudler, a former state trooper, shot down the notion as sending the wrong message to drug users and abusers. The article also appeared in the JACKSON (Wyo.) NEWS TRIBUNE, BROCKTOWN (Nev.) NEWS, and several other newspaper Web sites.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060209/od_nm/crime_marijuana_dc_1

Skorton, Regents Lobby For Congressional Support (WQAD-TV, Feb. 9)
Iowa regents and the presidents of the state's three public universities have launched a lobbying blitz in the nation's Capitol for continued support for higher education in Iowa. They met yesterday in Washington, D.C. with some members of Iowa's congressional delegation in an effort to help protect the system from federal budget cuts. This week, President Bush proposed a $2.7 trillion dollar budget that slices away at many education programs, including student aid for low-income students. University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON says students at Iowa receive about $160 million dollars a year in federal aid in grants and loans. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4477831&nav=1sW7

UI Student Co-Authors Mid East Article (United Press International, Feb. 8)
Nora Al Subai, a student at the University of Kuwait, and Bryan Gerbracht, a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, wrote an article about democratization in the Middle East as part of the United States' foreign policy. They wrote the article as part of the Soliya Connect program, an online Western-Islamic dialogue program.
http://www.upi.com/InternationalIntelligence/view.php?StoryID=20060208-022623-9804r

UI Researchers Take Part In Corporate Responsibility Study (The Age, Feb. 8)
A story about the growing number of companies considering adopting a strategy of corporate social responsibility (CSR) - in large part as a response to corporate scandals, anti-globalization protests and increasing evidence of man-made climate change - cites a meta-analysis by two American colleagues from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA of 52 previous CSP-FP (corporate social responsibility-financial potential) studies. They took into consideration the different measures used for CSP and FP and found that, although variable, CSP was positively related to FP. Additionally, they found that social performance was more likely to pay off than environmental performance. The paper is based in Australia.
http://www.theage.com.au/news/business/growing-belief-in-csr-challenges-neoclassical-nostrums/2006/02/08/1139379572350.html#

Researchers' Confinement Lot Comments Cited (Maryville Daily Forum, Feb. 8)
More than 70 people attended a meeting over the weekend to obtain information about concentrated animal feeding operations, many of them concerned about a 5,000-hog farm being proposed for Nodaway County. Among the information given at Saturday's meeting was a report about scientists convened by the Centers for Disease Control and researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, all of whom agree that CAFO air emissions may constitute a hazard to public health and worker health, finding increased nausea, headaches, brain damage, vomiting or diarrhea and even life-threatening pulmonary edema. The paper is based in Missouri.
http://www.maryvilledailyforum.com/articles/2006/02/07/news/news1.txt

Jones Comments On Arizona Primary (Arizona Republic, Feb. 8)
An op-ed piece discusses last week's seizure by FBI agents of the ballots cast in the September 2004 Republican primary in legislative District 20 in Arizona. The District 20 GOP primary raised eyebrows when a recount produced nearly 500 previously uncounted ballots. But the results were challenged, as the law requires. The matter went before a judge, and the ballots eventually were certified. The moderate candidate eked out a win over the conservative candidate to become a state representative. An out-of-state expert hired to examine the voting machines concluded that Maricopa County's system is "on the whole typical, or even above average in the quality of its election administration." In an interview with the Capitol Times, University of Iowa expert DOUGLAS JONES added, "I like many of the procedural safeguards they have in place."
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/opinions/articles/0208wed1-08.html

Hansen's Talk At UI Cited (CNN, Feb. 8)
A story about ongoing allegations that the Bush administration is working to silence scientists global warming, pollution and other contentious issues cites the case of one of the government's leading experts on climate change, 29-year NASA veteran James Hansen, who is director of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies. NASA officials have denied that Hansen was silenced, and insist public-affairs officers routinely review interview requests. Hansen himself has not stayed outside the realm of politics, having announced in a 2004 speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that he planned to vote for John Kerry.
http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/02/07/science.administration.tm/

Juweid Study Urges PET Use To Assess Treatment (MedIndia.com, Feb. 7)
MALIK JUWEID, M.D
., associate professor of radiology at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, says that using positron emission tomography (PET) technology can help doctors gauge the response of a cancer to the treatment being provided. The publication is based in India.
http://www.medindia.net/news/view_news_main.asp?x=7696

Fisher Research Cited In Editorial (Philadelphia Inquirer, Feb. 7)
An op-ed criticizes a ranking by the Beacon Hill Index that scored New Jersey low in business competitiveness. The column questions the methodology of the Index and cites PETER FISHER, a professor at the University of Iowa and author of a book about state business climate rankings called Grading Places, who studied the Beacon Hill Index and found that at least six of the variables for 2004 reverse causality.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/local/states/new_jersey/13809494.htm

