The University of Iowa
University News Services
Archives Services Contact Us A-Z Search

UI in the News

April, 2006

See UI in the New Archive Index

Squire Comments On Feingold UI Visit (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, April 30)
A story about a recent visit to Iowa by possible presidential aspirant and U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.) says Feingold ducked the question of whether he will run for president while speaking at the University of Iowa. "I'll think about it later," he said. Among Iowa political observers, the most frequent comparison for Feingold is to 2004 contender Howard Dean. Feingold is tapping into the same anti-war sentiment, and is a hit among those who, in Feingold's words, "want us to stand up for something we believe in." But, after an initial surge, Dean finished third in the state's 2004 caucuses, a result -- some say -- of a campaign organization that was lacking in a state where that can be as important as the message. "The audience they're really trying to reach right now are the people they can entice to work for them on their campaign," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Organization is critical," he said. "It's heightened this time because it looks like there will be a large field of candidates."
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=419945

Poet Wright's UI Connection Noted (Lexington Herald-Leader, April 30)
It's amazing that a mere 37 pages can contain the soul and structure of more than one world, but Charles Wright's "The Wrong End of the Rainbow" published by Louisville's Sarabande Books, autopsies the core of our collective universe. Wright's Appalachian heritage (he was born in Tennessee and raised there and in North Carolina), his stints at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Rome, his work for the Army Intelligence Service and his career as a prominent professor and poet at prestigious universities in the United States and Italy prepared him to view the world up close as well as to discern the bigger picture. The paper is based in Kentucky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/entertainment/books/14448311.htm

UI Alumnus Celebrates Store Purchase (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, April 30)
Jeff Noddle, CEO of the Super Valu grocery company was ready to pounce when the opportunity to buy Albertson's highest performing stores presented itself.  Several weeks after the announcement that the competitor was putting itself up for sale, Noddle would pop champagne corks at a surprise celebration with some of his senior managers to toast their $12.4 billion deal. It landed most of Albertson's highest-performing grocery stores, doubled Supervalu's annual revenue to $44 billion and fundamentally changed the corporate profile of the 135-year-old Eden Prairie-based grocer and wholesaler. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1969.
http://www.startribune.com/535/story/400994.html

Weinstein Comments On Medical Liability Bill (Washington Times, April 29)
STUART WEINSTEIN, Ignacio V. Ponseti Chair and professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, wrote a commentary addressing the impact of a Senate vote on S.22, The Medical Care and Access Protection Act of 2006, which addresses the issue of fixing the medical liability system. "How that vote turns out will determine whether millions of Americans continue to have access to quality medical care, or if excessive litigation and meritless lawsuits force many of our most highly trained doctors to cut back on "high-risk," lifesaving procedures -- or even abandon the practice of medicine," he said in the commentary. http://www.washingtontimes.com/commentary/20060429-084940-5697r.htm

Drew Author Keene Attended UI (American Heritage, April 29)
Edward Stratemeyer, who died 12 days after the first book about his creation, super girl sleuth Nancy Drew, was published, was replaced by two separate women writers: Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, the new head of the Stratemeyer Syndicate, and Mildred Wirt Benson, the ghostwriter behind most of the early mysteries. Together, Adams and Benson were Carolyn Keene, the author listed in the Library of Congress as Nancy Drew's author. Their differing visions of Nancy would eventually be reflected in two versions of the series. Benson, a Midwesterner who was the first woman to get a master's of journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, worked as a reporter (primarily at the Toledo Blade) from graduation until till the day she died at the age of 96. http://www.americanheritage.com/people/articles/web/20060429-nancy-drew-mysteries-carolyn-keene-edward-stratemeyer-bobbsey-twins-tom-swift-agatha-christie-harriet-adams-mildred-wirt-benson-hardy-boys.shtml

Bowlsby Formally Introduced At Stanford (San Francisco Chronicle, April 29)
Stanford baseball coach Mark Marquess and women's basketball coach Tara VanDerveer don't really know new athletic director BOB BOWLSBY. But the best measure of their confidence that Stanford hired the right person to be their new boss is the reaction of people who are well acquainted with Bowlsby, who is leaving the University of Iowa to come to the Farm. "I talked to (Iowa women's basketball coach) LISA BLUDER, and let's put it this way, she's sad," VanDerveer said Friday. "I think that's a good sign." Bowlsby was formally introduced at Stanford on Friday morning, he and his wife, Candice, coming to town for a couple of days to begin laying the groundwork for a big transition. Bowlsby, who has lived and worked in Iowa for most of his life, said he anticipates a little culture shock, already accomplished by a quick look at the real estate section of the newspaper.
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/chronicle/archive/2006/04/29/SPGOIIHMHB1.DTL

Irish Comments On Article About Lawns (New York Times, April 29)
ERIN IRISH, a biology professor at the University of Iowa who has done research in plant developmental biology, writes in a letter to the editor regarding an April 24 article titled "A Greener Way to Cut the Grass Runs Afoul of a Powerful Lobby" that another way to reduce pollution from lawn mowers is to keep small lawns, which can be easily maintained with a reel mower. "Cutting my lawn with a reel mower takes under an hour, uses no fuel (other than my breakfast), gives off no pollution, and best of all, when a neighbor stops to chat, as soon as I stop pushing the mower, it is silent!" she writes.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/29/opinion/l29lawn.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Hovenkamp: U.S. Can't Impose Antitrust Laws On OPEC (Gulf Times, April 28)
The Justice Department investigation ordered by President George W. Bush into gasoline-price increases may not find market manipulation by oil companies. Price increases have also prompted Republican Senators Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania and Mike DeWine of Ohio to propose enforcing U.S. antitrust laws against Saudi Arabia and other members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Applying U.S. antitrust laws to OPEC would go against a longstanding legal doctrine that U.S. courts don't have authority to rule on the legality of foreign government actions, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at University of Iowa law school in Iowa City. It also might prove difficult to enforce. The proposal also raises a foreign-policy issue because oil is "a natural resource for these countries" and "the way they set price is by controlling output," Hovenkamp said. "We would be outraged by the notion that a foreign country would tell us how much coal or how much hardwood" the U.S. should produce. The publication is a daily newspaper in Qatar.
http://www.gulf-times.com/site/topics/article.asp?cu_no=2&item_no=83864&version=1&template_id=48&parent_id=28

Ex-UI Professor Speaks At Prayer Breakfast (Danbury News Times, April 28)
Brian Mawhinney, a knight, privy counselor to Queen Elizabeth II and former member of the British Parliament, was the keynote speaker Thursday at the fifth annual Western Connecticut Prayer Breakfast. In the speech, Mahwhinney related an experience as a professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://news.newstimeslive.com/story.php?id=83261&category=Local

Attorney Donated Kidney, Other Organs (Rocky Mountain News, April 28)
A young deputy public defender who died this week of an apparent accidental gunshot wound in Grand Junction, Colo., was "passionate about her life and compassionate in her beliefs," her mother said Thursday, as one of her daughter's kidneys was being transplanted to a family friend in Iowa. Nicole Richardson, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Oregon Knight School of Law, began work with the Colorado Public Defender's Office in Grand Junction last October. Transplant teams took a total of seven organs from Richardson, all compatible for donation. The newspaper is based in Denver, Colo. http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_4656317,00.html

Hovenkamp: U.S. Can't Impose Antitrust Laws On OPEC (Bloomberg, April 27)
The Justice Department investigation ordered by President George W. Bush into gasoline-price increases may not find market manipulation by oil companies. Price increases have also prompted Republican Senators Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania and Mike DeWine of Ohio to propose enforcing U.S. antitrust laws against Saudi Arabia and other members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Applying U.S. antitrust laws to OPEC would go against a longstanding legal doctrine that U.S. courts don't have authority to rule on the legality of foreign government actions, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at University of Iowa law school in Iowa City. It also might prove difficult to enforce. The proposal also raises a foreign-policy issue because oil is "a natural resource for these countries" and "the way they set price is by controlling output," Hovenkamp said. "We would be outraged by the notion that a foreign country would tell us how much coal or how much hardwood" the U.S. should produce.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=acCQmMvebuuI&refer=us

Author Dubus Recalls Father's UI Stint (Boston Globe, April 27)
The first Newburyport Literary Festival will honor Andre Dubus the elder with panel discussions and readings. Several members of his renowned Thursday night writers' group, which continues to meet, will talk about the experience. "It feels like a blessing to be able to get up there and do this thing," said his son, Andre Dubus III, a Newbury resident who will moderate the opening panel and join in all weekend. The writer with the most to feel this weekend will still be the younger Dubus. There are fond memories, such as this from the 1960s, when his father brought the family to the famed Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA: "Every day this guy Kurt would come down from his house on our street to sit down with the four of us kids and watch 'Batman' in the afternoon, chain-smoking. Fill the room with his smoke. He'd say, 'I like False Face, who do you like?' 'I like the Riddler.' He was just kinda Uncle Kurt. But he was Kurt Vonnegut."
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2006/04/27/preparing_a_feast_for_the_literary_soul/

Alumna Involved In Accident (Gary Post-Tribune, April 27)
Three bystanders rescued Purdue University North Central Spanish professor Silvia Lorente-Murphy Wednesday morning after her car veered off the roadway and into a pond. Born In Argentina, Lorente-Murphy began teaching at PNC in 1985. She earned her undergraduate degree in Argentina and her doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1982. The accident is still under investigation by the Indiana State Police.
http://www.post-trib.com/cgi-bin/pto-story/news/z1/04-27-06_z1_news_01.html

Skorton, Jones Coauthor Article On Science Funding (The Hill, April 26)
DAVID J. SKORTON, president of the University of Iowa and president-elect of Cornell University, and Clay Jones, CEO of Rockwell Collins Inc., are coauthors of an article titled "Funding for science research pays off in jobs, competitiveness." The pair urges Congress to "consider the impact of the nation's investment in science research upon job creation in the future." The Hill is based in Washington D.C. and includes news "for and about the U.S. Congress."
http://www.thehill.com/thehill/export/TheHill/Comment/OpEd/042606_technology.html

Bowlsby Career Highlighted (San Francisco Chronicle, April 26)
Three weeks ago, BOB BOWLSBY had no intention of leaving the University of Iowa and no desire to leave the state in which he was born, spent the majority of his life and raised his family. Now Bowlsby is bound for Stanford, hired Tuesday as the university's athletic director. Bowlsby, a 54-year-old native of Waterloo, Iowa, will begin work in July, overseeing the nation's largest and most successful collegiate athletic department. Bowlsby, a college wrestler and longtime proponent of the nonrevenue sports that do so well at Stanford, has also made his mark with the marquee sports. Bowlsby hired both Iowa basketball coach STEVE ALFORD, whose team won the Big Ten Tournament last March, and football coach KIRK FERENTZ, who has turned the Hawkeyes' program into a national power.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/04/26/SPGCRIFFVJ1.DTL

Bowlsby Planned Move To Stanford Noted (Inside Bay Area, April 26)
Stanford plucked its new athletic director out of the American heartland. BOB BOWLSBY, athletic director at the University of Iowa the past 14 years, was introduced Tuesday as the new athletic director at Stanford. Bowlsby, 54, will begin at Stanford in July.
http://insidebayarea.com/sports/ci_3752625

