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UI in the News

October, 2005

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Current News Highlights

Uproar Over Pink Locker Room Chronicled (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 31)
The demand among Hawkeye fans for all things pink has soared after an associate law professor at the University of Iowa petitioned school officials to repaint the all-pink visitor's locker room at Kinnick Stadium. JILL GAULDING objected to the color scheme, she said, because it sent a misogynistic message and represented "a serious obstacle to gender equity on campus." Hawkeye fans reacted by snapping up pink merchandise and sending hundreds of e-mails -- many of them anonymous, some of them downright nasty. University President DAVID SKORTON tried to end the quarrel -- he said the pink locker room stays. Said TED HABTE-GABR, of the Los Angeles branch of the Iowa Alumni Association: "Iowa has no other major-league professional sports, so the Hawkeyes have a cult-like following that is incredibly superstitious. You don't do anything to jinx the team, no matter how ridiculous it might seem." Former University of Iowa coach HAYDEN FRY had the visitors' locker room painted pink in the early 1980s to get a psychological edge over other teams. Armed with cans of pastel-pink paint, the stadium's staff sought to create a soothing and calming environment. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the NEW UTAH DAILY HERALD and PROVO DAILY HERALD, both in Utah; the ARIZONA REPUBLIC and other media outlets.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-na-pink30oct30,1,5401850.story

Suls Partner In Study On Self-Knowledge (Innovations Report, Oct. 31)
In "Flawed Self-Evaluation: Implications for Health, Education, and the Workplace," investigators David Dunning (Cornell), Chip Heath (Stanford), and JERRY M. SULS (University of Iowa) summarized current psychological research on the accuracy (or rather inaccuracy) of self-knowledge, across a range of studies in a range of spheres. Their report is published in the December 2004 issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a journal of the American Psychological Society. A consistent and sobering picture emerged from the team's analysis: On the job, at school, or even in managing our own health, it is as though we all live in Garrison Keillor's fictional Lake Wobegon, "where all the children are above average." People's opinions of themselves, their abilities, and their health outlooks are generally skewed quite strongly in a positive direction. Such errors in self-assessment can have serious consequences, for example in how people manage their own health. The publication is based in Germany.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/gesellschaftswissenschaften/bericht-50998.html

UI Pink Locker Rooms Mentioned In Article (Cantonsville Times, Oct. 31)
A story about a salon and spa that recently decorated its interior pink in support of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month says the color is not normally associated with determination. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, for example, painted the visiting team's locker rooms pink to make its gridiron foes feel calmer and less aggressive before they took the field at Kinnick Stadium. The paper is based in Maryland.
http://news.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?pnpID=351&NewsID=671958&CategoryID=8381&show=localnews&om=1

Gaulding Calls For Repainting Of Pink Locker Rooms (New Kerala, Oct. 31)
An associate law professor at the University of Iowa wants school officials to repaint the all-pink men's visitor's locker room at Kinnick Stadium. JILL GAULDING says the color scheme sends a misogynistic message and represents "a serious obstacle to gender equity on campus." Former football coach HAYDEN FRY had the visitors' locker room painted pink in the early 1980s to get a psychological edge over other teams. When the university finished new locker rooms this year as part of an $86.8-million renovation of Kinnick Stadium, the school found ways to make the visitor's side even more Barbie-esque, the Los Angeles Times reported. The paper is based in India. A version of this story was also picked up by the UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL wire service.
http://www.newkerala.com/news.php?action=fullnews&id=45011

War Protesters Gather On UI Campus (WQAD-TV, Oct. 31)
War protestors marched, rallied and gave speeches in some Iowa communities as the death toll in Iraq surpassed two thousand U.S. soldiers. Opponents of the war gathered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus and on a heavily traveled street in Burlington in weekend protests. The protest in Iowa City was organized by the  University of Iowa Anti-war Committee. It began with a rally in front of Old Capitol, and led to a march around downtown Iowa City before returning to the campus. Counter protesters also wanted to be heard. They held signs saying they support national security and that troops believe they are doing the right thing. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4049280&nav=1sW7

UI Sets Date For Old Capitol Reopening Event (WQAD-TV, Oct. 31)
A ceremony to celebrate the reopening of Old Capitol on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus is scheduled for next spring. University officials say the ceremony is scheduled for May 5 and 6. They also say the third phase of the Old Capitol restoration has just begun. That work includes restoring the west portico, wood trim, exterior brickwork and repairing windows. Old Capitol served as Iowa's first capitol from 1846 to 1857. Fire caused more than $5 million in damage in 2001. The blaze destroyed the cupola, dome and bell and caused interior damage from smoke and water. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4046080&nav=1sW7

Damasio Studied Woman With Amygdala Damage (Montreal Gazette, Oct. 30)
A story about the potential for developing drugs that will control our sense of fear says that over the years, scientists have gradually discovered what fear actually means, locating the seat of this emotion to the amygdala, almond-shaped structures in each half of the brain. A classic demonstration of their frightening role came in a study of a woman with a damaged amygdala. She failed what Professor ANTONIO DAMASIO, of the University of Iowa, called the "Doris Day test". The neurologist recalled: "When we showed her a film clip of Doris Day screaming, she asked, 'What is she doing?'" The paper is based in Canada.
http://www.canada.com/montreal/montrealgazette/news/insight/story.html?id=cfa3f2fc-a255-4814-843a-ced9eb5058b4

Marshall Comments On Soft Drinks, Dental Decay (Dallas News, Oct. 30)
A story about the risks sugar-laden soft drinks post to childhood obesity says that studies have suggested that sugar in liquids may in some ways have a bigger effect on teeth than its solid counterpart. Some dentists speculate that this may be because sodas not only contain sugar but also acid that might erode a tooth's protective enamel. Dr. TERESA MARSHALL of the University of Iowa, who has conducted several studies on the effect of beverages on health, also believes it has something to do with the way drinks are consumed. Foods are eaten at once and washed down. Children often have sweet drinks between meals while doing other things. "If you're carrying around a beverage for a period of time, you have a constant exposure to the sugar," Dr. Marshall said. The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/103005dnnatliquidcandy.c19fb4f.html

Former Interrogator Attended UI (South Bend Tribune, Oct. 29)
A feature on a former U.S. Army Abu Ghraib interrogator Joshua Casteel, now a conscientious objector, says that while at West Point Casteel discovered an incompatibility between his Christian values and the military career he had chosen to pursue. Less than a year after arriving at the academy, he transferred to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. After graduating from the UI in 2002, he attended the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif., where he received training as an Arab linguist for a year and a half. During that time, he also received 16 weeks of training as an interrogator. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2005/10/29/local.20051029-sbt-FULL-B1-War_and_peace__One_s.sto

Murray Praises Genetics Award Winner (Science Magazine, Oct. 28)
A brief reporting that Robert H. Waterston received the $200,000 Peter Gruber Foundation Genetics Award last week at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, says Waterston, a geneticist at the University of Washington, Seattle, and his colleagues helped bring the human genome within reach by sequencing a nematode, showing that whole-genome projects were possible. "He is genuinely a role model for how you can do big science in a very personal way," says JEFFREY MURRAY, a geneticist at the University of Iowa, Iowa City. The prize has been awarded since 2001. Past winners include Nobel laureate Robert Horvitz.
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/vol310/issue5748/r-samples.shtml

Pierce Sentencing Covered (ABC News online, Oct. 28)
Former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball star Pierre Pierce was sentenced Friday to two years in prison for assaulting a former girlfriend at her apartment last January. The 22-year-old player wept as he hugged his parents and relatives after he was sentenced. Moments later, he was handcuffed and escorted a block down the sidewalk to the county jail. Pierce pleaded guilty in August to third-degree burglary, a felony, and assault with intent to commit sexual abuse, false imprisonment and fourth-degree criminal mischief, all misdemeanors. The charges were filed after police began investigating a Jan. 27 disturbance at the West Des Moines home of a woman Pierce had been dating for 2 1/2 years. After police confirmed Pierce was the focus of their investigation, Iowa basketball coach STEVE ALFORD dismissed him from the team. At the time, Pierce was the Hawkeyes' leading scorer and best defender.
http://abcnews.go.com/Sports/wireStory?id=1260646

Other Recent News Highlights

UI Employees to Get Free Generic Drugs (WQAD-TV, Oct. 28)
University of Iowa officials are hoping a plan to offer free generic drugs to some employees next year will save both the school and workers money. It would do so by prompting employees of the university to switch their prescriptions to the less-expensive generic drugs. About 7,000 of the 13,700 full-time employees are expected to be able to take part in the plan, according to RICHARD SAUNDERS, University of Iowa associate director of human resources. He says the program could save employees about $ 1 million. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4041618&nav=1sW7

Community Program Based on UI Model (Stockton Record, Oct. 28)
This was the seventh year that University of the Pacific students handed out candy from dormitories, Greek houses and other on-campus buildings. But this year, the 35 Pacific students who helped with the event donated their volunteer hours in exchange for a free concert as part of Pacific's new community service program.__ The program, called the Community Counts Show, hopes to collect 10,000 volunteer hours of donated community service to Stockton by March. Pacific student Abigail Nathanson helped start the program, which is based on one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she said. The newspaper is based in California.
http://www.recordnet.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051028/NEWS01/510280315/1001/NEWS01

Covington Comments on Miers Withdrawal (Canton Repository, Oct. 28)
White House counsel Harriet Mierswith drew her name from consideration Thursday, citing concerns that the confirmation process would infringe on the privacy of her dealings with the executive branch. Unlike cases where a person gets shouldered out because of something unsavory, Miers simply wasn't qualified, many political experts are saying. "She was never able to earn the support of the president's base," said CARY COVINGTON, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Other nominees in the recent past -- any other judicial nominees, Cabinet nominees -- the problems have usually come down to something that the candidates did. Some failing of the person that was not a political partisan kind of issue but something that disqualified them." The newspaper is based in Ohio.
http://www.cantonrep.com/index.php?ID=249672&r=0&Category=11

UI Declines Action on Locker Room (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 28)
The University of Iowa has decided not to bother the National Collegiate Athletic Association with questions about the color pink. Last month the color caused a great hue and cry after ERIN BUZUVIS, an adjunct lecturer at Iowa's law school, criticized the pink walls and fixtures in the visitors' locker room of the football stadium.  Buzuvis, whose research interests include gender equity in sports, complained that the use of the color promoted sexism and homophobia. PATRICIA A. CAIN, Iowa's vice provost and the chairwoman of the committee, concluded that the walls were irrelevant to the university's report on its distribution of athletics scholarships. "It's more of a climate issue," Cain said. http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i10/10a05403.htm

