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UI in the News

August 2006

See UI in the New Archive Index

Weissbort Replies To Criticism (Mumbai Mirror, Aug. 31)
DANIEL WEISSBORT, former director of the MFA program in translation at the University of Iowa, replies to criticism from an Indian academic that he is "not really an American" by saying he is, indeed, not an American but a Polish-born Jew raised in Britain. The Mirror is based in India.
http://www.mumbaimirror.com/nmirror/mmpaper.asp?sectid=14&articleid=83020062235596098302006223446125

Lie Research Led To 'Next Enron' (Austin American-Statesman, Aug. 31)
More than 80 companies have come under scrutiny in federal investigations of possible stock option fraud, and you can't help but wonder if we're on the verge of Enron/WorldCom/Tyco revisited. So far, news of the investigations hasn't roiled the markets the way a spate of corporate scandals did a few years ago. But this does have the potential to shake the confidence of investors. More than 2,000 U.S. firms have engaged in the practice, according to an analysis by two professors, the University of Iowa's ERIK LIE and Indiana University's Randall Heron. They examined nearly 40,000 stock option grants to executives at more than 7,700 companies between 1996 and 2005.
http://www.statesman.com/opinion/content/editorial/stories/08/31/31editorial_edit.html

UI Student Testifies At Sentencing (WQAD-TV, Aug. 30)
Cathy Carmack, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, testified in the sentencing hearing of Sarah Kolb, a Milan, Ill. high school student convicted of killing a classmate, then burning and dismembering the body and burying the remains in different places around the Quad Cities. Carmack, who has known Kolb since they were students at Jordan Catholic School, said it was Kolb who helped her deal with her own sexuality. She said Kolb "saved her life", with her compassion when she came out as a lesbian. And said Kolb was "verbally attacked because of her sexual preference." WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5341074&nav=menu132_2_3_6

IEM Rates GOP Chances Of Holding House, Senate (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 30)
A story about which party will win control of Congress this fall says that on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a real-money futures market operated by faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Henry B. Tippie College of Business, the contract for Republicans maintaining control of both the House and Senate has a bid of 45.7 cents. Registration is required to read this story.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115693992177149425.html?mod=hpp_us_my_companies

Alumna Runs For City Council Seat (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 30)
A story about the Democratic primary for a seat on the Annapolis, Md., city council points out that one of the candidates, Classie Gillis Hoyle, holds a doctorate in science education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/annearundel/bal-ar.sixth30aug30,0,3362230.story

Writing Class Set In Cemetery (Philadelphia Inquirer, Aug. 30)
The folks at West Laurel Hill Cemetery in Bala Cynwyd have hit on a creative way to get people in the door while they're still alive - offering a free memoir-writing class, given on the cemetery grounds. Mary Beth Simmons, who teaches graduate courses in memoir-writing at Villanova University, will lead the class, which starts Sept. 7. Simmons, who directs Villanova's Writing Center, has a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where the writing program is renowned.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/magazine/daily/15393117.htm

New Principal Earned UI Degree (The Midweek, Aug. 30)
Pamela Rockwood is the new superintendent for the Indian Creek School District in Shabbona, Ill. She received her master's degree in curriculum and technology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Illinois. http://www.midweeknews.com/articles/2006/08/30/local/shabbona/shabbona01.txt

Colleges Respond To Illegal Postings (The News and Advance, Aug. 29)
When colleges have concrete proof of illegal activities - as when photos are posted on such social networking sites as MySpace and Facebook - they are bound, legally, to respond. When hazing photos surfaced online last spring, Northwestern University temporarily suspended its women's soccer program. A University of Oklahoma freshman's joke in Facebook about assassinating President Bush prompted a visit from the Secret Service. Several other colleges - Elon College, Catholic University, Wake Forest, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, North Carolina State to Northern Kentucky - have disciplined or investigated students based on Internet postings. http://www.newsadvance.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=LNA%2FMGArticle%2FLNA_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1149190292984&path=!news!opinion

Van Allen's Last Paper Was About Asteroids (Space.com, Aug. 29)
Until his death this month at the age of 91, JAMES VAN ALLEN continued to do work that had fascinated him since childhood and made him a leading figure of America's Space Age. In what would be his last paper, he explored a subject that hits somewhat closer to home: The likelihood of an asteroid colliding with Earth. The research, published in this month's American Journal of Physics, details how the likelihood of such an event is enhanced by the gravitational pull between the two bodies. http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/060829_science_tuesday.html

Squire Comments On Ethanol, Elections (United Press International, Aug. 29)
The Iowa caucuses are still more than a year away, but that hasn't stopped presidential hopefuls from flocking to the state, attuned to what's on Iowans' minds: Ethanol. "Ethanol has always been a popular issue in the Iowa caucuses, particularly on the Republican side, which tends to include more farmers and people who work in the agricultural sector," PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa, told United Press International.
http://www.upi.com/Energy/view.php?StoryID=20060825-010712-4095r

Jones: Switch To E-Voting May Cause Problems (Bloomberg, Aug. 29)
Thousands of areas across the U.S. are scrambling to update voting equipment in time to meet a January deadline set by the Help Americans Vote Act, the law enacted by Congress following the disputed 2000 Florida vote count that eventually gave George W. Bush the presidency. The measure allocated $3.86 billion for state and local governments to improve election systems, in many cases by switching to electronic voting machines from the punch-card systems that plagued Florida, and provides funds for technology to eliminate errors and create more handicapped-accessible methods. Instead of reassuring voters, the transition has many communities up in arms -- and is stirring warnings from computer experts about the impact on this autumn's midterm elections. "You've got a third of our country going through this for the first time," said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "Inevitably, the first time someone makes a change with equipment, you are more likely to have problems."
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=aTrz304l11pA&refer=home

Weinberger Says New Decongestant Protects Market Share (Newsday, Aug. 29)
Bad news for allergy and cold sufferers: researchers in Florida say the over-the-counter nasal decongestant that's replacing Sudafed on many drugstore shelves is ineffective. The compound phenylephrine, marketed by Pfizer Inc. as Sudafed PE, isn't sufficiently absorbed into the bloodstream to make it an effective oral medication. Critics say Sudafed PE and other oral phenylephrine decongestants have been put on the market because drug companies are worried about losing profits if their products disappear from store shelves. "They're trying to protect their market share," said Dr. MILES WEINBERGER, director of pediatric allergy and pulmonary care at the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City. The same story appeared on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/ny-hsdrug4867678aug29,0,5119812.story?coll=ny-health-print

Editorial: Lie Research Led To Next Enron (Ft. Wayne News Sentinel, Aug. 29)
More than 80 companies have come under scrutiny in federal investigations of possible stock option fraud, and you can't help but wonder if we're on the verge of Enron/WorldCom/Tyco revisited. So far, news of the investigations hasn't roiled the markets the way a spate of corporate scandals did a few years ago. But this does have the potential to shake the confidence of investors. Stock options have been particularly popular in the high-tech field because they provide a way for some start-up companies to reward executives with the prospect of future riches in lieu of big paychecks. So it comes as no surprise that many of the 80 companies under investigation in the backdating scandal are high-tech companies. But the practice may be far more common. More than 2,000 U.S. firms have engaged in the practice, according to an analysis by two professors, the University of Iowa's ERIK LIE and Indiana University's Randall Heron. They examined nearly 40,000 stock option grants to executives at more than 7,700 companies between 1996 and 2005. Their analysis revealed that 29 percent of the companies manipulated at least some option grants. The practice fell off four years ago after the SEC required companies to report option grants within two days, but it didn't disappear. Some companies apparently ignored the new rules. The same article appeared on the Web sites of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and BELLEVILLE (IL) NEWS DEMOCRAT.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/news/editorial/15387794.htm

UI To Test Alternate Gas Tax System (KTRV-TV, Aug. 29)
A new traffic study is preparing to begin in the Boise, ID, area -- a study designed to take a closer look at how gas taxes are assessed. Government officials are growing more and more concerned over the increasing number of fuel efficient cars -- meaning one day you may pay your gas tax by mail, rather than at the pump. Across the country, gas tax revenues have been flat or are dropping. So to insure the state and federal governments continue getting their fair share, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is preparing to test a new mode of taxation. A data recorder already on most cars will record and upload the number of miles drivers drive. In theory, drivers would then be taxed on the miles they drive, rather than the amount of gas they purchase. The test will begin sometime this fall -- right now the University of Iowa still has to acquire volunteers. KTRV-TV is located in Boise.
http://www.fox12news.com/Global/story.asp?S=5337528

Lacy Faces Questions In Ramsey Case (Denver Post, Aug. 29)
Mary Lacy, the Boulder County, CO, district attorney who decided not to press charges against John Mark Karr for the murder of JonBenet Ramsey, now faces questions for her handling of the case. Lacy graduated with honors from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://www.denverpost.com/jonbenet/ci_4253029

UI Lab Vandalism Cited (Inside Higher Ed, Aug. 28)
A story about UCLA's attempts to combat animal rights militants cites the vandalism at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA laboratories as one of the rare instances when such acts become publicly known.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/08/28/ucla

Squire Comments On Dodd Candidacy (Hartford Courant, Aug. 28)
Connecticut Sen. Christopher Dodd is testing the waters for a possible bid for the Democratic presidential nomination. But University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE says, "He's showing up a little bit late." Squire said that in Iowa, John Edwards "has the best structure," while Hilary Clinton "doesn't have to worry about finding a niche." The Courant in published in Connecticut.
http://www.courant.com/news/politics/hc-dodd0828.artaug28,0,6341014.story?coll=hc-headlines-politics

Andreasen Cites Writers' Workshop Study (USA Today, Aug. 27)
"The Creating Brain: The Neuroscience of Genius," by University of Iowa neuroscientist NANCY ANDREASON of the Carver College of Medicine, is being republished in paperback this fall. In a USA Today interview, Andreasen cited her study of Iowa Writers' Workshop students and faculty, in which she documented that many had suffered from bipolar disorder. But, she noted, "mental illness is, on the whole, a handicap to the creative process."
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2006-08-27-creative-brain_x.htm

UI Asthma Experts Warn Of Drug Interactions (MedIndia, Aug. 27)
"Asthma experts at University of Iowa are taking efforts to make sure that an asthma drug combination is prescribed only when really needed," begins a story about problems of interaction with the drug Salmeterol. For a few patients, the combination of this drug with a corticosteroid may actually make asthma worse, or even fatal. "For most patients whose asthma cannot be controlled with a low-dose inhaled steroid, adding salmeterol to the steroid provides increased benefits. So there's no question this can be a useful combination drug for many individuals," said MILES WEINBERGER, professor of pediatrics in the University of Iowa Roy J. And Lucille A. Carver College Of Medicine. "However, some patients are receiving the combination drug but don't actually need it, and there is at least a small subgroup of patients for whom previous research showed the salmeterol-steroid combination has a very negative, rather than beneficial, effect."
http://www.medindia.net/news/view_news_main.asp?x=13697

UI Alumna Is Rare Boy Scout Leader (Greater Milwaukee Today, Aug. 27)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Alumna Sharon Moulds is CEO/Scout Executive for the Milwaukee County Council of Boy Scouts of America - the only woman to lead an urban Boy Scout council, and one of only two female CEOs in the country. Moulds' father was a professional scout and, she says, "When I graduated from the University of Iowa with my journalism and marketing degree, I really didn't know what I wanted to do, so he suggested I apply for a marketing job with BSA in Peoria, Ill." She's been working for BSA in some capacity ever since. Greater Milwaukee Today is published in Wisconsin.
http://www.gmtoday.com/content/CLS/2006/April/23.asp

Iowa Wrestler Takes On The Iditarod (Anchorage Daily News, Aug. 25)
Shenandoah, Iowa, native Matt Anderson, a three-year starter for the University of Iowa wrestling team, is taking on a new challenge, the Iditarod Sled Dog Race. Anderson's interest in the 1,150 mile Alaskan trek through subzero temperatures led to teasing by his teammates at the UI. "One day I found a picture of Iditarod winner Doug Swingley on my locker," he said. "Only his face had been replaced by mine. TOM BRANDS (newly hired University of Iowa wrestling coach) put it there, and I believe still has it. Tom knew that the determination that it took to run the race was right up my alley." The Anchorage Daily News is published in Alaska.
http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/ap_alaska/story/8123184p-8015507c.html

Antihistamines Make Driving Dangerous (CBS2, Chicago, Aug. 25)
University of Iowa research has shown than driving under the influence of antihistamines can be more dangerous than driving drunk. "Everybody should be aware of the problem -- consumers who buy the products [and] those who sell the products," said JOHN WEILER, a professor at the University of Iowa.
http://cbs2chicago.com/local/local_story_237155748.html

Analysis Confirms Climate-Related Plague Risk (Innovations Report, Aug. 25)
Statistical analysis by NOELLE I. SAMIA at the University of Iowa Department Of Statistics & Actuarial Science demonstrated that global warming could increase the prevalence of plague. Climate variation proved to be the critical variable in determining the prevalence of the plague bacterium in gerbil populations that were studied in Kazakhstan. The study involved researchers from Norway, Kazakhstan, Switzerland, Denmark, Belgium, UK and the U.S. Innovations Report is published in Germany.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/biowissenschaften_chemie/bericht-69493.html

Stone Comments On Research (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 25)
A story about personalized medicine, a form of medicine in which tests and drugs are developed for individuals, says the idea may never take hold because the markets are too small for companies to make money. It points out Dr. EDWIN STONE, a widely respected scientist who studies genetic connections to blindness. For more than a decade Stone and his colleagues at the University of Iowa have characterized genetic abnormalities associated with eye diseases. "We'd do our research, write the results and publish in medical journals," said Stone, sitting in his ophthalmology lab on the Iowa City campus. "Once we published, we figured our job was done. Someone else would develop tests and market them to physicians." But that never happened, and it took a while for economic reality to dawn on the academic scientist. "The diseases we study are too rare," Stone said. "There's no money to be made because the market is just too small."
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/health/bal-hs.personals25aug25,0,1954788.story?

