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UI in the News

December, 2006

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Kayle's Work Performed In Massachusetts (Ballet-Dance Magazine, Dec. issue)
JENNIFER KAYLE
from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DANCE DEPARTMENT was one of four choreographers invited to create new works on struggle and transcendance for an October production in Northhampton, Mass. Kayle's contribution to the "sensitive, dynamic evening" -- "she was, she thought" -- featured six full length mirrors placed far upstage and a background video projection.
http://www.ballet-dance.com/200612/articles/APE20061027.html

Weinberger: Phenylephrine Doesn't Work (Good Housekeeping, December 2006)
With laws now restricting the sale of sinus decongestants containing pseudoephedrine, many companies now make those products with phenylephrine. However, studies show that phenylephrine has no effect on nasal congestion, says MILES WEINBERGER, a pediatric pulmonary and allergy specialist at the University of Iowa.
http://magazines.ivillage.com/goodhousekeeping/hb/health/articles/0,,284594_705057,00.html

Knudtson Discusses QPCR (The Scientist, December 2006)
KEVIN KNUDTSON, DNA facility director at the University of Iowa, participates in a Q & A discussion about Real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR).
http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/36686/

Novel By Workshop Graduate Is Reviewed (New York Times, Dec. 31)
A review of the novel "Kockroach," written by Tyler Knox, a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, describes the work as a satire of American life.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/31/books/review/Weiland.t.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Laroche Study Finds Adults With Kids Eat More Fat (Arizona Republic, Dec. 31)
Anyone planning a New Year's resolution to eat healthier may want to get the kids involved. A new study led by a University of Iowa doctor shows adults living with children eat more saturated fat - equivalent to almost a pepperoni pizza per week - than adults who don't live with children. "It's important because it shows you can't just change the diet of one person in the household," said Dr. HELENA LAROCHE, the study's primary author and an associate in internal medicine and pediatrics at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. "We really need to focus on the whole family." The study is the first to show how children may influence adults' food intake, Laroche said. Studies typically examine how adults affect children's eating habits. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the DESERET MORNING NEWS, SCIENCE DAILY, ARIZONA DAILY STAR, WASHINGTON TIMES, WASHINGTON POST, FOX NEWS, NBC10-TV (Philadelphia), KETV-TV (Omaha), CBS NEWS, THE MAIL (UK) CBC, EDMONTON JOURNAL, CALGARY HERALD, MIRROR (UK), YORKSHIRE POST (UK), BBC, NEWS INTERNATIONAL, NETINDIA 23, INDIA DAILY, KERALANEXT (India), XINHUA NEWS AGENCY (China) and many other news organizations.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/1231eatingstudy.html

Colangelo: Acceleration Can Help Gifted Students (KGW-TV, Dec. 31)
Seven percent of the Oregon public school students were identified as "talented and gifted," or TAG, based on academic and intelligence test results and other indicators that vary by school and by child. Advocates for gifted education say many such top achievers are languishing in schools that are unable or unwilling to meet their needs, leaving them at risk of boredom, behavior problems, depression and even academic failure. NICK COLANGELO, a professor in the University of Iowa College of Education said research shows that acceleration is one of the easiest and most effective ways to meet the needs of TAG students. KGW is based in Portland, Ore.
http://www.kgw.com/sharedcontent/APStories/stories/D8MC0HU81.html

Column Notes Passing Of UI Alumnus (Winston Salem Journal, Dec. 31)
A year in review column notes the passing of Hayward Oubre, a Winston-Salem artist who earned a degree in fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1149192424191&path=!living&s=1037645509005

Lie Research Cited In Column On Scandal (Salt Lake Tribune, Dec. 30)
A column criticizing corporate executives who engaged in stock options manipulation notes the scandal was uncovered through research by University of Iowa business professor ERIK LIE. The same story appeared on the Web site of the GAINESVILLE (Fla.) SUN, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, ARIZONA DAILY STAR, SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.sltrib.com/business/ci_4926001

Squire: Edwards Highly Regarded By Iowa Dems (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 29)
Former U.S. Sen. John Edwards declared his candidacy for the presidency in New Orleans Thursday, then attended a rally in Des Moines. By starting in Des Moines, Edwards underscored Iowa's crucial role in his campaign. His surprisingly strong second-place finish in the 2004 Iowa caucuses was a major lift to his presidential candidacy that year, and a poor showing here in 2008 could doom his candidacy. He has visited Iowa 16 times since the 2004 election, and polls suggest he holds an early edge in the state. "He's been here as much as, if not more than, anybody else, and he's highly regarded by a lot of Democrats in Iowa," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor. The same story appeared on the Web site of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and KCPQ-TV (Seattle).
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-na-edwards29dec29,1,5436377.story?coll=la-news-a_section

Backdating Scandal Hits Apple, Jobs (KCBS-TV, Dec. 29)
Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs has reportedly hired his own attorney to deal with a stock options scandal that is putting his career and reputation on the line. That attorney will reportedly help Silicon Valley's most famous executive deal with a federal investigation into apparently falsified documents. Some analysts say this means Jobs and Apple are now moving in different directions. Investors are beginning to worry that Jobs' future at Apple is in doubt. More than 190 companies are under internal or federal investigation to find out whether they falsified stock option grant dates. More than 60 executives have quit or been fired. Some estimates say stockholders have lost more than $100 billion as companies are forced to restate earnings. A new report from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA says almost 30 percent of all companies that granted options manipulated them in some way. KCBS is based in San Francisco.
http://cbs5.com/local/local_story_362223902.html

Lie Research Cited In Column On Backdating Scandal (Allentown Call, Dec. 29)
A column criticizing corporate executives who engaged in stock options manipulation notes the scandal was uncovered through research by University of Iowa business professor ERIK LIE. The Call is based in Pennsylvania. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the FRESNO BEE and MODESTO BEE.
http://www.mcall.com/business/columnists/all-d2_kristoffdec29,0,6920826.column

Hemley Book Inspires Columnist (Evansville Courier Press, Dec. 29)
A columnist writing about embarrassing moments in his life notes that ROBIN HEMLEY, a University of Iowa professor, is researching a book about bad moments in his life that he's trying to fix. The Courier Press is published in Indiana.
http://www.courierpress.com/news/2006/dec/29/embarrassment-from-fifth-grade-desk-incident/

Graduate Directs Community Theater Production (Galveston Daily News, Dec. 29)
The Clear Creek Country Theatre of Nassau Bay, Tex., is performing a production of "The Mousetrap." The director, Aprille Meek, has a bachelor's degree in directing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://news.galvestondailynews.com/story.lasso?ewcd=e0ec63e6919984b3

UI Expands Aid For Needy Students (USA Today, Dec. 28)
A story notes that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is one of a handful of universities that are starting new financial aid programs for needy students or expanding existing programs.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2006-12-27-education-review_x.htm

UI Press Published Billy Sunday Book (Warsaw Times, Dec. 28)
The Billy Sunday Historic Museum in Winona Lake, Ind., is working with an Elkhart-based video production company to produce a documentary film about Billy Sunday. Sunday moved to Winona Lake in 1910 and died in 1935. The home where he lived is now the Billy Sunday Museum. The museum's curator, Bill Firstenberger wrote a book titled "In Rare Form: A Pictorial History of the Baseball Evangelist Billy Sunday" that was published in October 2005 by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press. The Times is published in Indiana.
http://www.timeswrsw.com/N1227060.HTM

UI Researcher Discovered Backdating Scandal (Forbes, Dec. 28)
In a year in review column, Forbes notes that the scandal of the year was stock options backdating, which ensnared executives at Apple computer, United Health, and dozens of other companies. And considering that researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Indiana University say almost a third of America's 2000 public companies have stock options timing issues, 2007 could bring further affairs to light.
http://www.forbes.com/2006/12/27/apple-unitedhealth-brocade-markets-cx_ms_1227leadersandlosers.html?partner=moreover?partner=moreover

Tippie Has Iowa-Texas Connection (San Antonio Express News, Dec. 28)
A story about little-known Iowa-Texas connections notes that Henry B. Tippie grew up in the small eastern Iowa town of Belle Plaine and graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1949. He amassed a fortune through investments in oil, transportation and other interests and became the prime benefactor for the Belle Plaine community. Tippie has helped finance the town library, airport and community center. And he even provides annual scholarships to students at his alma mater, which named its business college after him. So where does Tippie live now? In Austin.
http://www.mysanantonio.com/sports/big12/stories/MYSA122806.11C.FBCalamo.connections.279a60f.html

Alumnus Comments On Packers-Bears Game (Miami Herald, Dec. 28)
Tom Dickinson, a loyal Packers fan from Milwaukee, said he would have preferred the NFL not move Sunday's Packers-Bears game to Sunday night, so he could watch it while also keeping track of other playoff contenders. Now those other games will be over by the time the Packers take the field. ''Now I'll probably watch the game, skip dinner and celebrate [the Packers] making the playoffs. Hopefully,'' said Dickinson, 22, a recent graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the MONROE (Wisc.) TIMES, JANESVILLE (Wisc.) GAZETTE, MADISON CAPITAL TIMES, ALBEQUERQUE TRIBUNE, MANITOWOC (Wisc.) HERALD TIMES, HOUSTON CHRONICLE and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/16332466.htm

Alumnus Creates Bobbleheads (Seattle Times, Dec. 28)
A profile of Bryan Guise, who creates bobblehead toys in the cramped basement of his home in Des Moines, notes that he graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Guise, 29, has made bobbleheads for Iowa's governor, police officers, a woman with a deformed face, even a rush job for a dying man. Typically, he takes orders over the Internet and relies on photos of his subjects. "It's assuming what I'm dealing with rather than knowing for sure, but there's that universal language in a face," he said. Guise, who graduated from the University of Iowa with a fine arts degree in 2002, has been drawing caricatures since he was a child. He turned that interest into a job making bobbleheads after graduation. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the HOUSTON CHRONICLE, WASHINGTON TIMES, MIAMI HERALD, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, COLUMBUS (Ohio) DISPATCH, WATERLOO (Ontario) RECORD, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT and numerous other news organizations.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2003498172_bobbleheads28.html

Victim Sues Over Shooting By UI Alumnus (WQAD-TV, Dec. 28)
An unarmed airman who was shot by a sheriff's deputy earlier this year has filed a lawsuit, accusing the deputy and former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football player of excessive force. Elio Carrion, an Air Force security officer, claims former Deputy Ivory Webb lied about his account of the videotaped shooting in California. Carrion also says the San Bernardino County sheriff's office did not provide immediate medical attention or adequate training. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5864749&nav=1sW7