UI Course Examines Porn's Impact (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 28)
When JAY R. CLARKSON, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Iowa, created a course on pornography for this fall, he wasn't expecting political opposition, even if he put a mock "censored" on the syllabus to spice things up a bit. But last May, the Iowa Speaker of the House, Christopher Rants, said public funds should not go to that sort of course. Clarkson was interviewed on a number of local radio stations and received several offers from the pornography industry to send speakers to defend the course - all of which he politely turned down. A spokesman for the Republican legislator now says he has dropped his opposition to the course, called "Critical Pornography Studies." The course, for upperclassmen in Iowa's communications-studies department, was quickly oversubscribed, with 35 students registered and many more turned away. Students analyze the writings of theorists and social scientists. They do not actually view pornography. Students all know about pornography and have opinions," says Clarkson, "unlike, say, a literature class where students don't know the subject." http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i10/10a01002.htm

UI Alumnus Filming Documentary On Hurricane (Highland Park News, Oct. 27)
On Sept. 23, 1938, no one in New England was expecting the hurricane they would later call the Long Island Express. Ultimately, as many as 700 people would be killed. Next year, a two-hour documentary created by David Garte about this storm will appear on the History Channel. Scenes in the movie were filmed in the Alyce Brenner Periodical Room and the Historical Room of the Highland Park Public Library on Oct. 12. Garte is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA communications program and has worked for production companies for about five years. The paper, a weekly owned by the St. Paul Pioneer Press, is based in Minnesota.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/hp/10-27-05-723548.html

Sports Columnist Discusses Pink Locker Room Debate (Miami Herald, Oct. 27)
A columnist shares his thoughts on concerns recently raised by University of Iowa law professor ERIN BUZUVIS about the pink color scheme used in the visitors' locker room at Kinnick Stadium. He said Bezuvis interprets the color scheme as demeaning -- "a subtle way of painting the words 'sissy' [or] 'girlie man,'" according to her web blog. Last week UI President DAVID SKORTON declined to appoint a committee to study the topic. "It's probably gotten a lot more attention than it deserves," athletic director BOB BOWLSBY said. The writer also mentions that former Hawkeye head football coach HAYDEN FRY had the rooms painted pink because he'd read that the color has a calming effect on people and might make players of opposing teams slightly less aggressive on the field. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS in California.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/sports/13006700.htm

Jones Comments On Ariz. Vote-Counting Scandal (Phoenix New Times, Oct. 27)
Arizona State Republican Senator Jack Harper says he's determined to get to the bottom of a potentially explosive vote-counting scandal at the Maricopa County Elections Department. The second-term senator from Surprise plans to hold legislative hearings early next year into the controversial Sept. 7, 2004, District 20 recount, where the inexplicable appearance of nearly 500 new votes between the primary and the recount challenge the accuracy and integrity of elections in the nation's fourth-largest county. The fiasco has attracted the interest of DOUGLAS W. JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa. Jones is an expert on voting machines who has served as a consultant to elections officials across the country. "It's hard to tell whether they are covering up incompetence or fraud," says Jones, who has studied the District 20 situation extensively. "And it's hard to come up with a hypothesis that doesn't include, to some degree, one of these things or the other." The paper is based in Arizona.
http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/Issues/2005-10-27/news/dougherty.html

Belin-Blank Report On Accelerated Education Cited (New York Times, Oct. 26)
A story about the Davidson Academy of Nevada, a newly formed public school at the University of Nevada, Reno for profoundly gifted children (those whose test scores and evaluations place them in the 99.9th percentile) say academically gifted students' needs are often overlooked as federal and state governments concentrate their resources on slower learners to lift test scores in reading and mathematics to a minimum standard. It cites a 2004 report by the [CONNIE BELIN & JACQUELINE N. BLANK] INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR GIFTED EDUCATION AND TALENT DEVELOPMENT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that charges American schools with impeding the development of the country's brightest children and calls the lack of more programs for them "a national scandal." It warns, "The price may be the slow but steady erosion of American excellence."
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/26/education/26gifted.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1130335208-sJrLFOf90wX+KLzlKEza6Q

UI Part Of Talk On Reinventing University (Guardian Unlimited, Oct. 26)
A story on a discussion in the United Kingdom about whether universities need to be reinvented, and about an exhibit titled "Campus" at the John Hansard gallery at the University of Southampton that deals with conceptions of the university, says the debate will continue Nov. 2 through a video-linked web conference between the University of Southampton, Ball State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the U.S. This two-hour event will be broadcast at http://www.bsu.edu/web/jfillwalk/HypotheticalUniversities/ and can be viewed in the UK between 3 p.m. and 5p.m. (a log of which will become available at http://www.hansardgallery.org.uk/ shortly after. The paper is based in the U.K.
http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/comment/story/0,9828,1600379,00.html

Crooner Jarreau's UI Ties Cited (Lone Star Iconoclast, Oct. 25)
A story about an upcoming concert in which Al Jarreau, winner of five Grammy Awards and the only artist to receive Grammys in three categories, will join the Waco Symphony Orchestra on the Baylor University campus in Waco says Jarreau earned his master's degree in vocational rehabilitation at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and subsequently relocated to San Francisco to begin a career in rehabilitation counseling. The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.iconoclast-texas.com/News/2005/43-44/43news06.htm

Damasio Comments On Study Of Woman With Amygdala Damage (Telegraph, Oct. 25)
A story about the potential for developing drugs that will control our sense of fear says that over the years, scientists have gradually discovered what fear actually means, locating the seat of this emotion to the amygdala, almond-shaped structures in each half of the brain. A classic demonstration of their frightening role came in a study of a woman with a damaged amygdala. She failed what Prof ANTHONY DAMASIO, of the University of Iowa, called the "Doris Day test". The neurologist recalled: "When we showed her a film clip of Doris Day screaming, she asked, 'What is she doing?'" The paper is based in the U.K.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/connected/main.jhtml?xml=/connected/2005/10/25/ecfhallo25.xml&sSheet=/connected/2005/10/25/ixconnrite.html

Gurnett Comments on Lack of Lightning on Venus (USA Today, Oct. 25)
Lightning cracks several hundred times a minute on Earth, but for as long as scientists have studied Venus they haven't been able to say definitively whether it too has lightning, and it's important for researchers to solve this mystery. On previous missions, scientists thought they detected the tell-tale sounds of lightning on the evening side of Venus. But when Cassini-Huygens did two low orbits of Venus on its way to Saturn, the results were different. "We saw nothing, just dead nothing," said DONALD GURNETT, a physicist at the University of Iowa who helped monitor the readings from Cassini. "But when we flew by Earth, we started detecting lightning halfway out to the moon, and we're detecting it on Saturn."
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2005-10-24-venus-exploration_x.htm

Funk Studies Cancer Therapy Patients Quality of Life (Cancerpage, Oct. 25)
The difference in quality of life (QOL) between head and neck cancer patients who undergo surgery and those who opt for non-surgical therapies has narrowed considerably, new research suggests. It has generally been assumed that QOL for these patients is better when treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiation than with surgery and radiation, study co-author Dr. GERRY F. FUNK, from the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, and colleagues report.  Yet, few studies have addressed this topic.
http://www.cancerpage.com/news/article.asp?id=8973

Pierce Attorneys Want Report Tossed (WQAD-TV, Oct. 25)
Attorneys for former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball player Pierre Pierce have asked a judge to toss out a pre-sentence report prepared by state officials. The attorneys say the report violates Pierce's rights and attorney-client privileges. Pierce is scheduled to be sentenced Friday. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4022801&nav=1sW7

Hansen Comments On Prevalence Of Twins (Hilton Head Island Packet, Oct. 24)
Lady's Island Elementary School in Hilton Head, S.C., has seven sets of twins this year. Twins occur naturally in one in 80 births, but with an increase in the use of reproductive technology and the trend toward having children later in life, twin births have increased dramatically to one in 40 births, according to a July 2003 peer-reviewed article by Dr. WENDY F. HANSEN of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. The paper is based in South Carolina.
http://www.islandpacket.com/news/local/story/5279624p-4790722c.html

Cram: High Schools Have More Defibrillators (Innovations Report, Oct. 24)
A greater percentage of high schools had automated external defibrillators (AEDs) -- devices that can be used to treat cardiac arrest victims -- than senior centers, despite the fact that cardiac arrests appear more common in senior centers, according to a study by University of Iowa researchers. "It seemed counter-intuitive that defibrillators were being placed in high schools, where the population is relatively healthy and rates of cardiac arrest are low," said PETER CRAM, assistant professor of internal medicine in the University of Iowa's Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and the study's corresponding author. "We wanted to find out how common cardiac arrests were in high schools and how available defibrillators were." Innovations Report is based in Germany.
http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/studies/report-50703.html

O'Conner Was UI Graduate (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Oct. 24)
The farm where author Flannery O'Connor spent her final years has become a tourist destination, and a story about it notes she received her Master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.ajc.com/travel/content/travel/southeast/ga_stories/1005/23trandalusia.html

UI Has Collapsible Goalposts (WCCO-TV, Oct. 24)
A story about the death of a University of Minnesota-Morris student after he was struck by a goal post being torn down after a football game notes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has had the collapsible goal posts in place for 10 years and they have never been torn down. WCCO is based in Minneapolis.
http://wcco.com/topstories/local_story_297100313.html

Congressman Targets Wasserman Study (Times Online, Oct. 24)
Randy Neugebauer, a Republican from Texas, has won congressional approval for his amendment to revoke funding for two scholarly projects including one by Professor EDWARD WASSERMAN, a behavioral psychologist at the University of Iowa, into cognition and perception in pigeons. Wasserman claims that they have been singled out purely to make a political point and the move has been condemned  widely by the scientific community, including the American Psychological Association. The newspaper is based in the U.K.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,20909-1840137,00.html

UI Professor Comments On Workplace Gossip (Seattle Times, Oct. 23)
A recent study shows how prevalent rumors and gossip are in the workplace. Sixty-three percent of American employees said rumors are usually how they first hear about important business matters, according to a study by ISR, a global employee research and consulting firm headquartered in Chicago. Managers who keep workers in the dark about company concerns can breed anxiety and fuel rumors and gossip, said JAY CHRISTENSEN-SZALANSKI, a professor in the department of management and organization at the University of Iowa. "I cannot see any beneficial reason to advocate the use of gossip in business," he said. So it's best to keep the lines of communication open. "You should certainly make sure that you're a source of information for [workers] so that they don't have to go to other places for it," he said. "The information vacuum will be filled by rumors and gossip."
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2002577845_gossip23.html

Workshop Student Eager To 'Study The Craft' (Kansas City Star, Oct. 23)
Austin Bunn wanted to avoid the mistake many young fiction writers make. "I knew I needed to study the craft." That's why, at 32, he's studying at the IOWA WRITERS WORKSHOP, a University of Iowa program considered one of America's best. A version of this article also appeared Oct. 23 on the website of the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/entertainment/12954742.htm