Stanford President Announces Bowlsby Pick (CBS-5, April 26)
Stanford University President John Hennessy announced Tuesday that University of Iowa Athletics Director BOB BOWLSBY has been selected as Stanford's new athletics director. Bowlsby succeeds Ted Leland who stepped down at the end of December after 14 years to become a university vice president at his alma mater the University of the Pacific. Hall of Fame football coach Bill Walsh has been acting as interim athletic director since Jan. 1. Bowlsby has been athletic director at Iowa for nearly 15 years and is currently overseeing a $90 million renovation of the university's football stadium. The station is based in San Francisco.
http://cbs5.com/localwire/localfsnews/bcn/2006/04/26/n/HeadlineNews/STANFORD-ATHLETICS/resources_bcn_html

Bowlsby Accepts Stanford Post (Charlotte Business Journal, April 26)
Stanford University selected a new athletic director Tuesday, tapping BOB BOWLSBY of the University of Iowa. Bowlsby succeeds Ted Leland, who left his post at the beginning of the year to become a vice president at the University of the Pacific in Stockton. During Leland's 14-year tenure, Stanford won 50 national team championships and improved both its fundraising and athletic facilities. Former Stanford football coach Bill Walsh has been athletic director on an interim basis. At Iowa, Bowlsby headed an athletic department with successful football and men's and women's basketball teams. Iowa has 24 varsity sports and a budget of $56 million. Stanford's athletic budget is about $60 million and the school has 34 sports. Stanford is building a new $90 million football stadium, scheduled to be completed in time for this year's season. Bowlsby has been at the University of Iowa for 14 years and he will begin work at Stanford in July. The paper is based in North Carolina. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS JOURNAL, MILWAUKEE BUSINESS JOURNAL, and other media outlets.
http://charlotte.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/stories/2006/04/24/daily24.html

UI Mask Conference Inspires Book (Southern Pines Pilot, April 26)
A United States Institute for Theatre Technology grant will cover expenses for a University of North Carolina at Greensboro professor as she travels to Africa this summer to interview mask makers. Deborah Bell, a costume design professor working on a book about mask making, found out she had won the $7,150 grant April 1 during USITT's annual conference in Louisville, Ky. Bell began working on her book four years ago after she attended an international mask making conference -- the first of its kind -- at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The conference drew people from all over the world and represented a crystallization of mask work, she said. She soon realized that while many books on masks had been published, no one had really probed the creative process and the challenges mask makers confront. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.thepilot.com/news/042606uncg.html

Juror Causes Furor By Googling Gunshot (Rochester Democrat, April 26)
Jurors who decided the fate of a murder defendant two months ago returned to court Tuesday to testify about whether they had been influenced by one juror's Internet research. Royal Carmichael, 27, was convicted of second-degree murder in the shooting death last July of Frederick Lewis Jr., 12, on Langham Street in northeast Rochester. Carmichael said he believed he was shooting at someone who was responsible for the robbery of a drug house he supplied. Frederick happened to be walking by on his way home. After the 12 jurors reached their unanimous verdict Feb. 16, Juror No. 4 encountered defense lawyer D. Scott Young outside court and mentioned that he had looked up gunshot wounds on the Internet prior to the deliberation. Pathologists gave differing opinions at the trial about how far the shooter was from Frederick. Juror No. 4, a physician, said he went online the evening before deliberations for a Google search on "gunshot wounds." He said he spent more than 15 minutes viewing about 10 photos from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that depicted wounds inflicted at close range or from afar. "I wouldn't call it research," he said. "I am a scientist. I have taken an oath. I wanted to do justice and understand what was being presented." The paper is based in New York.
http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060426/NEWS01/604260332/1002/NEWS

Ferentz: No Interest In Bowlsby Job (USA Today, April 25)
Bob Bowlsby's decision to resign Tuesday to become athletic director at Stanford University stunned his University of Iowa coaches, but not those who view the 54-year-old as a national leader in college athletics. "I was surprised for the obvious reasons," said Iowa football coach KIRK FERENTZ. "I thought that Bob would retire here." Bowlsby said he expects to complete contract renegotiations with several Iowa coaches. Among those in negotiations: men's basketball coach STEVE ALFORD, along with likely new deals for Ferentz and women's basketball coach LISA BLUDER. Michael Gartner, president of the board of regents, said Bowlsby's resignation likely will result in the appointment of an interim athletic director. One of Bowlsby's top achievements during his career was overseeing the controversial hiring of Ferentz as the football coach to replace legendary Hayden Fry. Many Iowa fans questioned the choice of Ferentz, but his program's record of five bowl appearances in six seasons -- including four in a row on New Year's Day or later -- have made him the school's most recognized athletic figure. "Change is inevitable," Ferentz said Tuesday. Ferentz said that he has no interest in becoming the next athletic director. "There are three jobs I have no interest in -- Governor, university president or athletic director. If I become interested in anyone of the three, everyone has permission to hit me with a ball bat." The story originally appeared in the DES MOINES REGISTER.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/2006-04-25-bowlsby_x.htm

Khowassah Discusses Mumps Outbreak (Canton Repository, April 25)
How is that so many people in the Midwest are coming down with mumps even though most Americans were immunized as children? MARY KHOWASSAH of the University of Iowa offers one possibility: She says a small percentage who received the vaccination didn't end up with immunity to mumps, so they're catching the virus now. There has been speculation that two Iowa airline passengers carried the virus on flights, but otherwise no other indication of how this particular outbreak started, Khowassah said. And to make it even more difficult to curb the spread, health officials can't find any particular hot spots.  "We have examined our cases to see if they were localized, such as (in) the residence halls," Khowassah said. "We haven't found anything convincing. They're just sporadic throughout campus." The Repository is based in Canton, OH.
http://www.cantonrep.com/index.php?ID=282440&Category=8

Weinstein Urges Liability Reform (San Francisco Business Journal, April 25)
The Senate is scheduled to take another stab at medical malpractice reform in May. Dr. STUART WEINSTEIN, chairman of Doctors for Medical Liability Reform, says high malpractice insurance premiums are forcing doctors in some specialties to stop performing high-risk procedures, such as delivering babies. Plus, most doctors order tests they otherwise wouldn't just to cover themselves in case something goes wrong, he says. The American Medical Association says the medical liability climate in 21 states is jeopardizing patient care. "I think it's a very sad state of affairs," says Weinstein, who also is a professor of orthopaedic surgery at the University of Iowa's medical school. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the CITY BUSINESS JOURNAL editions in Sacramento, Atlanta, Albany, Houston, St. Louis, Boston, Dallas, and numerous other cities.
http://sanfrancisco.bizjournals.com/extraedge/washingtonbureau/archive/2006/04/24/bureau2.html?market=sanfrancisco

UI Extends Outback Bowl Investigation (KELO-TV, April 25)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA says it needs more time in its investigation into allegations of infractions during the 2006 Outback Bowl. The review surrounds concerns that at least five football players received preferential treatment from a cell phone company employee, who later received free tickets to the bowl game. The investigation started in late March, and was expected to take about 30 days. It has now been extended until May 15th. KELO is based in Sioux Falls, SD.
http://www.keloland.com/Sports/NewsDetail4671.cfm?ID=0,47624

Feingold to Speak At UI (Chicago Tribune, April 25)
A story about the presidential aspirations of Wisconsin Senator Russ Feingold notes he will speak at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Friday and deliver a lecture about his plan to censure President Bush. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, CHIPPEWA HERALD, WXOW-TV, WKOW-TV, WQAD-TV, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, WISCONSIN POLITICS and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/wisconsin/chi-ap-wi-feingold-iowa,1,203934.story

UI Mumps Cases Cited (Inside HigherEd, April 25)
A mumps outbreak that started in Iowa and has been most evident at colleges is spreading outside the state to colleges throughout the Midwest and as far away as Pennsylvania. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has more than 50 students diagnosed with mumps and is offering vaccinations.
http://insidehighered.com/news/2006/04/24/mumps

Story Cites UI Study of Gatorade Effect on Teeth (WUSA-TV, April 24)
According to a recent report, cavities among American children are becoming an epidemic. More than 25 percent of pre-schoolers suffer from tooth decay. And here's the catch - what you think are some of the healthiest foods to feed your child may in fact be damaging their teeth permanently. A recent study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA shows Gatorade erodes teeth faster than Coke. When extracted teeth were soaked in each drink for 25 hours, the sports drink did more damage to the enamel and roots. WUSA is based in Washington, D.C.
http://wusatv9.com/health/health_article.aspx?storyid=48752

UI Administers Capote-Endowed Literary Prize (Decatur Daily, April 24)
A story about some rare family photos and a collection of Truman Capote's letters to his favorite aunt in Alabama going on permanent display in the state's literary capital, where the writer spent some of his boyhood, also mentions that in his will Capote created a literary trust to give a prize in honor of Newton Arvin for the best book of literary criticism and to give scholarships for creative writing, said Louise Schwartz of Los Angeles, associate trustee of the Truman Capote Literary Trust. The prize is administered by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP and totals $30,000 each year to the best book of literary criticism published in the last few years. The paper is based in Illinois.
http://www.decaturdaily.com/decaturdaily/diversions/060423/capote.shtml

UI Student Part Of School-Hopping Trend (New York Times, April 23)
About 60 percent of students graduating from college attend more than one institution, a number that has risen steadily over at least the last two decades. Meighan Ruby, a senior at Drake University, began taking classes at a community college in her hometown, Des Moines, while still in high school. In her sophomore year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, she decided to change her major from communications to finance, so she went back to the community college in summer months to make up the credits she would need for her degree. The community college made it easy: she could do much of the course work online and still keep her summer job at an arts festival. Then, in her senior year, she moved back to Des Moines for a cooperative education semester working with a commercial real estate company. She intended to return to Iowa City after five months but ended up loving her work and getting hired full time. So she transferred to Drake in Des Moines, taking some credits over the summer at the community college to make up for ones that she lost in the move.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/23/education/edlife/zernike.html?_r=1&oref=slogin&pagewanted=all

Freyer's eBay Experience Cited (Rocky Mountain News, April 23)
A story about some of the strange things people sell, and buy, on eBay mentions that throughout 2000, as a project for his master's degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, John Freyer cataloged and sold nearly everything that he owned, including his Star Wars sheets, some old false teeth and half-eaten food. In August 2001 he started visiting his former belongings at the homes of the new owners, and in 2002 he published a book about it all, "All My Life for Sale." The paper is based in Colorado.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/family/article/0,2792,DRMN_107_4645270,00.html

Burton Warns Against Reselling Safety Items (Wall Street Journal, April 22)
This spring, Americans will again set up garage sales and their close cousins, stoop sales, yard sales and tag sales. But in many parts of the country, what was once a casual affair -- empty the closets onto the lawn, let the kids sell lemonade -- has been replaced by the frenzy of a free-market economy. Garage-sale organizers should be careful about selling safety-related products, like used children's car seats. In almost all states, if a seller says an item is being sold "as is," they are likely to be free of any liability. But if they say an item is in good condition -- or if they don't disclose a defect -- they may be liable, says STEVEN BURTON, a contract-law professor at the University of Iowa.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114565902822532854.html

