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March, 2005 See UI in the New Archive Index


Current News Highlights

Poetry Contest Critics Target UI (Boston Globe, March 31)
A columnist addresses the criticisms leveled by contributors to Foetry.com against a number of poetry contests, including one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2005/03/31/website_polices_rhymes_and_misdemeanors/

Alumna Leads Literacy Program (Idaho Statesman, March 31)
A Q&A column with Hildegarde Ayer, executive director of Boise's nonprofit Lee Pesky Learning Center, notes that she holds a master of social work from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.idahostatesman.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050331/NEWS02/503310363/1029

Squire: Iowans Leery Of Bush Plan (All Things Considered, NPR, March 30)
President Bush's trip to Cedar Rapids shows he is shoring up his base on this issue, according to University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE. "I think he probably thought he would have support here and he would have to convince people elsewhere. So coming here is a sign that he really has to work pretty hard even to get Republicans to give his plan full consideration." Squire said the average age in Iowa is among the highest in the nation so Iowans may be a little more resistant to change. "Iowans tend to be skeptical of radical notions from either the left or right and the president's proposal smacks a little bit of radicalism if it's fully implemented. So I think there's some reluctance here even among traditional conservatives here to necessarily throw the current system overboard in favor of something new."
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4568138

Redlawsk Says Iowans Fear Social Security Benefit Cuts (Bloomberg, March 30)
Halfway through a two-month campaign for Social Security overhaul, President Bush is trying to build pressure on Congress to let Americans younger than 55 divert about a third of the taxes they pay to fund Social Security into private investment accounts. Critics such as AARP, the nation's largest seniors lobby, say Bush's private accounts would put retirees' benefits at risk. Iowa is the 19th state Bush has visited to promote private accounts since his Feb. 2 State of the Union address that made an overhaul of Social Security his top domestic goal. He and his Cabinet on March 2 announced plans to visit 60 cities in 60 days to make their case. Iowa is on Bush's travel agenda to "generate some pressure on both [Rep. Jim] Nussle and [Sen. Charles] Grassley," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, in Iowa City. The Congressional Budget Office estimates a conversion to private accounts may require borrowing $1 trillion to $2 trillion. The administration estimates a 10-year price tag of $754 billion. "I don't see any reason to believe folks here are any more positive towards Bush's proposal than anywhere else," Redlawsk said. "It isn't the private accounts that cause so much distrust -- it's the expected cut in benefit guarantees and the huge cost of the transition that bothers people most."
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=aFwu1m8jyXds&refer=us

UI Graduate Promoted At SEC (Dow Jones Newswire, March 30)
The Securities and Exchange Commission promoted Scott Friestad to a top job in its division of enforcement. Friestad, 42, was named associate enforcement director, one of a handful of top jobs in the Washington enforcement division. He was previously assistant director. Friestad also has served as a special assistant U.S. attorney in the southern district of New York. He earned his bachelor and law degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA .

Sener Teaches Chinese Dance Students (China Daily, March 29)
Bodies lay splayed and stretching in the noon sun, as choreographer ALAN SENER looked around the warm studio a bit panicked. "My translator isn't here," he said. "This might be a bit difficult." Sener, an associate professor and chair of the dance department at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, was meant to be a guest artist at the Beijing Dance Academy, but without his interpreter, instructing the class would be a challenge. Sener's objective for the day was to teach the students contact improvisation, a form of dance and theatrical training that allows performing artists to act on impulse and to physically and naturally interact.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-03/29/content_428932.htm

Other Recent News Highlights

Boyle’s Writing Shows Passion For Environment (On Earth Magazine, Spring 2005)
T. C. Boyle first made his literary reputation in his 20s at the famed UNIVERSITY OF IOWA creative writing program. Boyle is known for his verbal exuberance and his scathing wit, but not for what is glaringly apparent to us: his abiding interest in the environment and his satirical, often hilarious, treatment of major environmental issues, from global warming to species extinction to suburban sprawl. Perhaps Boyle is not regarded as an "environmental writer" because people don't believe that anyone so consumed by the subject can also have a sense of humor. On Earth is the magazine of the National Resources Defense Council.
http://www.nrdc.org/onearth/05spr/frontlines2.asp

Stringer's UI Success Cited (Ebony, April 2005)
A profile of C. Vivian Stringer, Rutgers University women's basketball coach, notes that during her 33 years on the sidelines, she has been able to transform concepts into top-notch physical play. In the process, she has become the third-winningest coach in the history of the sport, and the first person, male or female, to take three different schools to the NCAA Tournament's Final Four. She has led her teams to 17 NCAA tournament appearances, including six of the last seven years. Stringer rose to national prominence in 1982 when she coached little-known Cheyney State University to the Final Four, along the way beating much bigger and better-financed schools. She left Cheyney in 1983 to pursue new coaching challenges at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. At Iowa, she built one of the country's top programs, so popular in the Hawkeye State that games were packed on a routine basis. The school even had the first-ever advance sellout. Stringer led Iowa to the Final Four in 1993. Two years later, Stringer left Iowa, with her three children in tow, to coach the Rutgers University Scarlet Knights. She quickly moved in and began to turn around the school's basketball program. In 1998, the school advanced to its first-ever "Sweet 16" in the tournament. The next year the team advanced to the "Elite 8," and in 2000, Stringer led the Scarlet Knights to its first-ever Final Four.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=8e8013bd65fbc74cddbb73b662ffdb5c&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=6013838b4e2e769205038d2d249cdae2