King, Toth Discuss Holidays For International Students (Voice Of America, Dec. 27)
A story about international students who remain in the United States during the holidays talks with Gyorgy Toth of Budapest, Hungary, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate student, who raves about a Christmas card from an Iowan friend written "in Hungarian, which is a very, very special experience for me because I'm not used to reading Hungarian Christmas greetings in the United States. So that was very special for me from her." Toth says he has a warm place in his heart for Christmas time spent at the University of Iowa. "I remember the first Christmas here: several people offered me to spend Christmas Day with them, whether it was faculty or friends. People really made an effort to reach out to me and include me in their celebration. It is a special time of the year, and it does show in people's behavior." SCOTT KING, the director of the University of Iowa's Office of International Students says it bothers him "that too many of our student exchange offices are envisioned at least initially by students as being mainly working with the immigration rules we have to abide by... like reports the government requires of us when we host students here or basic documents used to get visas. We also work with them on applications that come with immigration." King says the winter holidays are a time to put all that aside for a while and focus on the real meaning of international student exchanges like voluntary gestures of goodwill from the community. The same story appeared on the Web site of MEN'S NEWS DAILY.
http://www.voanews.com/english/AmericanLife/2006-12-22-voa73.cfm

Alumnus Creates Bobbleheads (USA Today, Dec. 27)
A profile of Bryan Guise, who creates the toys in the cramped basement of his home in Des Moines. Guise, 29, has made bobbleheads for Iowa's governor, police officers, a woman with a deformed face, even a rush job for a dying man. Typically, he takes orders over the Internet and relies on photos of his subjects. "It's assuming what I'm dealing with rather than knowing for sure, but there's that universal language in a face," he said. Guise, who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a fine arts degree in 2002, has been drawing caricatures since he was a child. He turned that interest into a job making bobbleheads after graduation. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the WASHINGTON POST, BALTIMORE SUN, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, LAKELAND (Fla.) LEDGER, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, MEMPHIS COMMERCIAL APPEAL, HARTFORD COURANT, SALEM (Ohio) NEWS, DESERET MORNING NEWS (Utah), BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, CINCINATTI ENQUIRER, THE STATE (SC), SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, ARIZONA REPUBLIC, WMAQ-TV (Chicago), KVVU-TV (Las Vegas), CANADIAN BUSINESS MAGAZINE, LONDON (Ontario) FREE PRESS,  PRAVDA (Russia), and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/manufacturing/2006-12-26-bobbleheads_x.htm

Smith: Home Care Workers Have Few Protections (MediLexicon, Dec. 26)
As more and more Americans turn to in-home health care workers to take care of elderly family members, research from a University of Iowa law professor has found nobody is taking care of the caregivers. PEGGIE SMITH, an expert in employment law, has found that most home health care workers are protected by few of the federal labor standards that other Americans take for granted. The same story appeared on the Web site of MEDICAL NEWS TODAY.
http://www.medilexicon.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=58891

Court Ruling Opened Foundation Records (South Bend Tribune, Dec. 25)
An op-ed columnist writing about open government records notes that a recent court ruling opened the records of the quasi-public UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Foundation.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061225/News05/612250313/-1/NEWS

Robillard, Katen-Bahensky Form Task Force (Red Orbit, Dec. 25)
Iowa's rural communities aren't always fortunate in tilling physician vacancies, particularly in specialty areas such as surgery. According to a recently completed statewide survey, there are 322 immediate openings for doctors in Iowa in key specialties. The average time to fill one of the 24 general surgery openings, based on the rate of new surgeons becoming available, is about two years. By early 2007, the Task Force on the Iowa Physician Work Force is expected to issue a report of its findings, which will likely include a request for more state funding for programs that assist rural communities in recruiting specialists. The task force was formed in June by JEAN ROBILLARD, dean of the Carver College of Medicine at the University of Iowa, and DONNA KATEN-BAHENSKY, director and CEO of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/779662/the_next_era_of_physician_recruitment/index.html?source=r_health

Corporate Board Members May Have Backdated (Fort Wayne News-Sentinel, Dec. 25)
Nearly 1,400 corporate board members appear to have profited from the manipulation of stock option grant dates over a 10-year period, results of one study show. The analysis raises the possibility that hundreds of board members were aware that options were backdated to boost their value to themselves and company executives. That could be seen as a conflict with their role as advocates for all company shareholders. The backdating scandal emerged this year after academic research by ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa, leading to resignations and investigations at scores of companies.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/business/16315875.htm

Polgreen Helped Set Up Flu Market (Kansas City InfoZine, Dec. 24)
Influenza experts have borrowed a page from economists, creating a futures market for influenza activity that predicted outbreaks two to four weeks in advance. In a prediction market, people with information about a future event buy and sell shares based on what they believe the likelihood of that event will be. For instance, if a health care worker started seeing more cases of influenza in her clinic, she would buy shares representing increased levels of flu in the coming weeks and sell shares representing decreased activity. The prices at which these shares trade reflect the group's consensus on the future event. "For decades, farmers have used futures markets to make decisions about what crops to plant," says PHILIP POLGREEN, MD, of the University of Iowa. "We're just borrowing that technology to help people in public health and health care make decisions about the future." Dr. Polgreen and his collaborators set up a "flu market" for the 2004-05 influenza season in the state of Iowa. Sixty-one health care workers from a variety of backgrounds participated.
http://www.infozine.com/news/stories/op/storiesView/sid/19807/

Lie Study Has Legs (Bergen Record, Dec. 24)
Eighteen CEOs swept out. More than a hundred public companies under federal investigation and more than $5 billion in profits erased by restatements. Indictments so far: five former top executives at two companies, Brocade Communications Systems Inc. and Comverse Technology Inc. The toll of the stock options-timing affair -- corporate America's scandal of the year -- has been heavy. Federal officials say more prosecutions will be brought in 2007 over manipulation of the timing of stock option grants to enrich top company executives. Nearly every business day, more companies report federal or internal investigations. New lawsuits by shareholders are filed. More businesses disclose that because past option grants may have distorted their financial results, they may have to restate earnings. Next year could well bring more restatements, and companies' stock could be stripped from public trading because reviews of options grants made them late in filing their quarterly financial reports. Will there be more? Just over 2,000 public companies, or 29 percent of those in the United States that give stock options to executives, have timing issues, said ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, and Randall Heron, an Indiana University associate finance professor. Their research last year helped focus attention on a widespread pattern of conduct. The Record is published in New Jersey. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, READING (Penn.) EAGLE and ARLINGTON HEIGHTS (Ill.) DAILY HERALD.
http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyOSZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NzA0MjU5OCZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTI=

Squire: Nevadans Must Find Enough Caucus Locations (Las Vegas Sun, Dec. 24)
Nevada Democrats are ecstatic that they've landed an early spot in 2008's presidential selection calendar, but now they face an unforgiving reality. With the national media watching, Democrats must put on a caucus that draws candidates and lots of voters while being free of flaws. Among the issues that organizers must deal with is securing proper locations to hold about 1,000 meetings. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political scientist and a caucus expert, said this must be the first priority. The selection of sites will largely depend on estimated guesses about voter participation in various parts of the state. In Iowa, about 2,000 caucus meetings are held at firehouses, schools and even homes. By contrast, Nevada had just 17 caucus sites in 2004 - one per county.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/sun/2006/dec/24/566630258.html

Attorney Graduated From UI Law School (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Dec. 24)
A Q&A interview with attorney Paul Bezilla notes that he earned his law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law. "After playing bass in a touring rock band for three years after college, I discovered that the first rule of all bands is they always break up. When mine did, I had an opportunity to go to law school and concluded it was the best way to obtain financial stability and stay involved with the music business."
http://www.startribune.com/535/story/887203.html

Hovenkamp Comments on Court Decision (Investor's Business Daily, Dec. 23)
The technology bubble may have burst more than six years ago, but Wall Street's biggest names are still fighting lawsuits stemming from the era's initial public offerings. In the latest skirmish, Credit Suisse Group, other investment banks and institutional investors scored a victory when the U.S. Supreme Court said it would hear their case after they lost in New York's 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Investors who believe they were burned in the dot-com meltdown accuse the banks of an "epic Wall Street conspiracy," according to the appeals court's decision. They say the banks conspired to inflate stock prices of IPOs in their roles as underwriters, the decision said. "Everybody always looks for someone to blame," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa and an adviser for the plaintiffs. "It's fair to say that there was a lot of euphoria at the time of the Internet bubble. This is a not a secret." He says stockholders who suffered losses weren't always small investors. "It's not like it was only the 70-year-old retiring plumber that was buying," Hovenkamp said. "It was mainly very large, fairly sophisticated investors who had access to the same information the sellers had." He says the bottom line is that the SEC has oversight in this case, something it has been trusted with for many years. If the high court were to take away the SEC's jurisdiction, it would create confusion, he says.
http://ca.biz.yahoo.com/ibd/061222/newissue.html?.v=1

Polgreen Helped Set Up Flu Market (Red Orbit.com, Dec. 22)
Influenza experts have borrowed a page from economists, creating a futures market for influenza activity that predicted outbreaks two to four weeks in advance. In a prediction market, people with information about a future event buy and sell shares based on what they believe the likelihood of that event will be. For instance, if a health care worker started seeing more cases of influenza in her clinic, she would buy shares representing increased levels of flu in the coming weeks and sell shares representing decreased activity. The prices at which these shares trade reflect the group's consensus on the future event. "For decades, farmers have used futures markets to make decisions about what crops to plant," says PHILIP POLGREEN, MD, of the University of Iowa. "We're just borrowing that technology to help people in public health and health care make decisions about the future." Dr. Polgreen and his collaborators set up a "flu market" for the 2004-05 influenza season in the state of Iowa. Sixty-one health care workers from a variety of backgrounds participated. http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/776861/prediction_markets_forecast_flu_activity/index.html#