UI Adopted Transgender Policies (Washington Blade, Aug. 25)
Tyrone Hanley, youth program coordinator for Gender Public Advocacy Coalition's Gender Youth Network, said his group wants to increase the number of colleges adding transgender protections to nondiscrimination policies. "It's only been in the past 10 years that schools have added the protections," he said. "In 1996, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was the first school. In 2005, 21 schools added them. Students are becoming more aware of how gender identity is affecting their lives." The article also appeared on the website of SOUTHERN VOICE.
http://www.washblade.com/2006/8-25/view/actionalert/aa.cfm

Ciochon Comments On 'Hobbit' Bones (Science, Aug. 25)
Strange new hominid or just another modern human? That's still an open question for the "hobbit" bones unearthed in Liang Bua cave on the Indonesian island of Flores. Their discoverers described them two years ago as a new species, Homo floresiensis, but critics have insisted from the start that the leading specimen, a 1-meter-tall, 18,000-year-old skeleton with a brain the size of a grapefruit, was that of a diseased Homo sapiens. RUSSELL CIOCHON of the University of Iowa in Iowa City commented on a study about this discovery. http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/313/5790/1028

Williams Advises Men Self-Examination For Testicular Cancer (Best Life, Aug. 25)
Men can do an easy test for test for testicular cancer, as described in this article. "It's especially important for young men--starting at age 16--to examine themselves monthly," says RICHARD WILLIAMS, M.D., professor and chairman of the department of urology at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "An easy way to remember your self-exam is to tie it to some other monthly activity."
http://www.bestlifeonline.com/cda/article/0,5507,s1-9---1634,00.html

Columnist Cites Van Allen Death, Magellan Anniversary (Newsweek, Aug. 24)
Rabbi Marc Gellman, in a column titled "On Boldly Going: How Explorers Touch the Lines that Flow from God," cites the recent death at 91 of physicist JAMES VAN ALLEN, former chair of the University of Iowa's Department of Physics and Astronomy. "Van Allen was America's most important early space scientist, a man who, in addition to inventing the instrumentation and circuits for many of the early satellites, discovered that the Earth is encircled by belts of high radioactivity trapped by its magnetic field," Gellman writes. "They are now called the Van Allen Belts." Gellman also notes that Van Allen's death nearly coincided with the 487th anniversary of explorer Ferdinand Magellan's historic voyage by ship from Spain to circumnavigate the Earth.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14502232/site/newsweek/

UI Alumna Designed Reading Glasses (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Aug. 24)
Julie Allinson is the  creator of the popular reading glasses known as eyebobs, Allinson, 48, designs her funky frames for people who are irreverent and playful. With tongue-in-cheek names such as Better Than Botox, Board Stiff and Barely Lucid and striking colors and shapes, her readers with attitude are a hit from coast to coast. She graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a business degree.
http://www.startribune.com/217/story/631006.html

Weinberger Warns Of Asthma Drug Mixing (CBC News, Aug. 24)
Asthma experts at the University of Iowa have added their voices to growing warnings about medications, such as Advair, that use the long-acting asthma drug salmeterol in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid. In some patients, this combination can make asthma more severe or even fatal, the experts write in a letter published in the Aug. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The letter describes two such cases handled by the University of Iowa doctors. Both patients had life-threatening problems related to salmeterol use. When they switched to a different asthma medication, their asthma was brought under control. "For most patients whose asthma cannot be controlled with a low-dose inhaled steroid, adding salmeterol to the steroid provides increased benefits. So there's no question this can be a useful combination drug for many individuals," Dr. MILES WEINBERGER, professor of pediatrics, said in a prepared statement. The same story appeared on the Web site of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, AUSTIN AMERICAN STATESMAN, FORBES, ALL HEADLINE NEWS and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.cbc.ca/cp/HealthScout/060823/6082302U.html

Westefeld Teen Suicide Study Cited (Washington Times, Aug. 24)
A story about teen suicide notes that in a 2004 poll of 1,865 students at four large universities, 24 percent said they had considered ending it all before graduation. That's a strikingly higher number than the 8.5 percent reported in a similar 2001 study and 9.5 percent noted in a 2000 analysis. A similar disparity was found in the rates of suicide attempts, reported by 5 percent of the students in the 2004 survey -- disturbingly higher than the 1 percent and 1.5 percent, respectively, so inclined in the two earlier investigations. "This is one of the most significant findings of this study," lead author JOHN WESTEFELD, counseling psychology professor at the University of Iowa College of Education, wrote in his conclusion. The same story appeared on the Web site of UPI.
http://washingtontimes.com/upi/20060823-025001-6077r.htm

Campbell Collaborates In Study (Science Daily, Aug. 24)
Research published in 2003 showed proof that cells with internal membranes use those membranes to repair potentially lethal outer-membrane injuries. A recent paper published in Nature in collaboration with Dr. KEVIN CAMPBELL's laboratory at the University of Iowa showed how human disease, including certain forms of muscular dystrophy, can result from a failure of this mechanism. An outer membrane tear is like an open door through which calcium just outside the cell rushes in. Too much calcium is lethal but that first taste signals the vulnerable cell it better do something quick. With epithelial cells, several of the internal mucus-filled compartments fuse together within about three seconds, forming a patch to fix the tear. In the process the compartments expel their contents so, almost like a bonus, extra mucus becomes available to lubricate the GI tract.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060823093156.htm

Lie: Not All Backdating Can Be Prosecuted (Hartford Courant, Aug. 24)
This summer, federal prosecutors and regulators fired two big opening volleys in their crackdown against suspiciously timed grants of stock options to top executives, bringing criminal and civil charges against former officials of two technology companies, one on each coast. Then: out of public view, it was back to the long investigative slog for Justice Department prosecutors and enforcement attorneys at the Securities and Exchange Commission -- poring over documents, interviewing witnesses. It could be a very long haul. Faced with a mountain of material and potential violations, the authorities are having to marshal their resources to concentrate on high-priority and more egregious cases of fraud involving the award of stock options. Just over 2,000 public companies, or 29 percent of those in the United States that give stock options to executives, have timing issues, according to ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, and Randall Heron, an Indiana University associate finance professor. But not all the backdating of options was illegal, and in some cases the evidence is insufficient for the government to make a case. In any event, investigators and prosecutors "don't have the time or the resources" to pursue every company, Lie said in a telephone interview. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, ST. LOUIS POST DISPATCH, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER, MARCO ISLAND (N.C.) EAGLE, LONG ISLAND BUSINESS NEWS and LAW.com.
http://www.courant.com/business/hc-options0823.artaug23,0,835975.story?coll=hc-headlines-business

Bowlsby Opens New Stanford Stadium (San Jose Mercury News, Aug. 24)
Bob Bowlsby, the new Stanford athletic director, saw his first Cardinal home football game eight years ago. Back then, Bowlsby was still running the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's athletic department. The Hawkeyes' football team had a bye week, though, so he was on the West Coast, raising money and playing golf. On Saturday afternoon, Bowlsby decided to drop by Stanford Stadium. He witnessed the classic Cardinal football tableau: maybe 30,000 fans splayed here and there among the 80,000 seats of the aged, dusty oval. Compared with the capacity crowds Bowlsby was used to seeing in the Big Ten, it was a stark scene. He recalls his reaction. "It was kind of like, 'Yikes,'" Bowlsby said. "You know, what are these people doing rumbling around this big old stadium?"
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/sports/colleges/stanford/15338014.htm

Hancher Commissioned New Works (Philadelphia Inquirer, Aug. 23)
With a history of nurturing about 80 works into being, Hancher Auditorium at the University of Iowa is now part of Music Accord, which, for only $7,500 a year from each of its 10 members, has delivered three new chamber-music works over the last decade by major composers such as David Del Tredici and William Bolcom. Most appetizing, says Hancher's artistic director, JUDITH HURTIG, are projects to which the university makes a unique contribution: The Terry Riley/Kronos Quartet piece “Sun Rings” incorporated recordings of outer-space noise culled from years of research done in Iowa. http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/entertainment/columnists/david_patrick_stearns/15336399.htm

UI Ranked Among Top Party Schools (Clarion-Ledger, Aug. 23)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ranks ninth among the nation's 10 top party schools, according to the annual Princeton Review survey. The newspaper is based in Mississsipp. The ranking was also cited  on the website of WOWT-TV in Omaha, Neb., WDSU-TV in Louisiana, the BILOXI SUN-HERALD in Mississsippi and KEYE-TV in Texas. Another article about other Princeton Review rankings appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE. http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060823/NEWS/608230353

Fees Climb for Football Teams (New York Times, Aug. 23)
Scheduling easy victories is a tradition as timeless in college football as fight songs and homecoming. But after the National Collegiate Athletic Association approved the addition of a 12th regular-season game for the coming season, the appearance fees began climbing in a bidding war for games against college football’s flotsam and jetsam. With the weakest teams in Division I-A becoming more expensive, top programs are stooping lower for competition. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a Big Ten favorite this year, wooed Montana, a Division I-AA program, for $650,000. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/23/sports/ncaafootball/23college.html?ei=5094&en=51aad1821df509be&hp=&ex=1156392000&adxnnl=1&partner=homepage&adxnnlx=1156345385-ctEfSthc6eVyOLlBZShA0Q

Prosecutors Prioritize Stock Options Cases (CBS News, Aug. 22)
This summer, federal prosecutors and regulators fired two big opening volleys in their crackdown against suspiciously timed grants of stock options to top executives, bringing criminal and civil charges against former officials of two technology companies, one on each coast. Faced with a mountain of material and potential violations, the authorities are having to marshal their resources to concentrate on high-priority and more egregious cases of fraud involving the award of stock options. Just over 2,000 public companies, or 29 percent of those in the United States that give stock options to executives, have timing issues, according to ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, and Randall Heron, an Indiana University associate finance professor. But not all the backdating of options was illegal, and in some cases the evidence is insufficient for the government to make a case. In any event, investigators and prosecutors "don't have the time or the resources" to pursue every company, Lie said in a telephone interview. Lie and Heron's research last year into deceptive option awards at numerous companies helped focus attention on an issue that has turned into a business scandal. The ASSOCIATED PRESS story also appeared in the CONTRA COSTA TIMES and SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS in California, NEW YORK TIMES, WASHINGTON POST, INTERACTIVE INVESTOR, KANSAS CITY STAR, ST.PAUL PIONEER PRESS, CBS NEWS, BUSINESS WEEK, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, and several other publications.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/08/22/ap/business/mainD8JLK5000.shtml

Students Health Issues Noted (Rocky Mountain News, Aug. 22)
As part of an article noting health issues for income college students, a photo is shown of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sophomore Anna Hermsen receiving a mumps, measles and rubella vaccination from nurse Jan Bush at the school's Student Health Service. Vaccination clinics were set up in college towns across Iowa as health officials tried to stem a mumps epidemic. While new roommates, course loads and weight gains tend to worry those college-bound for the first time, students and their families also need to plan for health issues. The newspaper is based in Denver, Colo. http://www.insidedenver.com/drmn/health/article/0,2777,DRMN_23956_4933855,00.html