UI Press Book 'The Men in My Country' Excerpted (Chronicle, April 1)
The paper's Melange section excerpts Marilyn Abildskov's new non-fiction book, "The Men in My Country," and ways it was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i30/30b00401.htm

'Deadwood' Director Attended UI (Lakeland Ledger, March 30)
A story about the new HBO western "Deadwood" says the series creator and director David Milch received a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050330/NEWS/503300304/1021

Van Voorhis Speaks On Menopause Symptoms (USA Today, March 29)
Sorting menopause symptoms from aging symptoms is tricky. For example, incontinence is more common in older women, said University of Iowa endocrinologist BRADLEY VAN VOORHIS. But the NIH-sponsored Women's Health Initiative found in 2002 that bladder control worsened in women on hormones, compared with those on a placebo, suggesting the problem is unrelated to menopause, he said. After listening to Van Voorhis and other speakers, an independent panel convened by the NIH concluded that only hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, painful intercourse and, probably, sleep disturbances were linked to declining estrogen.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2005-03-29-menopause_x.htm

UI Developed Basic Skills Test (Virgin Islands Daily News, March 29)
The federal No Child Left Behind Act demands more accountability from schools that receive federal money. That means that schools must test students every year and ensure that they meet targets for improvement. To further that goal, the federal government now pays for testing, a departure from previous practice, and for several years has given the Virgin Islands $510,000 or more for testing annually. Last year, the territory received $537,000, according to the U.S. Education Department. The Virgin Islands chose to implement the Iowa Tests as the territory's official testing vehicle because they are closely aligned with existing standards for curriculum, school officials have said. The elementary-level Iowa Tests of Basic Skills and the secondary-level Iowa Tests of Educational Development were developed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for public schools in that state and now are sold through Riverside Publishing to school systems throughout the nation.
http://www.virginislandsdailynews.com/index.pl/article_home?id=4028086

Gambling Proposal Has Oppenents (Gambling Magazine, March 29)
Robert Koller, a Washington accountant, believes the proposed casino and golf course in northeast Washington County will draw tourism. "If it doesn't happen, I think people will be depressed a little bit," Koller said. "We'll survive, obviously, but you only get these chances once in every lifetime." The project, just outside the town of Riverside, includes an 18-hole golf course, a 200-room hotel and 1,200-seat entertainment venue. It would create 850 jobs and bring in $83 million in its first year. But it also has its opponents. BRAD FRANZWA, a medical researcher at the University of Iowa, believes gambling preys on the poor. He and his family moved to neighboring Johnson County after the casino vote passed. "We didn't move there for that atmosphere and we moved away because of it," he said. The story also appeared in the LAS VEGAS (Nev.) SUN.
http://www.gamblingmagazine.com/managearticle.asp?C=280&A=14068#top

UI Suicide Study Noted (Inside Higher Ed, March 29)
Five percent of college students in a new study said that they had attempted suicide while in college. That number is significantly higher than those from several other studies of students and their propensity to try to kill themselves. Several studies have placed that figure at only 1 to 2 percent. While researchers said that they believed their findings were important and demonstrated the seriousness of the suicide problem in higher education, they also said that older students were not adequately represented in the study. The new study - which involved interviews with 1,865 students at four large universities - has been accepted for publication in Suicide and Life Threatening Behavior, the journal of the American Association of Suicidology. The study was conducted by six researchers, led by JOHN S. WESTEFELD, a professor of counseling psychology at the University of Iowa.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2005/03/29/suicide

CD Guides Kids' Choices (Tri-City Herald, March 29)
A new CD, "People Learning About Destructive Decisions" (PLADD), has scenarios on drinking and driving, date rape and domestic violence. It is being developed by Franklin County Coroner Dan Blasdel, the Benton-Franklin Substance Abuse Coalition in Richland and ImageWorks Media Group in Pasco. The goal is to supply the CDs to schools and driver's education classes for free. Washington State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA also are helping the group study the CD's effectiveness. The newspaper is based in southern Washington. 
http://www.tri-cityherald.com/tch/local/story/6318649p-6195403c.html

Museum Director has UI Degree (Seattle Post-Intellegencer, March 29)
Mimi Gates ability to persevere through change, massive growth and occasional adversity has served her well in more than 10 years as director of the Seattle Art Museum. She has several academic degrees, including a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/visualart/217823_mimigates.html

UI Business Graduate Discusses Bonds (Wall Street Journal, March 29)
In an online feature called "Econoblog" economist David Altig discusses the willingness of foreign central banks' readiness to buy up U.S. Treasury bonds and its impact on the economy. Altig is vice president and associate director of research in the research department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland He is currently an adjunct professor of economics in the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago. He received a bachelor's degree in business administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and master's and doctoral degrees in economics from Brown University.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB111202112287190860-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