UI Vaccination Requirement Buffers Against Mumps (Lincoln Courier, April 22)
Requirements that college students receive vaccinations for mumps may be protecting Illinois from an outbreak on the scale of neighboring Iowa, which has reported 975 cases, Illinois health department director said Friday. Iowa Department of Public Health spokesman Kevin Teale said that state has required the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine for schoolchildren since 1991, but does not require it for college admission. However, the state's top three state colleges -- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and University of Northern Iowa -- do require it, and have had very few cases, Teale said. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the PEORIA (Ill.) JOURNAL STAR.
http://www.lincolncourier.com/story.asp?SID=1175&SEC=8

UI Alumna Profiled (San Marcos Daily Record, April 22)
A feature on Gwen K. Smith, a history buff who has served on dozens of historic boards and preservation commissions in Texas, says she once taught dance and physical education to elementary and high school students, but soon became more interested in older students. So, in 1941, she decided to pursue a higher degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, one of the best schools for physical education in the country. She obtained a fellowship in 1944 and finished her doctorate in 1946. The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.sanmarcosrecord.com/articles/2006/04/23/news/news4.txt

UI Student Recalls Getting Mumps (Newsweek, April 21)
An article on the recent outbreak of mumps across the Midwest begins with an anecdote about a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student Ashley Ramirez, who was visiting friends in Omaha when she developed a fever and noticed a small lump on her neck. By the next day the lump was "completely massive" and the University of Iowa student was a patient in the hospital herself, hopped up on pain meds and waiting on a diagnosis that baffled doctors couldn't give her. Still sick, she returned to the University of Iowa and took to bed; when friends came by, they teased her for trying to eke out a few words through her cheeks, now swollen like a chipmunk's. By the time her doctors finally called her days later with test results, hundreds of kids across the Midwest were suffering similar symptoms, and Ramirez knew she was one of the unlucky ones. "They told me, 'you have the mumps,'" she says, "and I was like, 'Yeah, thanks, I kind of figured that out.'"
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/12425647/site/newsweek/

Sindt Says Poor Habits May Lead To Fungus Infection (News Journal, April 21)
A story about contact lens wearers contracting the Fusarium keratitis fungus from tainted solution points out that The number of cases is tiny considering that 30 million Americans wear contact lenses, said Dr. CHRISTINE SINDT, spokeswoman for the American Optometric Association's Contact Lens and Cornea Section. Sindt is also director of the contact-lens service at the University of Iowa, which has treated four patients with fusarium infections since last June. She said the fungus usually gets in the eye only if there's a break in the defense mechanisms of the ocular surface. The fungus can kill corneal tissue, resulting in loss of vision. The tissue becomes so thin that a corneal transplant is needed to prevent further damage. "Poor hygiene and compliance habits lead to ocular distress and ocular infections," Sindt said, "so it's very important to wear these lenses as recommended." The News Journal is based in Delaware.
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060421/NEWS/604210346

Prisinzano Comments On Drug Effects (Columbus Dispatch, April 21)
A story says that Salvia divinorum is a cousin of a flowering sage common in gardens and packs a mighty punch when smoked, chewed or brewed into a tea. Its active ingredient, salvinorin-A, "is probably the most potent naturally occurring hallucinogen," said THOMAS E. PRISINZANO, a medical researcher at the University of Iowa. Parents in the state of Delaware blamed its use for their 17-year-old son's suicide earlier this year. Animal studies have linked it to depression, Prisinzano said.
http://www.columbusdispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/04/21/20060421-A1-06.html

Ciochon Says Artifacts Reveal Life Of Java Man (Science News, April 21)
About 1.7 million years ago, a leggy human ancestor, Homo erectus, began prowling the steamy swamps and uplands of Java. That much is known from the bones of more than 100 individuals dug up on the Indonesian island since 1891. But the culture of early "Java Man" has been a mystery: No artifacts older than 1 million years had been found--until now.  At the meeting, archaeologist Harry Widianto of the National Research Centre of Archaeology in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, wowed colleagues with slides showing stone tools found in sediments that he says were laid down 1.2 million years ago and could be as old as 1.6 million years. The find, at a famous hominid site called Sangiran in the Solo Basin of Central Java, "opens up a whole new window into the lifeways of Java Man," says paleoanthropologist RUSSELL L. CIOCHON of the University of Iowa.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/312/5772/361

Student Writes About Tornado (Student Operated Press, April 21)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
student Sarah Huffman writes about her experience in last week's tornado.
http://www.thesop.org/index.php?id=924

UI Study Shows Emotion Is Bad For Investors (Int'l Herald Tribune, April 21)
One of the enduring mysteries of the finance world is also one of the simplest. How do seemingly intelligent, well-educated people make so many bad decisions? New research confirms what many of us had suspected. Most managers find it virtually impossible to think straight. So do most investors. They keep letting their emotions, especially their pride, get in the way. Last year, a team from Stanford University, Carnegie Mellon University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA looked at the investment decisions made by people who were unable to feel emotions because of brain lesions but who were otherwise normal. It then compared the decisions with those of people who did feel emotions. The same story appeared on the Web site of the SHANGHAI DAILY,
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/04/19/bloomberg/bxinvest.php

UI Students, Staff Comment On Mumps (Haber Saglik, April 21)
In the largest mumps outbreak in the United States in more than 20 years, almost 1,000 people have contracted the disease in the Midwest, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta announced Wednesday. The epidemic began in Iowa, where the State Department of Public Health has reported 815 suspected or confirmed cases. It has spread to at least seven other states. CHASE HARDIN, a freshman at the University of Iowa had a stiff neck in early March, but did not think anything of it until "it looked like someone had stuck an orange in the side of my neck." "I had no clue that I could get that," said Mr. Hardin, who was vaccinated as a child. "I thought it was something of the past." CHRISTINE F. CASSA, a University of Iowa freshman, got the mumps a few weeks ago, along with four or five other students on her dormitory floor. She said she had heard of about a dozen cases in her 900-student dormitory, Burge Hall. "The dorms are so like close quarters," Ms. Cassa said. "You're around so many people, and you don't think about what you're touching and what you're drinking, and people share a lot of stuff." Since December, the university's student health service has confirmed 55 cases, said LISA JAMES, associate director of student health. Haber Saglik is based in Turkey.
http://www.habersaglik.com/default.asp?Act=Dt&CatId=4&NwId=68242

Andreasen Comments On Conflict Report (CorpWatch, April 21)
Every psychiatric expert involved in writing the standard diagnostic criteria for disorders such as depression and schizophrenia has had financial ties to drug companies that sell medications for those illnesses, a new analysis has found. At least one psychiatrist who worked on the current manual criticized the analysis. NANCY ANDREASEN of the University of Iowa, who headed the schizophrenia team, called the new analysis "very flawed" because it did not distinguish researchers who had ties to industry while serving on the panel from those who formed such ties afterward. Two out of five researchers on her team had had substantial ties to industry, she said. Andreasen said she would have to check her tax statements to know whether she received money from companies at the time she worked on the panel, but said, "What I do know is that I do almost nothing with drug companies ... My area of research is neuroimaging, not psychopharmacology." The same story appeared on the Web site of the KAISER NETWORK,
http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=13510

UI Students Lunch With Buffet (Washington Times, April 21)
Warren Buffett is known for shrewd financial deals, but the world's second-richest man also invests some of his time to help guide business students. Buffett's Berkshire-Hathaway Inc. made an average of $23.4 million a day in 2005, yet he plans to spend the better part of 20 days this year answering questions and offering advice based on decades of stunningly successful experience. It's time the Oracle of Omaha thoroughly enjoys. A group of about 35 University of Tennessee students recently spent four hours with Buffett between the question-and-answer session at his offices and lunch at Gorat's -- Buffett's favorite steak house in Omaha. Buffett also paid for lunch for the Tennessee students and for about 90 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who met with him at the same time.
http://washingtontimes.com/business/20060420-103152-6959r.htm

Alumnus Starts Consulting Firm For Winery (St. Helena Star, April 21)
For the Merlot producers still smarting from the movie "Sideways," there is now a consulting firm available to research to what extent, if any, the film may have affected wine sales. Wine Market Council president John Gillespie has created several new products to cast light on this issue, as well as others dealing with the wine market. He has started a consumer research company called Wine Opinions, which is an Internet-based research company and is devoted entirely to the wine industry. Its unique feature is that the company has assembled a panel of 1,800 wine consumers nationwide to participate in wine-focused surveys. "We know who they are, where, they live, what wines they drink, and what their gender is," he said in an interview with the Star. "These are high-end consumers, who have agreed to be part of our panel. We know what stores they shop in, even how much wine they have at home, and which price points they use. It's all very useful for us to have when we go out and administer surveys." He studied writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and went on to New York in 1975 to represent both the French wine association and the Bordeaux Wine Information Bureau. The Star is based in California.
http://www.sthelenastar.com/articles/2006/04/20/features/food_and_wine/iq_3396234.txt

Ciochon Research Points To Giant Hyenas As Predators (Chronicle, April 21)
A story about humans as prey says the idea that our direct ancestor Homo erectus practiced cannibalism was based on the gruesome disfigurement of faces and brain-stem areas in a cache of skulls a half-million years old, found in the Zhoukoudian cave, in China. "How else to explain these strange manipulations except as relics of Man the Hunter?," the author asks. "But studies over the past few years by Noel T. Boaz and RUSSELL L. CIOCHON - of the Ross University School of Medicine and the University of Iowa, respectively - show that extinct giant hyenas could have left the marks as they crunched their way into the brains of their hominid prey."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i33/33b01001.htm

UI Bequest Noted (Chronicle, April 21)
In its Gifts & Bequests column, the paper reports that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FOUNDATION received $2.5 million from Leo Hauser and Gary and Camille Seamans for an endowed professorship in molecular ophthalmology at the Carver Family Center for Macular Degeneration.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i33/33a06001.htm

Andreasen Comments On Conflict Report (Washington Post, April 20)
Every psychiatric expert involved in writing the standard diagnostic criteria for disorders such as depression and schizophrenia has had financial ties to drug companies that sell medications for those illnesses, a new analysis has found. At least one psychiatrist who worked on the current manual criticized the analysis. NANCY ANDREASEN of the University of Iowa, who headed the schizophrenia team, called the new analysis "very flawed" because it did not distinguish researchers who had ties to industry while serving on the panel from those who formed such ties afterward. Two out of five researchers on her team had had substantial ties to industry, she said. Andreasen said she would have to check her tax statements to know whether she received money from companies at the time she worked on the panel, but said, "What I do know is that I do almost nothing with drug companies ... My area of research is neuroimaging, not psychopharmacology." Versions of this article also appeared April 20 in the CANTON (Ohio) REPOSITORY, the MAIL TRIBUNE in Oregon, and the STANDARD-SPEAKER in Pennsylvania.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/19/AR2006041902560.html