Kerber Discusses Black Historical Writing (Florida Today, Feb. 7)
A story about African-American History month points to a dearth of historical scholarship in Florida written by African-American researchers and writers. However, LINDA KERBER, chair of the University of Iowa's history department and president of the AHA, says "the participation among African-Americans (in writing history) is a weak link that will heal." The data, she says, are abundant, continually cataloged and await the inevitable arrival of inquiring minds. Florida Today is based in Melbourne.
http://www.floridatoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060207/LIFE/602070310/1005

Anderson: Males Suffer From Anorexia, Too (The Times of London, Feb. 7)
About 10 percent of people being treated for eating disorders are male, but the Eating Disorders Association (EDA) says that the true ratio for sufferers is probably higher. Professor ARNOLD ANDERSON, a leading expert on males and eating disorders (he is professor of psychiatry and director of the eating disorders program at the University of Iowa School of Medicine), says that it is probably more like 20 percent in adults and could be 25 percent among pre-teens and teenagers.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,8123-2024296,00.html

Ponseti Developed Clubfoot Treatment (WIS-TV, Feb. 7)
Doctors traditionally used surgery to correct clubfoot, but at the University of Iowa in the 1950s, Dr. IGNACIO PONSETI noticed surgery patients often had trouble as adults, "The patients at 20 to 25 years of age, feet are stiff and very painful." He studied baby foot anatomy and developed a technique to gently massage and manipulate the foot, remolding it into its normal shape. Dr. Ponseti says, "You just bring the foot up and then put your thumb right over the head of the talus and bring the foot so very easily into the right position." WIS is based in Columbia, S.C.
http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S=4462280

Juweid Study Urges PET Use To Assess Treatment (News-medical.net, Feb. 7)
A limitation of current cancer care is the difficulty of quickly assessing how well a therapy is working. However, expanding the use of existing positron emission tomography (PET) technology can provide early and accurate assessment of a tumor's response to a particular therapy, allowing physicians to better tailor a patient's treatment, according to MALIK JUWEID, M.D., associate professor of radiology at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. Writing in the Feb. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, Juweid and co-author Bruce Cheson, M.D., of the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University Hospital, outline the advantages and limitations of PET imaging in assessing cancer therapy and suggest that increasing the role of PET imaging has the potential to further improve cancer care management.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=15780

NASA Maverick Spoke At UI (Space.com, Feb. 7)
NASA is battling accusations that it tried to stifle its top climatologist, a man well known for speaking his mind about the causes and consequences of global warming. James E. Hansen, the director of the New York-based Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), and several of his NASA associates contend that political appointees at the agency's headquarters here have demanded to review his lectures and papers in advance, and have senior agency managers stand in for him in interviews with journalists. Hansen said in a Feb. 2 interview with Space News that the restrictions were imposed following a speech he gave at the American Geophysical Union's annual meeting in early December. Hansen gave a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in October 2004 in which he said government scientists were being prevented from speaking freely on global warming and that he intended to vote for President George W. Bush's Democratic challenger, Sen. John Kerry (Mass.). When NASA officials discouraged him from making the speech, Hansen told his story to reporters and then traveled to the Iowa engagement at his own expense.
http://www.space.com/spacenews/businessmonday_060206.html

UI Alumnus Vies For K-State Vice Chancellor (Lawrence Journal World, Feb. 7)
Richard Lariviere, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Texas, will interview for the position of vice chancellor at Kansas State University. Lariviere is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/feb/07/third_vice_chancellor_candidate_visits_campus/?ku_news

Novelist Attended UI (Alamogordo Daily News, Feb. 7)
A story about novelist Michael McGarrity points out that he received his degree in clinical psychology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Daily News is based in New Mexico.
http://www.alamogordonews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060206/NEWS01/602060302

Ross Warns Against Using Dated Drugs (Seattle Times, Feb. 5)
If you'd never open your refrigerator and pop the top on the milk jug - two weeks past its expiration date - and chug it down, then why would you open your medicine cabinet and pop a pill that's two months - worse yet, two years - past its expiration date? MARY ROSS, pharmacy supervisor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, poses that not-so-rhetorical question to make a point: People tend to take the expiration dates on their food products much more seriously than expiration dates on their prescription and over-the-counter drugs. "But, over time, the chemical makeup and potency of medications changes," Ross said. "Taking outdated medications may also mean you are taking a pill that is not going to help you. Many medications become ineffective past their expiration date. Heat, cold and moisture can also affect a medication's potency."
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/health/2002779183_healtholddrugs05.html