Oral Quoted In Story On Meth, Children (KSDK-TV, March 29)
A story about the impact of adult methamphetamine use on children says that under Iowa's current policies, which mirror those elsewhere, the Department of Human Services has some discretion as to removing meth-exposed children from home or giving addicted parents a chance to kick the habit -- but not always. "If we detect meth in a newborn, we're required to notify DHS," said Dr. RESMIYE ORAL, pediatrician at the University of Iowa hospital. "The baby gets medical follow-up and the mother goes to treatment. If she doesn't go along with the plan, the baby is removed." The TV station is based in St. Louis, Mo.
http://www.ksdk.com/news/health_article.aspx?storyid=77305

Walk Scheduled for Suicide Survivors Group (Journal Standard, March 29)
Rita Kay Reeder, 51, has registered as a participant in Out of the Darkness Overnight, a national 20-mile walk for suicide survivors happening July 16-17 in Chicago. The raises funds for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, a not-for-profit organization funding research and education programs to prevent suicide and assist family members after such tragedies. Reeder's son, Matthew committed suicide Sept. 27, 2002. He attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he joined the Sigma Nu fraternity in the fall of 2001. His chapter donated $100 to Rita's fund. Rich Culberg, 23, a senior at University of Iowa and member of Sigma Nu, said Matt was his pledge dad in the spring of 2002. A pledge dad is an active member of the fraternity who helps a pledge learn the fraternity's history and supports him through the pledging process. "It was his job to kind of look out for me," Culberg said. "He was a great pledge dad." The newspaper is based in Freeport, Ill.
http://www.journalstandard.com/articles/2005/03/28/local_news/news01.txt

Aslan Book Recommended (Ann Arbor News, March 28)
In listing of recommended reading about religion and spirituality, "No God But God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam," by REZA ASLAN is noted. The author is a professor of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Iowa and a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop. He argues that a reformation of Islam is under way. The newspaper is located in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/aanews/index.ssf?/base/features-0/1112024548113400.xml

Hendrix Departure From UI Over Stem Cell Ban Cited (Chicago Tribune, March 28)
A story about the Missouri legislature's contemplation of a measure that would criminalize therapeutic cloning to produce stem cells says that Dr. Mary Hendrix, chief of research at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago, left the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA after that state's legislature passed a law banning that form of stem cell research. She brought 10 scientists from her Iowa lab with her.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0503280195mar28,1,147124.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed&ctrack=1&cset=true

Oral Quoted In Story On Meth, Children (Seattle Times, March 28)
A story about the impact of adult methamphetamine use on children says that under Iowa's current policies, which mirror those elsewhere, the Department of Human Services has some discretion as to removing meth-exposed children from home or giving addicted parents a chance to kick the habit - but not always. "If we detect meth in a newborn, we're required to notify DHS," said Dr. RESMIYE ORAL, pediatrician at the University of Iowa hospital. "The baby gets medical follow-up and the mother goes to treatment. If she doesn't go along with the plan, the baby is removed." A version of the story also ran on the website of the LONG BEACH (CALIF.) PRESS-TELEGRAM.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/health/2002222059_meth28.html

'Gilead' Wins National Book Critics Award (Long Beach Press-Telegram, March 28)
"Gilead," MARILYNNE ROBINSON's poetic, modern-day testament of a dying Iowa preacher, has won the National Book Critics Circle prize for fiction. "I could not be more delighted," said an emotional Robinson, whose novel was her first since she debuted in 1980 with the acclaimed "Housekeeping." She is a faculty member at the University of Iowa's influential Writers' Workshop.
http://u.presstelegram.com/Stories/0,1413,218~24542~2783993,00.html

Damasio Decision-Making Study Cited (BusinessWeek, March 28)
The National Hockey League and its players wrangle over a salary cap. The impasse causes the season to be canceled. Everybody loses. What went wrong?  According to the new science of neuroeconomics, the explanations might lie inside the brains of the negotiators. Not in the prefrontal cortex, where people rationally weigh pros and cons, but deep inside, where powerful emotions arise. Brain scans show that when people feel they're being treated unfairly, a small area called the anterior insula lights up, engendering the same disgust that people get from, say, smelling a skunk. That overwhelms the deliberations of the prefrontal cortex. With primitive brain functions so powerful, it's no wonder that economic transactions often go awry. Neuroeconomics, while still regarded skeptically by mainstream economists, could be the next big thing in the field. It promises to put economics on a firmer footing by describing people as they really are, not as some oversimplified mathematical model would have them be. Neuroeconomics also challenges the notion that emotions can only corrupt economic decision-making. Indeed, emotions grab people's attention and motivate them to focus their rational brains on the issue at hand, says ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, a University of Iowa College of Medicine neurologist who studies brain-damaged patients. In his writings, he says that people who feel no emotions are bad at making decisions.
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_13/b3926099_mz057.htm?campaign_id=rss_magzn