Strauss Comments On Accutane Study (CBS News, Aug. 22)
Accutane, the powerful acne drug already known to cause birth defects, seems to raise the risk for potential heart and liver problems more than doctors had expected, according to a new study. The findings came from lab tests on 13,772 patients taking the popular acne drug and underscore the need to closely monitor people taking isotretinoin, which is sold as Accutane and in three generic versions. Abnormal results for cholesterol and liver function were more common than expected. While those conditions can lead to problems over the long term, abnormal lab tests don't necessarily mean patients will develop heart or liver problems, said study co-author Dr. Lee Zane of the University of California, San Francisco. The study won't change medical practice because dermatologists already carefully test patients taking Accutane, said Dr. JOHN STRAUSS, professor emeritus at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Strauss is a former consultant for Roche Laboratories Inc., the maker of Accutane, he said. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the BOSTON GLOBE, NEW YORK TIMES, WASHINGTON POST, CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, BALTIMORE SUN, WMAQ-TV (CHICAGO), WRAL-TV, (RALEIGH, NC), FORBES, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, KANSAS CITY STAR, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/08/22/ap/health/mainD8JLEJ280.shtml

Stone Finds Research Market Too Small For Profit (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Aug. 22)
A story about personalized medicine, a form of medicine in which tests and drugs are developed for individuals, says the idea may never take hold because the markets are too small for companies to make money. It points out Dr. EDWIN STONE, a widely respected scientist who studies genetic connections to blindness. For more than a decade Stone and his colleagues at the University of Iowa have characterized genetic abnormalities associated with eye diseases. "We'd do our research, write the results and publish in medical journals," said Stone, sitting in his ophthalmology lab on the Iowa City campus. "Once we published, we figured our job was done. Someone else would develop tests and market them to physicians." But that never happened, and it took a while for economic reality to dawn on the academic scientist. "The diseases we study are too rare," Stone said. "There's no money to be made because the market is just too small." The same story also appeared on the Web sites of THE STATE (SC), INTERNATIONAL NEWS SERVICE (Australia).
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/15331813.htm

Seashore Hall Break-in Cited (Inside HigherEd, Aug. 22)
Dario Ringach, an associate neurobiology professor at the University of California at Los Angeles, decided this month to give up his research on primates because of pressure put on him, his neighborhood, and his family by the UCLA Primate Freedom Project, which seeks to stop research that harms animals. Anti-animal research groups are trumpeting Ringach's move as a victory, while some researchers are worried that it could embolden such groups to use more extreme tactics. The story also mentions a break-in at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA by the Animal Liberation Front two years ago.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/08/22/animal

Students Warned About Posting Online (Eugene Register Guard, Aug. 22)
A story about people who put too much information on their blogs or social networking sites refers to investigations of athletes at various universities after questionable photos were posted at networking sites. One of the investigations was at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.registerguard.com/news/2006/08/21/tw.collegesonline.0821.p1.php?section=20below

Alumna Named Principal (Mt. Vernon News, Aug. 22)
Suzanne Miller has been hired as a principal at an elementary school in Mt. Vernon, OH. She earned her Master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.mountvernonnews.com/local/06/08/21/mv.new.html

Van Allen Death Noted (Time, Aug. 21)
JAMES VAN ALLEN
, 91, venerated physicist who discovered that Earth is surrounded by two belts of radiation, which were later named for him died in Iowa City, Iowa. In 1958 Van Allen, below center, with rocket designers William Pickering and Wernher von Braun, posed for one of the iconic photographs of the space age: the three men held a model of Explorer 1 over their heads the night the satellite--the U.S.'s first--went into orbit, four months after Sputnik. In a belated effort to add an element of scientific pursuit to the space race, Van Allen had been asked to design a ride-along experiment to hunt for charged particles, or cosmic rays. Finding the radiation belts, he later said, "was like going hunting for rabbits and encountering an elephant instead."
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1226154-2,00.html

Lie Sees 'Tip Of Iceberg' In Stock-Option Backdating (The Lawyer, Aug. 21)
Enron convictions were widely seen as the end of an era of U.S. corporate corruption. Instead, as a result of research by University of Iowa finance professor ERIC LIE, a new scandal emerged -- backdating stock options. And Lie's latest research suggests, "we may have seen only the tip of the iceberg." The Lawyer is published in the UK.
http://www.thelawyer.com/cgi-bin/item.cgi?id=121581&d=122&h=24&f=46

Westefeld Inspired Stormphobia.org Creation (Journal Gazette, Aug. 21)
The debilitating fear of lightning and thunder, or storms in general, afflicts people worldwide. One such sufferer was Zeus Flores of Chicago, but he took comfort in research by University of Iowa psychologist JOHN S. WESTEFELD. When Flores read Westefeld's 1996 study about "severe weather phobia," "a light bulb went off. ... It helped me to realize OK, I'm not the only one." In 1999, Flores founded stormphobia.org. The paper is based in Fort Wayne, Ind.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/15324816.htm

Skorton Reminds Cornell Freshmen That He's New, Too (Ithaca Journal, Aug. 21)
Being new to college and learning the ropes can be a challenge. But new Cornell University president David Skorton, who just arrived from THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was quick to remind incoming freshmen that he is "in the same boat as most of them." Skorton plans to take the swimming test required of all freshmen, and to live for a week in a dormitory.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060821/NEWS01/608210322/1002/NEWS01

Svensson New Purdue Pharmacy School Dean (Lafayette Journal Courier, Aug. 21)
In October, CRAIG SVENSSON, professor of pharmaceutical sciences and head of the division of pharmaceutics at the University of Iowa, will become dean of the College of Pharmacy, Nursing and Health Sciences at Purdue University. Svensson reflected on his research at the UI: "My research group has focused on understanding why unusual reactions to drugs occur so that we can both avoid their use in at-risk patients and develop safer drugs."
http://www.jconline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060821/NEWS0501/608210305

Multimedia Artist Stern Attended UI (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 21)
Multimedia artist Rudi Stern, who earned a master's degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, died in Spain Aug. 22 at the age of 69. Stern "used light and neon to create psychedelic shows for Timothy Leary and vibrant environments for the legendary New York disco Studio 54. ... Over the years, Stern created neon signs for the Broadway show "Kiss of the Spider Woman" and work for shows by several performance and musical artists, including Laurie Anderson." This article also appeared in the New York Times on Aug. 18.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/california/la-me-passings21.1aug21,1,6640119.story?coll=la-headlines-pe-california

Edwards Has Surprise Bestseller (Halifax Chronicle Journal, Aug. 21)
Kim Edwards, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, says having a surprise bestseller with "The Memory Keeper's Daughter" has resulted in "one surprise after another, all summer long." The paperback edition of "The Memory Keeper's Daughter," the story of a child born with Down syndrome and the web of family secrets and lies that follow, "has become a literary phenomenon and the surprise summer reading hit." This paper is published in Nova Scotia.
http://thechronicleherald.ca/Books/523359.html

UI Alumnus Al-Tawil Featured In Art Exhibition (Arab American News, Aug. 21)
An exhibition of Islamic art at the Synergy Art Gallery in Berkely, Mich., will feature works by UI alumnus HASHIM AL-TAWIL. "Hashim Al-Tawil has given lectures on Arabic-Islamic art, heritage and culture around the world. With degrees from the University of Baghdad, Iraq, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, IA and University of Hartford, Conn., Al-Tawil is becoming a voice for the conservation of Arabic- and Islamic culture. Many of his artworks have been purchased by museums and private collections in the Middle East, Europe, and the United States." The Arab American News is published in Michigan.
http://www.arabamericannews.com/newsarticle.php?articleid=6118

Jones Questions Reliance On E-Voting (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Aug. 19)
Minnesota is about to make the switch to electronic voting, but DOUGLAS JONES, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, has words of caution. Jones, an electronic-voting activist, questions the wisdom of turning over such a vital function of government to outsiders. "Are we outsourcing democracy?" he asks. "That adds a layer that wasn't there when we were talking about outsourcing maintenance of the rest stops along the highway."
http://www.startribune.com/587/story/623530.html

Editorial On Gifted Children Cites UI Research (Rocky Mountain News, Aug. 18)
The American educational system fails gifted children, asserts an editorial prompted by a presentation to Mensa, the international organization for the intellectually gifted. The presentation "cited work by DAVID LOHMAN, of the University of Iowa, who says that in a typical mixed-ability, first-grade classroom there are likely to be up to 12th grade levels of performance - from children who are still learning the alphabet to children whose performance is at the average level for high school seniors." The result is that both children at both ends of the spectrum are likely to struggle. The Rocky Mountain News is published in Denver, CO.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/opinion_columnists/article/0,2777,DRMN_23972_4928087,00.html

Obit: Van Allen 'True Pioneer Of Space Age' (The Independent, Aug. 18)
An obituary describes the late University of Iowa physics professor JAMES ALFRED VAN ALLEN, who died Aug. 9 at the age of 91, as "one of the true pioneers of the space age. He was a creative experimental space scientist and scientific leader and, possibly, the most famous Iowan ever. Universally known to space scientists as 'Van', Van Allen came to the front page of Time magazine and world fame when his experiment flew on the first successful American satellite, Explorer 1, launched on 31 January 1958."
http://news.independent.co.uk/people/obituaries/article1220045.ece

DA In Ramsey Case Attended UI Law School (Japan Herald, Aug. 18)
District Attorney Mary Lacy, the top prosecutor in this upscale college community, has spent years rising through the ranks of the DA's office and building a reputation as a fair, sometimes outspoken advocate for victims of sexual assault. In the glare of international media attention, Lacy stepped forward Thursday and calmly refused to answer any questions about a 41-year-old man arrested in the 1996 slaying of 6-year-old JonBenet Ramsey. "Our mission is the pursuit of justice,'' said Lacy, smiling at times as reporters shouted questions at her. "Professionally, what this does is challenge us to do our best work, back away from what we have here this morning, be cautious, be careful, investigate thoroughly and make good decisions based on the information that we have.'' Lacy, who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LAW SCHOOL in 1978, joined the district attorney's office in 1983 and became well-known for her sensitivity and experience with sexual assault cases.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,,-6022895,00.html

Tippie MBA Students Learn Etiquette (CNN International, Aug. 17)
As well as mastering marketing, finance and leadership, new students arriving for the Tippie School of Management's full-time MBA have been learning a series of other vital skills. For example, which fork do you use for salad? In a pointed example of the importance of etiquette and cultural understanding in today's global business world, students at the Tippie School, part of the University of Iowa, received some very specialized training during their week-long orientation program in mid-August. The school drafted in etiquette guru Lydia Ramsey to show the 60-strong class how to conduct themselves during a business meal. While seemingly trivial, matters such as formal dining are important to learn, the Tippie School stresses, especially when students come not only from across the United States but also countries such as China, Russia, Nigeria, Turkey, Pakistan and India. "This isn't training the students for high tea with the queen," said GARY GAETH, associate dean of the Tippie School. "Because so many of our students come from so many different countries, they come with significant differences in their cultural backgrounds, especially in areas like etiquette.
http://edition.cnn.com/2006/BUSINESS/08/14/execed.etiquette/index.html

Boyle Recalls Cheever From Workshop (NPR's All Things Considered, Aug. 17)
In All Things Considered's "You Must Read This" feature, author T.C. Boyle discusses "On Learning to Appreciate John Cheever's Stories." "In the fall of 1973, I was a member of John Cheever's writing class at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP," Boyle says. "John was then 61 years old, which seemed to me preposterously old at the time (as you can imagine, I've since modified my view), and he seemed rather frail and diminished into the bargain. I had read his stories -- most of them -- in a desultory way, but in that era of scintillating narrative experimentation they struck me as being somewhat antiquated, solid stories of a bygone era." Text of the essay, along with audio, is available at:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5652619&ft=1&f=2

Judge Pens Column On Iowa State Fair (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 16)
MICHAEL JUDGE
, a writer, Hoover Institution media fellow, and adjunct instructor at the University of Iowa School of Journalism and Mass Communication, writes about the Iowa State Fair, which he says features "10 days of back-to-back livestock and food competitions, a cow sculpted entirely of butter, fresh-squeezed lemonade by the gallon and pork chops on a stick. I mean beer tents and deep-fried Oreos, a 1,199-pound hog named Waldo ("Some pig," indeed!) and men who wrestle rare Bengal tigers."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115567873897736552.html