Jarreau Earned Master's At UI (Charlotte Observer, Oct. 22)
Singer Al Jarreau returns to Charlotte next weekend to open the Charlotte Symphony's pops series. Embracing jazz, pop and R&B, Jarreau has proved his staying power over five decades. Starting in the 1960s, he performed with the vocal group The Indigos while studying psychology at Ripon College in Wisconsin. He also earned a master's in vocational rehabilitation from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/entertainment/music/12962949.htm

Columnist: Michigan Players Not Fazed By Pink (Toledo Blade, Oct. 22)
When you walk into the visitors' locker room at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Kinnick Stadium, it looks like a place where Barbie got loose with a roller and a five-gallon pail of her favorite color. It is pink, pink, pink. There is pink everywhere. And it's not a hue or a tint -- it is a theme. Michigan, the team that will be dressing and showering in that sea of Pepto-Bismol this weekend when it plays the Hawkeyes in a crucial Big Ten game, thinks the pink locker room is no big deal. "It's nothing -- it's a pink locker room," offensive tackle Rueben Riley said. "You can try to make an issue of it and tell yourself it calms you before a game, but you know, those pink walls, it's no issue and it doesn't have anything to do with the game." The excessively pink motif did become an issue recently when a female law professor at Iowa raised objections to it, claiming the choice of colors was demeaning and an insult to women and homosexuals. She demanded that the pink be removed.
http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051022/SPORTS17/510220354

Artist, Woodworker Attended UI (San Jose Mercury News, Oct. 22)
Steven Schloemer, the artisan and woodworker behind Artisan Woodworking, a furniture and cabinetry business he runs from his workshop/studio in Santa Cruz, apprenticed with carpenters in the Midwest while he was an undergraduate studying fine arts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/living/home/12970222.htm

Bechara: No Emotion Key To Investing (Investor's Business Daily, Oct. 22)
Emotion can be your biggest enemy when it comes to investing. In fact, people physically incapable of feeling emotion may have a big edge on other investors, say some scientists. A study published in June in the journal Psychological Science found that emotionally impaired people are more willing to pursue aggressive growth investing strategies. ANTIONE BECHARA, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, says the best investors are those able to feel no emotions while trading. He called such investors "functional psychopaths."
http://www.investors.com/editorial/editorialcontent.asp?secid=1100&status=article&show=1&v=10/22

Magazine Ranks Iowa City As Retirement Choice (CNN, Oct. 21)
Money magazine sees Iowa City, home the University of Iowa, as one of the best to retire. Money magazine reporter Cybele Weisser said, "Iowa City has a lot of great cultural opportunities. I mean, there's no reason to be bored for a minute in Iowa City. And, you know, it also has great Big 10 sports. People love it. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has a senior college. It's sponsored by the alumni association. And that offers classes to retirees that you can take, everything from philosophy to photography."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ed78a959852e9f407abd4fab07593636&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=974a5eec9575f4e8612fac4445ba200d

Daily Iowa Story Noted (MSNBC, Oct. 21)
On the "Hardball" program, host Chris Matthews noted several news reports about the leaks the of CIA identity of the wife of Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV.  The Los Angeles Times reported that Scooter Libby, Cheney`s top man, was "consumed," by parts of former Wilson's book and ordered his aides to catalogue all of Wilson's writings and TV appearances for his personal scrutiny. "The compendium used boldface type to call attention to certain comments by Wilson, such as one in the Daily Iowan, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student newspaper, in which Wilson was quoted as calling Cheney, quote, 'a lying son of a bitch.'" Matthews said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ed78a959852e9f407abd4fab07593636&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=400554c7fd8c7af9f2438db917b15d72

Adams Comments on Stoke Drug (Contra Costa Times, Oct. 21)
Since 1996, The drug t-PA has been approved as an intravenous treatment for strokes. Studies show that patients who get the drug have much better odds of recovering without major disability. But because the drug can cause serious bleeding in the brain, in most cases it must be given within three hours of the onset of symptoms, far sooner than when most patients finally get to the hospital. In addition, many hospitals are not equipped to administer the drug. Or they shy away from using it because of the risk and a lack of reimbursement from Medicare and private insurers. As a result, fewer than 5 percent of stroke patients get t-PA. "It's sad," said HAROLD ADAMS, a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa and spokesman for the American Stroke Association. "Maybe it is a tragedy. I'm very frustrated." The newspaper is based in California. The article also appeared in The STATE (S.C.), San Luis Obispo Tribune( Calif.), Biloxi Sun Herald (Miss.) and other Knight-Ridder publications.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/nation/12950596.htm

New Crime Lab Opens (WQAD-TV, Oct. 21)
Applications for jobs at Iowa's new state crime lab in Ankeny are up, due to the "CSI effect." The top-rated T-V show and its various spinoffs have made forensic science a popular field. The lab, which opened in June, replaces smaller facilities in Des Moines. It's part of a $ 52 million complex that includes the state medical examiner's office, state agriculture labs and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY. The TV station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4006519&nav=1sW7

Daily Iowan Quoted Wilson (Los Angles Times, Oct. 21)
Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff was so angry about the public statements of former Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV, a Bush administration critic married to an undercover CIA officer, that he monitored all of Wilson's television appearances and urged the White House to mount an aggressive public campaign against him, former aides say. After Wilson published a book criticizing the administration in April 2004, during the closely fought presidential campaign, Libby became consumed by passages that he believed were inaccurate or unfair to Cheney, former aides said. He ordered up a meticulous catalog of Wilson's claims and public statements going back to early 2003. The compendium used boldfaced type to call attention to certain comments by Wilson, such as one in the DAILY IOWAN, the University of Iowa student newspaper, in which Wilson was quoted as calling Cheney "a lying son of a bitch." The story also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and NEW YORK NEWSDAY.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-libby21oct21,0,7741636.story?coll=la-home-headlines

UI Graduate Launches Gallery (OnMilwaukee.com, Oct. 21)
After studying at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, then graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Craig McKinney came to Milwaukee to help his sister and brother-in-law redo their basement. In typical "Milwaukee magnet" fashion, McKinney stayed in Brew City, launching both a successful professional career (as a graphic designer at OnMilwaukee.com) and an art gallery. McKinney's new gallery, called studiomak debuts Friday, Oct. 21, adjacent to the Walker's Point Center for the Arts.
http://onmilwaukee.com/ent/articles/studiomak.html?7676

UI Graduate Involved in DeLay Indictments (Texas Observer, Oct. 21)
The recent indictments of Tom DeLay-on charges that he criminally conspired to launder $190,000 in corporate political funds-identify Karl Rove protégé Terry Nelson as the unindicted co-conspirator who oversaw the alleged money laundering in Washington, D.C. in 2002. Nelson started in politics early. He was still two years shy of his graduation from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA when he managed the 1992 campaign of Congressman Jim Nussle (R-Iowa). 
http://www.mollyivins.com/showArticle.asp?ArticleID=2055

Olshansky Comments On Defibrillators (Spartanburg Herald Journal, Oct. 21)
The death of a 21-year-old college student in Utah who had an implanted defibrillator because of a genetic heart condition set off a series of events that would expose flaws in how producers of critical heart devices disclose defects to doctors and patients. Two months the student's death, the Guidant Corporation, the country's second-biggest maker of heart defibrillators, acknowledged that it had not told doctors for three years that one model had short-circuited in about two dozen cases, including the one involving him. The ripple effects of Guidant's recalls were felt throughout the summer and fall in doctors' offices and medical centers nationwide. One place was the University of Iowa Hospitals in Iowa City. "Every day, you didn't know what was going to happen," the facility's director of cardiac electrophysiology, Dr. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, recalled recently. "You were getting calls from all kinds of people. There would be another 'Dear Doctor' letter on my desk. Another patient calling. Another person from an investment house wanting guidance." The newspaper is based in South Carolina. The article, which was originally reported in the NEW YORK TIMES, also appeared in the TUSCALOOSA (Ala.) NEWS http://www.goupstate.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051020/ZNYT01/510200351/1051/NEWS01

Study Examines Emotional Investments (Daily News and Analysis, Oct. 20)
A recent study conducted by a team of researchers from the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has established that emotions negatively impact investment decisions. The findings of the study were published in the June 2005 issue of Psychological Science. The study analysed the investment decisions made by, among others, people who were unable to feel any emotions due to lesions in their brain; these subjects otherwise had normal intelligent quotients, and the parts of their brains that were responsible for logic and cognitive reasoning were not affected. The publication is based in India.
http://dnaindia.com/report.asp?NewsID=6548

Olshansky Comments On Defibrillator Defects (New York Times, Oct. 20)
The death of a 21-year-old college student in Utah who had an implanted defibrillator because of a genetic heart condition set off a series of events that would expose flaws in how producers of critical heart devices disclose defects to doctors and patients. It also would reveal that the Food and Drug Administration's oversight of the fast-growing heart device industry is, at best, loose. Those disclosures have resulted in calls for change in how and when companies and the F.D.A. alert doctors about malfunctions and, in turn, what physicians tell patients. Two months the student’s death, the Guidant Corporation, the country's second-biggest maker of heart defibrillators, acknowledged that it had not told doctors for three years that one model had short-circuited in about two dozen cases, including the one involving him. The ripple effects of Guidant's recalls were felt throughout the summer and fall in doctors' offices and medical centers nationwide. One place was the University of Iowa Hospitals in Iowa City. "Every day, you didn't know what was going to happen," the facility's director of cardiac electrophysiology, Dr. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, recalled recently. "You were getting calls from all kinds of people. There would be another 'Dear Doctor' letter on my desk. Another patient calling. Another person from an investment house wanting guidance." This story also appeared Oct. 20 on the website of the BOSTON GLOBE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/20/business/20device.html

Adams Notes Lack Of 'Clot-Buster' Use (Myrtle Beach Sun-News, Oct. 20)
Since 1996, the clot-busting drug t-PA, which had been used for years to treat heart attacks, has been approved as an intravenous treatment for strokes. Studies show that patients who get the drug have much better odds of recovering without major disability. But because the drug can cause serious bleeding in the brain, in most cases it must be given within three hours of the onset of symptoms, far sooner than when most patients finally get to the hospital. As a result, fewer than 5 percent of stroke patients get t-PA. "It's sad," said HAROLD ADAMS, a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa and spokesman for the American Stroke Association. "Maybe it is a tragedy. I'm very frustrated." Versions of this Knight Ridder article appeared Oct. 20 on the websites of the MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, KANSAS CITY STAR, TALAHASSEE.com, KENTUCKY.com
http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/news/nation/12950596.htm