Hemley Takes On Childhood Demons (Atlanta- Journal Constitution, Dec. 22)
ROBIN HEMLEY
is nervous about his appearance in "The Littlest Angel," a Christmas-themed children's musical at Marietta's Big Top Theatre. He's the head of the University of Iowa's prestigious nonfiction writing program, the author of seven books and, right now, in the middle of research on his next, about his attempts to redo various disappointing moments from his youth. At age 7, Hemley flubbed his lines in his elementary school production of "The Littlest Angel" in Athens, Ohio. Now, he's come all the way from Iowa City to this suburban Atlanta theater to try it again. Still, there's no guarantee that things will go right on the second try. He's got one shot at his angel role, one performance only. "No matter what happens," he says before taking the stage in Marietta, "it's fodder for the book." His tale, still about two years from publication, is tentatively titled, "Do-Over: A Middle-Aged Man Takes a Second Shot at Youth's Disappointments." http://www.ajc.com/living/content/living/stories/2006/12/21/1222lvhemley.html

UI Band To Perform At Alamo Bowl Event (San Antonio Express-News, Dec. 22)
In a listing of events in San Antonio, it's noted that the the Shiner Beers Alamo Bowl Tailgate Party on Dec. 30 includes performances by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Texas bands. The newspaper is based in Texas. http://www.mysanantonio.com/salife/stories/MYSA122206.cal.events.2fb7596b.html

Kidder To Discuss Work (PrideSource, Dec. 21)
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Kidder will partake in Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads at Jan. 25 at Washtenaw Community College. Kidder's book, "Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest Of Dr. Paul Farmer, A Man Who Would Cure The World" has been chosen as the focus of the program. Kidder graduated from Harvard and studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The publication is based in Michigan. http://www.pridesource.com/article.shtml?article=21795

Squire Comments On Congressional Campaign (Congressional Quarterly, Dec. 21)
Newly-elected Congressman Dave Loebsack's political challenge is to deal quickly with the perception that his victory was not a resounding affirmation of his candidacy nor even a referendum on the well-liked Rep. Jim Leach, but rather a reflection of a political mood that may not be relevant should the Democrat seek re-election in 2008. "Democrats were so angry that their anger over the war transcended their personal respect for Leach," said David Yepsen, the well-known political columnist for the Des Moines Register. This view was seconded by PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, which is located in the 2nd District. "Leach was always able to hold the district because he was able to appeal to enough Democrats to give him a fairly comfortable majority," Squire said. "This time around, there were enough Democrats that were unhappy with Republicans in general that Jim Leach ended up paying the price."
http://www.cqpolitics.com/2006/12/freshmen_rep_loebsack_tries_to.html

Squire: Anti-GOP Sentiment Cost Leach (New York Times, Dec. 21)
A story about incoming U.S. Congressman Dave Loebsack notes that he was able to defeat incumbent Republican Congressman Jim Leach because of anti-Republican sentiment among voters, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Leach was always able to hold the district because he was able to appeal to enough Democrats to give him a fairly comfortable majority," Squire said. "This time around, there were enough Democrats that were unhappy with Republicans in general that Jim Leach ended up paying the price." The same article was published in CONGRESSIONAL QUARTERLY POLITICS.
http://www.nytimes.com/cq/2006/12/20/cq_2053.html?pagewanted=2

Shareholders In Backdating Companies Lost Money (The Oregonian, Dec. 21)
Shareholders of stock in companies caught up in the backdating scandal have lost at least $100 billion, by one measure, since backdating was first covered in The Wall Street Journal, according to an academic study released Wednesday. The study measured the performance of 110 stocks in a Journal database of companies with backdating problems. The study measured the stocks' daily returns versus the returns that would have been expected based on the stocks' historical correlation to the wider market. Stocks in the Journal's database of companies with backdating problems began losing value after a May 2005 academic study by ERIK LIE at the University of Iowa first raised the issue. Wednesday's study said the stocks, on average, declined more than 15 percent compared with their expected returns during the four weeks leading to the Journal's first article about backdating, in March 2006. The same story appeared on the Web sites of MSN NEWS, SHAREWATCH, MSNBC, BUFFALO NEWS, LOUISVILLE COURIER JOURNAL, BALTIMORE SUN, INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, and BUSINESS WEEK.
http://www.oregonlive.com/business/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/business/1166671520126760.xml&coll=7

Story Tells History of Muslim Community (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 21)
MIKE JUDGE
, adjunct professor of journalism at the University of Iowa, writes about the decades-old Muslim community that lives and worships in Cedar Rapids. Subscription is required to enter the site.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116667097497756422-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22university+of+iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Banfi Discovers Cystic Fibrosis Mechanism (NewsRX, Dec. 21)
A recent University of Iowa study reveals a new immune defense mechanism in normal airways and may help explain why people with cystic fibrosis (CF) are particularly susceptible to bacterial lung infections. The findings also may point the way to new approaches for treating the disease. The UI study shows how two enzymes generate and use reactive oxygen species (ROS) to destroy bacteria in normal airways. The team also found that this process is defective in airway tissue and cells containing the CF gene mutation. The study is published in a recent online issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. "Among the host defense systems that we know of in the airway, at least in cell culture and tissue explants, this is one of the most efficient antibacterial system we have identified," said BOTOND BANFI, UI assistant professor of anatomy and cell biology and senior study author. "The findings suggest that one reason for CF patients' weakened innate immunity might be the absence of this natural oxidative host defense mechanism."
http://www.newsrx.com/articles/408133.html

UI Study Notes Lost Time To Vocal Problems (Wilmington News Sun, Dec. 21)
A story about students who have difficulty hearing their teachers notes that U.S. schools lose nearly $2.5 billion annually in sick leave for teachers with vocal problems, according to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's National Center for Voice and Speech. The News Sun is based in Delaware.
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061219/SPECIAL/112190019/1008/NEWS03

Weinstein Discusses Scoliosis (Springfield News Sun, Dec. 20)
Its common name is curvature of the spine, and you most often see it in its most dramatic, debilitating form -- the elderly, hunched over, grasping walkers or canes as they struggle to walk just a few yards. But scoliosis -- its scientific name -- more often strikes young girls and boys just as they hit adolescence. Late-onset idiopathic scoliosis -- or LIS -- is the most common form of the disease and is generally diagnosed after the age of 10. The condition, which has no known cause other than genetics, affects 3 percent of children between the ages of 8 and 16, and about 60,000 teens in the United States. Scoliosis manifests itself as a side-to-side curvature of the spine. On an X-ray, the spine appears more as an "S" or "C" than a straight line. In some cases, the bones in the spine may also rotate so the person's waist or shoulders appear uneven. "Before we had school screening, we used to see girls come in with their mothers complaining that they had to hem their skirts differently because of the asymmetry it causes, although there was no actual difference in leg lengths," said Dr. STUART L. WEINSTEIN, professor of orthopaedic surgery at the University of Iowa. The News Sun is published in Ohio.
http://www.springfieldnewssun.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/scol/534242.html

Bonthius: Pregnant Women Should Avoid Rodents (Healthscout, Dec. 20)
Pregnant women who come in contact with rodents run the risk of becoming infected with a virus that causes severe brain damage to unborn children. Doctors at the University of Iowa are recommending expectant mothers make sure their homes are winterized because rodents tend to take shelter in homes during the colder months. Rodents can carry lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The virus can cause mild flu-like symptoms in healthy people. However, when a fetus is exposed, conditions like congenital hydrocephalus, chorioretinitis (affecting vision), and mental retardation can result. "Cases of babies born with congenital LCMV are rare," reports Dr. DANIEL BONTHIUS, an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa. "However, because the virus can severely affect the developing fetus, it's important for pregnant women to take precautions."
http://www.healthscout.com/news/1/8015137/main.html

Corporate Boards Study Noted (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Dec. 20)
Nearly 1,400 corporate board members appear to have profited from the manipulation of stock option grant dates over a 10-year period, according to a study being released today. The analysis raises the possibility that hundreds of board members were aware that options were backdated to boost their value to themselves and company executives. That could be seen as a conflict with their role as advocates for all company shareholders. The backdating scandal emerged this year after academic research by ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa, leading to resignations and investigations at scores of companies. Lie said the new study underscored the important role directors should play in guarding against management abuses. "It's hard for shareholders to understand what's going on in a company because you can't be there," Lie said. "That's why you delegate the responsibility to a few people, the directors, who represent you. You have to have trust in those people and they have to act in a trustworthy manner."
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/business/16270018.htm

UI Researchers Study Bacterium (Post Chronicle, Dec. 20)
U.S. researchers say they better understand how a potentially deadly bacterium that could be used as a bioterrorist tool eludes the human immune system. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists say the bacterium, Francisella tularensis, is found naturally in the Northern Hemisphere and can be contracted through certain insect bites, contact with infected rabbits or by ingesting contaminated food, water or air. Although Francisella tularensis rarely infects people, the research was conducted because the bacterium has the potential to be used as a bioterrorist tool.
http://www.postchronicle.com/news/science/article_21255272.shtml

UI Researchers Get Teen Driving Study Grant (WQAD-TV, Dec. 20)
A team of researchers from Iowa says parents could play a key role in reducing crashes by teenage drivers. A team from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Injury Prevention Center and Blank Children's Hospital in Des Moines is getting federal funding for the study. Researchers will examine how parents could communicate more effectively with young drivers and prevent crashes.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5836950&nav=1sW7

Failed UI President Search Costs Reach $215,000 (WQAD-TV, Dec. 20)
New records show the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has paid more than $215,000 for a presidential search that is starting over after several months. The Board of Regents reported last month that $195,000 had been paid to a search firm. Today, regents revised the number to include other expenditures, including about $9,500 associated with interviewing candidates last month in Des Moines. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5837303&nav=1sW7

Alumna Takes Over Phoenix Charity (Arizona Republic, Dec. 20)
A Tempe woman has been named the new East Valley Regional Director for Catholic Charities Community Services. Beverly Perry has joined the non-profit social service organization in the supervisory role. Perry has a master's in social work from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.azcentral.com/community/ahwatukee/articles/1220TR-charities1216Z14.htm

Corporate Boards Study Noted (Monterey Herald, Dec. 19)
Nearly 1,400 corporate board members appear to have profited from the manipulation of stock option grant dates over a 10-year period, according to a study being released today. The analysis raises the possibility that hundreds of board members were aware that options were backdated to boost their value to themselves and company executives. That could be seen as a conflict with their role as advocates for all company shareholders. The backdating scandal emerged this year after academic research by ERIK LIE of the University Of Iowa, leading to resignations and investigations at scores of companies. Lie said the new study underscored the important role directors should play in guarding against management abuses. "It's hard for shareholders to understand what's going on in a company because you can't be there," Lie said. "That's why you delegate the responsibility to a few people, the directors, who represent you. You have to have trust in those people and they have to act in a trustworthy manner." The newspaper is based in California. The article, which originally appeared in the LOS ANGELES TIMES, also ran in the BALTIMORE SUN and HARTFORD COURANT in Connecticut.
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/mcherald/business/16272211.htm