Stone Finds Research Market Too Small For Profit (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 17)
A story about personalized medicine, a form of medicine in which tests and drugs are developed for individuals, says the idea may never take hold because the markets are too small for companies to make money. It points out Dr. EDWIN STONE, a widely respected scientist who studies genetic connections to blindness. For more than a decade Stone and his colleagues at the University of Iowa have characterized genetic abnormalities associated with eye diseases. "We'd do our research, write the results and publish in medical journals," said Stone, sitting in his ophthalmology lab on the Iowa City campus. "Once we published, we figured our job was done. Someone else would develop tests and market them to physicians." But that never happened, and it took a while for economic reality to dawn on the academic scientist. "The diseases we study are too rare," Stone said. "There's no money to be made because the market is just too small."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0608170218aug17,1,605871.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Van Allen Lauded For Pushing Limits (Fort Wayne News Sentinel, Aug. 17)
With the launch of its basketball-sized Sputnik satellite in 1957, the Chicago Tribune writes in an editorial, the Soviet Union punctured a dangerous myth: Before that startling coup, many Americans had assumed that the U.S. know-how that had produced the atom bomb would dominate global science for generations. A panic-stricken U.S. couldn't cede mastery of outer space to the Soviets. Fortunately, a major American discovery in that vast realm came quickly, thanks to shrewd research by an unassuming University of Iowa physicist, JAMES VAN ALLEN. His instruments aboard the first U.S. satellite -- it was Explorer I, launched early in 1958 -- detected what he later identified as two powerful radiation belts that circle Earth. To this day, the safe movement of spacecraft, and of astronauts, relies on carefully navigating those Van Allen Belts, as they'll always be known. It was, in multiple ways, a cosmic discovery. The same article appeared on the Web site of the BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/news/editorial/15294623.htm

Poet Is Workshop Alumnus (The Pitch, Aug. 17)
A story about poet Sam Witt points out that he received his MFA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop. The Pitch is based in Kansas City.
http://www.pitch.com/Issues/2006-08-17/news/backwash2.html

Columnist Writes of Kinsella Friendship (Columbia Tribune, Aug. 17)
A story about an ongoing friendship between Bill Clark, a columnist for the Tribune, and W.P. Kinsella, short story writer, points out that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop. The Tribune is based in Missouri.
http://www.columbiatribune.com/2006/Aug/20060816Feat001.asp

Goree Study Shows Plasma Kills Bacteria (PhysicsWeb, Aug. 16)
Physicists in the U.S. have shown that plasmas can be used to kill the bacteria that cause tooth decay. JOHN GOREE and colleagues at the University of Iowa have used a hand-held "plasma needle", which works at room temperature, to kill Streptococcus mutans grown in a glass dish. Although the needle is only an experimental device at the moment, the researchers say it could one day be used by dentists to replace mouthwash as a much more efficient way of eradicating oral bacteria.
http://physicsweb.org/articles/news/10/8/12/1

Van Allen Lauded For Pushing Limits (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 16)
With the launch of its basketball-sized Sputnik satellite in 1957, the Chicago Tribune writes in an editorial, the Soviet Union punctured a dangerous myth: Before that startling coup, many Americans had assumed that the U.S. know-how that had produced the atom bomb would dominate global science for generations. A panic-stricken U.S. couldn't cede mastery of outer space to the Soviets. Fortunately, a major American discovery in that vast realm came quickly, thanks to shrewd research by an unassuming University of Iowa physicist, JAMES VAN ALLEN. His instruments aboard the first U.S. satellite--it was Explorer I, launched early in 1958--detected what he later identified as two powerful radiation belts that circle Earth. To this day, the safe movement of spacecraft, and of astronauts, relies on carefully navigating those Van Allen Belts, as they'll always be known. It was, in multiple ways, a cosmic discovery.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/chi-0608160057aug16,1,1112778.story

UI Body Heat Study Cited (Shreveport Times, Aug. 16)
A columnist writing about training in hot, humid conditions cites a study by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 2002 on how the human body cools itself. The conclusion of the kinesiologists is that the acclimated athletes demonstrated a lower core temperature while at rest and during exercise. The cyclists produced more sweat with a decrease in sodium content. And supporting Reese's theory, the athletes' threshold for sweating was reduced, which means they started sweating earlier in the work out. Most important, however, is that the heat acclimation process did not reduce their time trial performances. The study confirms that with exposure to a hot training environment, your body becomes more efficient at cooling itself.
http://www.shreveporttimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060815/SPORTS/308150004/1001/SPORTS

Author Hilderbrand Is Workshop Alumna (Cape Cod Times, Aug. 16)
A profile of Nantucket author Elin Hilderbrand, author of the novel "The Love Season," notes that she is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.capecodonline.com/cctimes/food/thedinner16.htm

Lie: Executives Cherry-Picked Stock Buy Dates (The Independent, Aug. 15)
A story about the stock backdating scandal says the first hints were seen in 1997, when David Yermack, now a professor of finance at New York University, planted the first germs of suspicion by noting the lucky timing of the average executive options grant, which appeared to come just before a strong rally in a company's share price. As options grants became a more central plank of executive pay during the dot.com years, these coincidences became more frequent and striking. By the time ERIK LIE, associate professor at the University of Iowa, compiled statistics on the subject in 2003, he could come up with only one conclusion. "The odds of executives being able to predict a rally in the share price over the next few days after a grant were simply astronomical. I thought it was clear they were cherry-picking dates from the past." The Independent is based in Great Britain.
http://news.independent.co.uk/business/analysis_and_features/article1219345.ece

UI Hospitals Ranking Noted (Midwest Business, Aug. 14)
A writer notes that in the recent U.S. News' rankings of U.S. hospitals, many are surprisingly based in the Midwest. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS is included among the best hospitals nationally in many of its specialties.
http://www.midwestbusiness.com/news/viewnews.asp?newsletterID=15257

DI Receives Student Fees (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 14)
A story about the growth of the college newspaper industry, despite an overall downturn in newspaper circulation and advertising sales, notes that college papers are financed by a variety of means. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Daily Iowan, for instance, receives a portion of student fees.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/bal-papers0814,0,447082.story

Ann Madden Rice Accepts Position At UC Davis (California Aggie, Aug. 14)
ANN MADDEN RICE
, chief operating officer of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS, has been appointed chief executive officer of the UC Davis Medical Center. She will begin her appointment in October. Rice has served as COO of the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics, a 762-bed medical center, since 2002.
http://www.californiaaggie.com/media/storage/paper981/news/2006/08/14/CampusNews/Uc.Davis.Medical.Center.Names.Ceo-2205051.shtml?norewrite200608141001&sourcedomain=www.californiaaggie.com

Edwards Attended Writers' Workshop (Louisville Courier Journal, Aug. 13)
Memory Keepers Daughter, written by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop alumna KIM EDWARDS, has risen to No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list for paperback fiction. Edwards, an assistant professor of English at the University of Kentucky, has been receiving attention for the book. The novel takes place during a Lexington snowstorm in 1964 and concludes in 1989. Edwards says she picked the period to chronicle how attitudes about Down syndrome have changed.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060813/FEATURES06/608130313/1010/FEATURES

Writers' Workshop Alumna Discusses Identity (MetroWest Daily News, Aug. 13)
Author GISH JEN, an alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop, discusses the challenges of Chinese-Americans who don't speak Mandarin, marry whites, and in the process, redefine the meaning of identity. A major theme in Jen's work is that identity is fluid and that traditional definitions of identity based on skin color and geographical origin no longer apply in today's America. Jen herself is part of a multiracial family. Her husband is Irish American. They have two children.
http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/artsCulture/view.bg?articleid=137853

UI Paleontologist Discusses Dinosaur Trackways (Nashua Telegraph, Aug. 13)
A state building site in Connecticut uncovered one of the greatest paleontological discoveries in New England. Thousands of tracks imprinted on a layer of gray sandstone that reaches back some 200 million years. Visitors can look down from an elevated walkway onto the original tracks of a dinosaur resembling a Dilophosaurus, a three-toed, bipedal carnivore that was about 6 feet tall and 20 feet long. That area is now the site of Dinosaur State Park, touted as one of the largest dinosaur track sites in North America.  UNIVERSITY OF IOWA paleontologist CHRISTOPHER BROCHU discussed the importance of fossil trackways in understanding dinosaur behavior.
http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060813/STYLE/108130072/-1/ARTSANDLIVING

Center Cited On Vocal Problems (Delaware News Journal Online, Aug. 13)
Studies show that with noisy classrooms on the rise, listening and learning are some of the biggest challenges faced by most elementary and middle school students. Classrooms are using FrontRow Active Learning Systems, a wireless system, that amplifies and clarifies students' and teachers' voices. According to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's National Center for Voice and Speech, U.S. schools lose nearly $2.5 billion annually in sick leave for teachers with vocal problems. http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060813/SPECIAL/60809035/1008/NEWS03

Physicist Van Allen Dies (MacNewsWorld, Aug. 11)
JAMES VAN ALLEN
, who died Wednesday at age 91, designed instruments on board Explorer I that discovered belts of radiation now known as the Van Allen Belts. His experiments taught scientists to look at space not as a vacuum but as a place pulsating with energy, waiting to be explored. The discovery of the belts spawned a whole new field of research known as magnetospheric physics. "Many of my generation really went into space science because of that discovery," said Edward Stone, professor of physics at the California Institute of Technology. "It revealed a whole new area of science that was just waiting to be discovered." Van Allen was born Sept. 7, 1914, in Mount Pleasant, Iowa. As an undergraduate at Iowa Wesleyan College, he helped prepare research instruments for one of Admiral Richard E. Byrd's Antarctic expeditions. He got his master's and Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared Aug. 10 and 11 on the websites LINUXINSIDER.com, e-COMMERCE TIMES, TECHNEWSWORLD and CRM BUYER.
http://www.macnewsworld.com/story/LRYIl4Pr7UWCwX/Famed-Physicist-Space-Pioneer-Van-Allen-Dies-at-91.xhtml

Writer Recalls 'Problem Solver' Van Allen (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 11)
JAMES VAN ALLEN
, who died Wednesday at 91, came of age as World War II ushered in the era of big science. A key figure in the development of wartime technologies, when he returned to civilian life he pursued his fascination with auroras at the University of Iowa. With an unwieldy contraption he called a rockoon (part weather balloon, part rocket), he was among the first to measure conditions in the Earth's upper atmosphere. In 1958, his instruments, orbiting in the first American satellites, detected the layers of radiation that stood between Earth and outer space and came to be called the Van Allen Belts. On a practical level, this discovery led to new understandings of the hazards of space travel and the behavior of radio waves. We met in the last year of his life, to talk about the discovery of the radiation belts. He answered a stream of questions about Cold War science and his rocket days. Then he steered the discussion to topics he found more engaging: the common traits of scientists and the challenge of finding purpose in old age. At 91, he wasn't addressing momentous scientific issues, but that was not the point. He had chosen to hold on to certain essentials - the work of writing, posing problems and solving them - but he had also taken on a new purpose. He demonstrated that the habits of mind and the qualities that made him a great scientist continued to serve him to the end. His presence among the students at Iowa was a course in itself.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/opinion/la-oe-dantonio11aug11,1,4959249.story?coll=la-news-comment

Author Jen Attended UI Workshop (The Ottawa Citizen, Aug. 11)
A major theme in author Gish Jen's work is that identity is fluid and that traditional definitions of identity based on skin color and geographical origin no longer apply in today's America. Jen, who recently finished a writer's residency at the University of Hong Kong, says America has evolved from a society in which minorities try to bury their ethnic traits to one where they display their customs proudly. Jen's vision is partly shaped by a positive upbringing. Born to Chinese students who were studying in the United States, she was raised in Yonkers, N.Y., and upscale Scarsdale, N.Y. - a "classic" pattern of immigrant upward mobility, she says - then educated at Harvard University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Canada. Versions of this article also appeared Aug. 11 on the websites of the VANCOUVER SUN, REGINA LEADER-POST, MONTREAL GAZETTE, SASKATOON STAR PHOENIX, NEWS 1130, 570 NEWS and 680 NEWS, all in Canada.
http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/arts/story.html?id=a7c9f03f-3236-47b9-aef1-be1ba6550a4d&k=96707

19th-Century UI Physicist Coined Weather Term (Sun Chronicle, Aug. 11)
A storm that downed trees and power lines in the Attleboro area last week was a rare phenomenon called a "derecho," weather man Glenn Field of Foxboro said. Field wrote that the word "derecho" was coined in 1888 by Gustavus Hinrichs, a physics professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "Dr. Hinrichs chose this terminology for thunderstorm-induced, straight-line winds as opposed to the word tornado,'' Field wrote. "Derecho is a Spanish word which can be defined as 'direct' or 'straight ahead' while tornado is thought by some to have been derived from the Spanish word 'tornar' which means 'to turn.'" The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.thesunchronicle.com/articles/2006/08/11/city/city6.txt