UI Study Shows Educated Women Delay Childbearing (The Independent, Oct. 20)
Women are risking their chances of having children because they are delaying motherhood on the basis of "false expectations" about the success of IVF treatment, experts have warned. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA interviewed 464 female patients attending an infertility clinic and 688 women who did not have any problems with conception. The survey found that 63 per cent of all the women had delayed motherhood for an average of four years. Financial and career concerns were the most often cited reasons for putting off having a family. The researchers concluded: "Remarkably, a good education and understanding of the risks of ageing on fertility does not appear to translate into an urgency to conceive."  The newspaper is based in the U.K. A version of this story appeared Oct. 20 on the website NEWS-MEDICAL.net.
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health_medical/article320794.ece

Van Voorhis Comments On Fertility Study (The Times, Oct. 20)
Women who delay trying for a baby until their mid-thirties are well aware of the impact their decision might have on fertility and are not risking childlessness out of ignorance, scientists said yesterday. Research from a team at the University of Iowa has revealed that contrary to much medical opinion, women who wait longest before attempting to become mothers are in fact better informed about the effect of ageing on fertility than those who have children earlier in life. BRAD VAN VOORHIS, who led the study, said: “Remarkably, a good education and understanding of the risks of ageing on fertility does not appear to translate into an urgency to conceive. This study does not support the idea that we can improve the incidence of infertility through education on the role of ageing.” The research, presented yesterday at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Conference in Montreal, comes amid growing medical concern that women have unrealistic ideas of their ability to postpone child-bearing until their careers become established. The newspaper is based in the U.K.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,3-1833925,00.html

Ryan Notes Education As Factor In Delaying Motherhood (Telegraph, Oct. 20)
Women who understand that delaying childbirth reduces their fertility are more likely to put off having a baby for longer, according to research published yesterday. GINNY RYAN, a specialist in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa, who presented her research at the conference, said: "A significant majority of our surveyed population report having intentionally delayed childbearing. "Better education was associated with a higher frequency of delay. Remarkably a good education and understanding of the risks of ageing on fertility does not appear to translate into an urgency to conceive. Dr Ryan and colleagues carried out a survey among 440 patients attending a gynecology unit without any known history of infertility and 449 women who visited a fertility clinic, both of which were in Iowa. Two thirds of participants reported intentionally delaying pregnancy by an average of four years. The newspaper is based in the U.K.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2005/10/20/wbaby20.xml&sSheet=/news/2005/10/20/ixworld.html

UI Presidential Markets Cited (EducationGuardian, Oct. 20)
Market efficiency can be harnessed for much more than just making or losing money. Since the late 1980s, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has been running an electronic exchange that allows (mainly) academics to trade small sums of money on forthcoming presidential elections. On average, in the week before each election, the markets have predicted the candidates' share with an average error of 1.5 percentage points, compared with an error of 2.1 points in the final Gallup poll. The newspaper is based in the U.K.
http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/news/story/0,9830,1596177,00.html

Journalist Visits UI (Baltimore Sun, Oct. 20)
A television reporter fired a year ago after accusing his employer, Sinclair Broadcast Group, of a right-wing bias has been sued by the company for damages and for what it says are violations of his contract. The suit says that in October 2004 Jon Leiberman, Sinclair's Washington bureau chief at the time, broke company rules by speaking publicly about his disaffection with his bosses after they ordered Sinclair stations around the country to pass off as news a documentary critical of presidential candidate Sen. John F. Kerry. Reached yesterday in Iowa City, Iowa, where he was attending a journalism seminar at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Leiberman said he had not yet been served with the suit.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/lifestyle/bal-to.sinclair20oct20,1,7108079.story

Storey Comments On Pompeii Exhibit (Chicago Sun Times, Oct. 19)
A new Field Museum exhibit on Pompeii features artifacts, artwork and stunning casts of humans made from the hollows left when their buried bodies disintegrated. It is a snapshot of Roman life in 79 A.D. Part of that life included gambling and prostitution. The exhibit, which opens Saturday, features a fresco recovered from a brothel called the Inn of Salvius. The wall art depicts a prostitute named Myrtale kissing a man and a dispute between two dice players. Also on display is a gold snake-like bracelet that belonged to a slave likely used as a prostitute. A gift, it is inscribed in Latin: "from the master to his slave." Romans "accepted prostitution as something that could be regulated," said University of Iowa archeologist GLENN STOREY, a consultant on the exhibit.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/entertainment/cst-nws-pompeii19.html

UI-Based Quill And Scroll Society To Judge Work (The Times-Herald, Oct. 19)
A story about an essay contest being sponsored by the Olive Garden restaurants for students in first through 12th grades says that the Quill and Scroll Society of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS will judge entries, and prizes are U.S. Savings Bonds, dinner at an Olive Garden restaurant and, as part of the grand prize, a trip to New York City. The paper is based in Port Huron, Mich.
http://www.thetimesherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051019/NEWS01/510190314/1002

UI Alumna Joins Heinz Company As VP, CIO (dBusinessNews.com, Oct. 19)
H.J. Heinz Company has announced that Karen L. Alber is joining the company as vice president and chief information officer. Alber, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who later received her MBA from Loyola University in Chicago, joins Heinz after 19 years of experience in Supply Chain Management, Systems Implementation, Operations, Process Improvement and Change Management. She most recently was employed at PepsiCo, where she served as vice president, Change Readiness-Enterprise Systems. The paper is based in Pittsburgh, Penn.
http://pittsburgh.dbusinessnews.com/shownews.php?newsid=47907&type_news=latest

Singer Speaks On Reporter's Role (Honolulu Advertiser, Oct. 18)
Michael Bamberger, a senior writer with Sports Illustrated, watched intently as Michelle Wie took a penalty drop from an unplayable lie during the third round of the Samsung World Championship. Shortly afterward, he paced off the distance and determined Wie had dropped her ball closer to the hole, a two-stroke penalty. Bamberger's decision to report the incident to a rules official led to Wie's disqualification and put him under scrutiny as to whether he should have acted as an arbiter of that situation. JANE SINGER, associate professor at the University of Iowa School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Bamberger saw something ethically wrong and put his role as a person above his job as a reporter. "He can't help that he saw it. If he doesn't take action, he's kind of complicit in her action," Singer said. The same story appeared on the Web site of USA TODAY.
http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051018/SPORTS09/510180338/1032/SPORTS

Kuperman: Behavior Affects Age Of First Drink (Consumer Affairs, Oct. 18)
Having a first alcoholic drink at the early age of 12, 13 or 14 might be influenced more by a child's tendency to do things like lie, steal or skip school than by a family history of alcohol dependency, according to findings by University of Iowa and other investigators. "We found, somewhat surprisingly, that having a family history of alcohol dependency or anti-social personality disorder does not relate to age of first drink. However, the number of conduct disorder symptoms a child has does relate to the age of first drink," said SAMUEL KUPERMAN, M.D., corresponding author and professor of psychiatry in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. The same story appeared on the Web site of MEDPAGE TODAY.
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2005/alcohol_first_drink.html

IEM Has Flu, Hurricane Predicting Markets (CNN, Oct. 18)
A story about prediction markets and online markets mentions the Iowa Electronic Market at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which recently started markets to predict flu and hurricane activity. The same story appeared in TIME Magazine.
http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/10/17/markets.tm/

Top Korean Novelist, IWP Student, Profiled (Seoul Times, Oct. 18)
A profile of Korean writer Kim Young Ha says the author had to wait for the congratulations on his latest book, "Black Flower." He was in Iowa, participating in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA International Writing Program. Two days after his book was published he was sitting in the middle of the United States, an ocean and a continent away from the book's reception.
http://theseoultimes.com/ST/?url=/ST/db/read.php?idx=240

Moore To Receive Alumni Honor (Herald Democrat, Oct. 18)
DAN MOORE
, associate professor of music at the University of Iowa, will receive the Distinguished Alumni Award from Texas A&M University-Commerce during homecoming ceremonies this weekend. The Herald Democrat is based in Denison, Texas.
http://www.heralddemocrat.com/articles/2005/10/17/local_news/anews08.txt

Wider-Net Project Boon To Nigerian University (Newswatch, Oct. 17)
A story about the growth of the University of Jos (UNIJOS), whose goal is to be rated among the best three universities in Nigeria, cites the school's partnership in the wider-net project with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The wider-net project is Information Communication Technology-based. As a result of the partnership, UNIJOS is currently leading other universities in the country in ICT development and boasts of wired and wireless Internet access in its campuses. Lately, the institution has moved emphasis into e-learning, applying ICT to different disciplines. Newswatch, based in Nigeria, is a weekly newsmagazine offering reporting, commentary and analysis on Nigeria, world politics, business and economics, science and technology, culture and society.
http://www.newswatchngr.com/store/system/index.html

Teen Drinking Study Noted (New Kerala, Oct. 17)
A new study shows children's environment and how they react to that environment are more important determinants of the age of first drink than genetic factors. "A number of studies have demonstrated that an early [age of first drink] is associated with increased rates of childhood psychiatric disorders, lowered success in school and extracurricular activities, increased criminal behavior, and lowered overall life satisfaction and productivity," says researcher SAMUEL KUPERMAN, director of the division of child psychiatry at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. The paper is based in India. A version of the story also ran on the Website WEBINDIA, also based in India.
http://www.newkerala.com/news.php?action=fullnews&id=36504

Gbasha Discusses Retirement Challenges (New York Times, Oct. 16)
In an article on managing retirement saving, REBECCA GBASHA, 58, a University of Iowa professor who retired early on disability, discusses how she struggled to manage retirement savings of about $30,000 with piecemeal help from consultants. Most just wanted to sell her products, she said, and ultimately she lost money. "With small amounts of money, it's hard to get good advice," she said. But with an inheritance last fall, she renewed her efforts and learned some important lessons. She interviewed several financial advisers, and with each, she said, she learned more about what to ask. Ultimately, she selected a fee-only adviser. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the Barre Montpelier Times Argus in Vermont.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/16/business/yourmoney/16retire.html

Author Of UI Press Book To Speak (Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, Oct. 16)
The lineup of authors scheduled to appear at the 2005 Jewish Book Festival includes Joel Berkowitz, whose book "Shakespeare on the American Yiddish Stage" was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051016/LIVING/510160308/1032

Sidel Comments On Indian Wealth, Philanthropy (Indian Express, Oct. 16)
According to new data from the US Census Bureau, Asians have a median income of $57,518, nearly 30 per cent higher than the national average. Indian Americans are among the fastest growing immigrant groups in America. And Indian-Americans are sharing their wealth. For a 2004 project at Harvard on diaspora philanthropy, MARK SIDEL, professor at Iowa University, researched the Indian diaspora and found that they have been "increasingly generous" to causes in India, ranging from health, agriculture and education to religion and community development. "The spirit of generosity, there is no doubt, is growing," he says. "The numbers are hard to pin down, but we are talking about tens of millions of dollars at least, each year, in multiple channels." The paper is based in India.
http://www.indianexpress.com/full_story.php?content_id=79944