Ponseti Credited With Clubfoot Treatment (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 19)
The treatment of clubfoot, which affects about 5,000 newborns annually, has undergone a radical shift in the last 10 years. Before the mid-1990s, a standard treatment was major surgery that left many young patients with long-term orthopedic problems. Now that has changed dramatically, thanks mostly to a non-surgical approach called the Ponseti method, named for University of Iowa clubfoot specialist DR. IGNACIO PONSETI. By applying a series of plaster casts for a period from a few weeks to a few months, doctors trained in Ponseti's technique can correct the majority of clubfoot cases, according to studies published since 2000 in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopedics and elsewhere.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0612190189dec19,1,498875.story

Researcher Studies Alzheimer's Disease (Triangle Business Journal, Dec. 19)
Kathleen Welsh-Bohmer loves to dissect the brain's power to handle memory. A neuropsychologist, Welsh-Bohmer has led the Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Duke University since 1994. She did her clinical training at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA from 1985 to 1987. The newspaper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.bizjournals.com/bizwomen/triangle/content/story.html?story_id=1391666

UI Press Book Reviewed (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 19)
Jim Tomlinson's familiarity with life in small towns informs his first collection, "Things Kept, Things Left Behind" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 170 pages, $15.95 paper). But there's a more universal place he knows well. That is the country of marriage, visited here often and with insight. The collection of stories won the 2006 Iowa Short Fiction Award.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-0612190181dec19,1,3789449.story

Rao Comments On Incontinence Test (Washington Times, Dec. 18)
Diagnostic testing for fecal incontinence may not be required in every patient, but it could result in a more reliable diagnosis, says a U.S. study. _ Study co-author DR. SATISH S.C. RAO of the University of Iowa believes that a balance between the two primary treatment methods -- those based on testing and those based on empirical data -- must be achieved."Diagnostic testing for fecal incontinence may not be required in every patient, but its judicious use will provide an objective portrayal of the underlying mechanism(s) together with a more reliable diagnosis," says Rao. The article originally appeared on the UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL wire.
http://washingtontimes.com/upi/20061218-013439-9854r.htm

UI Alumnus Appointed To Congressman's Staff  (Herald and Review, Dec. 18)
Andrew Rowe, a Rock Island native, is the district economic development director Congressman-elect Phil Hare, D-Rock Island. He earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois and a master's of business affairs degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Decatur, Ill.
http://www.herald-review.com/articles/2006/12/19/columnists/ingram_frazier/1019940.txt

Erik Lie Says Backdating Scandal Has No Clear Villain (Macleans, Dec. 18 issue)
Across the U.S., the backdating of option grants -- an intentional manipulation meant to inflate their value -- has touched nearly 200 companies and cost dozens of executives their jobs. And yet, despite the stunning breadth of the abuses, the issue hasn't generated nearly the same sort of public frenzy that surrounded earlier cases of corporate malfeasance, like Enron, Worldcom and Tyco. Backdating became especially popular during the tech boom of the late 1990s when companies couldn't entice top employees with big cash, but did have fast-growing stocks. Backdating has since been uncovered at all kinds of companies. In fact, the scandal is probably 10 times bigger than anyone thinks, says ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA whose research first brought the issue to public attention.  Lie says the scandal has been somewhat diluted by the fact that there is no central character to easily cast as the villain. It's not like "when you have Ken Lay and Jeff Skilling in the middle," he says. Backdating is a scandal without plot or personal tragedy -- just billions of dollars of company money skimmed by hundreds of executives. Macleans is a Canadian magazine.
http://www.macleans.ca/topstories/business/article.jsp?content=20061218_138299_138299

Erik Lie's Research Leads To Corporate Boards Study (LA Times, Dec. 18)
Nearly 1,400 corporate board members appear to have profited from the manipulation of stock option grant dates over a 10-year period, according to a study being released today. The analysis raises the possibility that hundreds of board members were aware that options were backdated to boost their value to themselves and company executives. That could be seen as a conflict with their role as advocates for all company shareholders. The backdating scandal emerged this year after academic research by ERIK LIE of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, leading to resignations and investigations at scores of companies. Lie said the new study underscored the important role directors should play in guarding against management abuses. "It's hard for shareholders to understand what's going on in a company because you can't be there," Lie said. "That's why you delegate the responsibility to a few people, the directors, who represent you. You have to have trust in those people and they have to act in a trustworthy manner."
http://www.latimes.com/business/investing/la-fi-options18dec18,1,6036546.story?coll=la-headlines-business-invest&ctrack=1&cset=true

Radiation Side-Effect Research Began At UI (Journal-Register, Dec. 17)
Almost everyone who receives radiation treatment for oral cancer faces a painful and potentially devastating side effect knowan as mucositis. The radiation creates sores and inflammation inside the mouth and throat that can interfere with eating and drinking. Relief may be on the way for many patients, however, as a result of a decade of research by KATHLEEN CAMPBELL, a scientist at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. Campbell said her interest in protective agents originated from frustration she felt while working as a clinical audiologist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the 1980s. Many cancer patients lost hearing because of chemotherapy drugs. "I felt powerless to do anything," she said. She earned a doctorate in hearing science at Iowa and has researched drugs' effects chemotherapy side effects for 18 years. The Journal-Register is published in Springfield, Ill.
http://www.sj-r.com/sections/news/stories/103150.asp

Many Universities Conducting Presidential Searches (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Dec. 17)
The pool of presidential candidates is especially small these days because of a wave of university presidents who have retired as well as a number of presidents who are in the midst of moving from one place to another, said Claire Van Ummerson, vice president of the American Council on Education. "It is a very limited pool, so the competition is great," she said.North Dakota's university system recently extended a deadline for applications for its chancellor after it received only three. The Louisiana university system is looking for a new leader. Campuses also in the midst of searches include Ohio State, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Indiana University, Purdue, University of New Mexico - and probably 40 or 50 on top of that, added Van Ummerson, a former chancellor of the University of New Hampshire.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=8d3b3100bf2f5343c313a984d4d1081b&_docnum=5&wchp=dGLbVzW-zSkVA&_md5=ce31a48b296003fb1adb00738eb3d226

Fernandes Connected With Deaf At UI (Worchester Telegram & Gazette, Dec. 17)
In May, Worchester native JANE FERNANDES emerged into the national spotlight after her appointment as president of Gallaudet University, the world's only liberal arts university for the deaf. She said she had a plan to make the school more welcoming to deaf people who have not learned American Sign Language, which is the glue that many deaf leaders claim holds the deaf community together. Her detractors were determined to be heard: They marched to Capitol Hill, erected a "tent city" on campus, launched a hunger strike and shut down the school for several days -- eventually forcing the board to change its decision. Fernandes received her master's degree and Ph.D. in comparative literature at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. That's where she joined a deaf club and was first introduced, at age 23, to American Sign Language. She said she absorbed the language and culture of the deaf like a sponge. "That was the first time I saw a large number of deaf people," she said. "I thought, wow, all of these people are really like me."
http://www.telegram.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061217/NEWS/612170508/1116

Editorial: Thorne Comments On Factory Farms (Toledo Blade, Dec. 17)
ALL industries whose manufacturing processes produce noxious byproducts either are regulated by appropriate governmental agencies or should be. But because of the traditions of independence associated with agriculture, governments have  shrunk from doing the kind of oversight needed to adequately protect public health. A panel of scientists from the United States, Canada and northern Europe has warned that animal feedlots are contaminating water supplies and contributing to the rise of antibiotic-resistant germs. As PETER THORNE, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA environmental scientist who led the task force, put it: "There was general agreement among all that the industrialization of livestock production over the past three decades has not been accompanied by commensurate modernization of regulations to protect the health of the public or natural, public-trust resources, particularly in the United States." The Toledo Blade is published in Ohio.
http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061217/OPINION02/612160303/-1/OPINION

No Shame Takes Root In North Carolina (Asheville Citizen-Times, Dec. 16)
There's no dawdling Asheville's No Shame Theatre, a nationwide impromptu and performance troupe for playwrights, actors, dancers and musicians that has found a new home at the N.C. Stage Company. Written pieces are brought to the theater at 10 p.m. on the night of the show -- and an hour later, they're performed. TODD RISTAU, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA undergraduate, started No Shame in 1986 using lights from his motorcycle to illuminate stage in the back of a pickup truck. The group was first called Midnight Madness. "It rained every week we were out there," says JEFF GOODE, a founding member. "We had about 30 people under umbrellas in the dark. It was fun, extremely casual and impromptu." When the original performers left Iowa, they took No Shame with them, and it has since grown to more than 30 cities. The Asheville Citizen-Times is published in North Carolina.
http://www.citizen-times.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061215/ENT05/61214044/1037/ENT

Edwards Is Interviewed About Bestseller (Kansas City Star, Dec. 16)
KIM EDWARDS
' "The Memory Keeper's Daughter" is the current selection of the FYI Book Club. Edwards, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, said in an interview, "Story ideas come from so many places, most of them connected to something true that happens in the world - an overheard conversation, a newspaper story, something witnessed or experienced. The initial seed for 'The Memory Keeper's Daughter' was very small, just a few sentences about a man who had discovered when he was in his 40s that he'd had a brother who was institutionalized at birth. ... The brother had died in the institution, his life kept secret from his family from birth to death. I was struck by this idea of a secret at the center of a family and how it would alter all the dynamics and perceptions in ways that people wouldn't fully understand."
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/entertainment/columnists/john_mark_eberhart/16249798.htm

UI Hospitals Treated E Coli Victim (Pioneer Press, Dec. 15)
The parents of a nine-year-old girl hospitalized for E. coli-related kidney complications after eating a soft shell taco from a Cedar Falls Taco John's sued the restaurant chain in federal court Thursday. Her parents became the first to take legal action against the company, saying their daughter fell ill three days after eating at Taco John's. After her conditioned worsened, she was transported to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS, in Iowa City, and diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, according to the lawsuit. HUS is a condition often linked to E. coli poisoning that can cause temporary and permanent kidney failure. "The good news is she had a blood transfusion (Wednesday), her condition has improved and as a result we're hopeful she will be home before the weekend is over," said David Babcock, an attorney with Seattle-based Marler Clark, a law firm that specializes in food-borne illness cases. The Pioneer Press is published in St. Paul. This AP story has appeared widely.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/local/16243079.htm