Weiner Comments on Cancer Treatment (ElitesTV.com, March 25)
Drug giant Pfizer is set to invest $50 million dollars in a new cancer drug that has been developed by the University of Iowa. The intent of the drug, named ProMune, is to use the natural immune system to fight the cancer cells.  Dr. GEORGE WEINER, the director of UI's Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center said that, while the preliminary results are encouraging, 'there is still a lot of work to be done.' He believes that it will take 'several years before the treatment could be offered on the general market.'  The university stands to make approximately $6.75 million on the project, which will be paid within three months. BRUCE WHEATON, executive director of the University of Iowa Research Foundation, stresses that while it is great that the university will be making millions of dollars, the fact that they are contributing to saving lives is more significant.
http://www.elitestv.com/pub/2005/Mar/EEN424433c12a7d3.html

Edwards Comments On UI 'Acting Out' Exhibit (Art Museum Network News, March 25)
The University of Iowa Museum of Art (UIMA) will present "Acting Out: Invented Melodrama in Contemporary Photography," an exhibition that identifies melodrama as a major theme in contemporary fine art photography, April 7-June 5 in the museum's North Gallery. "Acting Out" focuses on the enduring presence of melodrama in fine art photography. In the exhibition, 32 photographs by 14 artists make use of the long-standing language of melodrama inspired by literature, theatre, cinema, television, advertising, film stills, photojournalism and historic photography. Some of the photographs in "Acting Out" refer to memorable media images. "Untitled" by Israeli artist Adi Nes, for example, mimics the intensity of a famous photograph taken by John Filo during the violence at Kent State University May 4, 1970, while it also alludes to the current crisis in the Middle East. "Many of the photographs in the exhibition strive to critique the status quo and challenge societal archetypes," noted KATHLEEN A. EDWARDS, curator of prints, drawings, photographs and new media at the UIMA and curator of the exhibition.
http://www.amnnews.com/press.jsp?id=2593

Stringer Coached UI To Final Four (Courier Post, March 25)
C. Vivian Stringer, the head women’s basketball coach at Rutgers University is a coaching legend. She's a pioneer. She took tiny Cheyney State all the way to the inaugural NCAA championship game back in 1982, where her team lost to Louisiana Tech. This weekend, Stringer's third-seeded Scarlet Knights will be one of four teams playing in the Sweet Sixteen at Temple University's Liacouras Center. Stringer, an Edenborn, Pa., native who graduated from Slippery Rock University, has compiled a 722-245 overall record in 33 seasons at Cheyney, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and now Rutgers, and is the only coach in men's or women's basketball to lead three different schools to the Final Four. The newspaper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.courierpostonline.com/news/sports/s032505c.htm

Vieland’s Work Informs Colleague (Medical News Today, March 25)
A California wine country music festival will aid a Rutgers scientist's research into schizophrenia, its causes and cures. Dr. Linda Brzustowicz, an associate professor of genetics at Rutgers University, a board certified psychiatrist and an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), was selected from more than 35 highly qualified applications for the inaugural Staglin Family Music Festival NARSAD Schizophrenia Research Award. The Staglin Family, through the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD), the world's largest nongovernmental funding source for mental health research, established the $250,000 award to be made each year to a "rising star" scientist. It will be supported by funds raised by the Music Festival for Mental Health, an annual event at the Staglin Family Vineyard in the Napa Valley that offers music, fine wines and gourmet dining. Brzustowicz hopes to use the Staglin NARSAD grant to support two lines of research, one involving a new statistical analysis developed by a colleague, VERONICA VIELAND, at the University of Iowa.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=21779

Kutcher Attended UI (Orange County Register, March 25)
Ashton Kutcher, the son of factory workers (his dad worked in a Cheerios plant and his mother in a plant that made Head & Shoulders shampoo), was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, but the family moved to an 80-acre farm in nearby Homestead when Kutcher and his twin brother were 13. After high school, the future actor attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as a biochemical engineering major for one year, dropping out after winning a modeling contest in a shopping mall. This story also appeared on the web sites of the HOUSTON CHRONICLE and the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.
http://www.ocregister.com/ocr/2005/03/25/sections/entertainment/entertainment/article_455776.php

Former UI Players Rally Around Teammate (Chicago Tribune, March 25)
Members of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's 1980 Final Four team continue to rally around teammate Kenny Arnold. The former Calumet High School star has been disabled by complications from a brain tumor and is unable to work. Arnold's former Hawkeyes teammates have established a trust account in his name to help with his medical bills and other living expenses.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/chi-0503250269mar25,1,3443219.story

Coryell Cautions On Bipolar Diagnosis (New York Times, March 24)
Scientists have found that bipolar disorder is widely variable, that its milder forms are marked by hypomanias, currents of mental energy and concentration that are less reckless than full-blown manic frenzies, and unspoiled, in many cases, by subsequent gloom. New research helps explain how people with manic or hypomanic tendencies navigate the small triumphs and humiliations of daily life, and provides clues to how some of them quickly shake off the emotional troughs that their ambitious natures should make inevitable. Most recently, researchers have turned their attention to the mild end of the bipolar spectrum, and sliced it into many permutations. Bipolar II, III and IV, for example, each include depressive episodes and varieties of hypomania, or exuberant moods. Cyclothymic disorder involves rapid cycling from moderate depressive to manic symptoms, and hyperthymia is a state of elevated mood. With the exception of bipolar II and cyclothymic disorder, which are accepted as standard psychiatric diagnoses, these permutations of low-level bipolar disorder overlap with each other and with normal ranges of mental function so much that some scientists question how distinct they are. "For some of us, there is a lot of wariness about this tendency to see bipolar disorder everywhere," said WILLIAM CORYELL, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa School of Medicine, adding that "it's very difficult to determine reliable boundaries between one diagnosis and another" and document the true prevalence of the conditions. A version of this article also appeared March 24 in the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/22/health/psychology/22hypo.html?