Former UI Professor Comments On Hofstra Law Dean (Newsday, Oct. 16)
Aaron D. Twerski has been appointed Hofstra University Law School's new dean. Beyond bearing the "first Hasidic" designation of his appointment, Twerski has built a reputation that makes him "clearly one of the leading torts scholars in the United States," said Malcolm Wheeler, a former law professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Kansas law schools, who now practices business law in Denver.
http://www.newsday.com/features/printedition/longislandlife/ny-lfdean4468502oct16,0,2036360.story?coll=ny-lilife-print

Drew Author Benson Attended UI (Orlando Sentinel, Oct. 16)
Mildred Wirt Benson, the first woman to earn a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was the ghostwriter on many Nancy Drew mysteries, a series that has sold 80 million copies since the teen sleuth made her debut in 1930.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/entertainment/books/orl-drew05oct16,0,4035906.story?coll=orl-calbookstop

Hygienic Lab Testing Infants In Hurricane Wake (Shreveport Times, Oct. 16)
A list of briefs with information for recent hurricane victims notes that parents of babies born between Aug. 15 and Sept. 21 or who otherwise were affected by Hurricane Katrina should check to see if their child's heel-stick screening tests have been processed. A New Orleans laboratory used by the state Office of Public Health has been unable to process them. Meantime, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY is handling the tests. The paper is based in Louisiana.
http://www.shreveporttimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051016/NEWS01/510160333/1002/NEWS

Adams Notes Lack Of 'Clot-Buster' Use (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Oct. 15)
Since 1996, the clot-busting drug t-PA, which had been used for years to treat heart attacks, has been approved as an intravenous treatment for strokes. Studies show that patients who get the drug have much better odds of recovering without major disability. But because the drug can cause serious bleeding in the brain, in most cases it must be given within three hours of the onset of symptoms, far sooner than when most patients finally get to the hospital. As a result, fewer than 5 percent of stroke patients get t-PA. "It's sad," said HAROLD ADAMS, a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa and spokesman for the American Stroke Association. "Maybe it is a tragedy. I'm very frustrated."
http://www.jsonline.com/news/metro/oct05/363420.asp

Porter: New Bankruptcy Law 'Terribly Drafted' (NBC-10, Oct. 14)
Critics of a new bankruptcy law say it's bad news for many people. "The new bankruptcy law is terribly drafted, incredibly complicated and is going to price some people out of being able to afford bankruptcy relief," said KATHERINE PORTER, of the University of Iowa. The station is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.nbc10.com/consumeralert/5100622/detail.html

Fiber Optic Network Loses Ground (WQAD-TV, Oct. 14)
The state's fiber optic network is losing ground to online classes at Iowa's two largest universities. The Iowa Communications Network (ICN) was once touted as the best way to deliver higher education to more Iowans. But over the past five years it has fallen out of favor at the University of Iowa and Iowa State University, where it has been replaced by online classes. Iowa spokeswoman ANNE ZALENSKI says while the ICN is a good system, people are looking for something they can do at midnight from their convenience of their own home. The TV station is based in Moline, Ill. http://www.kwqc.com/Global/story.asp?S=3978676&nav=7k7NJ1IJ

Hurst Advises on Email Etiquette (Shreveport Times, Oct. 14)
Among the faux pas that many recent college graduates make early in their careers is begin too casual in their emails, according to DEE HURST, director of human resources at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. "A lot of new grads get nailed in their career early for sending really too casual e-mails," Hurst said. An e-mail is still a written document that can be printed and forwarded, so use proper grammar and check your spelling. As a rule of thumb: Visualize any e-mails you send as also going to a manager two levels above you, Hurst said. Also nix the online abbreviations, and save the "emoticons," which use punctuation to express emotion, for text messages to your friends. The newspaper is based in Louisiana. http://www.shreveporttimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051014/NEWS05/510140307/1064

Bhattacharya Comments on Cell Process (Scientific American, Oct. 14)
A tiny ocean organism's relationship with an alga is shedding light on an unexplained process that occurred more than a billion years ago and drove the evolution of plants and algae. The process involves one stage that could hint at what needs to happen to make a chloroplast a permanent part of the cell. "Whatever you need to make that a permanent part is not occurring here. Maybe in a hundred millions years it will figure it out," says biologist DEBASHISH BHATTACHARYA, director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Genetics at the University of Iowa. http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa003&articleID=000DBF79-0930-134F-893083414B7F0000

Teen Drinking Study Noted (Fox News, Oct. 14)
A new study shows children's environment and how they react to that environment are more important determinants of the age of first drink than genetic factors. "A number of studies have demonstrated that an early [age of first drink] is associated with increased rates of childhood psychiatric disorders, lowered success in school and extracurricular activities, increased criminal behavior, and lowered overall life satisfaction and productivity," says researcher SAMUEL KUPERMAN, director of the division of child psychiatry at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.  http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,172192,00.html

Kuperman Comments on Drinking Study (Forbes.com, Oct. 13)
A family history of alcoholism has little to do with the age at which a child takes his or her first alcoholic drink, a U.S. study finds. The study of children aged 7 to 17 looked at four factors that may affect age at first drinking: child characteristics, family demographics, family psychopathology, and child behavior problems. "Three variables explained 45 percent of the model variance," study corresponding author DR. SAMUEL KUPERMAN, director of the division of child psychiatry, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, said in a prepared statement. "Age at interview accounted for 38.3 percent, conduct scale score accounted for 6.2 percent, and the number of alcohol-dependent adult siblings accounted for 0.5 percent," he said. http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/10/13/hscout528502.html

Woman Advocates Farm Safety (Farm and Ranch Guide, Oct. 13)
After an farm accident killed her son, Farm Safety 4 Just Kids founder Marilyn Adams warned farmers and others about risks of gravity-flow wagons.__ In 1988, Marilyn attended a farm safety conference at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and began spreading the word to medical professionals. http://www.farmandranchguide.com/articles/2005/10/13/ag_news/regional_news/news15.txt

UI Researchers Develop Flu Market (Economist, Oct. 13)
Extrapolating from the adage "two heads are better than one", a group of economists at the University of Iowa has learned how to turn the instincts of individuals into useful predictions of the future. So far, the researchers have tested their method by predicting the outcome of such events as the American presidential election and the number of books sold on the first day of a Harry Potter release. Now, they have turned their sights to influenza. PHILIP POLGREEN and his colleagues wondered if they could succeed where medical science had failed, and give adequate warning of influenza outbreaks. They developed a flu market was able to predict the flu activity with 80 percent accuracy, two to three weeks in advance. With a lead time of four weeks, it was able to get within one colour either side 90 percent of the time. http://www.economist.com/science/displayStory.cfm?story_id=5017176

Author Kidder Profiled (Kalamazoo Gazette, Oct. 13)
A profile of writer Tracy Kidder notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP from 1971 to 1974. The newspaper is based in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/news/kzgazette/index.ssf?/base/news-15/112921686358640.xml&coll=7

Workshop Alumnus Is Poet, Musician (OnMilwaukee.com, Oct. 13)
Louisiana-bred songwriter Kevin Gordon has both mastered the art of churning, bayou-driven rock and earned a master's degree from a venerated writing school as a published poet. This singular combination permeates his great CDs, and better yet, his live performances. Gordon plays a rare Milwaukee gig Oct. 22. Gordon, 41, was born in Shreveport, La., and grew up to the east in Monroe, also in the northern part of the state. He later earned his master's degree from the prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, becoming a published poet. But through the years, Gordon also played guitar, wrote songs and performed in bands. And when he reached a career crossroads, the pull of writing and playing music won out.
http://onmilwaukee.com/music/articles/kevgordon.html?7639

UI's Galvin To Offer Local Workshop (Green River Star, Oct. 13)
Poet and novelist James Galvin, author of "Fencing the Sky," the first Sweetwater County "One Book, One County" selection, will offer a free writing workshop Oct. 28 at Western Wyoming Community College. Chicago born and northern Colorado raised, Galvin now splits his time between his Wyoming ranch at Tie Siding and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at Iowa City, where he is a member of the permanent faculty of the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The newspaper is based in Wyoming.
http://www.greenriverstar.com/articles/2005/10/12/people/people2.txt

Column Notes Grant Wood's UI Ties (Marketwatch.com, Oct. 13)
Columnist Marshall Loeb writes, "Every now and then it's important to get out from behind the damn desk to see what's really going on in the country. So I recently accepted an invitation from local leaders to give some speeches about the future of the economy, and spend a few days interviewing the folks in bucolic Cedar Rapids, Iowa. If you ever doubt where you are, just pop into the local art museum and be swept away by 'American Gothic' by Grant Wood, who was an art teacher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, some 20 miles down the road. Like many communities in rapidly changing America, this place is full of surprises." This column also was published Oct. 13 on the Web site of INVESTORS BUSINESS DAILY.
http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?guid=%7B1F55025F-7A28-45F0-A7AF-E29026BBFB89%7D&siteid=google

UI Students Make Solon Tenderloin A Novelty (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 13)
Three Tribune reporters who are "former Iowans" (if such a thing is possible) write about their quest to find a decent breaded pork tenderloin sandwich in Illinois. They agree that Joensys in Solon, Iowa, is Mecca for the tenderloin enthusiast, noting that Joensys owner Biran Joens says he sells about 600 breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches a week. He attributes their popularity to the fact Iowans prefer plain, simple food and stick with something they like. Forever. It also helps that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is only a few miles away and the sandwiches have become a novelty of sorts for students.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/services/newspaper/premium/printedition/Thursday/atplay/chi-0510120412oct13,1,3516414.story

Grose: Chickenpox Cases Justify Immunization (ABC News Online, Oct. 12)
While chickenpox seems to be in decline among school-aged children, the threat of a serious case -- in which the virus can spread to the bones, lungs, blood and even to the brain, causing a range of serious diseases like pneumonia and encephalitis -- is enough justification for continuing vaccinations. "Even though the risk of encephalitis [from chickenpox] is not high at about one in 10,000," says Dr. CHARLES GROSE, author of a study outlining the impact of the chickenpox vaccine from the University of Iowa. "There is no risk of getting it with the vaccine," and sooner or later someone is going to become one of the statistics, he adds.
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Healthology/story?id=1204588

Bechara: 'Psychopaths' Make Best Decisions (African-American News, Oct. 11)
A columnist, musing on whether he tested his faith by staying home despite being in the path of Hurricane Rita, discusses the issues of courage and risk-taking and quotes ANTOINE BECHARA, a professor of neurology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, whose study revealed that "'functional psychopaths' make the best decisions, because they can't experience emotions such as fear. Fear stops most people from taking even logical risks -- meaning those who have suffered damage to areas of the brain affecting emotions, and can suppress feelings, make better decisions. The ability to control emotion helps performance even in business and the financial markets." The publication is based in Texas.
http://www.aframnews.com/html/2005-10-12/budseye.htm