Regents May Eye Politician To Lead UI (WQAD-TV, Feb. 5)
The state Board of Regents may consider a politician to become the new University of Iowa president. But regents have rejected rumors that U.S. Rep. Jim Leach might be in line for the job. The search for the university's new leader will not be restricted to academic circles, but Regent Amir Arbisser, of Davenport, says Leach has no background as an academic or hospital administrator. DAVID SKORTON announced last month he is leaving Iowa in June to become president of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Leach, a Republican, lives in Iowa City and has served in Congress since 1976. With states cutting money to universities every year, politicians have become popular as presidents because of their fund raising skills. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4456410&nav=1sW7

Donations To Help Create UI Genetics Testing Lab (WQAD-TV, Feb. 5)
Donations of $6.2 million will be used by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to create a genetics lab to fight degenerative eye diseases. The lab will help researchers understand the genetics of the macular degeneration -- an eye disease that can cause blindness. The leading donor is Lucille Carver, of Muscatine, who contributed $5 million on behalf of her son, John Carver. The Foundation for Fighting Blindness contributed the rest. The lab will be named the John and Marcia Carver Nonprofit Genetic Testing Lab. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4454966&nav=1sW7

UI Press Book On Yiddish Theater Cited (Jewish Theatre, Feb. 4)
A story about books on Jewish theater includes "Shakespeare on the American Yiddish Stage" by Joel Berkowitz, published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. "Although this study focuses on Yiddish productions of Shakespeare, it reaches beyond that specific topic to tell several stories at once," the review says. "One is the story of the development of the professional Yiddish theater. Berkowitz gives a concise explanation of how this arose, both in Europe and in the United States, and vividly describes the Yiddish theater scene on the Lower East Side around the turn of the 20th century." The publication is based in Israel.
http://www.jewish-theatre.com/visitor/article_display.aspx?articleID=1713

Workshop Alumnus Irving Remembers Time With Vonnegut (The Times, Feb. 4)
Author and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP alumnus John Irving reflects on the life of author and former workshop instructor Kurt Vonnegut on the occasion of the publication of Vonnegut's autobiography, "A Man Without a Country: A Memoir of Life in George W. Bush's America." "Soon I will be 64, which makes me 20 years younger than Vonnegut, who was my teacher at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa 40 years ago," Irving writes. "In those years (1965-67), many of the writing students at Iowa dismissed Vonnegut as a science fiction hack; he wasn't literary enough for them, and he wouldn't become literary in the mainstream American media until the publication of 'Slaughterhouse-Five' (1969) - although anyone with half a brain and a sense of humor knew he was literary from the beginning, with 'Player Piano.'" The paper is based in the U.K.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,923-2021940,00.html

LA Officer In Shooting Case Played Iowa Football (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 3)
The family of a man whose shooting by deputies was caught on videotape rallied at the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department this morning to demand the arrest of the police officer. Deputy Ivory John Webb, 45, has been suspended after he shot Senior Airman Elio Carrion, a passenger in a car involved in a high-speed chase in Chino on Sunday night. Webb was a standout football player at Carson High School who also played for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, entered law enforcement in the long shadow of his father, a respected former police chief in Compton.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-020306shooting_lat,0,3434365.story?coll=la-home-headlines&track=morenews

Federici Comments on Football Helmets (Daily Times, Feb. 3)
A study in the February issue of "Neurosurgery" shows that the Riddell Revolution football helmet, which is computer-designed around the head's center of gravity, reduces the chances for a concussion by 31 percent compared to other helmets such as Riddell's VSR-4. in Super Bowl XL, only 21 Pittsburgh Steelers and six Seahawks will be wearing the Revolution. Just three offensive players expected to start the game will be wearing the Revolution --all linemen. PAUL FEDERICI, former head trainer for the Seahawks, said that helmets in the NFL are primarily chosen by familiarity and for comfort. "There were four different helmets players wore when I was in Seattle," said Federici, who is the director of athletic training at the University of Iowa. "It depended a lot on player preference, but also on the fit by the equipment manager. Not everyone's head is shaped the same way." The newspaper serves Maryville, Tenn. 
http://www.thedailytimes.com/sited/story/html/229327

UI Study Discusses Cancer Therapy (Innovations Report, Feb. 3)
A limitation of current cancer care is the difficulty of quickly assessing how well a therapy is working. However, expanding the use of existing positron emission tomography (PET) technology can provide early and accurate assessment of a tumor's response to a particular therapy allowing physicians to better tailor a patient's treatment, according to MALIK JUWEID, M.D., associate professor of radiology at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. Writing in the Feb. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, Juweid and co-author Bruce Cheson, M.D., of the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University Hospital, outline the advantages and limitations of PET imaging in assessing cancer therapy and suggest that increasing the role of PET imaging has the potential to further improve cancer care management.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/medizin_gesundheit/bericht-54764.html