UI Participated In Gun Study (Allentown Morning Call, March 24)
Shooting holes in perceptions about gun violence in the Lehigh Valley, a multiyear study shows that most homicide victims were local residents, not out-of-town drug dealers, and most suicide victims were over 45, not in their 20s. Those were among the findings of a comprehensive examination of local gunfire deaths released Wednesday at St. Luke's Hospital in Fountain Hill. St. Luke's worked on the grant-funded project with the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Lehigh Valley Hospital and local law enforcement, social service and mental health professionals. The study was initially funded with $600,000 by the Joyce Foundation, a philanthropy based in Chicago, and also includes St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Youngstown, Ohio, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL in Iowa City Iowa. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.mcall.com/news/local/all-a1_5gunsmar24,0,2952613.story?coll=all-newslocal-hed

UI Student Studies Olympics (Malay Mail, March 24)
Sports can unite and strengthen a nation, as it can rally people from all walks of life, capture the imagination of many and lift spirits above the mundane or ordinary. Coupled with Olympic spirit, one will be able to tread through the challenges of life with optimism. That is what the participants in the Eighth National Olympic Academy Session learn. Among the participants are 18 foreigners from 12 Asian countries and the US. "This is a great opportunity to understand the sports environment in various countries and learn their cultures," said Laura Lunders, a sports management major from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, U.S.
http://www.mmail.com.my/Current_News/MM/Thursday/Sport/20050324122241/Article/index_html

Former UI Professor, Workshop Graduate Interviewed (NPR, Fresh Air, March 23)
Host Terry Gross interviews Reza Aslan, author of is “No God but God: The Origins, Evolution and Future of Islam.” The book is a call to reform, and a proposal to end the religious battle between East and West. Aslan was born in Iran and lives in the United States. He was a visiting assistant professor of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he got an MFA in fiction at the WRITERS’ WORKSHOP.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4557220

Former UI Professor Speaks On Rural Healthcare (Billings Gazette, March 23)
The Montana State University-Billings Library will sponsor Dr. Sheila K. McGinnis, director of Health Administration in the MSU-Billings College of Allied Health Professions, in a free public faculty lecture "Rural Healthcare: Crossroads or Crisis?" on March 29 from 12:15 to 1:30 p.m. in the Lewis and Clark Room of the Student Union Building. McGinnis will discuss current issues in health-care administration and how these trends are affecting rural health care. Previous to her position as director of the Health Administration Program, McGinnis held faculty appointments in health care administration at Idaho State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and also business administration at Metropolitan State College in Denver.
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2005/03/23/build/health/62-rural-healthcare.inc

UI Alumnus To Run Living History Park In Virginia (Roanoke Times, March 23)
If Larry Vander Maten were to run Explore Park the way he runs his nursing home business, this much seems clear: Explore will expand. Vander Maten, who has steered his St. Louis-based nursing home management company through years of growth, is scheduled to be in Roanoke today to discuss his plans for Explore. Although details are scarce, the terms of a proposed 50-year lease would allow Vander Maten to radically transform the living history park into a "destination resort." Vander Maten wants to invest at least $20 million in ventures that could include a hotel, restaurants, stores, an amphitheater and a water park. A graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Vander Maten started out in the 1970s as a certified public accountant for a family-owned business in Fort Dodge, Iowa, said Michael Brady, director of administrative services for HSM. Some of his clients were nursing homes, and Vander Maten developed an interest in the field that led him to buy two homes. The paper is based in Virginia.
http://www.roanoke.com/news/roanoke%5C20589.html

Klohnen Study Finds Opposites Don't Always Attract (Northern Life, March 22)
In one of the most comprehensive studies ever undertaken on these questions, researchers at the University of Iowa find that people tend to marry those who are similar in attitudes, religion and values. However, it is similarity in personality that appears to be more important in having a happy marriage. The findings appear in the February issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association (APA). Psychologist EVA C. KLOHNEN, Ph.D., and graduate student SHANHONG LUO, M.A., of the University of Iowa looked at assortative mating issues (mating based on similar or opposite characteristics) among 291 newlyweds who had participated in the Iowa Marital Assessment Project. The paper covers Ontario, Canada.
http://www.northernlife.ca/lifestyleArticle.asp?32id11-pn=&view=84101

UI Says Kinnick Renovation On Time, Under Budget (CNN/SI.com, March 22)
The $87 million renovation project for Kinnick Stadium is on schedule in some phases, ahead in others and within its budget, University of Iowa officials said Tuesday. The new 14,200-seat south stands, with new home and visitor locker rooms underneath, will be complete in time for the first home Hawkeye football game on Sept. 3, said JANE MEYER, senior associate athletics director. Work on a new entrance plaza on the south side of the 75-year-old stadium and a new press box on the west side will continue through the summer and fall, she said. The entire project is scheduled to be complete in time for the start of the 2006 football season. No work is being done on the playing field, but the renovation project has forced cancellation of the annual spring football game this year. Even though fans may be inconvenienced, Iowa football coach KIRK FERENTZ called the renovation a "win-win for everybody." A version of the story also ran on the website of the DETROIT FREE PRESS.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/football/ncaa/03/22/bc.fbc.kinnickstadium.ap/