Lie Expects Scandal To Be Widespread (CNN Money, Aug. 11)
The widespread options backdating scandal is gaining new momentum after the Department of Justice charged executives from Comverse Technology with securities fraud for profiting from manipulated stock options. It was the second set of high-profile arrests resulting from the government's wide probe into options backdating. For Corporate America, it should serve as a wake up call: the government is on a mission to prosecute wrongdoers in the latest scandal to hit Wall Street. ERIK LIE, assistant professor of finance at the University of Iowa - whose research put a spotlight on the granting of options to executives prior to big run-ups in the stock price - said he expects the number of companies involved in the scandal to grow.
http://money.cnn.com/2006/08/10/news/companies/options_backdating/

Lehrman Is Speechwriter, Novelist (Washington Jewish Week, Aug. 10)
BOB LEHRMAN
,
a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop, where his advisor was Kurt Vonnegut and John Irving was a classmate, has spent many years writing speeches for politicians such as senators, majority whips, actors and the Clinton White House, where he wrote speeches for then vice president Al Gore from 1993 to 1995. He also wrote a novel in 1982, Juggling, that won the American Library Association's award for best book of the year.
http://www.washingtonjewishweek.com/main.asp?SectionID=4&SubSectionID=4&ArticleID=5699&TM=43479.2

Physicist Van Allen Dies (New York Times, Aug. 10)
JAMES A. VAN ALLEN
, the physicist who made the first major scientific discovery of the early space age, the Earth-circling radiation belts that bear his name, and sent spacecraft instruments to observe the outer reaches of the solar system, died yesterday in Iowa City. He was 91. The cause was heart failure, family members said. Dr. Van Allen was a longtime professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Iowa, and, with the discovery of the Van Allen belts of intense radiation surrounding Earth, he became a leading figure in the new field of magnetospheric physics, which grew in importance as spacecraft began exploring the planets. A legendary lecturer and an inspiration to several generations of budding physicists and astronomers, Dr. Van Allen continued to show up at his office-laboratory until a month or so before he died.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/10/science/space/10vanallen.html?ex=1155268800&en=93517e04f5373e62&ei=5087%0A

Van Allen: 'Pure Investigation Has Benefit' (Washington Post. Aug. 10)
JAMES A. VAN ALLEN
, 91, who helped launch the United States into space with the discovery that radiation belts surround the Earth, died after a heart attack Aug. 9 at the University of Iowa Hospital. He graduated from Iowa Wesleyan College, and he helped prepare research instruments for the Byrd Antarctic expedition, which one of his professors joined. He received a master's degree in 1936 and a doctoral degree in 1939, both in physics, from the University of Iowa. Dr. Van Allen returned to the University of Iowa to be chairman of its physics department and retired from active teaching in 1985. But he continued to work in science as an emeritus professor and on a number of scientific boards. One of his daughters told the Chicago Tribune in 1999 that her father's endless experiments were part of family lore. "I believe in scientific inquiry for its own sake," he said. "I think the history of science gives ample examples that pure investigation has enormous benefit ... I can't tell you what this might be good for, but learning about nature is important. And lovely things turn up."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/09/AR2006080901946.html

Colleagues Pay Tribute To Van Allen (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 10)
JAMES VAN ALLEN, one of the pioneers of America's space program who gave his name to the belts of radiation that encircle the Earth, died Wednesday. He was 91. Van Allen died of heart failure at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City. The winner of numerous awards and proclamations, including the nation's highest scientific award, the National Medal of Science, Van Allen helped blaze the trail into space for America in the period following the launch of the Russian satellite Sputnik on Oct. 4, 1957. Tributes poured in Wednesday for one of the last of America's founding generation of space visionaries. "James Van Allen was one of the greatest and most accomplished American space scientists of our time, and few researchers had such a wide range of expertise in so many scientific disciplines," said NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin. "NASA's path of space exploration is far more advanced today because of Dr. Van Allen's groundbreaking work." He remained a classroom teacher into his seventies, retiring in 1985. His widow, Abigail, said that even in retirement, her husband went to his office at the university nearly every day. Until the end, he was writing and publishing scientific papers. "He was still as bright as a tack," she said of her husband of 61 years. Abigail Van Allen said her husband seemed to be recovering well from surgery in May and was eager to get back on his feet. "His strong motivation was to get back to his office," she said.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/california/la-me-vanallen10aug10,1,3271403.story?coll=la-headlines-pe-california

Van Allen Lauded (The Times, Aug. 10)
JAMES VAN ALLEN was a path-breaking astrophysicist whose pioneering contributions in the late 1950s to the space age made him a household name in the U.S. and beyond. He became famous for his discovery that the Earth is surrounded by intense regions of energetic particles - regions that have since become known as the Van Allen radiation belts. The discovery spawned the entirely new field of scientific research known as magnetospheric physics. In 1951 he was appointed professor and head of the Department of Physics (later the Department of Physics and Astronomy) at the University of Iowa, a post he held until his retirement in 1985. He then became Carver Professor of Physics Emeritus at the University of Iowa, and continued his research in the areas of space and magnetospheric physics. Van Allen was an excellent teacher of undergraduates and an inspiring supervisor of graduate research students doing advanced degrees in physics and astronomy at the University of Iowa. He supervised about 80 of them, and many are now leaders in the community of space physics. He is survived by his wife, Abigail, and their three daughters and two sons. The newspaper is based in the United Kingdom.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,60-2306001,00.html

Van Allen's Career Spanned More Than Half-Century (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 10)
Physicist JAMES A. VAN ALLEN, a leader in space exploration who discovered the radiation belts surrounding the Earth that now bear his name, died Wednesday. He was 91. The University of Iowa, where he taught for years, announced the death in a statement on its Web site. In a career that stretched over more than a half-century, Van Allen designed scientific instruments for dozens of research flights, first with small rockets and balloons, and eventually with space probes that traveled to distant planets and beyond. Van Allen gained global attention in the late 1950s when instruments he designed and placed aboard the first U.S. satellite, Explorer I, discovered the bands of intense radiation that surround the earth, now known as the Van Allen Belts. The bands spawned a whole new field of research known as magnetospheric physics, an area of study that now involves more than 1,000 investigators in more than 20 countries. The discovery also propelled the United States in its space exploration race with the Soviet Union and prompted Time magazine to put Van Allen on the cover of its May 4, 1959, issue. The folksy, pipe-smoking scientist, called "Van" by friends, retired from full-time teaching in 1985. But he continued to write, oversee research, counsel students and monitor data gathered by satellites. He worked in a large, cluttered corner office on the seventh floor of the physics and astronomy building that bears his name. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared Aug. 9 and 10 on the websites of the WALL STREET JOURNAL; WASHINGTON POST; FORBES; NEWSDAY; USA TODAY; SALON.com; MSNBC; FOX NEWS; CNN.com; ABC NEWS; ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE; ARIZONA DAILY STAR; the LOS ANGELES TIMES, LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD, CONTRA COSTA TIMES, FRESNO BEE, SAN LUIS OBISPO TRIBUNE, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, INLAND VALLEY DAILY BULLETIN, and LONG BEACH PRESS-TELEGRAM, all in California; BRADENTON HERALD, ORLANDO SENTINEL, FLORIDA TODAY, ST. PETERSURG TIMES, all in Florida; ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER and MACON TELEGRAPH in Georgia; BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT; INDIANAPOLIS STAR, FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL and FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE in Indiana; TIMES-PICAYUNE in Louisana; BALTIMORE SUN; WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM; JACKSON CITIZEN-PATRIOT, DETROIT FREE PRESS and DETROIT NEWS in Michigan; MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, PIONEER PRESS and DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota; BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD; KANSAS CITY STAR; WILMINGTON MORNING STAR, LEXINGTON DISPATCH, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER and WINSTON-SALEM JOURNAL in North Carolina; GRAND FORKS HERALD and HERALD NEWS DAILY in North Dakota; NASHUA (N.H.) TELEGRAPH; CANTON REPOSITORY and CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER in Ohio; CUSHING (Okla.) DAILY CITIZEN; OREGONLIVE.com; PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW, WILKES BARRE TIMES LEADER and CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania; THE STATE and MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS in South Carolina; FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM and HOUSTON CHRONICLE in Texas; DESERET NEWS and KSL-TV in Utah; BARRE MONTPELIER TIMES ARGUS in Vermont; SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER and SEATTLE TIMES in Washington; JACKSON (Wyo.) NEWS-TRIBUNE; SPACE.com and EARTHTIMES.org; GUARDIAN UNLIMITED and THE HERALD (U.K.); GLOBE AND MAIL, WINNIPEG FREE PRESS, WESTFALL WEEKLY NEWS, SCIENCE NEWS (Canada); DAILYINDIA.com; PRAVDA (Russia); and XINHUA (China.)
http://www.chicagotribune.com/technology/chi-0608100060aug10,1,878163.story?coll=chi-news-hed

U.S. Astrophysicist Van Allen Dies (PhysicsWeb, Aug. 10)
The U.S. astrophysicist JAMES VAN ALLEN died yesterday aged 91. Van Allen was best known for his studies of the Earth's magnetosphere -- the region of space filled by the Earth's magnetic field. In particular, he found bands of intense radiation, later named the Van Allen radiation belts, which he discovered using the first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1. He also conducted the first surveys of the radiation belts of Jupiter and Saturn using the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft. Born on 7 September 1914, Van Allen graduated from the Iowa Wesleyan College in 1935 and then received a Masters and PhD from the University of Iowa. In April 1942, after a spell at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, he moved to the Applied Physics Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins University in Maryland, where he helped develop anti-aircraft technology for use on board ships. Later that year he was commissioned as an officer in the US Navy, field testing his anti-aircraft technology in the Pacific Ocean. After the war Van Allen started work on high-altitude research, first at the Applied Physics Laboratory and, after 1950, at the University of Iowa. He and his graduate students used the university's football field to launch rockets designed to carry out cosmic-ray experiments above the atmosphere. The physics news website is based in the U.K.
http://physicsweb.org/articles/news/10/8/8/1

UI's Rice To Head California Hospital (Sacramento Business Journal, Aug. 10)
ANN MADDEN RICE, a veteran health-care executive, has been named chief executive officer at the University of California Davis, Medical Center. Rice has been chief operating officer at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS since 2002. The Iowa medical center has annual revenue of $650 million and almost 7,500 employees. She joined the hospital as chief financial officer in 1999.
http://sacramento.bizjournals.com/sacramento/stories/2006/08/07/daily31.html

UI Alumnus Shows Art (Aberdeen American-News, Aug. 10)
The works of Lilli Ann and Ed Haskell are on display at the Granary Rural Cultural Center near Groton. Ed Haskell attended graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/local/15240039.htm

Alumnus Appointed To Diplomatic Post In Taiwan (China Post, Aug. 10)
Robert Wang, newly appointed deputy director of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) Taipei Office, is scheduled to arrive in Taipei Friday to assume his post, diplomatic sources reported Tuesday. Wang, a senior foreign service officer with more than 20 years of experience in the U.S. State Department, holds a doctoral degree in political science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chinapost.com.tw/taiwan/detail.asp?ID=87536&GRP=B

Lie: Expect More Lawsuits In Backdating Scandal (USA Today, Aug. 10)
An accounting controversy is depressing the stock prices of dozens of tech companies, turning some into takeover targets. Last week, flash memory maker SanDisk said it would acquire Israeli rival Msystems for $1.55 billion. The Securities and Exchange Commission is examining whether Msystems and about 80 other companies improperly accounted for stock-option grants. Options allow employees to buy shares of a company at a fixed price in the future. They're a popular way for fast-growing tech firms to woo workers. But some companies have been accused of improperly tweaking the timing of options grants to increase their value, especially during the dot-com boom and bust. That's a huge liability. Two former executives of communications software maker Comverse Technology surrendered to the FBI Wednesday after being charged with options fraud, while a third went missing. (Story, 1B.) Two executives of storage-maker Brocade Communications Systems face similar charges and are out on bail. Shareholder lawsuits are already being filed against Comverse, Brocade, Apple and other companies. Expect more as the controversy unfolds, says ERIK LIE, a business professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/management/2006-08-09-acquisition-usat_x.htm