Helms Plans Aggressive Staff Immunization Campaign (New York Times, Oct. 11)
As worries increase about the possibility of a flu pandemic, public health officials are hoping that this year's flu season will be the first in years with an abundance of vaccines. Dr. CHARLES M. HELMS, chief of staff at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, said he planned an aggressive campaign this year to immunize much of his own staff, since national surveys showed that just 38 percent of health care workers were immunized against the flu each year. Dr. Helms said he hoped that widespread worry about a pandemic flu would increase immunization rates against seasonal flu.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/11/health/11vaccine.html

Peters Studies Ultrafine Particle Hazard (Occupational Hazards, Oct. 11)
A new study, conducted by researchers from the University of Iowa looked at the ultrafine particle levels in a 1.1-million-square-foot machining and assembly facility that makes about 1,000 diesel engines a day. Researchers involved in the study found the greatest ultrafine particle number concentrations in the block-head-rod area, and they believe that the majority of ultrafine particles generated in that area came from direct-fire, natural gas burners that heated the supply air. Researchers observed a nearly 1,000-percent spike in number concentration of ultrafine particles in the supply air when the heating system was operating compared to when it was turned off. Researchers also noted that the number concentration of ultrafine particles in the block-head-rod area was "dramatically lower" in the spring, when the heating system was off and the outside doors were open, lead author THOMAS PETERS of the University of Iowa concludes in the study.
http://www.occupationalhazards.com/articles/14139

Student Saves Buying Tickets Online (Bankrate.com, Oct. 11)
If you're buying an airline ticket, booking a hotel room, picking out a computer or even shopping for an unusual book, something small and obvious sounding may surprise you. Before you search the virtual world over for a deal, just go to the maker's home page and see if they'll give you something good. Jeremy Knapp, a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, saved on a holiday flight by buying through the airline. "The last time I went home for Thanksgiving, I checked Travelocity, Expedia and Orbitz, and I found tickets that were consistently $45 to $60 higher than what was on Delta.com," Knapp says. "Plus Delta had a direct flight with no connections, just straight from Cedar Rapids to Cincinnati."
http://www.bankrate.com/brm/news/cheap/20051010a1.asp

Robinson Comments on Obesity (CBS News, Oct. 10)
It doesn't matter very much whether you're rich or poor if you are overweight. A study done by the University of Iowa has shown that the rich are not immune from being overweight and the fat cats in America are getting really fat. "We used to think that obesity was primarily a problem of people in lower socioeconomic groups, and now we've found that it's a problem across all income categories," said DR. JENNIFER ROBINSON, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Iowa on the show "The Osgood Files." "Certainly, things that could play a role are eating more food, eating out more, eating more at restaurants, lattes, carry-out or simply that people have less time to exercise because they're working too hard or commuting longer." 
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=84a533605f8ebf513e4d0aa39e76aa3f&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=e1598bc4e3ce80a1d27f0dabb4336c82

Alumnus Helped Unlock Flu Code (Rocklin and Roseville Today, Oct. 10)
A story about successful efforts to sequence the genetic blueprint of the deadly "Spanish flu" pandemic, which swept the globe in 1918-19 and killed as many as 50 million people, says a large sample of lung specimens gathered from victims surfaced in 1997, when retired researcher and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate Johan Hultin, hearing of another researcher's efforts, returned to the chase for flu virus. Hultin had led an expedition to Brevig in 1951 and, with the permission of local elders, retrieved lung-tissue samples from four bodies preserved in permafrost. With the lab technology available at the time, he was unable to revive the virus. In 1997, he returned to Brevig and found one obese woman's body in the mass grave. Her lungs had been particularly well-preserved because her excess body fat had helped insulate them during brief periods when the permafrost had melted. The paper is based in California.
http://www.rocklintoday.com/news/templates/health_news.asp?articleid=2583&zoneid=7

UI-Aided Study: Many Wrong Diagnoses (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Oct. 10)
A new study suggests that hundreds of thousands of people get wrong diagnoses on initial cancer tests. While follow-up tests usually provide the right answers, the errors can lead to diagnosis delays, increased costs and anxiety for patients, said Dr. Stephen Raab, a pathologist at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He and researchers at Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Detroit's Henry Ford Health System and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTHCARE reviewed cancer tests conducted in their medical centers. "We found up to 10 percent of these tests had errors associated with them," Dr. Raab said. Their findings will be published online today in Cancer.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05283/585801.stm

UI Alumnus Played Key Role In Flu Research (Washington Post, Oct. 9)
A story about the effort it took over many years to resurrect the deadly Spanish influenza virus of 1918 so its genetic code could be broken says a key player in the effort was Johan Hultin. Hultin had taken a break from medical studies in his native Sweden to study for a doctorate in microbiology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. At a departmental lunch in 1950, he heard a professor make a passing reference to the idea that intact samples of the infamous 1918 strain might still exist in bodies frozen in the Arctic. Hultin was looking for a dissertation project. He proposed to his adviser that he try to recover the virus for use in a vaccine. The idea was approved.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/10/09/AR2005100900932_pf.html

Feld Angered By TIAA-CREF Fee-Hike Effort (New York Times, Oct. 9)
TIAA-CREF is not exactly a household name. But the firm, which manages more than $350 billion for universities and other nonprofit organizations, is trying to raise its profile with an expensive advertising campaign, the first in its 87-year history. But it recently angered investors by trying to raise some of its mutual funds' management fees, which have been among the lowest in the industry. Shareholders voted against the increases at 9 out of 12 affected funds in late August. "This makes me so angry I could spit," said RONALD FELD, director of clinical chemistry laboratories of the University of Iowa hospitals and clinics. Mr. Feld, a customer of TIAA-CREF since 1976, who voted against the higher fees. "At a time when stocks are returning low single digits, expenses are especially important." Feld is also featured in a photograph accompanying the story.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/09/business/mutfund/09tiaa.html

Fry Pretty In Pink; Color Use Study Cited (Dallas Morning News, Oct. 9)
A columnist reports that University of North Texas football team honored former head coach HAYDEN FRY and his 1975 team at halftime of UNT's loss to Troy, "and the crafty old coach came dressed like he was going out clubbing afterwards -- decked out in maroon suit with a pink shirt open at the collar." It also quotes UNT professor Don Beck's comments about University of Iowa professors who want to do away with Fry's old policy of painting the opposing team's locker room pink. Beck claims to have given this idea to Fry on a trip he made to Iowa City to a "Values in Coaching Workshop." Said Beck: "When in Iowa City I described for Hayden and his group how law enforcement organizations would use such a pink room to 'calm down' aggressive humans rather than use physical force." Beck also emailed the columnist a study titled "The Physiological Effect of Color on the Suppression of Human Aggression: Research on Baker-Miller Pink" by Dr. Alexander G. Schauss, Director, A.I.B.R. Life Sciences at the American Institute for Biosocial Research, Inc. Tacoma, Wash. The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/drc/sports/stories/DRC_Szatmary_column.11062e6fa.html

Students Get Scam Job Emails (Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, Oct. 9)
A story about job scams on the Web warns that if a job seems too good to be true, it probably is. In addition to illegal activities, students are often targets for scams that ask them to send in money to make money. For example, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students were sent e-mail messages asking for participants in research projects; to be hired for the job, students were told to pay a $30 membership fee. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051009/BUSINESS0105/510090315/-1/COLUMNS

Levy: Amoxicillin May Cause Infant Teeth Decay (Indianapolis Star, Oct. 9)
Giving the antibiotic amoxicillin to infants may contribute to problems with the enamel of their permanent teeth, a new study suggests. However, the study authors and other experts said the finding is preliminary and more research is needed to determine if a cause-and-effect relationship exists. "The changes in the appearance of the teeth in children that we call dental fluorosis appears to be associated with the use of amoxicillin during the first year of life," said lead researcher Dr. STEVEN M. LEVY, the Wright-Bush-Shreeves Professor of Research and director of Dental Public Health at the University of Iowa. The findings appear in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051009/NEWS06/510090412/1083/LIVING01

Nelson, Polgreen Discuss Flu Market (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 8)
Public-health officials who predict the timing and size of seasonal flu epidemics could learn a trick or two from the Chicago futures market, researchers said. Economics professor FORREST NELSON and medical-school instructor PHILIP POLGREEN of the University of Iowa in Iowa City said they were able to predict the extent of flu outbreaks in Iowa last year by adapting a futures-market model that also has forecast events from presidential elections to the Academy Awards. The study was presented at the Infectious Disease Society of America meeting in San Francisco Thursday.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB112873661273663550.html

UI Press' 'Sweeping Beauty' Reviewed (Detroit News, Oct. 8)
A new book of poetry, "Sweeping Beauty: Contemporary Women Poets Do Housework" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2005), features 80 poets, including notables such as Margaret Atwood and Alicia Suskin Ostriker, who pivot back and forth from opposite ends of domesticity's spectrum. The women either are decrying housework's drudgeries or celebrating the joys of the kitchen. They either embrace "women's work" or highly resent it.
http://www.detnews.com/2005/lifestyle/0510/08/E04-340670.htm

Fisher Questions Business-Friendly Indices (Rocky Mountain News, Oct. 8)
A columnist wondering why, if -- as many rankings suggest -- Colorado is such a business-friendly state, its economy isn't better off cites a book by PETER FISHER, a professor at the University of Iowa, titled "Grading Places: What Do Business Climate Rankings Really Tell Us?" Fisher, who studied five rankings used to determine business-friendly places, said the rankings all "assert that they are measuring something of critical importance to a state's economic future and its potential for growth. Thirty-four of the 50 states can claim they are in the top 10 in terms of business climate or competitiveness; they just have to pick which of the five indexes they want to point to." Fisher concludes that "none of them actually do a very good job of measuring what it is they claim to measure, and they do not, for the most part, set out to measure the right things to begin with."
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/business_columnists/article/0,1299,DRMN_82_4142248,00.html

Illinois Faculty Want Ban Because of Mascots (News-Gazette, Oct. 7)
Some faculty at the University of Illinois and other universities are asking NCAA Division I schools not to schedule sports competitions with the UI and other schools that use American Indian mascots. A letter signed by 90 people, mostly faculty members from various universities, was sent Tuesday to the presidents, chancellors and athletic directors at more than 300 universities. The letter comes after the NCAA adopted a policy in August that prohibits schools using "hostile or abusive" American Indian imagery from hosting postseason events or displaying such imagery at those events. When the NCAA announced its policy, it also suggested schools follow the lead of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Wisconsin, which don't schedule regular season, non-conference games with schools that use American Indian nicknames or mascots. The paper covers the Urbana-Champaign area of Illinois.
http://www.news-gazette.com/localnews/story.cfm?Number=19111