Robinson Wins National Book Critics Circle Prize (Newsday, March 22)
Gilead, MARILYNNE ROBINSON’s poetic, modern-day testament of a dying Iowa preacher, won the National Book Critics Circle prize for fiction Friday night. "I could not be more delighted," said an emotional Robinson, whose novel was her first since she debuted in 1980 with the acclaimed Housekeeping. Robinson, a faculty member at the University of Iowa's influential Writers' Workshop, praised her school for offering "a wonderful intellectual and spiritual home." The same story appeared on the Web site of the HOUSTON CHRONICLE, ATHENS (GA) JOURNAL and the CBC. http://www.nynewsday.com/features/booksmags/nyc-criticsawards,0,7339383.story?coll=nyc-books-bottom-promo

Coryell Wary of Bipolar Diagnoses (New York Times, March 22)
A mental condition known as hypomania and other permutations of low-level bipolar disorder overlap with each other and with normal ranges of mental function so much that some scientists question how distinct they are. "For some of us, there is a lot of wariness about this tendency to see bipolar disorder everywhere," said Dr. WILLIAM CORYELL, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa School of Medicine, adding that "it's very difficult to determine reliable boundaries between one diagnosis and another" and document the true prevalence of the conditions. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the SPARTANBURG (SC) STANDARD JOURNAL, WILMINGTON (NC) STAR.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/22/health/psychology/22hypo.html

Oral Explains Iowa Meth Law (Daytona News Journal, March 22)
Jittery babies, mistreated toddlers, strung-out mothers: Cheryll Jones' pediatric nursing practice is far from what it was when she started out 30 years ago -- long before methamphetamine invaded this riverside Corn Belt town. "If anybody told me my primary caseload would be kids exposed to illicit drugs, I'd have said they were crazy," said Jones, who used to focus on such problems as lead poisoning and cerebral palsy. Now she heads a local task force helping the most helpless victims of the nation's meth epidemic, small children whose parents make and use the highly addictive drug. The scars are inflicted in myriad ways: Exposure to the drug in the womb, contamination from toxic chemicals used in home-based meth manufacture, explosions and fires, long-term neglect from parents obsessed with their drug habits, physical abuse and sexual abuse. Many of the meth-lab homes are filthy, often strewn with drug paraphernalia and pornography; meth-making chemicals have been found in diaper bags and toy chests. Under Iowa's current policies, which mirror those elsewhere, the Department of Human Services has some discretion as to removing meth-exposed children from home or giving addicted parents a chance to kick the habit -- but not always. "If we detect meth in a newborn, we're required to notify DHS," said Dr. RESSMIYE ORAL, pediatrician at the University of Iowa hospital. "The baby gets medical follow-up and the mother goes to treatment. If she doesn't go along with the plan, the baby is removed." The News Journal is based in Florida.
http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/Lifestyle/Health/03AccentHEAL02032205.htm

UI Whipworm Study Cited (Voice of America, March 22)
An American study suggests that some small organisms may help people with Crohn’s disease. The study involved twenty-nine people. It found that eggs from helminths may be an effective treatment for this disease. Helminths are worms that can live in the intestines, the muscular tube where waste passes in the body. The researchers used whipworm eggs from the intestines of pigs. Scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA led the study. The twenty-nine people involved had a moderately active form of the disorder. The patients already were taking medicine for Crohn’s disease. The researchers gave each patient a drink containing two thousand five hundred whipworm eggs. The patients swallowed this drink once every three weeks for a period of twenty-four weeks.
http://www1.voanews.com/SpecialEnglish/article.cfm?objectID=B7DC6AB9-91A1-4CFF-A5A91D76C63F156C&title=SCIENCE%20IN%20THE%20NEWS

UI Addiction Study Cited (Dunn County News, March 22)
Some habits are tougher to break than others. Ask anyone who's ever gambled to excess, been on a diet or tried to give up smoking. Walk into an Alcoholics (or Narcotics) Anonymous meeting and listen to members share their stories. They'll be the first to tell you that recovering from any addiction is a daily, one-step-at-a-time process that takes lots and lots of practice. There's a recurring myth that kicking a methamphetamine habit is impossible. But research -- and the experience of alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) counselors -- indicates that, while it's certainly not easy, active meth addicts can indeed join the ranks of former meth users. One of the key elements in a successful recovery is time, notes Pam Haukeness, executive director of Arbor Place, a non-profit alcohol and drug counseling agency that also operates a 16-bed community-based residential treatment facility in Menomonie. Her observation is supported by a team of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers who reported in the April 2003 issue of the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment that it takes even longer to treat someone addicted to meth than it does a person who is addicted to heroin or cocaine. It's the time factor -- or lack of sufficient time -- that causes many treatment programs to fail. The News is based in Wisconsin.
http://www.dunnconnect.com/articles/2005/03/21/news/news04.txt