Fethke Announces Van Allen Death (UPI, Aug. 9)
Renowned physicist JAMES VAN ALLEN, who helped launch the United States into the space age and for whom the Van Allen radiation belts are named, has died. He was 91. Interim University of Iowa President GARY FETHKE announced the Van Allen's death Wednesday, but offered no details, the Des Moines Register reported. Explorer I, the first successful U.S. space venture, carried, at Van Allen's insistence, a small Geiger counter. That led to a significant scientific finding: the discovery of two belts of intense radiation that surround the Earth. Although his scientific accomplishments were myriad, he opposed manned space flight: "Man is a fabulous nuisance in space right now (1959). He's not worth all the costs of putting him up there and keeping him comfortable." He once offered his own explanation of space: "It is that in which everything else is ... in other words, space is the hole that we are in." In 1951 Van Allen became a professor and head of the University of Iowa's Department of Physics and Astronomy, the Register reported. He held that position until he retired from teaching in 1985. Versions of this article appeared Aug. 9 on the websites SCI-TECH TODAY, PHYSORG.com and POLITICAL GATEWAY.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20060809-011339-4578r

Hogan: Van Allen Was Influential Yet Unassuming (Reuters, Aug. 9)
American physicist JAMES VAN ALLEN, who helped propel the United States into the space race and discovered the bands of radiation that surround the Earth that were later named for him, died on Wednesday, the University of Iowa said. Van Allen, a longtime professor at the university, died from undisclosed causes. He was 91. He designed numerous instruments carried aboard U.S. space probes beginning with the instrumentation and Geiger counters aboard Explorer 1. The satellite went into Earth orbit January 31, 1958 -- four months after the Soviet Union's launch of Sputnik I triggered unease about America's scientific prowess. The Explorer mission led to the discovery of a doughnut-shaped region of charged-particle radiation encircling the Earth, now called the Van Allen belts. "James Van Allen was one of the university's most influential and best-regarded scholars of all time. Yet he remained the most unassuming and caring man. We will all miss him deeply," University of Iowa Provost MICHAEL HOGAN said. He is survived by his wife, five children, and seven grandchildren. Versions of this Reuters article also appeared Aug. 9 and 10 on the websites of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, ABC NEWS, and DAILY NEWS & ANALYSIS in India.
http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=scienceNews&storyID=2006-08-09T202704Z_01_N09303362_RTRUKOC_0_US-VANALLEN.xml&WTmodLoc=NewsHome-C3-scienceNews-3

Renowned Physicist, Space Pioneer Van Allen Dies (Voice of America, Aug. 9)
Renowned physicist and space pioneer JAMES VAN ALLEN, who discovered the radiation belts surrounding the Earth, has died at the age of 91. The University of Iowa, where Van Allen taught for years, announced his death Wednesday. The cause of his death was not given. The highlight of Van Allen's career was in the 1950s when instruments he designed and placed aboard the first U.S. satellite, Explorer One, discovered the bands of radiation surrounding the Earth. Those radiation belts were later named after Van Allen. Van Allen retired from teaching in 1985, but he continued to monitor data gathered by other satellites and served as an interdisciplinary scientist for the Galileo spacecraft.
http://www.voanews.com/english/2006-08-09-voa57.cfm

Blog Reports Van Allen Death (Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 9)
JAMES A. VAN ALLEN, a pioneering scientist in space exploration and a physics professor for 35 years at the University of Iowa, died this morning at the age of 91.
http://chronicle.com/news/article/830/pioneering-astronomer-james-van-allen-is-dead-at-91

UI Announces Van Allen Death (Photonics.com, Aug. 9)
Physicist JAMES A. VAN ALLEN, a U.S. space pioneer who discovered the bands of intense radiation surrounding the Earth that now bear his name, died this morning at the age of 91. A statement about Van Allen's death was released today by the University of Iowa, where he taught physics and general astronomy from 1951-85.
http://www.photonics.com/content/news/2006/August/9/83779.aspx

High-profile Attorney Is UI Alumnus (St. Petersburg Times, Aug. 9)
A profile of Tampa attorney John Fitzgibbons notes that he grew up in the north Iowa farming community of Estherville, where his father practiced law. The oldest of eight children, John Fitzgibbons grew up playing basketball and refining his argument skills on the debate team. He graduated from law school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, followed by stints as a federal prosecutor in Des Moines and an attorney for the U.S. House of Representatives and Department of Justice in Washington, D.C.
http://www.sptimes.com/2006/08/09/Hillsborough/Lawyer_puts_aw_shucks.shtml

Daily Iowan Receives Student Fees (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 9)
It's not breaking news that the newspaper industry is losing the attention of young readers. But one sector of the industry is defying the trend: college papers. Hip, local, relevant and generated by students themselves, college newspapers have held steady readership in recent years while newspapers in general have seen theirs shrink. Big advertisers are going on campus to reach these young readers. Ford Motor Co., Microsoft Corp., Samsung Electronics Co., and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. have all placed recent ads in college newspapers. Now, media giants are jumping in. Last week, Gannett Co.'s Tallahassee Democrat acquired Florida State University's FSView & Florida Flambeau, one of the nation's few for-profit college newspapers. Most college newspapers are nonprofit organizations, with missions to inform the university community and provide a training ground for students. Their revenue is funneled back into the operation, supporting trips to journalism conferences, professional staffs and the latest technology systems. Some college newspapers, like the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S THE DAILY IOWAN, receive a portion of student fees. Others, like the Daily Pennsylvanian, are financially independent from the university.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115509164245730752.html

'Memory Keeper's Daughter' Author Attended Workshop (Buffalo News, Aug. 9)
A story about Kim Edwards' debut novel, "The Memory Keeper's Daughter," which recently rose to the No. 1 spot on the New York Times list of bestselling paperback fiction, says the 48-year-old author may be a newcomer to writing novels, but not to storytelling. She is an assistant English professor at the University of Kentucky, a graduate of the esteemed IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and her collection of short stories, "The Secrets of a Fire King," fetched numerous awards when published in 1997. "The Memory Keeper's Daughter" is the story of a child born with Down syndrome and the web of family secrets and lies that follow.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20060809/1067799.asp

Columnist Attended Summer Writing Festival (Southwest News-Herald, Aug. 8)
A columnist describes her recent attendance of an intensive weekend workshop at the prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SUMMER WRITING FESTIVAL. "Luckily I was unaware of just how prestigious until I got there, or I might not have made the trip at all," the columnist writes. "Iowa City puts on a conference for real writers, not a pretender like me with a checkered past, having done time in advertising and Hollywood." The paper is based in Illinois.
http://www.swnewsherald.com/online_content/2006/08/080806fw_ln_brain.php

Feldstein, Bloom Capture Town In Pictures, Words (Orlando Sentinel, Aug. 7)
At first, John Honn felt like so many of his neighbors -- a tad suspicious when PETER FELDSTEIN announced his plan to photograph all 676 residents in town. For some, such as Tim Hennes, there was also a reluctance to take part in the "artsy" ventures of Feldstein, who despite having lived in Oxford for six years was by some accounts still a newcomer. Yet there they are, part of a collection of friends, neighbors, relatives, classmates, lovers and ex-lovers, colleagues, drinking buddies and quilting partners, each frozen in an insignificant instant of their lives more than 20 years ago in black-and-white. At the time, not even Feldstein -- who snapped portraits of 670 residents of this eastern Iowa town that summer -- knew what to think or do with his work. After a brief exhibition at the American Legion Hall, Feldstein gathered his prints and stashed the negatives in storage. "I had no intention of ever coming back and doing this again," says Feldstein, who retired last year after teaching photography at the University of Iowa for 32 years. Now, more than two decades later, he is tracking down anyone who hasn't died, moved or been sent to jail for another round of portraits. This time, Feldstein has added a twist, thanks to his friend STEPHEN BLOOM, an author and journalism professor at the University of Iowa. Based on interviews, Bloom has crafted short narratives that lend a confessional, poetic and unvarnished dimension to the lives in Feldstein's then-and-now portraits. A version of this Associated Press article also appeared Aug. 6 on the website of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/orl-oxfordproject06aug07,0,2701015.story?coll=orl-shopping-headlines

Van Beek Comments On Tanning, Cancer (International News Service, Aug. 8)
An article about a young woman who developed skin cancer after repeated, frequent use of tanning beds quotes the president of the Indoor Tanning Association who says that since the cause of a person's melanoma can't be scientifically proven even if the patient used tanning beds, doctors should include tanning beds as just one item on a long list of possible cancer causes. For a long time, the tobacco industry said the same thing about cigarettes and lung cancer, said Dr. MARTA VAN BEEK, a member of the American Academy of Dermatology and assistant professor at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. "There are a lot of things that can contribute to lung cancer - tobacco is just a big one you can avoid. Same with tanning beds and sun exposure," Van Beek said. INS is based in Australia.
http://feed.insnews.org/v-cgi/feeds.cgi?feedid=150&story_id=2050532

'Memory Keeper's Daughter' Author Attended Workshop (Macleans, Aug. 8)
A story about Kim Edwards' debut novel, "The Memory Keeper's Daughter," which recently rose to the No. 1 spot on the New York Times list of bestselling paperback fiction, says the 48-year-old author may be a newcomer to writing novels, but not to storytelling. She is an assistant English professor at the University of Kentucky, a graduate of the esteemed IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and her collection of short stories, "The Secrets of a Fire King," fetched numerous awards when published in 1997. "The Memory Keeper's Daughter" is the story of a child born with Down syndrome and the web of family secrets and lies that follow.
http://www.macleans.ca/culture/news/shownews.jsp?content=e080708A

Hageman Leads International Macular Degeneration Study (Daily India, Aug. 7)
The U.S. National Institutes of Health awarded a five-year, $14.6 million grant to fund a study of macular degeneration. The money will finance an international, multidisciplinary effort led by the University of Iowa to leverage two recent genetic discoveries into possible treatments for age-related macular degeneration. The research will be led by UI Ophthalmology Professor GREGORY HAGEMAN. AMD is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. People with AMD lose the central part of their vision when the macula, a part of the retina, degenerates. No treatment currently exists for early stages of AMD, which affects nearly 50 million people worldwide.
http://www.dailyindia.com/show/49310.php/Macular-degeneration-study-is-funded

Ziegler Discusses Breastfeeding Study Findings (Independent Online, Aug. 7)
Breastfed babies living in northern latitudes often lack healthy levels of vitamin D, and may even be severely deficient, results of a new study suggest.  "In northern latitudes, such as that in Iowa (41 degrees North), sunshine is too diminished in the winter for the infants to generate enough vitamin D on their own," lead author Dr. EKHARD E. ZIEGLER told Reuters Health. Ziegler, from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and his team analyzed blood samples from 84 infants when they were about 9 months old. Forty-nine received vitamin D, either from formula or supplements, while 35 were breastfed and received no supplements. The publication is based in South Africa.
http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=14&click_id=117&art_id=qw1154968382542B243

Baldus Comments On Death Row 'Volunteers' (MSNBC, Nov. 7)
On Friday, after 19 years on death row for killing three members of a family, David Dawson is scheduled to die by lethal injection at the Montana State Prison in Deer Lodge. Dawson, 48, is what death penalty expert DAVID BALDUS refers to as a "volunteer," one of a small number of condemned inmates who willingly end court battles aimed at keeping them alive. Just 12 percent of those who've been executed in the United States since 1976 have abandoned their appeals, according to a report by the Criminal Justice Project of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund Inc. The figure is as of April 1. Baldus, a law professor at the University of Iowa, cites three reasons inmates on death row might "volunteer" to die: despair, loss of interest in living, remorse.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14234869/

Baldus Comments On Death Row 'Volunteers' (Helena Independent Record, Aug. 7)
On Friday, after 19 years on death row for killing three members of a family, David Dawson is scheduled to die by lethal injection at the Montana State Prison in Deer Lodge. Dawson, 48, is what death penalty expert DAVID BALDUS refers to as a "volunteer," one of a small number of condemned inmates who willingly end court battles aimed at keeping them alive. Just 12 percent of those who've been executed in the United States since 1976 have abandoned their appeals, according to a report by the Criminal Justice Project of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund Inc. The figure is as of April 1. Baldus, a law professor at the University of Iowa, cites three reasons inmates on death row might "volunteer" to die: despair, loss of interest in living, remorse. The newspaper is based in Montana.
http://www.helenair.com/articles/2006/08/07/montana_top/01mtt20060806231.txt