FCC Commissioner Takes Comments At UI Forum (FMQB Radio, Oct. 7)
FCC Commissioner Jonathan Adelstein hosted a public forum at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA (dubbed "Town Meeting on the Future of the Media"), addressing local concerns surrounding state of media consolidation and deregulation. The forum, attended by citizens and broadcasters served as a pulpit for the necessity of local news media, with Commissioner Adelstein stating, "What we've done over the years is to pull our own fangs, and we have become basically a toothless tiger. The public is better served hearing many voices rather than a handful of giant voices across a number of outlets they own. There's virtually no coverage of local issues." The station is based in New Jersey.
http://www.fmqb.com/Article.asp?id=129878

Nelson, Polgreen Flu Market Study Cited (Medpage Today, Oct. 7)
Using Wall Street traders' techniques, healthcare workers predicted flu outbreaks two weeks before the actual events, according to a pilot study. To test whether such market methods would be useful for prediction of infectious diseases, researchers at the University of Iowa recruited 60 healthcare workers from their state and organized a stock-market scenario. They described their methods and results at a meeting here of the Infectious Disease Society of America. "Ninety-percent of the time, the market was able to get within one color four weeks ahead of the event," said FORREST D. NELSON, Ph.D., an economist at the university who has developed prediction markets and is a member of the research team. PHILIP M. POLGREEN, M.D., the infectious disease specialist who led the study, is also quoted. Stories that run in MedPage Today are linked to directly from MSNBC's Website.
http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/URItheFlu/tb/1890

Former UI Professor Comments On Vaccine (Sci-Tech Today, Oct. 7)
An experimental vaccine against cervical cancer has moved a step closer toward becoming the first cancer vaccine of any kind on the market. Scientists are reporting today that the vaccine was 100 percent effective in preventing cervical cancer and precancerous changes tied to two types of a common sexually transmitted virus. "Preteens and adolescents, sexually active or not, could receive the HPV vaccine along with the other shots they're required to get, said co-investigator Kevin Ault, an Emory University obstetrician/gynecologist who did his research when at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sci-tech-today.com/news/Study--Vaccine-Prevents-Cervical-Cancer/story.xhtml?story_id=0130009WBYGO

Virtual Soldier Program Noted (Clarion Ledger, Oct. 7)
Mississippi State University engineers are helping test computer-generated animation techniques the U.S. Army hopes will simulate real soldiers performing tasks in real time. The university's Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems recently was awarded a $500,000 contract to develop methods for testing and validating digital human models created at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as part of the Virtual Soldier Research program. The newspaper is based in Jackson, Miss.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051007/NEWS01/510070352/1002

Media Forum Held At UI (Billboard Radio Monitor, Oct. 7)
FCC commissioner Jonathan Adelstein railed against media consolidation at a public forum at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Oct. 5, saying that media deregulation tends to harm small communities, where local broadcast news dries up. The event was the latest stop on his and fellow commissioner Michael Copps' series of community forums designed to gather testimony before the FCC rewrites ownership guidelines. "I want to make sure that what we do serves the public interest and not the interest of corporations that seek to profit," Adelstein said, according to the Des Moines Register.
http://billboardradiomonitor.com/radiomonitor/news/business/leg_reg/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1001261787

UI Developed Flu Futures Market (Contra Costa Times, Oct. 7)
Forget corn and soybean futures. The market to watch may soon become flu futures. Several dozen health professionals have been wheeling and dealing, predicting when the annual influenza season will arrive. A test run of the market indicated the pooled knowledge of "futures" investors produced an earlier and more accurate forecast of the flu season. "Even one or two weeks' notice would be helpful," said DR. PHILIP POLGREEN, an infectious diseases associate at the University of Iowa. "For example, it would provide an opportunity to increase vaccination rates. ... It would also help us plan for an increase in admissions to the hospitals." The newspaper is based in California. http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/living/health/12841403.htm

Ross Advises Checking Drug Expiration Dates (Kansas City Star, Oct. 7)
MARY ROSS
, pharmacy supervisor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, says it's important to check the contents of your medicine cabinet regularly. "But, over time, the chemical makeup and potency of medications changes," Ross says. "Taking outdated medications may also mean you are taking a pill that is not going to help you. Many medications become ineffective past their expiration date. Heat, cold and moisture can also affect a medication's potency." http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/living/12834393.htm

Cadaver Service Noted (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 7)
Many medical schools have begun showing their appreciation with annual memorial services to honor the cadavers used in anatomy courses. Families of those who deeded their bodies join the students who dissected them -- each group remembering the donors in distinctly different ways. "The students, anatomically, know the donor better than anybody else, but they know little about who that person was," says JOHN F. ENGELHARDT, the University of Iowa's interim head of anatomy and cell biology. "Did they have a big family? What were their interests? What kind of mourning is their family going through?" The University of Iowa has been offering the memorial service for more than 30 years, usually in the cemetery where the bodies will be buried.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i07/07a00602.htm

UI Graduate Contributed To Flu Discovery (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 6)
The tissue sample that Dr. Johan Hultin extracted from the frozen ribcage of a corpse seven feet deep in the subarctic permafrost in 1997 would be used by federal researchers to help unlock the genetic secrets behind the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic that killed tens of millions of people in the waning days of World War I. Researchers announced Wednesday that they've recently completed the reconstruction of the genetic map of the virus. The Swedish-born Hultin immigrated to the United States in 1949. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE and worked at the Mayo Clinic.
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2005/10/06/MNGB9F37E71.DTL

Former UI Researcher Aided Flu Study (Scripps Howard News Service, Oct. 6)
Government and university researchers used virus particles from preserved samples of lung tissue to sequence the genetic blueprint of the deadly flu of 1918-19 and have resurrected a live virus that contains all eight genes of the flu strain that turned many American cities into ghost towns at the end of World War I. The team detailed the sequence of the last three genes of the flu virus in a report published Thursday in the journal Nature. A second report on the reconstituted flu virus is being published Friday in the journal Science. Lung specimens collected during autopsies of soldiers preserved in the institute's archives enabled the team to tease out details about the virus. A larger sample of material came in 1997, when retired UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researcher Johan Hultin collected a sample from the lungs of a female flu victim buried in the Alaska permafrost. Versions of this article appeared Oct. 6 on the Web sites of the KNOXVILLE (Tenn.) NEWS SENTINEL, BREMERTON (Wash.) SUN, and RECORD-SEARCHLIGHT in California.
http://www.knoxstudio.com/shns/story.cfm?pk=FLUGENES-10-05-05&cat=AN

Former UI Professor Founder Of Successful Company (New York Times, Oct. 5)
In the late 1800's a New York surgeon named William B. Coley noticed that when one of his cancer patients developed a severe bacterial infection, the cancer disappeared. Over the following decades, Dr. Coley began injecting tumors with bacteria, with some success. But the results were inconsistent, and critics derided the work as quackery. "Coley's toxins," as they were called, faded into disuse with the advent of radiation treatments and chemotherapy. Now, though, recent discoveries about the immune system have spurred interest in modern descendants of Coley's toxins. Big drug makers are putting money into the effort, including Pfizer and Sanofi-Aventis, which have both placed bets on a biotechnology upstart named in honor of the surgeon, the Coley Pharmaceutical Group.  Many previous attempts to stimulate the immune system - by using so-called cancer vaccines, for example - have not worked. Others, like the immune-bolstering drugs interferon and interleukin-2, can cause debilitating side effects. "The history of immune modulators is ugly," said Arthur M. Krieg, the founder and chief scientist of Coley, which is based in Wellesley, Mass. But he said that the new drugs appeared to stimulate the immune system in a more directed way. Krieg, a former professor who has done groundbreaking work in the field at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, started Coley in 1997. He initially named the company CpG ImmunoPharmaceuticals, with the CpG being shorthand for the DNA pattern at the heart of his work. The company changed its name to the Coley Pharmaceutical Group in 2000, but only after receiving the blessing of Helen Coley Nauts, Dr. Coley's daughter. Ms. Nauts, who died in 2001, had preserved her father's legacy and founded the nonprofit Cancer Research Institute in New York to further the study of immune-based cancer therapy.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/05/business/05toll.html

Hong Leads Study On Antibiotics, Dental Problems (WebIndia123.com, Oct. 5)
Amoxil (amoxicillin), an antibiotic widely used on infants, may cause dental problems later in life, says a study. LIANG HONG and colleagues at the University of Iowa enrolled 1,390 participants at birth from eight Iowa hospitals. Of those, 579 had an examination of early-erupting permanent teeth at approximately the age of nine; their teeth were assessed for fluorosis, reports medical portal MedPage Today. From birth to 32 months, the children had been followed by regular questionnaires, filled out by their parents, to assess fluoride intake and the use of Amoxil (also sold under the brand names Trimox and Wymox).
http://news.webindia123.com/news/showdetails.asp?id=129427&n_date=20051005&cat=Health

Fisher: Business Climate Studies Carry Bias (Business Gazette, Oct. 5)
A story about the kinds of data executives use to make choices on where to open an office or expand business said think tanks such as the Cato Institute, the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council and the Tax Foundation, all of Washington, the Beacon Hill Institute at Suffolk University in Boston and the Pacific Research Institute in San Francisco rated Maryland anywhere from 17th best to 27th best in business climate last year. That wasn't too much of a variation compared with the rankings of neighboring states Virginia and Pennsylvania. The former placed from third to 26th, while the latter varied from 12th to 45th. Such studies carry political biases, said PETER FISHER, a professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa who recently released a study of his own on - what else? - the business climate studies. The indices vary but have one thing in common - a claim that lower taxes and fewer government regulations will lead to more business growth, Fisher said. ''None of them actually do a very good job of measuring what it is they claim to measure, and they do not, for the most part, set out to measure the right things to begin with," he wrote. The paper is based in Maryland. http://www.gazette.net/stories/100505/busimlo215911_31892.shtml

Boyle Attended UI Writers' Workshop In '70s (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Oct. 5)
A feature story on author T.C. Boyle says that the greatest moment of my career was when he was doing a book signing during the buildup to the Iraq War, and a 16-year-old girl said that the two artists who were helping her cope were Boyle and Britney Spears. Boyle, who was in the writing program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the early '70s, said that at the time he could hardly have imagined he'd be mentioned in the same breath as a pop superstar. Now his novel "Tortilla Curtain" is mandatory reading for every high school student in his adopted state of California, and he has an army of passionate fans around the globe who congregate at his web site, www.tcboyle.com.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/books/story/58482724A7D6DF6686257091000CCE5B?OpenDocument

LGBT Students Protest Recruiters On UI Campus (GayNZ.com, Oct. 5)
Two American Universities have staged protests against military recruitment on campus after the Pentagon has begun pulling funding from schools who deny recruitment access on anti-discrimination grounds.  After 24 law schools went to court, fighting for their right to refuse military recruitment on campus due to the anti-gay "don't ask don't tell" policy; three of those schools were charged and their funding withheld. Under the Solomon Amendment, universities must allow military recruiters full access to campus, students, and student records. The government, under this law, can withhold federal funds from a University who does not cooperate fully. Stanford University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA held noisy protests as military recruiters entered their campuses this week, and recruiters left a short while later with no students having shown any interest in enlisting. Students at Iowa have been raising awareness of the military's anti-gay position, saying it is outrageous that recruiters had let it be known that they would not interview LGBT students. "We're not anti-military," one student said, "we're just opposed to the policy that excludes gays." The publication is baed in New Zealand.
http://www.gaynz.com/news/default.asp?dismode=article&artid=2865

Fry: 'UI Hospitals And Clinics Saved My Life' (ESPN2, Oct. 4)
Former Hawkeye head football coach Hayden Fry, a guest in the broadcast booth during the North Texas-Troy State football game, briefly chatted with the commentators and discussed his successful battle against prostate cancer and the importance of getting PSA screenings. Fry also said that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS saved his life. (No link available).