Sidel: Indian-American Financial Clout Growing (Hindustan Times, March 22)
The Indian-American community has gained new visibility in recent years as its political - and financial - clout has grown. As America's wealthiest ethnic group, it is particularly divided over allegations that some charities are funneling money to sectarian violence like that in the province of Gujarat. "We are seeing increased attention by Indian-Americans to how their donations are used, particularly in the wake of Sept. 11 and the Gujarat events," says MARK SIDEL, an expert on Indian diaspora at the University of Iowa. "We now see the emergence of controversy and of watchdog groups of various kinds." The Times is based in India.
http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/5967_1288750,001600060001.htm

Sidel: Indian-American Clout Growing (Christian Science Monitor, March 21)
The Indian-American community has gained new visibility in recent years as its political - and financial - clout has grown. As America's wealthiest ethnic group, it is particularly divided over allegations that some charities are funneling money to sectarian violence like that in the province of Gujarat. "We are seeing increased attention by Indian-Americans to how their donations are used, particularly in the wake of Sept. 11 and the Gujarat events," says MARK SIDEL, an expert on Indian diaspora at the University of Iowa. "We now see the emergence of controversy and of watchdog groups of various kinds."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0321/p03s01-ussc.html

UI's Admittance Of Women Cited In Campus Sex Story (Chicago Sun Times, March 21)
Traditional stereotypes dictate that men want sex, and women crave love. But, on today's college campuses, students say those gender lines are blurrier than a pair of beer goggles. A timeline accompanying this story, which otherwise does not mention the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, states that in 1855 the UI became the first public college to admit women.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-campus21.html

UI Cited In Story On 'Dark Horse' Consultant (Los Angeles Times, March 21)
As a longshot mayoral candidate - even as a super longshot - Bob Hertzberg was much like political consultant John Shallman's other clients: a true believer with near-zero name recognition whom few people expected to win. The difference was that Hertzberg met those expectations. He lost. Shallman has built a career on making dark horses win. A father of four who works near his modest Sherman Oaks home so he can pick up his children from school, Shallman in the last few years has engineered wins for three Los Angeles City Council members, four Los Angeles Unified School District board members, City Controller Laura Chick, Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley and Democratic state Sen. Tom Torlakson of Antioch, among others. Shallman drives his father's 1966 Ford Mustang, a silver-blue hardtop that Shallman restored last year. When the car was new, the family lived in Rock Island, Ill., and the car still bears the parking pass that his dad, Bill Shallman, used when he was getting his doctorate at the nearby UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-shallman21mar21,1,5685614.story?coll=la-headlines-california

Jones Pointed Out Voting Machine Problems (Daytona Beach News-Journal, March 21)
Debate about the need for a "voter verifiable paper trail" emerged after federal and state elections officials turned to touch screen machines as a remedy for some of the ills of the 2000 presidential election. Along the way, a number of computer scientists pointed out potential vulnerabilities in both electronic voting systems and the certification processes meant to guarantee them. In 2003, DOUGLAS JONES, an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Iowa, called for decertification of Diebold Election Systems existing touch screen systems, citing what he said were insecure software codes. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/News/Headlines/03NewsHEAD04POL032105.htm

Robinson Profiled (Palm Beach Post, March 21)
A feature on author MARILYNNE ROBINSON says she lives within walking distance of the University of Iowa, where she has taught in the prestigious Writers' Workshop since 1989.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/accent/content/accent/epaper/2005/03/21/a1d_book_mrobinson_0321.html

UI Alumnus Elected District Attorney (Durango Herald, March 20)
A feature on recently elected Durango, Colo., District Attorney Craig Westberg says that as a young man, Westberg considered practicing journalism but instead pursued an undergraduate degree in political science and French from Colorado State University and a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He then joined the Judge Advocate Generals Corps, the legal branch of the military.
http://durangoherald.com/asp-bin/article_generation.asp?article_type=news&article_path=/news/05/news050320_3.htm

Workshop's Conroy, Swensen Cited In Story (American Profile, March 20)
A profile of Iowa City includes information about the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. "Iowa City is a place that respects writers and literature," says FRANK CONROY, director of the Writers' Workshop and author of books that include Body and Soul and Stop-Time. "There are people in town, for example, who can point out the house where Kurt Vonnegut Jr. wrote Slaughterhouse-Five. People here don't think you're odd because you're a writer." The heart of the workshop experience is the chance to have their writing critiqued by fellow students and faculty, which include respected writers such as MARILYN ROBINSON, JAMES GALVIN, JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON, MARK LEVINE, and ETHAN CANIN, along with frequent visiting teachers that have included Robert Frost, Robert Penn Warren, John Cheever, Jane Smiley and Philip Roth. "You can't teach people writing, but you can give people the space and time to develop their own writing and introduce them to other writers who can inspire them," says poetry professor COLE SWENSEN. American Profile is a weekly, four-color magazine that celebrates hometown American life.
http://www.americanprofile.com/issues/20050320/20050320_4514.asp

Kutcher Dropped Out Of UI To Model (Chicago Sun-Times, March 20)
A story about actor Ashton Kutcher of Cedar Rapids says he left his biochemical engineering studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to become a model. To make a living between jobs, he swept floors at the local General Mills plant for $12 an hour.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/movies/sho-sunday-ashton20.html