Author Attended UI Writers' Workshop (Cincinnati Enquirer, Aug. 7)
Kim Edwards, author of "The Memory Keeper's Daughter," which has risen to No. 1 on The New York Times list of bestsellers for paperback fiction, may be a newcomer to writing novels, but not to storytelling. She is an assistant English professor at the University of Kentucky, a graduate of the esteemed IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and her collection of short stories, "The Secrets of a Fire King," fetched numerous awards when published in 1997.
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060807/NEWS0103/608070361/1077

Weinstein: Early Diagnosis Key In Scoliosis Treatment (Forbes, Aug. 6)
Scoliosis manifests itself as a side-to-side curvature of the spine. On an X-ray, the spine appears more as an "S" or "C" than a straight line. In some cases, the bones in the spine may also rotate so the person's waist or shoulders appear uneven. "Before we had school screening, we used to see girls come in with their mothers complaining that they had to hem their skirts differently because of the asymmetry it causes, although there was no actual difference in leg lengths," said Dr. STUART L. WEINSTEIN, professor of orthopaedic surgery at the University of Iowa. The trick is to catch the disease when it first appears. "It's important that primary-care physicians check for this and look for it on each annual exam," said Weinstein. "School check-ups, particularly when one gets to the adolescent growth spurt at 10 to 16 years of age, are also important. Doctors need to look for it, as do families." Versions of this story also appeared Aug. 6 on the websites of WWAY-TV in North Carolina, WFIE-TV in Indiana, KLAS-TV in Nevada, LEX18 in Kentucky, DRKOOP.com, and HEALTHCENTRAL.com.
http://www.forbes.com/forbeslife/health/feeds/hscout/2006/08/06/hscout534242.html

Frisbie: High Stakes Magnify Errors (Arkansas Democrat Gazette, Aug. 6)
Arkansas' recent student test score mishap is the latest in a string of nationwide scoring blunders, experts say. Last week, publishers of the Iowa Test of Basic Skills resent exam results to every Arkansas school district after incorrectly reporting total math and composite scores in June. Errors are inevitable in an industry that administers 45 million standardized tests annually. A lack of psychometricians, combined with pressure from states to test later and report earlier in the year, can lead to slips. "They just can't be as careful checking as they need to be in some cases," said DAVE FRISBIE, a University of Iowa professor who helps design the Iowa tests. "So some mistakes are going to happen, and unfortunately, when you put high stakes on the results of tests, the mistakes are more consequential."
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/162669/

Lie Study Shows Rampant Backdating (Miami Herald, Aug. 6)
U.S. companies, buffeted by five years of financial scandals, are under scrutiny by prosecutors again, this time over stock-option grants. To some investors, the latest investigation shows that corporate promises to root out executive wrongdoing failed. Federal investigations, which have ensnared more than 80 companies including UnitedHealth Group and Home Depot, may involve dozens more, according to U.S. officials, securities lawyers and executive-pay specialists. A July 15 study by Professors Randall Heron of Indiana University and ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa, who were among the first to question backdating, concluded that more than 2,200 companies may have tinkered with option rewards between 1996 and 2005.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/15213066.htm

Van Beek Comments On Tanning, Cancer (Buffalo News, Aug. 6)
An article about a young woman who developed skin cancer after repeated, frequent use of tanning beds quotes the president of the Indoor Tanning Association who says that since the cause of a person's melanoma can't be scientifically proven even if the patient used tanning beds, doctors should include tanning beds as just one item on a long list of possible cancer causes. For a long time, the tobacco industry said the same thing about cigarettes and lung cancer, said Dr. MARTA VAN BEEK, a member of the American Academy of Dermatology and assistant professor at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. "There are a lot of things that can contribute to lung cancer - tobacco is just a big one you can avoid. Same with tanning beds and sun exposure," Van Beek said.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20060806/1072716.asp

UI Among Big Ten Universities Seeking President (Indianapolis Star, Aug. 6)
For the first time in three decades, the presidents of Indiana's two flagship universities are on the way out at the same time. More noteworthy in higher education circles is that Purdue is the fourth Big Ten Conference school to search for a president this year. Aside from Indiana University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Ohio State University are in the market for new leaders.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060806/NEWS01/608060484/-1/ZONES04

Gill Comments On Bird Flu Study (Memphis Commercial Appeal, Aug. 6)
A study of duck hunters in Iowa is believed to be the first to show people can catch bird flu -- a non-threatening kind -- from wild birds. The type of bird flu seen in the study is not H5N1, the deadly form that emerged in Asia which has sparked concerns of a potential worldwide flu epidemic. Rather, it is H11N9, another form seen in ducks and other waterfowl that had not been associated with human illness. In the Iowa study, one hunter and two state environmental workers tested positive for the virus, though none of the three men got sick, said Dr. JAMES GILL, the University of Iowa researcher who led the study.
http://www.commercialappeal.com/mca/outdoors/article/0,1426,MCA_470_4897490,00.html

Author Launched Writing Dream At UI (Belleville News-Democrat, Aug. 5)
Chicago author Melissa Fraterrigo's recently published collection of short stories features characters who are rooted in a day-to-day matter-of-factness though their lives have extraordinary details. Built on "what if" scenarios (what if all the women left town? what if you had giants who were swingers as neighbors?), the tales examine how everyday people handle such situations. To that end, Fraterrigo's stories have been called "blue collar magic realism," and she likes that description. Writing courses at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA convinced her to pursue her own dream. That took her to Bowling Green State University in Ohio for an MFA, then to postgraduate work and employment at branches of Penn State and Southern Utah University. The newspaper is based in Illinois. A version of this article appeared Aug. 6 on the website of CBS-2 in Chicago.
http://www.belleville.com/mld/belleville/news/politics/15207209.htm

UI Was Partner On Withdrawn Grant At Kansas (Wichita Eagle, Aug. 5)
The University of Kansas has been notified that the National Science Foundation is cutting short its funding of a $17 million grant for research. A recent report from the foundation said the university failed to perform as expected with research at the Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis. The report said the center demonstrated a "near absence" of innovative research. The center -- partnered with researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Washington University in St. Louis and Texas' Prairie View A&M University -- develops chemical processes for industry that are better for the environment and economically viable.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/eagle/living/education/15206906.htm

UI Study Examines Medical Errors (United Press International, Aug. 4)
Medical errors are often a system-based problem, but disclosing errors can be a very individual issue, according to an Iowa researcher. DR. LAURIS KALDJIAN of the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine said disclosing medical errors can contribute to three main goals of quality healthcare: patients deserve to know when things do not go the way they were expected; hospitals and clinics need to be aware of mistakes in order to improve patient safety; and sharing medical mistakes with colleagues can help educate other doctors to avoid the error. http://www.upi.com/ConsumerHealthDaily/view.php?StoryID=20060803-031215-2292r

Proposals Chosen To Study Radiation Belts (Los Alamos Monitor, Aug. 4)
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has chosen four mission proposals to study the formation of Earth's radiation belts and how they change during stormy weather from the sun.__ Solar influences are increasingly critical in a high-technology environment, according to NASA. Changes in solar irradiation can influence global warming and ozone depletion. An instrument developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Southwest Research Institute is a part of a proposal offered by a team led by Boston University. The other three teams are the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at Iowa City, and the New Jersey Institute of Technology at Newark. The newspaper is based in New Mexico. http://www.lamonitor.com/articles/2006/08/03/headline_news/news02.txt

Johnson Files Opinion In Grasso Case (New York Times, Aug. 4)
Next month, a jury will begin hearing testimony in the lawsuit filed against former New York Stock Exchange head Richard Grasso by Eliot Spitzer, the New York attorney general. The suit contends that the $80.6 million in compensation and $119.8 million in retirement benefits awarded to Mr. Grasso from 1999 through 2002 was unreasonable and violated the state's laws governing nonprofits. Mr. Grasso contends that the pay was reasonable and justified by his many contributions to the Big Board, a nonprofit organization. Court filings made this week by experts on both sides provide a glimpse of what the jury will hear in the case. The experts submitted their opinions Monday on matters relating to compensation, accounting and corporate governance. Among those submitting opinions on behalf of the attorney general was W. BRUCE JOHNSON, an accounting professor at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. An entry in the WALL STREET JOURNAL'S "Law Blog" notes the New York Times article. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/04/business/04nyse.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Stock Options Probe Widens (Financial Times, Aug. 4)
The Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating about 80 companies in the stock options backdating scandal, but the probe could widen significantly. According to one published study conducted by ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa finance professor whose research in 2004 helped spur the current set of probes, more than 2,000 companies appear to have used backdated options to boost executives' income.
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/8dd61426-23ac-11db-ae89-0000779e2340.html

Decongestant May Not Work Like Original (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 4)
Researchers in Florida say the over-the-counter nasal decongestant that's replacing Sudafed on many drugstore shelves is ineffective. The researchers raised the issue in a pharmaceutical journal last month because they are concerned that people will buy a medication that doesn't work -- not realizing that a better drug is available a few feet away -- if they ask for it. Critics say that Sudafed PE and other oral phenylephrine decongestants have been put on the market because drug companies are worried about losing profits if their products disappear from store shelves. "They're trying to protect their market share," said DR. MILES WEINBERGER, director of pediatric allergy and pulmonary care at the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/health/bal-hs.decongestant04aug04,0,283123.story

Options Scandal Ensares More Companies (Bloomberg, Aug. 3)
U.S. companies, buffeted by five years of financial scandals, are under scrutiny by prosecutors again, this time over stock-option grants. To some investors, the latest investigation shows that corporate promises to root out executive wrongdoing failed. Federal investigations, which have ensnared more than 80 companies including UnitedHealth Group Inc. and Home Depot Inc., may involve dozens more, according to U.S. officials, securities lawyers and executive-pay specialists. A July 15 study by Professors Randall Heron of Indiana University and ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa, who were among the first to question backdating, concluded that more than 2,200 companies may have tinkered with option rewards between 1996 and 2005. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=aAvZNjSdQx78&refer=home

Students Warned About Social Networking Sites (USA TODAY, Aug. 3)
Incoming college students are hearing the usual warnings this summer about the dangers of everything from alcohol to credit card debt. But many also are getting lectured on a new topic -- the risks of Internet postings, particularly on popular social networking sites such as Facebook. The attention colleges are devoting to the topic is testimony both to the exploding popularity of online networking on campus, and to the time and energy administrators have spent dealing with the fallout when students post things that become more public than they intended. Northwestern temporarily suspended its women's soccer program last spring after hazing photos surfaced online, while athletes at Elon College, Catholic University, Wake Forest and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA also were disciplined or investigated. Non-athletes at numerous schools from North Carolina State to Northern Kentucky have been busted for alcohol violations based on digital photographs. Students at Penn State were punished for rushing the field at a football game. A University of Oklahoma freshman's joke in Facebook about assassinating President Bush prompted a visit from the Secret Service. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared Aug. 2 and 3 on the Web sites of NEW YORK TIMES, BUSINESSWEEK, FORBES, FOX NEWS, ABC NEWS, CBS NEWS, SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, NEWSDAY, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, WASHINGTON POST, SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, THE OLYMPIAN in Washington, WINONA (Minn.) DAILY NEWS, DALLAS MORNING NEWS, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, SALON, THE GUARDIAN (U.K.), BOSTON HERALD, BENNINGTON (Vt.) BANNER, the RECORD-SEARCHLIGHT in California, WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM, PIONEER PRESS in Minnesota, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, NORTH COUNTY TIMES in California ARIZONA DAILY STAR, ARIZONA REPUBLIC, NEWARK (N.J.) STAR LEDGER, DESERET NEWS in Utah, WINSTON-SALEM (N.C.) JOURNAL, WASHINGTON TIMES, BOSTON GLOBE and WXIA-TV in Georgia.
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/internetprivacy/2006-08-02-facebook-orientations_x.htm?POE=TECISVA

Lie Study Shows More Than 2,200 Companies Backdated (Bloomberg, Aug. 3)
U.S. companies, buffeted by five years of financial scandals, are under scrutiny by prosecutors again, this time over stock-option grants. To some investors, the latest investigation shows that corporate promises to root out executive wrongdoing failed. Federal investigations, which have ensnared more than 80 companies including UnitedHealth Group Inc. and Home Depot Inc., may involve dozens more, according to U.S. officials, securities lawyers and executive-pay specialists. The probe has turned into the country's biggest investigation of corporate malfeasance since the inquiry of improper mutual-fund trading three years ago led to $4.3 billion in penalties. A July 15 study by Professors Randall Heron of Indiana University and ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa, who were among the first to question backdating, concluded that more than 2,200 companies may have tinkered with option rewards between 1996 and 2005.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=a350iQ_RDa4A&refer=home