UI Student Named Arts Group Director (Chatham Journal, Oct. 4)
Janet Seiz, an arts historian and community arts advocate with 25 years of experience, is the new Executive Director of ChathamArts, the county arts council. Seiz is a doctoral candidate in history at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

The Journal is based in Chatham, N.C.
http://www.chathamjournal.com/weekly/news/local/chathamarts-seiz-51004.shtml

UI Study: Antibiotic Linked To Tooth Enamel Problems (CNN, Oct. 4)
One of the most widely used pediatric antibiotics, Amoxil (amoxicillin), may interfere with the complete development of tooth enamel, researchers here say. The findings were based on a longitudinal study of the effects of fluoride on tooth development, and they "highlight the need to use antibiotics judiciously, particularly during infancy," reported LIANG HONG, DDS, Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of Iowa. But, they noted in the October issue of Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, the study has several limitations -- including a relative lack of children not treated with the antibiotic -- and requires further research before it can be considered conclusive. The association between Amoxil and fluorosis on some early-erupting permanent teeth "holds implications for both dental and medical practice if it holds up," said Paul Casamassimo, DDS, of the Ohio State University College of Dentistry in Columbus.
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/GeneralPediatrics/tb/1862

Levy: Antibiotics May Damage Childrens' Teeth (Forbes, Oct. 4)
Giving the antibiotic amoxicillin to infants may contribute to problems with the enamel of their permanent teeth, a new study suggests. However, the study authors and other experts said the finding is preliminary and more research is needed to determine if a cause-and-effect relationship exists. Amoxicillin is commonly prescribed to children for problems such as ear infections and other bacterial illnesses. "The changes in the appearance of the teeth in children that we call dental fluorosis appears to be associated with the use of amoxicillin during the first year of life," said lead researcher Dr. STEVEN M. LEVY, the Wright-Bush-Shreeves Professor of Research and director of Dental Public Health at the University of Iowa. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the BBC, REUTERS, NEWSWEEK, WEB MD, HEALTHCENTRAL, ABC NEWS, KPHO-TV, WLEX-TV, MEDPAGE TODAY, WILLISTON (N.D.) HERALD, the Qatar GULF TIMES and many other media outlets. http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/10/03/hscout528303.html

Levy Not Sure How Antibiotic Harms Young Teeth (Times Columnist, Oct. 4)
The most commonly prescribed antibiotic for babies and children appears to double the risk of tooth defects in permanent teeth, new research shows. The defects range from barely noticeable white flecks to, in the most severe cases, pits and brown stains. U.S. researchers who followed 579 children from birth found 24 per cent developed fluorosis -- tooth enamel defects -- on their permanent front teeth, and children were twice as likely to have stained teeth if they had been given amoxicillin between three and six months of age. So far, no biological explanation exists for how the drug might be harming tooth enamel, said one of the investigators, Dr. STEVEN LEVY. The paper is based in Canada. Versions of the story also ran in the VANCOUVER SUN in Canada and other media outlets.
http://www.canada.com/victoria/timescolonist/news/story.html?id=c2a53ea8-dc21-4ed6-ac74-6337b0e45aae

Nancy Drew Creator Benson Was UI Alumna (Raleigh News and Observer, Oct. 4)
A review of "Girl Detective: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her," about the series of books mostly written by Mildred Wirt Benson, a plucky Iowan who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1925 and worked as a journalist before writing the Nancy Drew series. The same review appeared on the Web site of the CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR.
http://www.newsobserver.com/24hour/entertainment/story/2776182p-11389860c.html

Photographer Received BA, MFA From UI (Portsmouth Herald, Oct. 4)
Photographer Douglas Prince, whose work is on exhibit at a Portsmouth gallery, is profiled. Prince is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a BA in art and MFA in photography. The paper is based in Maine. http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/10042005/it/66259.htm

Suit Against UI Allowed Over Stuttering Study (Inside Higher Ed, Oct. 4)
The Iowa Supreme Court ruled 4-3 on Friday that the University of Iowa could be sued for its role in a notorious research project, started in 1939, in which orphans were taught to stutter. Some of the orphans developed stutters and others said that they had lifelong damage because of the experiments, which were supervised by the late Wendell Johnson, who was considered a leader in treating speech disorders. The Iowa Supreme Court's ruling does not resolve the case, but sends it back to a lower court to hear arguments on the merits of the issues involved. The university has apologized for the experiments. Shortly after the San Jose Mercury News reported on them, DAVID SKORTON (then the vice president for research and now Iowa's president) issued a statement saying that the university was "deeply sorry" for what had happened. http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2005/10/04/iowa

Rietz Study Cited in Disaster Risk Commentary (Business Week, Oct. 3)
An allowance for varying probabilities of disaster events may explain a lot of riddles in study of finance. In an his article, THOMAS REITZ of the University of Iowa argued that the high equity premium and the low risk-free real interest rate could be explained by fears of low-probability disaster events, such as a depression. People are risk-averse and try to protect themselves against a collapse of stocks in bad economic times. In his version of Reitz's theory, Robert J. Barrois a professor of economics at Harvard University says the average equity premium suggests that the Rietz thesis explains not only the high equity premium and low risk-free rate but also several other conundrums, including the volatility of stock prices.

UI Investment Study Noted (Toronto Globe and Mail, Oct. 3)
"Functional psychopaths" make the best investment decisions -- and may also make good CEOs -- because they can't experience emotions such as fear, a study by researchers at Stanford Graduate School of Business indicates. Fear stops people from taking even logical risks, meaning those who have suffered damage to areas of the brain affecting emotions and can suppress feeling, make better decisions, according to their findings. The ability to control emotion helps performance in business and the financial markets, the researchers found. "Many CEOs and many top lawyers might share this trait," ANTOINE BECHARA, a professor of neurology of the University of Iowa, said in a statement on the Stanford Graduate School of Business website. The study was carried out by Stanford, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Iowa.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20051003/COBRIEFS03-2/TPBusiness/General

Lutz Suggests Intelligent Design Additions (Daily Herald, Oct. 3)
In a satirical op-ed piece, TOM LUTZ, professor of English at the University of Iowa, suggests supplementing the teaching of Intelligent Design theory with ideas from Ghanain or Nigerian mythology, and also announces his intention to develop a new alternate creation theory, Malevolent Design. The Herald is based in Provo, Utah.
http://www.harktheherald.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=65548

UI Student Blogger Noted (Inside Higher Ed, Oct. 3)
For a generation of students who grew up with blogs, online journals and peer-to-peer sites, the Internet has become an arena to write, post and link all the things they might not be able to express normally. The difficulty now, for some, is realizing that, more and more, their "peers" include professors, administrators, prospective employers and sometimes law enforcement personnel. Whereas administrators used to tell students to take the "Hey dude" messages off their answering machines during job-hunting seasons, now some students are being told to watch their digital profiles. Some students seem to be setting themselves up for disaster. A "live journal" from Jen, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA junior, described Jen's fear about a dream in which her boyfriend, Cole, found and read her live journal. "I'm thinking about making this friends only," she writes about the blog, which is open not only to Cole, but also to the world.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2005/10/03/online

Hu Work Exhibited At Taiwan Museum (Taiwan Headlines, Oct. 3)
The National Museum of History in Taipei is holding an exhibition titled "Hu Hung-shu at Seventy: a Retrospective" Sept. 9 to Oct. 2, featuring 80 of Hu's paintings created from 1975 to 2004. Born in Shanghai in 1935, the artist is a professor emeritus at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA School of Art and Art History in Iowa City, where he was the founder and head of the school's design section for more than three decades, from 1968 until his retirement in 2002.
http://english.www.gov.tw/e-Gov/index.jsp?categid=176&recordid=86502

Student Writes About Relationship With Jenna (New York Times, Oct. 2)
Brian Goedde, an M.F.A. candidate in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Nonfiction Writing Program, writes about getting over a bad break-up with a girlfriend.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/02/fashion/sundaystyles/02love.html

Merrill Calls For Renewed Cultural Diplomacy (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 2)
In an op-ed piece, CHRISTOPHER MERRILL calls for a renewal of U.S. cultural diplomacy efforts. Merrill directs the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa and is a member of the Advisory Committee on Cultural Diplomacy.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/chi-0510020298oct02,0,4597641.story

Former Anchor Attended UI (Cincinnati Enquirer, Oct. 2)
Norma Rashid, a former Cincinnati news anchor, said that "when I went to (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA), I was going to become a biochemist. I wanted to try to find medical cures."
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051002/LIFE/510020342/1079

UI Developing Postpartum Depression Questionnaire (Newsday, Oct. 2)
Depending on the assessment method, it's estimated that anywhere from 5 percent to more than 25 percent of new mothers suffer from postpartum depression, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC has set aside $50,000 to launch its first national public awareness campaign on the condition. A date has not yet been set for its launch as the agency is still in the process of getting funding for the campaign. The federal agency is also working with the UNIVERISTY OF IOWA to develop new questions on postpartum depression for its Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, a project to collect data on maternal experiences associated with pregnancy. The same story also appeared on the Web site of the AUBURN (N.Y.) CITIZEN.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newyork/ny-bc-ny--postpartumdepress1001oct01,0,3741536.story?coll=ny-region-apnewyork

Stuttering Lawsuit Kept Alive (Kansas City Star, Oct. 1)
The Iowa Supreme Court on Friday kept alive a lawsuit filed by orphans who alleged lifelong psychological suffering after unwittingly becoming subjects of a stuttering experiment in the 1930s at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Ruling 4-3, the justices agreed with a lower court in rejecting the state's claim of immunity and petition for dismissal. The same story appeared on the Web site of the NORTH COUNTY TIMES (Calif.).
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/nation/12787736.htm

UI Library Turns Cards Into Art (School Library Journal, August 2005)
In an era where "found art" is all the rage, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is helping to fuel the trend. To honor its 150th anniversary, the UI libraries will distribute its last remaining card catalog cards to anyone willing to create works with them. The results will be displayed at the library next year. This article is not available online.

 

 

 

 

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