Artistic Director Founded Dance Exchange Program (Canberra Times, Feb. 2)
The Beijing Modern Dance Company's artistic adviser is US-based Wang Xiaolan, a choreographer, educator, producer and arts administrator. She was the first modern dancer from abroad to visit China after the Cultural Revolution in 1978 - on a trip with her mother, Hualing Nieh, the well-known Chinese fiction writer, and her stepfather, the American poet Paul Engle. In 1980, after the normalisation of the relationship between the United States and China, Wang founded the US China Dance Exchange Program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Three years later she lead a ground- breaking national modern dance workshop. Wang was on the faculty of dance at the University of Iowa and UCLA and has been the chair of the dance department at Connecticut College since 1994. The newspaper is based in Austrailia.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=cff41059c1a244cf2dee973166d570fd&_docnum=8&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=2cd9ce836513a9862dd81b39bf0ca4e8

Ballots To Be Examined In Arizona Vote (Arizona Republic, Feb. 2)
Ever since a recount showed John McComish won the September 2004 Republican primary for state representative, opponent Anton Orlich and his supporters have cast doubt on the vote tally. At issue is the outcome of the close race between McComish and Orlich, in which McComish prevailed after an automatic recount found nearly 500 new votes, reversing the initial outcome. McComish went on to become state representative. After examining the voting machines used in the election, DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa computer scientist, said he could not rule out the possibility of fraud unless he examined the ballots to determine whether there had been tampering. But Maricopa County Treasurer David Schweikert refused to release the ballots, saying he needed a valid court order before he would relinquish control. On Tuesday, Schweikert got one and, with it, the promise that the controversy over the election would be put to rest.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0202recount0202.html

UI Study About Medications Cited (Daily Times, Feb. 2)
A story about a national shortage of school nurses cites UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research that shows that every day, more than 3.5 million school children nationally take medication at school. The numbers include 200 types of prescription drugs, or three times the number of drugs taken by schoolchildren in the 1980s. The paper is based in Maryland.
http://www.delmarvanow.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060202/NEWS01/602020301/1002

Vonnegut Noted Teaching At UI (Valley Advocate, Feb. 2)
Writer Kurt Vonnegut is profiled in this article, and he's quoted in an address to the graduating class at Bennington College in 1970 -- contained in "Wampeters, Foma & Granfalloons" (1974) -- as saying, "It isn't often that a total pessimist is invited to speak in the springtime. How pessimistic am I, really? I was a teacher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA three years ago. I had hundreds of students. As nearly as I am able to determine, not one of my ex-students has seen fit to reproduce." The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://valleyadvocate.com/gbase/News/content?oid=oid:142078

Jones Reviewed Voting Machines After Election (Arizona Republic, Feb. 1)
Federal authorities seized ballots cast in a 2004 Republican primary on Wednesday, a move that could put to rest a long-running dispute over who won the race. At issue is the outcome of the close race between John McComish and Anton Orlich. McComish prevailed after an automatic recount found nearly 500 new votes, reversing the initial outcome. Ever since, Orlich and his supporters have questioned how so many new votes appeared during the recount. After reviewing the voting machines used in the election, DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa computer scientist, said he could not rule out the possibility of fraud unless he examined the ballots to determine whether there had been tampering.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0201recount01-ON.html

School Nurse Shortage Story Cites UI Study (Black Mountain News, Feb. 1)
A story about a shortage of school nurses in Buncombe County, N.C., schools cites UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research that shows that every day, more than 3.5 million school children nationally take medication at school. The numbers include 200 types of prescription drugs, or three times the number of drugs taken by school children in the 1980s. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://blackmountainnews.com/?module=displaystory&story_id=2862&format=html

Fales Comments On 'ID' Case (Science & Technology News, Feb. 1)
EVAN FALES
, a professor of philosophy at the University of Iowa, comments on Judge John Jones' ruling in Kitzmiller et al v. Dover Area School Board that "intelligent design" is not science. "Jones correctly finds against Dover," Fales argues, "but does so employing problematic premises."
http://www.stnews.org/commentary-2604.htm

Nathan Interviewed For Story On New Drug (NPR, Feb. 1)
PETER NATHAN
, a professor of community and behavioral health at the University of Iowa, is interviewed for a story that aired on NPR's "Morning Edition" about a study in the February issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry which indicates that a new drug, Nalmefene, may help reduce urges in pathological gamblers. The drug is not yet approved for the treatment of gambling addiction. A link on the synopsis page (see URL below) allows visitors to the site to download and listen to the story.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5182193

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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