UI Students, Staff Comment On Mumps (New York Times, April 20)
In the largest mumps outbreak in the United States in more than 20 years, almost 1,000 people have contracted the disease in the Midwest, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta announced Wednesday. The epidemic began in Iowa, where the State Department of Public Health has reported 815 suspected or confirmed cases. It has spread to at least seven other states. Chase Hardin, 19, a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, in Iowa City, had a stiff neck in early March, but did not think anything of it until "it looked like someone had stuck an orange in the side of my neck." Christine F. Cassa, a University of Iowa freshman, got the mumps a few weeks ago, along with four or five other students on her dormitory floor. She said she had heard of about a dozen cases in her 900-student dormitory, Burge Hall. "The dorms are so like close quarters," Ms. Cassa said. "You're around so many people, and you don't think about what you're touching and what you're drinking, and people share a lot of stuff." Since December, the university's student health service has confirmed 55 cases, said LISA JAMES, associate director of student health. Because of the wide range of symptoms, from achy limbs to swelling, officials did not initially consider mumps a possibility. "Now we're testing a lot of students, even with mild symptoms, especially if the students say they've been in contact with someone who's had it," Ms. James said. Students who have symptoms are told to isolate themselves for at least five days. This article also appeared April 20 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/20/health/20mumps.html

UI Prof Says Prestige Doesn't Equal Quality (Wall Street Journal, April 20)
More middle- and upper-income families are trying to assess the value of a degree from a top-tier school. Even as the price of attending an elite college approaches $50,000 a year, less-prestigious schools are offering more merit aid, making the cost differences starker. Nationwide, $7.3 billion in merit scholarships was awarded in 2003-2004, up from $1.2 billion in 1993-1994, according to the latest data available from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. And college officials say the trend is growing. The latest evidence suggests high-achieving students are likely to thrive wherever they go. "How College Affects Students," a 2005 book that reviewed three decades of related research, found that a university's prestige and selectivity had little consistent impact on teaching quality, student learning and other factors. "'Hard to get into' doesn't mean you are going to get a better education," says co-author ERNEST PASCARELLA, an education professor at the University of Iowa.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114549432060630668.html

UI Reports On Mumps (Wall Street Journal, April 20)
Federal health officials said that they have received more than 1,000 reports of mumps in eight Midwestern states and expect to see more case reports as local officials investigate probable cases in seven other states. The bulk of cases, or 815, have been seen in Iowa, with 350 additional reports in neighboring states. About 20 percent of the Iowa cases have been reported on college campuses, according to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114549220592630633.html

Doctor Was Head Of Transplants At UI (Arkansas Times, April 20)
Youmin Wu, the director of the Solid Organ Transplant Department at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, began his career as Pittsburgh's first Chinese surgeon and moved to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to head the Department of Transplant Surgery. He was on his way to racking up a 10-year record of surviving pediatric patients when UAMS came calling.
http://www.arktimes.com/Articles/ArticleViewer.aspx?ArticleID=5cd23b1a-3f17-4200-a8e4-8b02c3b65f10

Black Targets Time In Shopping Addiction (CNN Money.com, April 19)
Rev. Billy Talen looks and sounds a lot like the evangelists on Sunday morning television. But there's a big difference between Reverend Billy and Billy Graham. Reverend Billy is the founder of the Church of Stop Shopping. His congregants are the shopping-afflicted. Talen and others who try to help people control their spending are striking a nerve and find themselves in high demand. Why? America has a shopping problem. Tracking spending helps you figure out your weak spots. But DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, suggests tracking your time as well. "It's helpful for people to realize shopping has become too great an interest for them, that they're spending time on what is essentially a selfish behavior," he says.
http://money.cnn.com/2006/04/19/pf/debt/revbilly_moneymag_0605/

Iowa City Tornadoes Recalled (Portage Daily Register, April 19)
Wisconsin's worst tornado outbreak ever occurred last August when 27 struck on the same day. That gives renewed meaning to Wisconsin's Tornado and Severe Weather Awareness Week, which runs through Friday. Tornadoes tore across the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in Iowa City last week, ripping walls off a downtown church and killing a woman in a mobile home. The paper is based in Wisconsin.
http://www.wiscnews.com/pdr/news/index.php?ntid=80634&ntpid=2

UI Administers Capote-Endowed Literary Prize (Capital Times, April 18)
A story about some rare family photos and a collection of Truman Capote's letters to his favorite aunt in Alabama going on permanent display in the state's literary capital, where the writer spent some of his boyhood, also mentions that in his will Capote created a literary trust to give a prize in honor of Newton Arvin for the best book of literary criticism and to give scholarships for creative writing, said Louise Schwartz of Los Angeles, associate trustee of the Truman Capote Literary Trust. The prize is administered by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP and totals $30,000 each year to the best book of literary criticism published in the last few years. The paper is based in Madison, Wisc.
http://www.madison.com/tct/features/index.php?ntid=80518&ntpid=1

Polgreen Study: Immigrants Have Better Skills (Free Market News, April 18)
With Congressional immigration legislation pending, a new study published in the Southern Economic Journal found that changes in immigration policy that control the types of immigrants admitted to the U.S. - especially the Immigration Act of 1990 - have had a direct effect on the overall skill level of new immigrants. The study, by Nicole Simpson, assistant professor of economics at Colgate, and LINNEA POLGREEN, a lecturer at the University of Iowa's economics department, also found that legal immigrants to the United States today have overall higher skill levels than foreigners entering the country in previous decades. The same story appeared on the Web site of RELIABLE PLANT magazine.
http://www.freemarketnews.com/WorldNews.asp?nid=11352

UI Team Develops Personality Disorder Treatment (News-Medical.net, April 18)
A cognitive therapy treatment program developed at the University of Iowa is helping people all over the world deal with borderline personality disorder. The treatment program, called Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem-Solving (STEPPS), augments standard treatment -- medication and individualized psychotherapy -- in order to give people with borderline personality disorder techniques to raise self-awareness and self-management. Borderline personality disorder, characterized in the STEPPS program as emotional intensity disorder, is found all over the world at about the same prevalence rate, said NANCEE BLUM, social work specialist in psychiatry in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. Blum pioneered the treatment program along with colleagues DON ST. JOHN, UI physician assistant in psychiatry, and BRUCE PFOHL UI professor of psychiatry.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=17409

UI Students Lunch With Buffet (Louisville Courier Journal, April 18)
Warren Buffett is known for shrewd financial deals, but the world's second-richest man also invests some of his time to help guide business students. Buffett's Berkshire-Hathaway Inc. made an average of $23.4 million a day in 2005, yet he plans to spend the better part of 20 days this year answering questions and offering advice based on decades of stunningly successful experience. It's time the Oracle of Omaha thoroughly enjoys. A group of about 35 University of Tennessee students recently spent four hours with Buffett between the question-and-answer session at his offices and lunch at Gorat's -- Buffett's favorite steak house in Omaha. Buffett also paid for lunch for the Tennessee students and for about 90 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who met with him at the same time.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060418/BUSINESS/604180338/1003

UI Students Help With Storm Clean Up (New Kerala, April 18)
More than 300 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students have been helping victims of a tornado that struck Iowa City. The twister left a path more than 3 miles wide across the city. One of the buildings destroyed was the Alpha Chi Omega sorority. New Kerala is based in India. Versions of this story also appeared in the WASHINGTON TIMES and the DAILY INDIA.
http://www.newkerala.com/news2.php?action=fullnews&id=43858

UI Students Return To Class (KETV-TV, April 18)
Despite the extensive damage in the area, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students are heading back to class on Monday. KETV is based in Omaha.
http://www.ketv.com/news/8774029/detail.html

UI Administers Capote-endowed Literary Prize (The Advocate, April 18)
A story about some rare family photos and a collection of Truman Capote's letters to his favorite aunt in Alabama going on permanent display in the state's literary capital, where the writer spent some of his boyhood, also mentions that in his will Capote created a literary trust to give a prize in honor of Newton Arvin for the best book of literary criticism and to give scholarships for creative writing, said Louise Schwartz of Los Angeles, associate trustee of the Truman Capote Literary Trust. The prize is administered by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP and totals $30,000 each year to the best book of literary criticism published in the last few years.
http://www.advocate.com/news_detail_ektid29778.asp

UI Study Shows Fat Deteriorates Blood Vessels (RxPG News, April 18)
Fat cells around coronary arteries release chemicals that could trigger inflammation leading to deterioration of the vessels, says a new study that may provide the crucial link between obesity and heart disease.  The study by researchers at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that fat cells lying close to blood vessels in the heart are highly active, releasing many chemicals that influence biological processes within the body. Fat cells or adipocytes, were once thought to do nothing other than simply store excess fat tissue.
http://www.rxpgnews.com/research/metabolism/obesity/article_4059.shtml

UI Students, Other Volunteers Help With Cleanup (WQAD-TV, April 17)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
students are turning out in droves to help members of a sorority and others displaced by last week's tornadoes. Yesterday, volunteers hauled out what was still useable from the Alpha Chi Omega house and took it to the sorority's temporary home -- a vacant fraternity house. Damage from Thursday night's storm could reach more than $12 million. The twister ripped through St. Patrick's Catholic Church. Hundreds turned out yesterday for Easter Sunday Mass at Regina High School. Meanwhile, classes are to resume today at the University of Iowa. They were canceled on Friday. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4777196&nav=1sW7

Story On Capote Items Mentions Workshop (Times & Transcript, April 17)
A story about some rare family photos and a collection of Truman Capote's letters to his favorite aunt in Alabama going on permanent display in the state's literary capital, where the writer spent some of his boyhood, also mentions that in his will Capote created a literary trust to give a prize in honor of Newton Arvin for the best book of literary criticism and to give scholarships for creative writing, said Louise Schwartz of Los Angeles, associate trustee of the Truman Capote Literary Trust. The prize is administered by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP and totals $30,000 each year to the best book of literary criticism published in the last few years. The publication is based in Canada. A version of the story also ran in the MIAMI HERALD, ZEE NEWS in India, WYOMING NEWS and other media outlets.
http://www.canadaeast.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060417/TPLIFE13/604170349/-1/LIFE

UI Leaders Comment On Displaced Students (Appleton Post-Crescent, April 17)
The destruction left behind by Thursday's tornado in Iowa City, Iowa, hit close to Nancy Crowley's heart. Her younger daughter, Erin Crowley, is a junior at the University of Iowa, where loss estimates alone were $6 million, much of it roof damage from hail. Total losses in the city of more than 63,000 in east-central Iowa were expected to top $10 million. The overall losses were bad enough, but it's what happened to the sorority house Erin and another 42 students lived in that made Crowley anxious as she learned about the severity of the tornado. The tornado ripped away the east side of the Alpha Chi Omega sorority house's wall and part of the roof. The house has been condemned and will be bulldozed in two weeks, Erin Crowley said Sunday. University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON said between two dozen and four dozen UI students are believed to be homeless as a result of the tornado, although he expects that figure will rise as students return from Easter weekend travels. MICHAEL HOGAN, UI's provost, said displaced students basically have three options for finishing the semester. They could take classes as usual, take their current grade as their final grade for the semester or take an incomplete grade and finish the course later. The paper is based in Wisconsin.
http://www.postcrescent.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060417/APC0101/604170543/1003/APC01

UI Student Discusses Mumps Ordeal (Duluth News Tribune, April 17)
After getting diagnosed with mumps, Sara Breitbach spent five days in isolation, hiding behind a surgical mask that her doctor ordered her to wear. But the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sophomore could not hide when health officials tracking a strange new outbreak of the disease came to interrogate her. An epidemic of mumps is continuing to spread across the Midwest, afflicting even people who have been immunized against the once-common disease. More than 800 cases have been reported in nine states, including Minnesota -- the largest U.S. outbreak in two decades. And public health officials don't know why. The epicenter of the outbreak is in Iowa, where more than 600 confirmed or "probable" cases have turned up, with dozens of others suspected, said Kevin Teale, spokesman for the Iowa Department of Health. About 200 confirmed or suspected mumps cases also have been reported in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Nebraska, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Missouri, the CDC said Friday night. The paper is based in Minnesota.
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/news/local/14359955.htm