Andreason Discusses Creativity (NPR, Dec. 15)
NANCY ANDREASEN
, Andrew H. Woods Chair of Psychiatry, Director of the Mental Health Clinic Research Center, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, was the guest on National Public Radio's "Talk of the Nation" Dec. 15, discussing the nature of creativity.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6631146&ft=1&f=5

UI Researches Lymphoma Drug (Medical News Today, Dec. 15)
Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- including GEORGE WEINER, M.D.; JAMES WOOLDRIDGE, M.D.; and BRIAN LINK, M.D. -- and their collaborators have presented results of a Phase II clinical study indicating that an oral drug, tipifarnib, can stall or reverse disease progression for patients with relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This story is appearing widely.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=58728

Bonthius Comments On Virus Risks (UPI, Dec. 15)
Pregnant women can minimize their risk of becoming infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), an infectious agent carried by house mice and other rodents that can cause severe brain damage in a fetus. The risk of LCMV transmission increases in the winter months, when rodents seek shelter in homes, said DANIEL BONTHIUS, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of pediatrics at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ROY J. AND LUCILLE A. CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. "Pregnant women should avoid contact with rodents, especially mice, or anything the animals have been in contact with," said Bonthius, who also is a pediatric neurologist with CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF IOWA AT UI HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. "Women in both urban and rural areas should be aware of the risks and take appropriate steps to protect themselves." This story is appearing widely.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=59275&nfid=mnf

Jones Comments on Voting Machine Standards (Tampa Tribune, Dec. 15)
On Dec. 7, the U.S. Election Assistance Commission updated its standards for federal certification of electronic voting machines. Compliance by states, which set their own standards, is voluntary. About two weeks earlier, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology produced a report that assailed the design and security of voting machines. The standards need strengthening, said DOUG JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa who sat on the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems from 1994 to 2004. He was chairman for three terms. "The security standards, at this point, seem to be designed with deliberate loopholes in them in order to grandfather in existing products, and they ignore large areas of well-known practice in the world of secure computing," Jones said. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.tbo.com/news/nationworld/MGB76E55QVE.html

Bedell Resigns From Board of Regents (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 15)
Tom Bedell submitted his resignation Thursday from the Iowa Board of Regents, saying new leadership is needed. Bedell, who has served on the board for 1 1/2 years, said the regents have become "mired in controversy and name-calling." His resignation comes amid a torrent of criticism and controversy aimed at the regents over the failed search for a new president at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Bedell, of Spirit Lake, sent a letter to Governor-elect Chet Culver saying he would ask Culver to accept his resignation when he takes office next month. The newspaper is based in Nebraska.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1636&u_sid=2297556

Smith: Homecare Workers Are More Subject To Injury (UPI, Dec. 14)
A University of Iowa researcher says that as more and more children of the elderly hire home-care workers, these workers are subject to injury. PEGGIE SMITH, an expert in employment law, says that most home healthcare workers are protected by few of the federal labor standards that other Americans take for granted.
http://www.upi.com/ConsumerHealthDaily/view.php?StoryID=20061213-051342-9756r

Former UI Doctor Practices In Fresno (Fresno Bee, Dec. 14)
A story about the University of California at San Francisco medical Education Clinic in Fresno notes that Michael Peterson, the chief of medicine at the facility, was recruited from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.fresnobee.com/170/story/18738.html

Hovenkamp Comments On Municipal Bond Probe (Bloomberg, Dec. 14)
The federal criminal antitrust probe into the municipal bond market that has yielded more than a dozen subpoenas of brokers, bankers and insurers may also lead to a spate of civil lawsuits by cities, said an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa law school. Civil claims typically follow in the wake of successful criminal price-fixing investigations by the U.S. Justice Department. For example, a government probe of vitamin producers prompted more than $3 billion in civil settlements beginning in 1999. "If it turns out there is a nationwide conspiracy to fix interest rates'' of investment contracts sold to local governments, "it's got to be big,'' said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, 58, a University of Iowa law professor and editor of the most widely cited treatise on U.S. antitrust law. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601015&sid=auMT50E75pTk&refer=munibonds

Poet, Writer Speaks To Students (Maryville Daily Forum, Dec. 14)
Northwest Missouri State University alumnus James Solheim, a poet and children's author, on Wednesday visited the Horace Mann Laboratory School, where he read from his work and talked to pupils. He holds a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and has taught creative writing at Southern Illinois University and Washington University in Saint Louis. The newspaper is based in Missouri.
http://maryvilledailyforum.com/articles/2006/12/14/news/news5.txt

Homecare Workers Are More Subject To Injury (Washington Times, Dec. 13)
A University of Iowa researcher says that as more and more children of the elderly hire home-care workers, these workers are subject to injury. PEGGIE SMITH, an expert in employment law, says that most home healthcare workers are protected by few of the federal labor standards that other Americans take for granted. For the most part, those government agencies responsible for enforcing labor laws, like the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, have turned a blind eye to home healthcare workers," says Smith. "The problem the government faces is, how do you regulate the employment relationship of someone who works in a private home?"
http://washingtontimes.com/upi/20061213-051342-9756r.htm

Kirchhoff: New Drug Should Help Chagas Patients (New York Times, Dec. 13)
After years of delays, the Food and Drug Administration approved a test today for a fatal parasitic infection that is common in Latin America and increasingly prevalent in the United States blood supply. The nation's major blood banks said they would quickly adopt the test for Chagas disease, which in Latin America is usually transmitted by the bite of a parasite-carrying insect called the kissing bug, but can also be passed from mother to child or through blood transfusion or organ donation. Until now, the only treatments for Chagas are two drugs, nifurtimox and benznidazole, that cause very unpleasant side effects. They cure up to 95 percent of recently infected children, according to Dr. LOUIS V. KIRCHHOFF, a leading Chagas expert at the University of Iowa, but they are successful in fewer than 10 percent of adults with long-dormant infections. Complicating matters, it is nearly impossible to tell when treatment of such patients has worked because the antibodies detected by the test linger in the blood.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/13/science/14parasitecnd.html?_r=1&ref=health&oref=slogin

UIHC Buys Work Of St. Paul Artist (Voice of the Twin Cities, Dec. 13)
A profile of St. Paul mosaic artist Barbara Keith notes that four of her nursery rhyme-themed mosaics have been purchased by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS.
http://www.pulsetc.com/article.php?sid=2872

MBA Alumnus Named To Congressional Staff (Moline Dispatch, Dec. 13)
Andrew Rowe has been named economic development director on the staff of newly elected Illinois Congressman Phil Hare of the Quad Cities. Rowe earned his MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://qconline.com/archives/qco/display.php?id=318752

Erik Lie: Execs May Have Manipulated Dates To Cheat On Taxes (AP, Dec. 13)
In a paper that began circulating in recent days, a Securities and Exchange Commission economist concludes there is strong statistical evidence that executives manipulated the exercise dates of their options as part of a tax dodge. The new information could open another front in the options-backdating scandal. ERIK LIE of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, whose work broke open the scandal, has been working with other academic to analyze the exercise dates.  Although preliminary, their new research found that 13 percent of the exercises by CEOs who followed an "exercise-and-hold" strategy and didn't immediately report the actions to the SEC came at their stock's lowest price of the month. That percentage is nearly three times as great as would be expected if CEOs were exercising on random dates, and is highly suggestive that some were backdating exercises to avoid taxes.
http://accounting.smartpros.com/x55814.xml

UI Search Demonstrates Facebook's Power (Christian Science Monitor, Dec. 13)
Bridget Henry didn't think her school, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, gave students an appropriate venue to participate in the search for a new president. That's why Henry, a senior majoring in political science, started "Hogan's Heroes," a group supporting provost MICHAEL HOGAN for the job. Henry and her friends tried a laundry list of ways to publicize "Hogan's Heroes" - everything from a letter-writing campaign to handing out flyers. But what succeeded most was their page on the social networking website Facebook, which attracted more than 200 supporters. Henry learned what colleges and universities are waking up to: Facebook is no longer just a fun way for students to keep in touch. It is now essential to the college experience, a fact that faculty and staff are scurrying to catch up with.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/1213/p13s01-legn.html#employers

Smith Studies Home Healthcare Workers' Protections (eMaxHealth, Dec. 13)
As more and more Americans turn to in-home health care workers to take care of elderly family members, research from a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA law professor has found nobody is taking care of the caregivers. PEGGIE SMITH, an expert in employment law, has found that most home health care workers are protected by few of the federal labor standards that other Americans take for granted.
http://www.emaxhealth.com/28/8580.html

UI Faculty Vote 'No Confidence' In Regents (Inside Higher Education, Dec. 13)
By a vote of 62 to 1 Tuesday, the Faculty Senate at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA voted no confidence in the state's Board of Regents, which has faced increasing criticism over its handling of the search for a president at the university. A statement by SHELLY KURTZ, a law professor who leads the Faculty Senate, outlined what many professors consider to be a series of mistakes by the regents, who rejected a slate of finalists and are seen by many on the campus as having repeatedly changed direction and priorities for the search, while ignoring the views of faculty members and others.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/12/13/qt

Regents Given 'No Confidence' Vote (Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 12)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Faculty Senate voted overwhelmingly this afternoon (Tuesday) for a resolution expressing no confidence in the Board of Regents, which has drawn increasingly heated criticism for a failed presidential search. The vote was 62 to 1, with seven members absent. The regents ended their search for a new president last month after concluding that the finalists were unqualified. After that decision was assailed by a host of critics, the board initially said it would resume the search, with the original candidates. But last week the regents said they planned to restart the search from scratch, prompting today's vote.
http://chronicle.com/news/index.php?id=1401

UI Researchers Are Developing Lymphoma Drug (WTOP Radio, Dec. 12)
Researchers from the Mayo Clinic and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are developing a drug that appears to stall or reverse the progression of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The medicine is called Tipifarnib and researchers say it's a small study and much more work needs to be done. WTOP broadcasts in Washington, DC.
http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=106&sid=1003502