Gray: Poultry Workers Should Be Vaccinated (San Antonio Express-News, Aug. 3)
People who work in large poultry production facilities should be considered one of the priority groups for protection against bird flu, an expert in emerging infections told a scientific meeting in San Antonio on Wednesday. These poultry workers deal with live birds raised in crowded conditions where any exposure to bird flu would rapidly spread through the livestock and could potentially infect workers. Yet they are not considered a priority when it comes to preventing the spread of the virus, said Dr. GREGORY GRAY, director of the University of Iowa's Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases. "These people are at increased risk and they are not given any attention and surveillance," Gray said at the Diseases In Nature Transmissible to Man conference. "They are not on the short list to receive annual influenza vaccines and they are not on the list to receive pandemic vaccines (as they become available)."
http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/metro/stories/MYSA080306.03B.animal_diseases.1652c16.html

UI Wins Workplace Health Grant (Boston Globe, Aug. 3)
The University of Massachusetts at Lowell has been awarded a federal grant estimated at $5 million to create the Center for the Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace. The center, which aims to improve workplace safety and health, is a cooperative venture by UMass-Lowell and the University of Connecticut, with assistance from healthcare and insurance companies, state governments, and labor organizations. According to a press release by US Representative Martin Meehan, a Lowell Democrat, more than 40 institutions across the country applied for the grant. UMass-Lowell and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA were chosen to receive the funding.
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2006/08/03/university_to_create_workplace_health_center/

Westefeld Weather Phobia Study Cited (Memphis Commercial-Appeal, Aug. 3)
Fear of thunder and lightning is among the 200 most common phobias. Others include fear of spiders, snakes, blood, elevators, bridges and tunnels. How common is hard to quantify. People with storm-related phobia are often too embarrassed to seek treatment, only to have the problem emerge during treatment for panic or obsessive-compulsive disorders when asked about their other fears.  Zeus (yes, the god of thunder) Flores, a Chicago resident who created the Web site stormphobia.org in 1999, knows about avoidance behavior through his own storm-related fright. He also knows from the public postings on his site. Flores created his Web site in part because of his own thunder-phobia that he had suffered since childhood, but has since eased. When Flores read a 1996 study about "severe weather phobia" by Dr. JOHN WESTEFELD of the University of Iowa, published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology, "a light bulb went off. ... It helped me to realize OK, I'm not the only one."
http://www.commercialappeal.com/mca/lifestyle/article/0,1426,MCA_521_4888922,00.html

UI Shares In NASA Grant (Newark Star Ledger, Aug. 2)
Four university teams, including one based at the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark, will share $100 million to provide experiments and supporting hardware for a future NASA mission to study the effects of near-Earth space radiation, the agency announced yesterday. As part of the program, researchers at NJIT will study how space weather creates what is called the "storm time ring current" around Earth and determine how that phenomenon supplies and supports the creation of radiation particles. Scientists at Boston University in Massachusetts will measure space radiation particles near Earth to determine the physical processes that produce them. Investigators at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Iowa, will study the origin of plasma waves that energize space particles. Also, University of Minnesota scientists in Minneapolis will focus on electric fields in space that energize radiation particles and modify the structure of the magnetic field closest to Earth, known as the inner magnetosphere.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-8/1154498130138030.xml&coll=1

Columnist Cites UI (Kiplinger's Personal Finance, Aug. 2)
A columnist who advocates that college students should help pay their own college expenses tells the story of a young woman named Ashley who had set her sights on attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She received enough financial aid to cover tuition and fees, but came up short on room and board. Rather than have Ashley go into debt, her mother, a single parent, recommended that she attend a community college. Ashley did, with the intention of working and saving enough to transfer. But she was still devastated when her friends headed off to UI.
http://www.kiplinger.com/personalfinance/columns/drt/archive/2006/dt060802.html

UI Doctor Questions Book's Premise (St. Louis Post Dispatch, Aug. 2)
They are Mother Nature's performance-enhancing "drugs" for women. How these hormones affect women before birth and through menopause is the subject of Dr. Louann Brizendine's "The Female Brain" (Morgan Road Books, 279 pages, $24.95), which went on sale Tuesday. A readable synthesis of brain research, Brizendine wants average women to know what scientists are learning about their gray matter. Newsweek calls the book controversial and quotes a doctor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who says that nurture plays such an important role in human behavior that focusing on biology is "next to meaningless."
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/books/story/F6F394F1CA0FF280862571BD0031940F?OpenDocument

UI Wins Workplace Health Grant (Lowell Sun, Aug. 2)
A $5 million grant to UMass Lowell from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health will go a long way in promoting a healthy work force. The money will be spread out over five years and will help create the Center for the Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace. Competition for the grant was stiff, with as many as 60 applicants from across the country applying. Only UMass Lowell and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA were selected. The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.lowellsun.com/local/ci_4121421

Scientists Build On Flatte's Work (Electronic Engineering Times, Aug. 2)
Hole-rich semiconductors like gallium arsenide could enable future spintronic devices which store information on magnetic atoms inserted into their crystalline lattice. But the current technique of random doping of magnetic atoms makes adding spintronics capabilities a hit-or-miss process. Now researchers claim to have perfected a method of brewing exactly the right molecular arrangement. Using a scanning tunneling microscope to substitute magnetic (manganese) atoms for individual gallium atoms, Princeton University researchers were able to experiment with different crystalline lattice architectures to optimize spintronic capabilities. Employing a theoretical template hypothesized by University of Iowa professor MICHAEL FLATTE, the Princeton researchers confirmed the optimal lattice architecture for a new spintonic material: gallium manganese arsenide. Results of the spintronics research were published in the July 27 edition of Nature magazine.
http://www.eetasia.com/ART_8800428025_499486_a3817445200608.HTM

Colangelo AP Index Cited (Washington Post, Aug. 1)
A columnist writes about the criticism he has received for publishing a ranked list of public high schools, based on participation in college-level tests, which he first did in 1998. He notes that he is no longer the only person doing this kind of comparative high school assessment and cites NICHOLAS COLANGELO, director of the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development at the University of Iowa who has just published his second annual Iowa AP Index. Colangelo said he thought paying close attention to each school's AP data would be a good way to encourage Iowa schools to be more challenging.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/01/AR2006080100490.html

Pascarella Studies Engagement, The Underprepared (Inside Higher Ed, Aug. 1)
Two new studies suggest that not only does "engagement" work for minority and academically underprepared students, but such practices make a bigger difference for such students than for students in general. The studies come from two of the biggest and best-known names in the learning assessment world: George D. Kuh, Chancellor's Professor and director of the Center for Postsecondary Research at Indiana University, and ERNEST T. PASCARELLA, Mary Louise Petersen Chair in Higher Education and co-director of the Center for Research on Undergraduate Education at the University of Iowa. Both measured the effects of participating in certain kinds of educational activities - collaboration with other students, significant faculty-student contact, etc. - that are generally thought to "engage" students in the learning process.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/08/01/engage

Playwright Is UI MFA Candidate (Washington Post, Aug. 1)
A story about the Hatchery, a new play incubator project in Washington, D.C., points out that two of the plays performed were written by Sarah Sander, an MFA candidate in playwriting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/07/31/AR2006073101138_2.html

Grant To UI To Study Near-Earth Radiation (Space Daily, Aug. 1)
NASA said Monday it will award $100 million to four university teams to provide experiments and supporting hardware for a future NASA mission to study near-Earth space radiation. This type of radiation is hazardous to astronauts, orbiting satellites and aircraft flying high altitude polar routes. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, researchers will attempt to understand the origin of plasma waves that energize space particles to radiation levels. They also will measure the distortions to Earth's magnetic field that control the structure of the planet's radiation belts.
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/NASA_Selects_Teams_For_Space_Weather_Mission_And_Studies_999.html

UI Bird Flu Study Cited (Binghamton Press and Sun, Aug. 1)
A columnist writing about differences in bird flu strains cites a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study in which researchers went to a state-managed duck hunting area in October 2004 and enlisted hunters for the study. Blood from 39 hunters was tested for antibodies that would reveal prior infection to any of about a dozen types of bird-based influenza. Several hunters had antibodies to H1, H2 and H3 forms of bird flu, which have adapted to humans and are now routinely seen in people. But one hunter also tested positive for H11N9, which is not seen in humans. The hunter, 39, was a healthy man who had been hunting birds for 31 years and kills or handles hundreds of birds a year. In addition, H11N9 antibodies were seen in two of 68 Iowa Department of Natural Resources workers who were studied. The men, ages 52 and 53, have placed leg bands on ducks for years. The Press and Sun is based in New York.
http://www.pressconnects.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060801/COLUMNISTS16/608010332/1003/

Legendary Seattle Judge Is UI Law Grad (Seattle Times, Aug. 1)
Over the past 25 years, John Coughenour has become a legendary figure on the Seattle federal bench, in part because he is such a study in contrasts. He is renowned for his compassion when sentencing defendants and his ability to make connections that prompt cards and visits from those he sends to prison. He is a strict taskmaster who excoriates high-powered lawyers who disrespect the judicial process. He is a lover of Russian history who has read "War and Peace" eight times. He is a Harley-Davidson rider who sails, skis and enjoys the television crime drama "Law & Order." Coughenour has handled numerous high-profile trials and delivered scores of controversial verdicts as a Seattle federal judge since 1981. Last Thursday, when he turned 65, Coughenour quietly assumed "senior status." Coughenour is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2003166531_coughenour01m.html

Gill Study Finds Bird-Human Flu Transmission (National Geographic, July 31)
A duck hunter and two wildlife workers in Iowa have tested positive for a non-lethal form of avian flu, according to a team of U.S scientists. Their study is the first to suggest that bird flu can be transmitted to humans from wild birds. "We did not detect H5N1, the virus that has caused such a high death rate in the humans it has infected," said the study's lead author, JAMES GILL, who is a disease specialist at the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory in Iowa City. Instead the researchers found that the infection was caused by the H11 virus, a strain commonly found in ducks, geese, and shorebirds but not previously associated with human illness.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/07/060731-bird-flu.html

Kochanska Studies Delayed Gratification In Children (KGO TV, July 31)
Over-the-top teens like lazy A.J. Soprano and "Desperate Housewives" angst-ridden Andrew and impulsive Danielle reflect our culture's convictions that teens are angry, oversexed risk-takers. So 17-year-old Ali Nepola, who's at the top of her class, cross-country team captain, a competitive dancer, and popular and well behaved to boot, doesn't quite fit the stereotype. According to new research, Ali's self-control may be the key to her success. "She's got a lot of self-control and knows her limitations and knows her strengths and weaknesses," says Cathy Nepola, Ali's mom. GRAZYNA KOCHANSKA, a professor at the University of Iowa, has tracked Ali and more than 300 other kids for almost 20 years to gauge how their ability to delay gratification and exert self-control affects their lives. "Self-control is generally considered a very good thing," Kochanska says. "In our own research, this capacity has clearly been associated with positive aspects of social development." KGO is based in San Francisco.
http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=bizarre&id=4417428

Rowley Graduated From UI Law School (ECM Newspapers, July 31) The story profiles Coleen Rowley, who is running for the U.S. Congress in Minnesota's Second District. Rowley received her law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law. ECM newspapers is based in Coon Rapids, Minn.
http://www.hometownsource.com/capitol/2006/July/31coleenwhistle.html

DVD Tries To Make Lifelong Iowa Fans (Sports Illustrated On Campus, July 26)
The writer lists what she considers to be the "Top 10 most bizarre" examples of college memorabilia and merchandise, including in the No. 2 spot Team Baby Entertainment's DVD, which is designed to turn children into lifelong Hawkeye fans. The Baby Hawkeye DVD uses "officially licensed footage of Hawkeye sports, mascot, marching band and campus attractions to expose children to The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in an exciting, playful and educational manner," according to the company's Website.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/sioncampus/07/26/bizarro.merchandise/1.html

Wing Discusses Plight of Palestinian Women (Scoop, July 18)
ADRIEN WING
, a professor of law at the University of Iowa College of Law, discussed the plight of Palestinian women during the fighting in Lebanon, and during the civil strife between Hamas and Fatah, in a lecture at the University of Auckland. "Remote from the male geopolitics of the region, they are being shot at and intimidated while trying to take care of their families and keep people together. The psychological and emotional burden which women have to bear in these circumstances is often overlooked." Scoop is published in New Zealand.
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE0607/S00060.htm

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