UI Team Studies Fat Around Coronary Arteries (PakTribune, April 17)
Fat cells around coronary arteries may play a key role in heart disease, research suggests. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found the cells release chemicals which can trigger inflammation. Under certain circumstances, they might also stimulate potentially damaging growth of new blood vessels. The findings, presented to the Experimental Biology 2006 conference in San Francisco, may help explain why obesity increases heart disease risk. This is the first time that researchers have paid careful attention to fat cells lying close to blood vessels in the heart. The publication is based in Pakistan.
http://www.paktribune.com/news/index.php?id=140864

Buffett Buys Lunch For UI Students (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, April 17)
Warren Buffett is known for shrewd financial deals, but the world's second-richest man also invests some of his time to help guide business students. Buffett's Berkshire-Hathaway Inc. made an average of $23.4 million a day in 2005, yet he plans to spend the better part of 20 days this year answering questions and offering advice based on decades of stunningly successful experience. It's time the Oracle of Omaha thoroughly enjoys. A group of about 35 University of Tennessee students recently spent four hours with Buffett between the question-and-answer session at his offices and lunch at Gorat's -- Buffett's favorite steak house in Omaha. Buffett also paid for lunch for the Tennessee students and for about 90 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who met with him at the same time. The paper is based in California. A version of the story also ran on the Websites of HOUSTON CHRONICLE, SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE in Florida and other media outlets.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/266877_buffett17.html

Columnist Writes About Surviving Tornado (Wall Street Journal, April 17)
Reporter Michael Judge writes a first-person account of last Thursday's tornadoes in Iowa City, as well as his family's encounters with other tornadoes throughout Iowa's history. "On Thursday, a tornado like the finger of God tore through our historic neighborhood here in Iowa City, downing trees and power lines, overturning cars and trucks, and tearing the roofs from 100-year-old houses," Judge writes. "Some 6,000 homes lost power as the twister rended this beautiful Midwestern college town, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114523059978227186.html

Damage To Iowa City Noted (Dallas Morning News, April 16)
City streets in Iowa City showed signs of returning to their normal rhythms Saturday in the aftermath of a tornado that carved a 31/2-mile path of destruction through the heart of downtown. Meanwhile, a round of tornadoes ripped through Nebraska, damaging farm buildings and downing power lines. The strong storms dumped heavy rain and hail and produced winds of up to 60 mph, but no injuries were reported. Two poultry complexes - each 476 feet by 78 feet - were leveled. In Iowa City, crews opened streets that had been blocked off since Thursday's tornado and restored power to the 6,500 customers cut off by downed utility lines. Customers returned downtown to shop and dine. "I can see already that the response has been extremely rapid and professional," said Lt. Gov. Sally Pederson, who toured damaged neighborhoods. City and county officials estimated the preliminary damage to public buildings at $4 million but said total costs could rise another $3 million. That doesn't include damage to buildings at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which federal officials estimated at $5.9 million. A version of the story also ran on the Website of WFAA-TV in Texas.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/nation/stories/041606dnnatsevereweather.3f782d27.html

Iowa City, Other Areas Affected By Tornadoes (Boston Globe, April 16)
Many Indiana residents were scrambling yesterday to board up broken windows and clean up other high wind and hail damage before another round of severe storms moved across the region. Strong storms passed through Indiana on Friday night, and there were unofficial reports of tornadoes northeast of Lafayette and near Crawfordsville, officials said. No injuries were reported. Illinois was hit by high winds and hail, and the Weather Service confirmed that a tornado touched down in Lincoln early Friday morning. A string of tornadoes in Iowa City on Thursday tore across the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus, ripped walls off a downtown church, and killed a woman in a mobile home outside town.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2006/04/16/severe_weather_continues_to_batter_the_midwest_after_tornadoes_strike/

Weir Comments On Consent For Tissue Use (New York Times, April 16)
A story about the ethics of using human tissue removed from patients during routing procedures and surgery for research without first getting the patient's consent says the law isn't clear on whether people have the right to own and control their tissues. When they're part of your body, they're clearly yours. Once they're excised, things get murky. If the issue of consent isn't addressed, ROBERT F. WEIR, founder of the biomedical ethics center at the University of Iowa and an author of "The Stored Tissue Issue," sees only one outcome: "Patients turn to law as a last resort when they don't see their participation being acknowledged." Weir favors fewer lawsuits and more disclosure. "Let's get these things on the table and come up with legal guidelines we can all live with," he says. "Because going to court is the only other option."
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/16/magazine/16tissue.html

UI Student Recalls Tornado (New York Times, April 15)
Courtney Rodemeyer, a sophomore at the UNIVERSITY of IOWA, ran to the basement of the Alpha Chi Omega house Thursday night after the first tornado warning sounded. She was under a table when the twister, part of a series that hit the state, struck. "It sounded like a freight train coming right at us," said Rodemeyer, 19, still shaken Friday morning outside the sorority house, with cuts from flying glass on her face and legs. "Then it just got so quiet, and the pressure started building up. My ears are still ringing." Rodemeyer was one of many residents assessing their losses on Friday after one or two tornadoes ripped through this university town, toppling power lines, splintering giant oaks and peeling the walls and roofs off dozens of buildings, including Rodemeyer's 100-year-old sorority house. Damage on the campus was limited to a parking garage for university vehicles and some downed trees. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/15/us/15iowa.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

UI Hosts Entrepreneur Camp For Kids (Business Week Online, April 14)
At the Jacobsen Entrepreneur Camp, campers work with University of Iowa faculty and student Entrepreneur Club members to identify their hobbies and skills, create an idea, make business cards, run their companies, and present their ideas at a Business Expo. "It's a mini version of what you would see in a venture-capital room," says DAWN BOWLUS, youth entrepreneurship coordinator. Some businesses even go on to operate after the session ends. Fifteen-year-old John De Angelis has started charging residents of his small Iowa town to sell their unwanted products on eBay and to convert their VHS tapes to DVDs. Both ventures started as weeklong summer projects for the Jacobson Entrepreneurship Camp and garnered $1,800 in profits over the past two years.
http://www.businessweek.com/print/smallbiz/content/apr2006/sb20060414_976260.htm

UI Suicide Case Cited In Wake Of MIT Settlement (Chronicle, April 14)
For years, the lawsuit arising from the death of Elizabeth H. Shin, a student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who died on the campus in 2000, has rattled college administrators throughout the nation. Ms. Shin's parents sued MIT for $27-million, alleging that the institution had failed to prevent her apparent suicide, and last summer a Massachusetts judge ruled that the plaintiffs could seek damages from individual staff members named in the lawsuit. Last week, MIT announced that it had settled the case with Ms. Shin's parents for an undisclosed sum. In a written statement, Ms. Shin's father said his daughter's death was "likely a tragic accident" -- not a suicide. In recent years colleges have faced an increasing number of costly lawsuits arising from student deaths. Although courts have generally not held colleges and their employees liable for student suicides, some recent rulings suggested that the legal responsibilities for colleges in student-suicide cases could expand, at least in some circumstances. In other prominent student-suicide cases, however, judges did not expand the legal liability of colleges: In 2000 the Iowa Supreme Court found that non-therapist officials at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA had no duty to notify parents that their son was in "impending danger" before he took his own life.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i32/32a04101.htm

Parrott Comments On Tornado Damage (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, April 14)
Tornadoes tore across the University of Iowa overnight, ripping roofs and walls off a sorority house, homes and apartments, crushing cars and killing a woman in a mobile home southeast of Iowa City. Sophomore Melissa Fortman huddled with her sorority sisters in a basement as the sirens sounded, then decided to run upstairs for her homework just as the tornado was about to hit. "There was debris flying everywhere inside the house," Fortman told ABC's "Good Morning America" early Friday. "I couldn't go downstairs because there was debris and glass flying up the stairs, so I just hid in a telephone booth we have in our house and I just hid there crying." In Iowa City, 21 people were reported treated at hospitals for storm-related injuries, none believed to be life-threatening. "We don't have any reports of serious injuries, which is short of miraculous considering what some of the damage appears to be," University of Iowa spokesman STEVE PARROTT said. The paper is based in Indiana. Versions of this Associated Press article also ran on the Websites of CBSNEWS.COM, ABCNEWS.COM, CNN.COM, THE BOSTON GLOBE, KVUE-TV in Texas, NEWSTALK ZB in New Zealand, USA TODAY, THE GUARDIAN in the United Kingdom and many other news outlets.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/14343630.htm

UI, Iowa City Begin Storm Cleanup (CBS 47, April 14)
With daylight, authorities are getting to see what damage was done by severe storms in eastern Iowa last night. The Iowa National Guard is on duty in heavily damaged areas. Iowa City was hit hard, including the campus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which has canceled classes today. Some five-thousand people still don't have power. Northern Illinois has also been hit hard. Heavy winds knocked down trees and power lines in communities along the Mississippi River. There were reports of funnel clouds, and the National Weather Service says at least one tornado was spotted on the ground south of the Quad Cities. The station is based in California. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of XETV FOX6 in San Diego, Calif.; ABC4 in Salt Lake City, KGET 17 in California, NEWSWATCH 50 in New York and many other media outlets.
http://www.cbs47.tv/news/national/story.aspx?content_id=F45ECD8A-2D37-45D8-B161-E183B4D73EC2

Parrott Reports That UI Classes Cancelled Friday (Daily India, April 14)
Eastern Iowa residents surveyed the aftermath Friday from deadly storms that ripped through the area spawning tornadoes, high winds and hail. CNN reported at least one death. Homes and cars were crushed, trees were toppled and power was cut to thousands. A tornado touched down at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, the National Weather Service said. Iowa City appeared to be the hardest hit. There also were tornadoes reported in Tama, Linn, Muscatine and Johnson counties and strong storms in northern Illinois. University of Iowa spokesman STEVE PARROTT said classes were canceled Friday while crews repair the campus and clear debris. Iowa City Police Sgt. Troy Kelsay said the pedestrian mall was closed and cordoned off with yellow tape after reports of looting and gas leaks. A small number of Iowa National Guard soldiers were activated to help maintain security downtown as a precaution, the Iowa City Press-Citizen reported. http://www.dailyindia.com/show/17377.php/Tornadoes-strike-eastern-Iowa

Heat Spawns Tornadoes Throughout Iowa (Chicago Tribune, April 14)
Thursday's unseasonable warmth helped fuel violent thunderstorms that produced at least 15 tornado reports along with hail as large as grapefruit in eastern Iowa and northwest Illinois through late evening. Heavy damage was reported in Iowa City including some on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0604140091apr14,1,3952577.column?coll=chi-news-hed