Lie Stock Option Research Noted (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 12)
New research by Securities and Exchange Commission economist David Cicero suggests that some executives may have cut their income-tax burden by pretending their options were exercised on a prior day, when the company's stock was trading at a lower price. "The Cicero paper appears to be very well done," said David Yermack, a finance professor at New York University's Stern School of Business who has studied options issues. "It's strong evidence that executives were manipulating their exercise dates, similar to the way they were manipulating their award dates." Yermack said he also has been studying the issue, along with ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa and Randall Heron, of the University of Indiana. Messrs. Lie and Heron are widely credited with the first academic research that suggested backdating of option grants could be widespread.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116589240479347248-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Stock Options Scandal Could Continue (Business Week, Dec. 12)
The toll of the stock options timing affair -- corporate America's scandal of the year -- has been heavy. Federal officials say more prosecutions will be brought in 2007 over manipulation of the timing of stock option grants to enrich top company executives. Nearly every business day, more companies report federal or internal investigations. New lawsuits by shareholders are filed. More businesses disclose that because past option grants may have distorted their financial results, they may have to restate earnings. Will there be more? Just over 2,000 public companies, or 29 percent of those in the United States that give stock options to executives, have timing issues, according to ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, and Randall Heron, an Indiana University associate finance professor. Their research last year helped focus attention on a widespread pattern of conduct. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared in the HOUSTON CHRONICLE, MSN MONEY, and the BOSTON GLOBE.
http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D8LUSQ7O0.htm

Changes In Store For UI President Search (WQAD-TV, Dec. 12)
The Iowa Board of Regents says expect some changes with a new search for a new president at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The regents will meet next Monday in a conference call to talk about the next phase of the search that broke down after ten months before a new president was named. Regent Bob Downer says some "repair work" with the public and the campus community is needed. Today, the university's Faculty Senate, frustrated by the search, is to vote on a resolution of no-confidence in the regents. Staff leaders will take a similar vote tomorrow. The television station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5801947&nav=1sW7

Board of Regents Approves Tuition Increase (KTTC-TV, Dec. 11)
The Board of Regents has approved a 5.2 percent increase for in-state undergraduates at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State and Northern Iowa for 2007-08. With fees added, in-state students at the UI will pay $358 dollars more, to nearly $6,300. At Iowa State University, it's $301 more and $278 dollars more at the University of Northern Iowa. The television station is based in Rochester, Minn.
http://www.kttc.com/News/index.php?ID=10204

Pamuk To Receive Nobel Prize (Turkish Press, Dec. 11)
Turkey's Nobel-winning novelist Orhan Pamuk will receive his prize in a ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall on Sunday. He spent the years 1985-1988 in the United States where he was a visiting researcher at Columbia University in New York and for a short period attached to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.turkishpress.com/news.asp?id=154911

Drug Slows Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (United Press International, Dec. 11)
A study released Monday shows tipifarnib can stall or reverse disease in relapsed, aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Mayo Clinic researchers, working with a team from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, found that, of 38 patients in a clinical trial who were evaluated, 18 percent of those taking the oral drug at a 300-mg dose had partial response, resulting in a reduction of cancerous cells, and 21 percent had stable disease. http://www.upi.com/HealthBusiness/view.php?StoryID=20061211-052247-3979r

Gantz Developed New Cochlear Hybrid Implant (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 11)
With a new hybrid cochlear implant surgeons hope simply to supplement natural hearing without destroying it, says Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, professor of otolaryngology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and developer of the device. Since 1999, about 80 patients have received the hybrid device, Gantz says, and clinical trials are underway at 15 U.S. sites. Preliminary results, released in November, reported that surgeons in the trial have been able to retain hearing in about 96% of the patients. Before surgery, patients were able to understand about one-third of words on standard hearing tests. After one year or more with the implant, scores increased to an average of 75%. Hybrid implant users also function better than traditional implant users in noisy situations, says CHRISTOPHER TURNER, audiology professor at the University of Iowa and a study investigator. They are far more able to follow and appreciate music.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-lab11dec11,0,7368753.story?coll=la-headlines-health

Band Extravaganza Is Model For Monmouth Event (Peoria Journal Star, Dec. 11)
After a hiatus of 40 years, Monmouth College in Illinois is reviving its marching band. Not only that, but they are planning a performance combining the new band with other campus bands. "It's modeled after an event at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA," said Steve Richter, Monmouth's director of instrumental activities.
http://www.pjstar.com/stories/121006/REG_BBOA7652.017.shtml

UI Grad Was TV Ad Pioneer (Herald Tribune, Dec. 11)
Art Bellaire, who earned a journalism degree from THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1940, was a pioneer and influential critic of TV advertising. He wrote three books on advertising, and for many years wrote columns under two different bylines for the industry's leading trade publication, Advertising Age magazine. Advertising Age described him as a "TV ad authority" in a recent tribute. The Herald Tribune is published in Sarasota, Fla.
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061209/NEWS/612090361
Hovenkamp Advises Wall Street In Supreme Court Case (CFO Magazine, Dec. 11)
The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to review an appeal from investment banks that are fighting antitrust charges. According to some experts, the high court's decision could have implications that extend to a number of other, unrelated industries. Hovenkamp Advises Wall Street In Supreme Court Case (CFO Magazine, Dec. 11) antitrust professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who is advising the Wall Street firms, told Bloomberg that if the banks win, it could help other regulated businesses, including the trucking, airline, natural gas, and electricity industries.
http://www.cfo.com/article.cfm/8400906/c_8401983?f=home_todayinfinance

UI Faculty Again Plans No-Confidence Votes (Inside Higher Education, Dec. 11)
The Iowa Board of Regents is again under attack for the aborted search for a new president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Faculty and student leaders are again planning votes of no confidence, according to WHO-TV, and some local leaders are calling for the ouster of some regents, The Des Moines Register reported. Tension over the search had diminished a bit when the regents agreed to look again at finalists they had rejected, but when the board announced Thursday that the search was essentially starting from scratch, the dissent returned in full force.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/12/11/qt

Influential Teacher/Scout Leader Started At UI (Arizona Daily Star, Dec. 11)
Generations of women in Tucson consider drama teacher/Girl Scout volunteer Lela Freiman an important influence on their lives. She was raised in the national parks by a father who worked at parks from Louisiana to the Badlands of South Dakota. After high school, which she finished in New Orleans, Freiman went on to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree in speech and drama at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "Between my junior and senior year, I had no job." Which is how she became a leader at the Girl Scouts' Camp Ingawanis, in Iowa. "I didn't know a thing," says Freiman, who quickly learned "how to cook over an open fire, and if you burned your meal you could survive on peanut butter and jelly and have a great time."
http://www.azstarnet.com/allheadlines/159585

'UI' FantasticMachine Hoax Illustrates Internet (Information Week, Dec. 10)
FantasticMachine2, the Internet hoax that claims an animated mechanism is a real machine, invented at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA using tractor parts, illustrates how things that are interesting will naturally spread on the Internet. That's the opinion of commentator David DeJean. "The Internet is great for spreading the word about something interesting, but I just don't think you can force it -- if the thing isn't actually interesting in itself, word won't spread. And FantasticMachine2 is proof. If it hasn't hit your mailbox already it will soon. All 3.7MB of it."
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/2006/12/fantasticmachin.html

UI Grad Heads Wisconsin Dental Association (Holmen Courier, Dec. 8)
Eva Dahl, the Onalaska root-canal specialist who became president of the Wisconsin Dental Association last month, isn't a stranger to leading dental organizations. Some would say it's in her "roots." Dahl is a fourth-generation dentist who set up her own practice 10 years ago and has served on a number of professional boards since graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY in 1976.
http://holmencourier.com/articles/2006/12/08/news/07dahl.txt

Orhon Concerts Recommended (Arizona Daily Star, Dec. 8)
Previewing two Tucson concerts by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA string bass faculty member VOLKAN ORHON, critic Cathalena E. Burch wrote, "Orhon is worth seeing twice."
http://www.azstarnet.com/sn/accent/159357.php

UI Alum's Dance Company Is 'Simply Classic' (Taiwan News, Dec. 8)
Taiwan's premier dance company, Cloud Gate, was founded and is directed by Lin Hwai-min, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. "In the beginning I had to rely on existing materials to create the dances. With my literary background, I naturally turned to classic Chinese myths and tales," Lin explained. Lin achieved famed as a writer by publishing the novel "Cicada" at the age of 24. This summer Time magazine honored Lin with the Asian Hero Award. Cloud Gate has been universally acclaimed for its trademark styles of astounding visual beauty and the penchant for literary depth.
http://www.taiwannews.com.tw/etn/news_content.php?id=338743&lang=eng_news&cate_img=186.jpg&cate_rss=Arts,Entertainment_TAIWAN

Knight Named In Ethics Complaint (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Dec. 8)
An ethics complaint accuses the dean of the University of Washington Law School of doing business for a huge insurance company when he should have been working for the university. Law School Dean W.H. "Joe" Knight Jr. sent or received hundreds of e-mails at his university e-mail account regarding State Farm Insurance, of which he is a board member, the complaint says. The e-mails were sent from 2002 to 2005. The complaint, filed with the state Executive Ethics Board earlier this fall, was written by Mercer Island lawyer Molly Kenny on behalf of an unidentified UW employee. UW spokesman Norm Arkans said the university was alerted to Knight's e-mail usage about a year ago by a public records request. The university thought it violated the state's policy of prohibiting the use of public resources for business purposes, and the university told Knight he had to stop using his e-mail for such purposes, he said. "We informed Dean Knight that he had to stop doing it, which he did," Arkans said. Knight joined the UW in 2001. He previously served as vice provost and law professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The article also appeared on the Websites of KING5-TV and MSNBC.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/295218_ethics08.html

Squire Comments On Vilsack Candidacy (Austin-American Statesman, Dec. 8)
Two-term Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack, who leaves office Jan. 12, declared his presidential candidacy Nov. 30. The candidate knows he has to quickly introduce himself to the country. "Vilsack's appeal revolves around competence. He is not a scintillating speaker, but he is articulate and he is a tenacious campaigner," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "He has a compelling personal story and can connect well with average Americans. The big questions are whether he will raise enough money to get his message across and whether voters will prefer a more flashy candidate." The newspaper is based in Texas.
http://www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/nation/12/08/8vilsack.html

Doctor Treats Opera Singers (RedNova.com, Dec. 8)
University of Kentucky Opera Theatre singers turn to Dr. Sanford Archer, an ear, nose and throat specialist, when there's an emergency. Talk to almost any singer in the University of Kentucky voice department, and they'll have a story about how Archer nursed them back to health and the show went on. Archer became interested in the professional singing voice when he was a resident at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. "We just received equipment to do some voice analysis while I was there," Archer recalls. "I got to play with some of the equipment and work with some of the singers down there, and I was really fascinated by it. The article also appeared in the FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL in Indiana.
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/759681/voice_doctor_helps_opera_singers_have_their_say/index.html?source=r_health

Furor Erupts Over Failed UI Search (Chronicle, Dec. 8 issue)
Iowa officials have been scrambling to calm the anger over the failed search for a new president of the state's flagship university. The furor erupted when the state Board of Regents announced in November that it was terminating its search for a successor to David J. Skorton, who left the presidency of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last summer to take the helm at Cornell University. The board's president, Michael G. Gartner, said the regents felt they needed a candidate with more experience managing health-science operations. But faculty members who were on the search committee have accused Mr. Gartner and another regent of calling off the search because the candidate they wanted was not among the four finalists the committee submitted to the board.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i16/16a01902.htm

Hovenkamp Advises Securities Firms (Bloomberg, Dec. 7)
The U.S. Supreme Court will consider shielding securities firms from antitrust suits, agreeing to review an appeal from investment banks fighting accusations that they rigged initial public offerings. A victory for the securities firms might also help other regulated businesses, including the trucking, airline, natural gas and electricity industries, according to University of Iowa antitrust professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who is advising the securities industry in the case. The story also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aBdzzvT2FCpk&refer=worldwide

Lie Comments On Pediatrix Backdating (Sun Sentinel, Dec. 7)
Pediatrix Medical Group said Wednesday that it has backdated stock options, making the Sunrise, Fla.-based provider of care for premature babies the first South Florida company to acknowledge engaging in a practice being scrutinized by federal investigators. Pediatrix also announced the resignation of board member Lawrence M. Mullen, who it said had a "significant role" in the administration of the stock options program. ERIK LIE, a University of Iowa expert on backdating who studies the relationship between grant prices and dates, said Pediatrix "has [made] quite a few grants, a number of which occur at troughs in the prices." But Lie wouldn't comment on the severity of the problem for Pediatrix or any specific company. The Sun Sentinel is based in Ft. Lauderdale.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/business/local/sfl-zpediatrix07dec07,0,4531517.story?coll=sfla-business-headlines

Lie: General Counsels Will Lose Jobs Over Backdating (Law, Dec. 7)
Nothing in memory has ever caused as many GCs to lose their jobs as quickly as stock options backdating. In little more than a year, 12 general counsel have stepped down amid options problems at their companies. These legal chiefs constitute about a quarter of the 40-plus executives who have lost their jobs in the steadily expanding options controversy. Indeed, backdating has forced out as many GCs as CEOs. By all indications, the casualty list will only grow. "I expect that we will see more general counsels lose their jobs," says ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa business professor whose research into backdating kindled the current firestorm.
http://www.law.com/jsp/ihc/PubArticleIHC.jsp?id=1165413316556

Loebsack Carried Johnson County, UI (Washington Post. Dec. 7)
A story about the election race between U.S. Rep. Jim Leach and his Democratic challenger Dave Loebsack notes that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is located in the district, and that Loebsack carried Johnson County with a large majority of voters. "The irony of this election is that the public, in seeking change, has . . . weakened the center," Leach said recently.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/12/06/AR2006120601954.html

UI School Nurse Study Cited (Deseret News, Dec. 7)
A state senator and the Utah School Nurse Association brought some scary statistics to legislators Wednesday, hoping to further their plea for more nurses in public schools. But amid a statewide nursing shortage, is there any way to make their dream a reality? Schools are giving more than 1,600 medications to students, plus 4,000 more that are prescribed "as needed," every day, the study states. Yet most often, medication is administered by a school secretary or teacher. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA School of Nursing study shows schools are three times more likely to err in medicating students when someone other than a nurse is involved. The Deseret News is based in Salt Lake City, Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,650213069,00.html

Rep. Bonior Is UI Graduate (Detroit Free Press, Dec. 6)
A profile of Michigan Congressman David Bonior notes that he earned his bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061206/NEWS04/612060305/1006/NEWS04

Man Pleads To Watching Porn On UI Computer (WQAD, Dec. 6)
A man accused of watching child pornography on a computer at the main library at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last summer has pleaded guilty to a charge of sexual exploitation of a minor. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5777566&nav=1sW7

Mims Comments On NCAA Crackdown (New York Times, Dec. 6)
Aware that some athletes are exploiting fast and easy grades offered by dubious schools to earn college scholarships, the National Collegiate Athletic Association has changed its rules in recent months. FRED MIMS, an associate athletic director at the University of Iowa, said: "These places had been lurking out there for some time, and people had expressed concern about them. But nobody wanted to step forward and say: 'This isn't right; our institutional values are such that we need to hold the line here.' Now the NCAA has stepped forward and done an enhanced review of records, and you're seeing things happening."
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/06/sports/ncaafootball/06ncaa.html?ex=1166072400&en=11d9a0e3c2475b1a&ei=5040&partner=MOREOVERNEWS

UI Study Cited (Pittsburgh Post Gazette, Dec. 6)
A story about children with cardiovascular disease cites a study by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers that began in the 1970s and tracked thousands of school-age children that found more cardiovascular disease deaths among relatives of those who had elevated cholesterol levels, were overweight or had high blood pressure.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06340/743812-114.stm

Trow Essay Published By UI Press (Inside Higher Ed, Dec. 6)
A columnist writing about recently deceased author George Trow notes that his book-length essay "Harvard Black Rock Forest" was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press.
http://insidehighered.com/views/2006/12/06/mclemee

Hawkeye Fans Flock To Alamo Bowl (News-Express, Dec. 6)
The Alamo Bowl is expected to generate $12 million to $15 million in direct spending from University of Texas and University of Iowa fans. With Iowa in the game, expect to see plenty of people in black-and-gold jackets and shorts on Alamo Plaza, no matter how cold it might feel to South Texans. Fans of the Hawkeyes, now on their fourth trip to San Antonio, tend to stay at least a day or two before or after the game. "The Alamo Bowl selected Iowa because they knew we'd all come and spend money," said EMILY CORNISH, director of marketing for the alumni association affiliated with the University of Iowa. "And I guarantee you will see plenty of bare legs." The newspaper serves San Antonio, Texas. http://www.mysanantonio.com/business/stories/MYSA120706.01E.AlamoBowlEconomics.2751385.html

Pappajohn's Charitable Donations Noted (Financial Times, Dec. 5)
Venture capitalist John Pappajohn has been involved in several public companies, including a special purpose acquisition company called Healthcare Acquisition, American Caresource Holdings, and AllionHealthcare, which offers disease management services for HIV patients, has $20 million cash in the bank and trades for 18 times cash flow. One thing that keeps John young and excited about coming to work every day is that he gives an enormous amount to charity. One example is the JOHN AND MARY PAPPAJOHN CLINICAL CANCER CENTER, which is affiliated with the University of Iowa. "Giving money away is a prerequisite to making more money. When you get older," he told a reporter, "you have to keep thinking of new ways to create value. That's important."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a3c17c36ca848f9eba1af62e860854c6&_docnum=9&wchp=dGLzVlz-zSkVb&_md5=01bfa762d1da3a7ae2ab56dc7d01651f

Author Discusses Her UI Press Book (Bluff Country Reader, Dec. 5)
A story about Nancy Overcott, author of "Fifty Common Birds of the Upper Midwest," notes the book is published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press. The Reader is published in Canton, Minn.
http://www.hometown-pages.com/main.asp?SectionID=14&SubSectionID=23&ArticleID=14204

Pharmacy Alumna Named To FDA Post (News-Medical.net, Dec. 5)
Susan C. Winckler, RPh, Esq., has been named the acting chief of staff of the U.S Food and Drug Administration. In this role, Winckler will coordinate staff activities in the Office of the Commissioner and serve as the principal liaison to Department of Health and Human Services. Winckler earned her pharmacy degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Pharmacy.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=21203

UI Law Alumnus Becomes Illinois Judge (Lake County News Sun, Dec. 5)
John Phillips was sworn in Monday as a new circuit court judge in Illinois for Lake County, becoming the county's first African-American judge. Phillips is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law. The News Sun is published in Illinois.
http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/newssun/news/159826,5_1_WA05_PHILLIPS_S1.article

Covington Analyzes Iowa Democratic Caucus (Knoxville News-Sentinel, Dec. 4)
A story about the presidential prospects of Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack notes that Democratic presidential candidates seem unwilling to cede the Iowa caucuses to the homestate governor. "They'll be looking to exceed expectations," said CARY COVINGTON, a University of Iowa political scientist, and a close observer of presidential politics. "You get a bounce wherever you can." The same story appeared on the Web site of WSHB-TV (Kansas City).
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/national/article/0,1406,KNS_350_5189487,00.html

Erik Lie Says Current Scandal Tip Of The Iceberg (Dallas News, Dec. 4)
Business types were quick to argue that Enron Corp. and HealthSouth Corp. were nasty aberrations to the way corporate America behaves. So just how did we wind up with an epidemic stock options mess dominating today's headlines? It was spread by the most contagious germ of all: Everybody's doing it, so it must be OK, says business columnist Cheryl Hall. The SEC is investigating about 100 companies for their options practices. We've only seen the tip of the iceberg, predicts ERIK LIE (pronounced lee), an associate professor of finance at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "Those that have not come to the surface yet may have been more clever about hiding their practices by not being so greedy as to pick the lowest price in a period, but the second- or third-lowest price," Dr. Lie says. "Or maybe they did it for a couple of grants and not for every grant." He estimates that more than 2,000 companies backdated options in some fashion: "This has been passed along from general counsel to general counsel, director to director, executive to executive. When you have interlocking boards, if one was involved in a scandal, the other one probably was also."
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/bus/columnists/chall/stories/DN-Hall_03bus.ART.State.Edition1.316e7ed.html