Buffett Buys Lunch For UI Students (Contra Costa Times, April 14)
Warren Buffett is known for shrewd financial deals, but the world's second-richest man also invests some of his time to help guide business students. Buffett's Berkshire-Hathaway Inc. made an average of $23.4 million a day in 2005, yet he plans to spend the better part of 20 days this year answering questions and offering advice based on decades of stunningly successful experience. It's time the Oracle of Omaha thoroughly enjoys. A group of about 35 University of Tennessee students recently spent four hours with Buffett between the question-and-answer session at his offices and lunch at Gorat's -- Buffett's favorite steak house in Omaha. Buffett also paid for lunch for the Tennessee students and for about 90 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who met with him at the same time. The paper is based in California. A version of the story also ran on the Websites of THE JOURNAL NEWS in New York, the BALTIMORE SUN and the SOUTH BEND TRIBUNE in Indiana.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/local/states/california/14341866.htm

War Crimes Prosecutor Speaks At UI (WQAD-TV, April 14)
A war crimes prosecutor lectured yesterday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he told an audience that people who commit genocide are getting the message that they will be punished. Stephen Rapp is chief of prosecutions for the United Nations' International War Crimes Tribunal of Rwanda. He says he is hopeful that the prosecution and conviction of Rwandans accused of genocide-related crimes will prevent similar crimes. Rapp, a former federal prosecutor in Iowa, has spent the last four years prosecuting suspects in the 1994 genocide that left an estimated 800 thousand Rwandans dead. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4769647&nav=1sW7

Umbach Studied Gender Gap in Faculty Pay (Inside Higher Ed, April 13)
Why do female professors earn less than male professors? Some charge that gender bias is at play, while others insist that once factors such as experience are accounted for, the gaps aren't consequential. There may be truth to both views, according to research findings presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association by PAUL D. UMBACH, an assistant professor of higher education at the University of Iowa. Umbach used a series of databases to calculate the gender gap in pay over all, and then to account for all kinds of factors other than gender bias that may contribute to the salary gap. In the end, he found that looking at those factors decreases the size of the gap, but that it remains meaningful.
http://insidehighered.com/news/2006/04/13/gender

Atkins Comments On Heart Ailments (WYMT-TV, April 13)
Children who suffer from frequent infections -- including something as seemingly benign as the common cold -- may also be sustaining damage to their hearts, a new study suggests. Researchers found elevated levels of a protein in infection-prone children that, when seen in adults at the same level, indicates heart injury. But other experts point out that the study authors did not measure actual damage to the heart muscle, only blood levels of a protein called cardiac troponin I that, in adults, indicates injury. "I don't think that we fully understand troponin levels in children," said Dr. DIANNE ATKINS, a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association and professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa. "We often do get children in intensive-care units with high levels, and we never really understand what they mean or what we should do." The television station is based in Kentucky.
http://www.wkyt.com/Global/story.asp?S=4767000&nav=6uyu

Estrogen/Progestin Use Questioned (KARE-TV, April 13)
A growing body of evidence shows that progestin, when combined with estrogen in postmenopausal women, has its own set of problems, leading some doctors to question the dogma of combination hormone therapy. A study published last year found that after two years there was no difference in the uterine lining between women wearing an ultra-low-dose estrogen patch and those wearing a placebo patch. While such a low dose helps prevent osteoporosis, it's too small to relieve menopause symptoms, says lead author SUSAN JOHNSON, a University of Iowa OB/GYN. The television station is based in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.
http://www.kare11.com/news/health/health_article.aspx?storyid=123025

UI Students Comment On Mumps (Washington Post, April 13)
Local, state and federal health experts are urgently trying to contain a large mumps outbreak raging across Iowa that has now spread to at least eight other Midwestern states. As health officials work to break the chain of transmission of the viral infection, disease detectives are trying to puzzle out what is causing it. Cases appear concentrated among young, otherwise healthy adults. About a dozen patients in Iowa have been hospitalized so far, including one who was treated for encephalitis, but all have recovered, officials said. Much of the effort has been focused at colleges, where many of the cases are occurring. Sara Breitbach was stunned when a doctor told her to leave her sorority, go home and hide behind a surgical mask whenever she went near her parents. "I couldn't believe it," said the 20-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sophomore, who spent a week in isolation before the infection passed. "Nobody ever talks about the mumps. It was very weird." "I've never been so miserable in my life," said Christopher J. O'Brion, 22, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA senior who holed up in his apartment for two weeks after his chin swelled up. "I couldn't eat. I couldn't sleep. It was just miserable." A version of this article also appeared April 13 on the website of the LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/12/AR2006041201458.html

UI Study Participation Noted (Kansas City InfoZine, April 13)
By performing two surgical procedures during the same operation, researchers in a National Institutes of Health (NIH) network reduced by half the incidence of urinary incontinence in women with a condition known as pelvic organ prolapse. These findings, reported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Pelvic Floor Disorders Research Network, appear in the April 13 issue of the "New England Journal of Medicine". In addition to the NICHD, other member institutions of the Pelvic Floor Disorders Research Network that participated in this study were the Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Illinois; the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas; the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City; the University of Alabama at Birmingham; the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; the University of Pittsburgh; and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
http://www.infozine.com/news/stories/op/storiesView/sid/14246/

Playwright Is UI Alumna (San Diego Union-Tribune, April 13)
A story about "Gibson Girl," a play by Kirsten Greenidge, notes that the playwright attended Wesleyan University and earned her MFA at the Playwrights Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she was a Barry Kemp Fellow.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/features/20060413-9999-lz1w13gibson.html

Hines Questions Rankings (The State Journal, April 13)
The nation's only high-profile ranking system for law schools has downgraded the West Virginia University College of Law, but the new score may not be an accurate reflection of the school's quality. The U.S. News and World Report rankings may get a lot of attention, but not everyone is convinced they should be taken as gospel truth about a school's quality. In the November 2005 issue of the Association of American Law Schools newsletter, N. WILLIAM HINES, dean emeritus of the University of Iowa College of Law, also took issue with the U.S. News rankings. In "The Ten Major Changes in Legal Education Over the Past 25 Years," Hines said No. 10 was the effect of the U.S. News rankings. "Add up all the time, money, energy and angst wasted by leaders in legal education that are directly attributable to the U.S. News ranking, and I think it is hard to dispute their place on a Top Ten list, troubling though that recognition might be." The newspaper is based in West Virginia. Versions of this article also appeared on the websites of West Virginia television news stations WOWK, WBOY, WVNS, and WTRF.
http://www.statejournal.com/story.cfm?func=viewstory&storyid=10116&catid=166

UI Hygienic Lab Explores Mumps (CNN.com, April 12)
A story about Iowa's mumps outbreak includes a photo of Sandy Jirsa looking at mumps samples at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY.
http://edition.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/conditions/04/12/mumps.outbreak.ap/

Johnson Comments On Hormone Therapy (USA Today, April 12)
Doctors have known since the 1970s that taking estrogen greatly increases postmenopausal women's risk of endometrial cancer. To counteract the effect on the uterine lining, doctors began prescribing a second hormone, progestin. Only women who have had a hysterectomy take only estrogen. But a growing body of evidence shows that progestin, when combined with estrogen in postmenopausal women, has its own set of problems, leading some doctors to question the dogma of combination hormone therapy. A study published last year found that after two years there was no difference in the uterine lining between women wearing an ultra-low-dose estrogen patch and those wearing a placebo patch. While such a low dose helps prevent osteoporosis, it's too small to relieve menopause symptoms, says lead author SUSAN JOHNSON, a University of Iowa OB/GYN.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2006-04-12-estrogen-debate_x.htm

UI Student Considers Experimental Therapy (South Bend Tribune, April 12)
Dr. Steven Hinderer, medical director of the Center for Spinal Cord Injury of the Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan, in Detroit, has developed an intense program of rehabilitation that goes far beyond the normal scope, both in the exertion it requires of patients and in its basic goals. He is also working closely with a promising but unproved adult stem cell implant performed only at a hospital in Lisbon, Portugal. The highly invasive surgery cannot be performed in the United States, not because of the federal ban on stem cell research funding, but because the Food and Drug Administration has not yet approved its safety. Joey McTigue, 22, a former Marian High School soccer player and now a junior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was scheduled for the surgery in June, but has decided not to have it this summer so he can graduate with his current classmates.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060412/Lives08/604120520/-1/LIVES/CAT=Lives08

McCain Campaign Staff Includes Two UI Alumni (Chicago Tribune, April 12)
On the eve of his first campaign visit to Iowa, Sen. John McCain has reeled in one of the state's best-known Republicans to join his 2008 team. Chuck Larson, the former chairman of the Republican Party of Iowa and a state senator from Cedar Rapids, has jumped aboard the McCain bandwagon. He will be at his side Thursday as the Arizona Republican travels to four Iowa cities, launching his effort to win over GOP activists in a state that kicks off the road to the White House. Last month, McCain hired a new top political strategist: Iowa native Terry Nelson, the political director for the Bush campaign in 2004. In the small world department, Nelson and Larson were college roommates at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://newsblogs.chicagotribune.com/news_theswamp/2006/04/team_mccain_1_b.html

Sindt Comments On Contact Lens Solution Problems (Smartmoney.com, April 11)
Investors could no longer turn a blind eye to mounting evidence that a popular Bausch & Lomb contact-lens solution might be the cause of potentially serious fungal infections in some users. Shares of the Rochester, N.Y., company dropped 14.6 percent Tuesday, a day after Bausch & Lomb voluntarily agreed to stop U.S. shipments of its ReNu with MoistureLoc product. At least five analysts downgraded the stock. The Food and Drug Administration announced a review of 109 cases of suspected fungal keratitis that could be linked to the solution. Fungal keratitis affects the cornea and can cause a serious loss of vision or even blindness if left untreated, says CHRISTINE SINDT, an optometrist at the University of Iowa Hospital and a member of the American Optometric Association's Contact Lens & Cornea Section Council. "Fungal keratitis is extremely rare," Sindt says, noting most keratitis, or infection cases, are caused by bacteria. Contact-lens wearers who're experiencing symptoms such as serious eye pain, sensitivity to light, persistent tearing and persistent red eyes should contact an optometrist, she says. Discerning fungal keratitis from bacterial keratitis, which is easily treated with antibiotics, can take up to two weeks, Sindt says.
http://www.smartmoney.com/onedaywonder/index.cfm?story=20060411

Death Of Former UI Foundation President New Noted (WQAD-TV, April 11)
MICHAEL NEW, the former president of the University of Iowa Foundation, died of cancer on Sunday in Iowa City. He was 63. New took over the foundation in 1998 before stepping down last September because of health reasons. Under his watch, the foundation raised more than $1 billion for the university. New was born in Chicago, and grew up in a farm near Nevada in central Iowa. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4755112

Stoll: Fat Cells May Play Role In Disease (News-medical.Net, April 11)
The fat cells that surround coronary arteries may play a central and previously unrecognized role in development of cardiovascular disease, according to a study by University of Iowa researchers. Dr. LYNN STOLL presented the research team's findings at Experimental Biology 2006 in San Francisco. Her presentation was part of the scientific program of the American Society of Investigative Pathology. Once thought of as mere storage depots for excess energy, fat cells ("adipocytes") are now known to be highly active metabolically, releasing potent pro-inflammatory proteins and hormones that regulate inflammation, blood pressure, insulin activity, and other biological processes. Where fat cells are located has a major influence on their impact, as seen in the fact that visceral fat surrounding the internal organs ("apple" body shape) is far more highly correlated with development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease than subcutaneous fat in the thighs and buttocks (pear" body shape).
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=17242

Op-ed Writer Cites UI Wal-Mart Study (Asheville Citizen Times, April 11)
An opinion writer critical of Wal-Mart cites a study by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers that shows that by 1995, stores Iowa communities lost between 16 and 46 percent of their sales after Wal-Mart arrived between 1983 and 1993, causing many of them to collapse. A year after the company came to Independence, Iowa, a dozen local businesses had closed their doors.
http://www.citizen-times.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060411/OPINION03/60410033/1123

Covington Comments On Candidates' Iowa Visits (CQPolitics.com, April 10)
None of the prospective candidates in the 2008 presidential race has officially begun campaigning. And while they are undoubtedly trying to raise their own visibility, many of them are tying their visits to appearances on behalf of others running for local offices. "I think we had John Kerry in town campaigning for a city council member in Cedar Rapids," said CARY COVINGTON, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Last fall, I gave extra points to articles on presidential sightings. I was giving away a lot more points than I thought I would." Covington added, "People want a signature slogan next to their name and candidates want to be seen as a presidential candidate. Gingrich was here in the fall in part to promote a new book he'd written. He went to Iowa and New Hampshire as if they were the big book audiences." CQ Politics is an online edition of Congressional Quarterly.
http://www.cqpolitics.com/2006/04/unusual_08_means_a_busy_06_for.html

UI Tuition Cited In Story On Canada Rates (Edmonton Journal, April 10)
A story about Canada's college tuition rates says that Canadian students pay anywhere from one-fifth to one-tenth the tuition that American students pay in their state-subsidized universities. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the cost of tuition for a student living in the state is about $5,500. An out-of-state student is charged $16,000. At the University of Washington, the in-state tuition is $5,600 and for out-of-state students it is $18,000. The publication is based in Canada.
http://www.canada.com/edmontonjournal/news/opinion/story.html?id=7fb3929e-7847-4d9b-a706-4e6f1d9be811

Songwriter Attended University Of Iowa (Arkansas News, April 10)
A story about songwriter Ernie Oakleaf of Little Rock, Tenn., who will play in the Tucson Folk Festival's May 21 festival in Arizona, says that in the mid-1970s, Oakleaf and his wife moved to Iowa City so both could work on doctorate degrees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. There was The Mill, a restaurant, where folk-nicks like Greg Brown, now of National Public Radio's Prairie Home Companion fame, and Don Lange, who gave up the business for winemaking after cutting a couple of "albums," played.
http://www.arkansasnews.com/archive/2006/04/09/News/335478.html

UI Spring Football Game Canceled (WQAD-TV, April 10)
The University of Iowa has canceled its spring football game for the second consecutive year. Due to continuing renovation work on Kinnick Stadium, the Hawkeyes will again hold their final spring drills on the team's practice field. Only player families and special guests will be invited to the scrimmage this Saturday. Coach KIRK FERENTZ says the team regrets that fans have to be left out, but like last year he says the Hawkeyes will hold some preseason events this summer that fans can attend. The $88 million stadium renovation is scheduled to be completed in time for Iowa's first game on Sept. 2 against Division-One-Double-A Montana. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4747564&nav=1sW7

Bloom Quoted On Oxford Project (New York Times, April 9)
A story about photographer Peter Feldstein and the Oxford Project, an effort to document small-town Iowa life through the images and words of its people, says STEPHEN BLOOM, 54, an author and journalism professor at the nearby UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has conducted interviews with Mr. Feldstein's subjects, distilling their comments into short prose poems. He said his model for the text came from "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men," the 1941 photojournalistic account by James Agee and Walker Evans of three Depression-era Southern sharecropper families.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/09/us/09oxford.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Squire: Leak Revelation Further Hurts Bush (Hartford Courant, April 9)
Some pundits are calling President Bush leaker-in-chief and hypocrite, and while people may not fathom all the details about the Valerie Plame case, they understand barbs like those. And that means even more serious political trouble for a White House whose fortunes have been sliding downward for months. The disclosure "is another drip ... that hurts him," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa, another wound in a year when the White House has had what seems like persistent bad news. The paper is based in Connecticut.
http://www.courant.com/news/nationworld/hc-leaks0409.artapr09,0,6471072.story?coll=hc-headlines-nationworld

'Superman' Routh Attended UI (South Bend Tribune, April 9)
A story about Brandon Routh, the actor playing Superman in the next movie about the superhero, says Routh was raised in Iowa -- about 100 miles from where George Reeves, star of the 1950s television show "Adventures of Superman," grew up -- and did school plays but initially gave no serious thought to an acting career. Planning to become a writer, Routh spent a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with the idea of modeling and acting on the side to pay for college. Those side gigs, however, led Routh to New York City and later Hollywood, where he landed a recurring TV role in the soap opera "One Life to Live" and guest spots on such series as "Will & Grace" and "The Gilmore Girls." The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060409/Ent04/604090498/-1/ENT

Catlett Attended UI; Studied With Grant Wood (Newark Star-Ledger, April 8)
A story about printmaker and sculptor Elizabeth Catlett says the artist went on to graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she studied with Grant Wood. The paper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/entertainment/ledger/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/1144562265191240.xml&coll=1

McCarthy Comments On Missed Medications (Los Angeles Times, April 8)
A story about the growing number of children on medications, and the growing pressure on schools to administer these medications, says that despite strict guidelines, drugs dispensed in the school setting are accompanied by a high rate of errors. In one survey of about 600 school nurses, published in 2000 in the Journal of School Health, almost half reported that medication problems had occurred in their schools during the previous year. "One of the biggest errors in schools is missed doses," says ANN MARIE MCCARTHY, a professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Iowa who helped conduct the survey.
http://www.latimes.com/news/education/la-he-themd10apr10,1,5965036.column?coll=la-news-learning

Gable Says Retirement May Be On Hold (WQAD-TV, April 8)
Wrestling legend DAN GABLE is mulling over options for his future at the University of Iowa. The 57-year-old Gable has been working as an assistant to Athletics Director BOB BOWLSBY since he retired as wrestling coach after the 1997 season. He was considering reducing his duties, but Iowa's coaching change has opened another option. Gable could join the staff of new coach TOM BRANDS. If he does decide to return, Gable says he won't be doing much actual wrestling. Gable has been a mentor to many programs at Iowa, counseling teams and coaches. A return to wrestling would most likely be as a counselor off the mat, working on the mental part of the sport. Brands says he will find a way to utilize Gable's knowledge of wrestling. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4745313&nav=1sW7

Peters Comments On Economic Incentives (Dallas Morning News, April 7)
Bring economic development our way, many states and cities tell corporations, and we'll stuff your pockets with cash. But the case of Dallas-based Vought Aircraft Industries Inc. may demonstrate the perils of that approach. In 2004, the state of Texas gave Vought $35 million as an incentive to create 3,000 jobs. But the trends are headed in the wrong direction: The maker of aircraft components said this week it would lay off 600 people by this summer. Despite the typically poor return on investment, handing out taxpayer money for jobs makes for good politics, said ALAN PETERS, chair of the graduate program in urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa, who has studied incentive programs nationwide. "Every mayor and every governor in the nation wants to cut ribbons," he said. When companies threaten to take jobs out of state, employees and politicians have a common interest in keeping the jobs at home. "Those employees, no matter what side of the political divide they are on, are going to be pretty much in favor of flinging money around," Mr. Peters said. "Firms that say, 'To retain jobs, you've got to give us money' are probably more effective than firms that say, 'If you want us to come to your state, you have to give us money.' "
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/bus/stories/DN-vought_07bus.ART.State.Edition2.f2cda94.html

UI's Graduate Debt Load Cited (Chronicle, April 7)
A story about Grinnell College, whose $1.4-billion endowment makes it the wealthiest liberal-arts college in the country, says that financially needy students who must borrow to pay for Grinnell still graduate carrying less debt, on average, than do graduates of Iowa's public colleges. (The average for Grinnell students is about $16,000; the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA about $17,000; and Iowa State University about $27,000.)
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i31/31a01401.htm

Kochanska Guilt Research Cited (Wall Street Journal, April 6)
People have always had reasons to feel guilty, but these days, the guilt-inducing machinery is accosting us at every turn. Marketers, advocacy groups and the media give us countless reasons to feel guilty. Why are you bottle-feeding your baby instead of breast-feeding? Why do you drive a gas-guzzling SUV? Why is your dog overweight? The guilt police target working moms, inattentive dads, slacker teens and couch-potato children. Most children first experience guilt between ages two and three, according to research by GRAZYNA KOCHANSKA, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa. In her studies, she led toddlers to believe they damaged valuable items. She found that kids who show discomfort when they think they've done something wrong are more likely to refrain from transgressions as they get older.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114428565343618406.html

Jones Faults Voting Machines (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 6)
Allegheny County has scrapped a deal to buy electronic push-button voting machines and will instead buy 4,700 touch-screen units from a different supplier. County officials reopened negotiations with Election Systems & Software, a Nebraska firm, for its iVotronic, a machine that resembles a bank ATM and has received both state and federal approval. One of the company's most high-profile clients is Miami-Dade County. It first used the iVotronic in 2002. During a primary election that year, poll workers needed extra time to start the machines, delaying the opening of voting sites. Two years later, the county brought in DOUGLAS JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, to check technical problems. Jones found several program errors that interfered with the machine's electronic auditing capability. He said ES&S later addressed the issue, but the incident exposed limitations with state and federal certification testing for electronic voting technology. "The effect of that error was to throw the entire record of the election into question," he said. "That bug should have been detected during rigorous testing."
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06096/679896-85.stm

Shields: Early Intervention Is Key In Spinal Cord Injuries (UPI, April 6)
University of Iowa scientists say early intervention and electrical stimulation can reduce osteoporosis and atrophy caused by spinal cord injuries. Researcher RICHARD SHIELDS, a professor of physical therapy and rehabilitation, and colleagues say electrical stimulation causes muscle contraction and exerts mechanical loading on targeted bone, thereby significantly reducing severe osteoporosis and muscle atrophy caused by spinal cord injury. Versions of this United Press International article also appeared on NEWKERALA.com and DAILYINDIA.com (India) and eMAXHEALTH.com and the POST-CHRONICLE (U.S.).
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20060405-062031-3742r

Flatté Touts New Semiconductor Chip (Ferret.com, April 6)
The U.S. Department of Defense is funding a multi-university research initiative (MURI) to develop a new type of semiconductor chip that can independently process electronic, magnetic and optical information. Professor MICHAEL FLATTÉ from the University of Iowa said the multifunctional chip will not only be able to independently process, but also convert information from and to electronic, magnetic and optical forms. "Such a chip could revolutionize the computing, storage and communications capability of small portable devices such as cell phones," he said. Ferret.com is a news website based in Australia.
http://www.ferret.com.au/articles/b1/0c03e9b1.asp

Chen Is UI Visiting Scholar (CRI.com, April 6)
Chen Danyan, always one of China's most popular writers, says her recent focus on Shanghai is rooted in the seductive richness of the city's past and present. "It is a place worth digging," says Chen, 48, currently a visiting scholar in the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. China Radio International (CRI) is the only overseas broadcaster in the People's Republic of China and is owned and operated by the state.
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/1521/2006/04/06/60@73177.htm

Alumnus To Lead Local Chamber (The Courier-Journal, April 6)
Keith Chandler has been appointed executive director of the newly formed Carroll County Chamber of Commerce. Chandler, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, recently accepted the job after previously serving as executive director of the Tipton Boys and Girls Club and executive director of the Peru/Miami County Chamber of Commerce. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.jconline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060406/BUSINESS/604060317