UI Researchers Make Cystic Fibrosis Discover (Innovations Report, Dec. 4)
A recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study reveals a new immune defense mechanism in normal airways and may help explain why people with cystic fibrosis (CF) are particularly susceptible to bacterial lung infections. The UI study shows how two enzymes generate and use reactive oxygen species (ROS) to destroy bacteria in normal airways. The team also found that this process is defective in airway tissue and cells containing the CF gene mutation. BOTOND BANFI, M.D., Ph.D., UI assistant professor of anatomy and cell biology and senior study author, said, "The findings suggest that one reason for CF patients' weakened innate immunity might be the absence of this natural oxidative host defense mechanism." Banfi's colleagues included PATRYK MOSKWA, M.D., Ph.D., a UI postdoctoral fellow and first author of the study; graduate student DANIEL LORENTZEN; KATHERINE EXCOFFON, Ph.D., associate research scientist; JOSEPH ZABNER, M.D., professor of internal medicine; PAUL MCCRAY, M.D., the Roy J. Carver Chair in Pulmonary Research and professor of pediatrics; and WILLIAM NAUSEEF, M.D., professor of internal medicine.. Report originates in Germany.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/biowissenschaften_chemie/bericht-75336.html

Astronomer Earned Doctorate At UI (Deseret News, Dec. 4)
Astronomer Stacy Palen, who earned a doctorate in physics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is now a faculty member at Weber State University, where she directs WSU's Ott Planetarium and astronomical observatory. A dynamic speaker, Palen has given presentations for Clark Planetarium and the Salt Lake Astronomical Society and the Ogden Astronomical Society. She has carried out astronomical research at some of the world's most noted observatories. "I started out actually as a psychology major," she said. "I had been math-science tracked in high school and was tired of being the only girl in all my classes. And so I went off to be a psych major for a year, and then after a year of that I decided that I wanted to study problems that had answers... And so I went back to physics." The Deseret News originates in Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,650212279,00.html

Lie's Stock Option Study Cited (CNN, Dec. 3)
Fortune magazine editor-at-large Justin Fox was a guest on the "In the Money" program. Fox has been writing about the stock options backdating scandal and how it was uncovered.  He noted that finance professors "troll around in the data looking for interesting patterns, and they found this interesting pattern. For about 10 years they didn't know quite what to make of it, but then in the last couple of years they figured, hey, maybe CEOS are lying about when they got their stock options. And then immediately they called the SEC. (They) sent their papers to the SEC, (including) this one professor, ERIC LIE, at the University of Iowa, and the SEC got cracking as soon as they got Eric's paper."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=2f55c746e3cdc58811d812c3d43c18fd&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLzVlz-zSkVb&_md5=e70fd1e50863be30e190bbe14429445a

UI Expedition Finds Baby Giant Sloth (TheDenverChannel.com, Dec. 3)
The remains of a baby giant sloth are found in western Iowa, the third member of what researchers believe is a family that died there about 10,000 years ago. HOLMES SEMKEN is a co-leader of the sloth expeditions from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He said it's even more important now to prove the sloths were a family. It could help scientists know more about the extinct animal's family behavior and several other mysteries. This story appeared widely.
http://www.thedenverchannel.com/nationalnews/10453834/detail.html

Jones Comments On Florida Voting Tests (Houston Chronicle, Dec. 3)
Before figuring out what, if anything, went wrong in Sarasota County's Nov. 7 congressional election, state officials must determine what happened in a test conducted Tuesday. That test, a simulated election using state elections employees acting as voters, was supposed to help uncover any glitches with the county's electronic touch-screen voting machines. Instead, the Florida Division of Elections spent Wednesday studying the test results -- with limited success. Officials blamed human error for two of the 10 discrepancies in the tallies from the simulated election. But they couldn't explain the others, including five involving the disputed 13th Congressional District race, where Republican Vern Buchanan was certified the winner over Democrat Christine Jennings by fewer than 400 votes. "You lose focus after a few ballots," said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer science professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who performed similar vote machine testing as an elections examiner for the state of Iowa. "It's really hard to follow a script and not make mistakes."
http://blogs.chron.com/kuffsworld/2006/12/fl13_even_the_state_cant_get_t.html

Erik Lie's Research Has Rocked Corporate America (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 3)
Academic research conducted by a mild-mannered UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor, ERIK LIE, is at the epicenter of a still-widening backdating scandal that has trashed the careers of some of the nation's leading corporate executives, tainted corporate reputations from coast to coast and spurred federal officials to launch a criminal investigation. Through some inspired number crunching conducted largely in his tiny campus office, Lie (pronounced Lee) came up with data that provide near-ironclad proof that hundreds, and most likely thousands, of U.S. corporations have been secretly manipulating the dates on the stock options they grant to their executives. By doing so, those companies perverted what was intended to be a performance-based incentive plan into a shower of free money. Although the financial reverberations have been substantial for corporate America, Lie 's life hasn't changed much at all. Even his students don't seem all that aware of his prominent role in kicking up the biggest corporate scandal in years. And that's just fine with Lie, who never sought the spotlight: "I like my life here in Iowa City. I like doing research. My life, it hasn't really changed that much beyond the extra time I spend talking on the phone."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0612030002dec03,0,5707065.story?coll=chi-business-hed

Squire Comments On Vilsack Candidacy (Kansas City Star, Dec. 3)
Though Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack registers at about 1 percent in the latest national polls, he has apparent advantages: The last two Democratic presidents have also been governors of small states, and he's getting an early jump and should be a favorite in the Iowa caucuses, an early nomination test.  Most of the other leading potential contenders for the Democratic nomination are senators with complicated votes to defend. But "He doesn't have much of a home-field advantage," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "So many Democrats have already spent so much time here that many activists have already committed to other candidates. And there's a little state humility that makes it hard for Iowans to see one of us as president."
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/breaking_news/16155230.htm

Gray Criticizes Gulf War Syndrome Funding (Washington Post, Dec. 3)
Fifteen years after the end of the 1991 war with Iraq, a Dallas researcher is in line to get as much as $75 million in federal funding to press his studies of Gulf War syndrome, even though most other scientists long ago discounted his theories. Epidemiologist Robert Haley has been trying for 10 years to prove that thousands of Persian Gulf War troops were poisoned by a combination of nerve gas, pesticides, insect repellents and a nerve-gas antidote, and funds were earmarked for his research by Texas GOP Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchinson. "This is a tremendously egregious misuse of government funding," said GREGORY GRAY, who headed the Navy's Gulf War illness research center in San Diego before retiring in 2001. He now directs the Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH. This story has been widely reprinted.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/12/02/AR2006120201291.html

UI Research Focuses On Teen Driving (Arizona Daily Star, Dec. 3)
Some parents are using technology to help teens improve their driving, especially during their most dangerous first few hundred hours on the road. In the parking lot of a northeast Iowa high school, video highlights and other data are downloaded daily via wireless signals from cars driven by a group of 25 teens who have volunteered for a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research program. The teens have had a small camera installed behind their rearview mirrors. The camera is always recording. The video is stored permanently only if the car experiences G-forces beyond a preset limit, a condition triggered by excessive acceleration, deceleration or taking a curve too fast. When limits are exceeded, 10 seconds of video is stored from before and after the incident. This story originated in the Chicago Tribune and was distributed through its syndication service.
http://www.azstarnet.com/allheadlines/158713

UI's eGranary Affiliated With MIT Project (All Africa.com, Dec. 1)
When the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) announced in 2001 that it was planning to offer free online access to educational materials from hundreds of its course offerings, the university in Cambridge said it hoped its Open Course Ware (OCW) Web site would inspire other educational institutions to help create a "worldwide web of knowledge that will benefit humanity." Judging by the enthusiastic worldwide response to MIT's gesture, the university appears five years later to be leading an international movement that is affecting education on every continent. Twelve U.S. educational institutions currently are participating in what has become an international consortium comprising more than 50 institutions in Africa, Asia, Europe and South America. The OCW-affiliate organizations tend to have a regional or single country focus. The eGranary Digital Library, for example, places Web resources, including OCW offerings, on a server on African university campuses that have little or no Internet connectivity. A nonprofit, largely volunteer service based at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, the eGranary Digital Library manually updates its library at least twice each year on dozens of African campus intranets.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200612040366.html

Frost Sees Renaissance Of Print (Forbes, Dec. 1)
To the fear mongerers among the literati, the Internet is a threat to the paperbound book. But, oddly, that isn't how things are working out. In fact, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA library conservator GARY FROST takes the opposite--and optimistic--view that "screen-based reading and the digital revolution ... are actually going to engender a renaissance of print." Frost's point is that all book production is already digital, and that's saved publishers a lot of money, allowing for more books to be printed. The only meaningful decrease in printed books, Frost says, is nothing bibliophiles should lament. Gone are the books of airline and train schedules while novels, nonfiction and poetry books flourish.
http://www.forbes.com/home/technology/2006/11/30/copyright-ebooks-internet-tech-media_cz_je_books06_1201copyright.html

Hogan Was Finalist For Delaware Presidency (AP, Dec. 1)
Patrick Harker, dean of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton business school, was named president of the University of Delaware on Friday. Harker, 48, was one of two finalists to replace David Roselle, who is retiring in May after 17 years as president. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA executive vice president and provost MICHAEL HOGAN was the other finalist.
http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?section=local&id=4814558

Hypnosis Used To Ease Pain (WFTV, Dec. 1)
Drugs, injections and surgery are common ways to treat the pain, but they don't always work and can cause side effects. That's why doctors are searching for other ways to stop the ache. Yoga is one proven method. In a UCLA study, patients with chronic pain reduced their meds and felt better after four weeks. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers are using hypnosis to ease pain. Research shows the technique may actually change the way the brain processes pain. The televisions station is based in Florida. The story also appeared on the website of ABC 7 in Chicago.
http://www.wftv.com/health/10432226/detail.html?rss=orlc&psp=health

Regents Halt UI Presidential Search (Chronicle of Higher Ed., Dec. 1 issue)
Iowa Board of Regents has disbanded the search committee for a new president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, announcing that it had set no timetable or process for finding new candidates. The regents, saying they wanted to find someone with broader experience, had rejected all of the original search committee's recommendations. "The apparent secrecy of the search proceedings has irked some Iowans: One open-government advocate said last week that the regents had not properly announced a series of meetings about the search."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i15/15a00802.htm

UI Press Keeps Hull Book Available (Chronicle of Higher Ed, Dec. 1 issue)
Lynda Hull was rising to prominence as a poet when she died in a car accident in 1994. Her first two books - "Ghost Money" (University of Massachusetts Press, 1986) and "Star Ledger" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 1990) - were praised for their blend of lyricism, toughness, and maturity. Hull's work still resonates with readers, and it remains particularly influential on her fellow poets. A growing audience has had an increasingly hard time finding her work, but Iowa has kept "Star Ledger" available.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i15/15a01601.htm

 

 

 

 

 

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