Spine Injury Treatment Noted (United Press International, April 6)
Researchers said Thursday long-term electrical stimulation given early gives spine-injured patients hope for a cure down the road. The team at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA said that early intervention and electrical stimulation -- which causes muscle contraction -- reduces both severe osteoporosis and muscle atrophy experienced by patients with spinal-cord injury.
http://www.upi.com/HealthBusiness/view.php?StoryID=20060406-124900-4605r

Children's Guilt Research Cited (Pittsburg Post-Gazette, April 6)
Most children first experience guilt between ages two and three, according to research by GRAZYNA KOCHANSKA, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa. In her studies, she led toddlers to believe they damaged valuable items. She found that kids who show discomfort when they think they've done something wrong are more likely to refrain from transgressions as they get older. The article originally appeared in the WALL STREET JOURNAL.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06096/679988-51.stm

Aslan To Speak At Center (Payvand Iran News, April 6)
Author Reza Aslan will be among the speakers at "Maktub: New Writing From/To the Mideast" April 9 at the Levantine Cultural Center in West Hollywood, Calif. Aslan has a Master of Fine Arts in Fiction from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.payvand.com/news/06/apr/1046.html

Mumps Cases Expected To Rise In Nebraska (Omaha World Herald, April 5)
As the number of suspected mumps cases soared to 300 in Iowa, one health official predicted that Nebraska might see similar waves of illness in the coming months. "My belief is we will very closely reflect what is going on in Iowa," the Nebraska state epidemiologist, Dr. Tom Safranek, said Wednesday. "We're lagging behind them by a couple months. My guess is we're going to catch up pretty fast." In Iowa, the counties with the most cases were Dubuque (home of the University of Dubuque and Clarke College in addition to Loras), Johnson (home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA), Black Hawk (home of the University of Northern Iowa) and Linn (home of Cedar Rapids, the state's second-largest city). The newspaper is based in Nebraska.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=1ba173e8f99ab7e11ca0d6c982f2c452&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVb&_md5=253d1d347629c97fd74e8a1324c71d51

Barceló Named To Minnesota Post (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, April 5)
The University of Minnesota has named its first vice president for access, equity and multicultural affairs. Nancy (Rusty) Barceló, a former university official who is now vice president for minority affairs and diversity at the University of Washington, will take her new job May 15, pending approval by the Board of Regents. A California native, she has a doctorate in higher education administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.startribune.com/1592/story/354068.html

UI, Other Schools Teaching Pornography Courses (WNYMedia Network, April 5)
A small but growing number of scholars are probing the aesthetic, societal and philosophical properties of pornography in academic departments ranging from literature to film, law to technology, anthropology to women's studies. Those specialists argue that graphic sexual imagery has become ubiquitous in society, so it's almost irresponsible not to teach young people how to deal with it. "I was amazed by how much the students knew about pornography but how little they knew how to think about it," says Jay Clarkson, a graduate student in communications who introduced the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Pornography in Popular Culture class last fall. But although Clarkson and his peers may agree that porn studies have a place in the curriculum, they are divided over how far professors should go in teaching them. This article was originally published in TIME. WNYMedia Network is based in New York. http://www.wnymedia.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1209&Itemid=35

Alumna Named Carnegie Mellon Dean (Pittsburgh Business Times, April 4)
Jennifer Church, who has served as interim dean of student affairs for Carnegie Mellon University since June 2005, has been named to fill the position permanently. Church officially succeeds Michael Murphy, who was promoted to associate vice president of the university last summer. Prior to coming to CMU in 1995, Church was director of housing and student activities at Yakima Valley Community College in Yakima, Wash., and an admission counselor and sorority house director at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Church, a graduate of Arizona State with a master's in higher education from Iowa, called the appointment "an honor and a privilege."
http://pittsburgh.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/stories/2006/04/03/daily20.html

Alumni Fly Hawkeye Flag In Illinois (Kansas City Star, April 4)
Some UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumni elected to show school pride in an odd way two weeks ago, hanging an Iowa flag atop a state building -- in Illinois. A construction crew in Springfield, Ill., apparently raised the University of Iowa's Hawkeye emblem while working on a historic building last week, unaware that only U.S. and state flags are typically allowed to fly atop state buildings. The rules apply to state buildings that are under construction as well, so state officials in Illinois ordered the university flag taken down last weekend. Several workers for the project's general contractor, Halverson Construction Co., attended the UI and apparently wanted to show pride in their alma mater.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/special_packages/coffee_break/14254377.htm

Disselhorst to Perform Concert (Wausau Daily Herald, April 4)
DEL DISSELHORST
, head of the organ department at the University of Iowa, will hold a concert April 23 at First Presbyterian Church in Wausau. He also will hold a master class at April 22. The Wisconsin River Chapter of American Guild of Organists is sponsoring the concert.
http://www.wausaudailyherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060404/WDH04/604040352/1619

Hoover Discusses Testing In Special Report (CBS Evening News, April 3-4)
HIRAM D. "H.D." HOOVER
, professor emeritus of the Iowa Testing Programs in the University of Iowa College of Education, is interviewed for a two-part story on academic testing. "The Trouble With Testing" aired April 3 and "Too Much Testing?" aired April 4. Both stories may be read or viewed via Web browser at the following links:

Too Much Testing?

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/04/04/eveningnews/main1472010.shtml?CMP=

ILC-SearchStories

The Trouble With Testing

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/04/03/eveningnews/main1467643.shtml?CMP=ILC-SearchStories

Alumni Fly Hawkeye Flag In Illinois (Arizona Republic, April 3)
Some UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumni elected to show school pride in an odd way two weeks ago, hanging an Iowa flag atop a state building -- in Illinois. A construction crew in Springfield, Ill., apparently raised the University of Iowa's Hawkeye emblem while working on a historic building last week, unaware that only U.S. and state flags are typically allowed to fly atop state buildings. The rules apply to state buildings that are under construction as well, so state officials in Illinois ordered the university flag taken down last weekend. Several workers for the project's general contractor, Halverson Construction Co., attended the UI and apparently wanted to show pride in their alma mater.
http://www.azcentral.com/offbeat/articles/0403FlagFlap03-ON.html

Iowa Mumps Outbreak Biggest Since 1980s (CNN International, April 3)
A story about a mumps outbreak in Iowa includes a photograph of SANDY JIRSA examining mumps samples at the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory in Coralville. The story says the epidemic is the nation's biggest outbreak in at least 17 years. As of Thursday, the latest report available, 245 confirmed, probable or suspected cases of mumps had been reported to the Iowa Department of Public Health since mid-January. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it is the nation's only outbreak, which the CDC defines as five or more cases in a concentrated area. "We are calling this an epidemic," said Iowa state epidemiologist Dr. PATRICIA QUINLISK, explaining that mumps has spread to more than one-third of the state and does not appear to be confined to certain age groups or other sectors of the population. Quinlisk said Iowa has had about five cases of mumps a year in recent years, and this is its first large outbreak in nearly 20 years. "We're trying to figure out why is it happening, why is it happening in Iowa and why is it happening right now. We don't know," she said.
http://edition.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/conditions/04/03/mumps.outbreak.ap/

Schmidt, Rynes Eye Corporate Social Duties (Asbury Park Press, April 3)
Mattel is one of many U.S. corporations taking social responsibilities more seriously in foreign markets, from the rain forests of Asia to civil-war-torn Africa. As Yahoo, Google and other Internet giants face harsh criticism for their business practices in China, more companies realize it's smart business to be good corporate citizens in the exploding global economy. In 2004, business professors FRANK SCHMIDT and SARA RYNES at the University of Iowa looked at 52 studies on corporate social responsibility over 30 years. They found that well-run, profitable businesses also boasted solid social and environmental records. The paper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060403/BUSINESS/60401024/1003

Hansen Comments At UI On Global Warming Cited (National Ledger, April 3)
Columnist Robert Novak discusses a "60 Minutes" report about James E. Hansen, director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, who says that the federal government has tried to cover up scientific reports that global warming is a real, imminent threat. Speaking at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Oct. 26, 2004, as the presidential elections were heating up, Hansen said that "In my more than three decades in government, I have never seen anything approaching the degree to which information flow from scientists to the public has been screened and controlled as it is now." At that same event, Hansen said he was voting for Kerry. The publication is based in Apache Junction, Ariz. The column also ran on the Website of THE LINCOLN TRIBUNE in North Carolina and other media outlets.
http://www.nationalledger.com/artman/publish/article_27264570.shtml

UI Alumni Take Enthusiasm To New Heights (6ABC.com, April 3)
Illinois officials say only U.S. and state flags should ever fly above state buildings -- whether or not they're under construction. That clarification came after they ordered that an Iowa Hawkeyes flag be taken down from a state building under construction near the Lincoln Presidential Library. The flag was flying for at least several days last week before officials became aware of it and had it removed over the weekend. The Springfield building was once a train station and will eventually become the visitors' center for the presidential library and museum. A spokesman for the Illinois Capital Development Board -- which is overseeing the $12.5 million renovation -- says several construction workers attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The station is based in Pennsylvania.
http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?section=bizarre&id=4048934

Hines: UI Administrators Make Less Than Peers (WQAD-TV, April 3)
Administrators at the University of Iowa are, on average, paid less than their peers in the Big Ten Conference. But one faculty member at Iowa says academics know that coming in. N. WILLIAM HINES, a law professor who was dean of the university's College of Law from 1976-2004, says current administrators and those considering Iowa understand they aren't going to be paid as much as their peers. Hines says people want to become administrators at Iowa because it's a place where they think they can make a difference. Deans in the university's 11 colleges generally rank in the middle or at the bottom of the 10 public schools in the Big Ten. Iowa has the smallest enrollment of public schools in the conference. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4714741&nav=1sW7

Pascarella Education Book Noted (Washington Post, April 2)
For years, many people, particularly those at the high-end public universities (the public Ivies), have argued that the value of four years at an elite private school is overstated. The conventional wisdom on those schools is more the result of long-held impressions than actual results, they say. In their 2005 update of their book "How College Affects Students, "two professors who study higher education, ERNEST PASCARELLA of the University of Iowa and Patrick Terenzini of Penn State, raise similar points. The book, a synthesis of three decades of research, finds that "little consistent evidence suggested that college selectivity, prestige or educational resources had any net impact in such areas as learning, cognitive and intellectual development, the majority of psychosocial changes, the development of principled moral reasoning, or shifts in attitudes and values." In other words, you might be a different person when you leave college, but not because of how hard it was to get into the school you chose.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/28/AR2006032801333.html

Novel Depicts Fictional UI Writing Students (Philadelphia Inquirer, April 2)
A review of Hilma Wolitzer's novel "The Doctor's Daughter," in which the main character and her husband are described as having met while studying writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/special_packages/sunday_review/14241417.htm

Poet Levine Teaches At UI (News Courier, April 2)
A story about poet Mark Levine says he spends part of each year teaching poetry at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The publication is based in Alabama.
http://www.enewscourier.com/homepage/local_story_091195000.html?keyword=leadpicturestory

top

 


 

 

 

 

 

The University of Iowa All rights reserved copyright 2006