Schoen Interviewed About Book On N.C. Eugenics Program (Newsweek, March 19)
As part of a package of stories on forced sterilizations practiced by many states during the early and mid-20th century, the magazine interviewed at length University of Iowa history professor JOHANNA SCHOEN, author of "Choice & Coercion: Birth Control, Sterilization and Abortion in Public Health and Welfare" (out this month from The University of North Carolina Press). The book explores North Carolina's eugenics program, which had one of the most aggressive programs, with more than 7,000 state residents -- some as young as 10 or 11 years old -- sterilized or castrated over four decades for reasons that ranged from mental illness to allegations of promiscuity to simply running with the wrong crowd. Some of those affected suffered severe complications; a few died within days of the operation. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7242649/site/newsweek/

Vandalism Cost $450,000 And Disrupted Research (USA Today, March 18)
The damage and losses caused by vandals at an animal research lab at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has reached $450,000 and could continue to climb, university officials said. Masked intruders broke into the psychology offices of Seashore Hall and one of its wings, Spence Laboratories, last November, destroying about 40 computers, spilling chemicals and releasing pigeons, rats and mice used in research. An e-mail claimed the Animal Liberation Front was responsible for the damage, which targeted animal research being done in the building. "The research programs were set back roughly three to six weeks not counting lost data, of which there was much less than we had feared," said Gregg Oden, chairman of the Psychology Department. University spokesman Steve Parrott said Thursday that the university is self-insured with a $2 million deductible, so it would have to cover all the damage. A version of this Associated Press article appeared March 18 on the web site of WQAD-TV in Illinois.
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/mathscience/2005-03-18-lab-trashed_x.htm

Baby Recovering Well From Surgery At UI (Foster’s Daily Democrat, March 18)
Amber Vairo has grown two inches and gained nearly a pound, and the three tiny scars on her belly have all but vanished - along with any doubts she'd survive a complex surgery to fix a life-threatening condition.  Last month, at just 5.6-pounds and six days after birth, Amber became the smallest patient in the world to undergo robotic surgery of any kind, according to her doctors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL AND CLINICS. She was born with a hole in her diaphragm, the abdominal muscle that is critical to breathing and forms a wall between the chest and abdomen. The condition, called congenital diaphragmatic hernia, can be fatal because the hole allows the intestines to migrate into the chest, putting pressure on the heart, lungs and spleen that can stunt organ growth or shut them down altogether. The little girl suffered from a particular type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, according to Dr. JOHN MEEHAN, who led Amber's surgical team. Known as a Bochdalek hernia, it affects about one in 3000 babies and has a 25 percent mortality rate, Meehan said. "Was this life saving? Yes," Meehan said. "But I think what is also interesting is this is a new way of treating a severe medical problems in newborns. We didn't invent a new operation here, but just used a different technique to get it done." The newspaper is based in New Hampshire.
http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050318/SPNEWS01/50316036

UI Student Injured in Spring Break Fall (Omaha World Herald, March 18)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student is the first spring break visitor seriously injured in a balcony fall this year in this Florida Panhandle resort city.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1638&u_sid=1363278

Sketch Released of UI Lab Break-in Suspect (Omaha World Herald, March 18)
The FBI has released a sketch of a woman who may be linked to last year's break-in at an animal research lab at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The FBI's sketch is of an unidentified white female in her late teens to early 20s, 5 feet 2 inches to 5 feet 6 inches tall, with dark hair and a light or fair complexion. She last was seen wearing a gray hooded sweat shirt, light brown or khaki pants, white tennis shoes and a light blue plastic wristwatch.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1638&u_sid=1363335

Kerber Calls For Academic Flexibility (The Chronicle, March 18)
LINDA KERBER, University of Iowa professor and chair of history and president-elect of the American Historical Association, calls for increased flexibility in a number of areas as a path toward a more equitable and compassionate academic workplace. "In the recent furor over remarks by Lawrence H. Summers, president of Harvard University, about why so few women go into math and science, one key issue seems to be getting lost. Among other points, Mr. Summers suggested that women don't want to work the 80-hour weeks required for an academic career. Eighty hours? Is that really good for women? For anyone? What has happened to our academic workplace?" she writes. "As the recent renovations in internship hospital schedules have demonstrated, 80-hour professional weeks are an old-fashioned way of displaying machismo, and they are not a healthy way for a society to organize its most subtle and significant work. In the year and a half that I have chaired my department, I have learned a lot about human frailty. At one point last winter, there were at least seven members of a 30-person department who were heroic when they met their classes at all, and only one was coping with her own illness. The others were struggling with tragedies that afflicted spouses, children, parents, siblings. Half involved men as caregivers, one for a dying wife. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has prided itself on longstanding generous health care and other benefits for faculty members. But we have not begun to think collectively about how family care might be taken out of the crisis mode."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i28/28b00601.htm

Sidel: Case Won't Set Precedent (The Chronicle of Philanthropy, March 17)
A U.S. appeals court in Seattle reinstated a $1.25-million lawsuit against the Northwest Area Foundation last month, saying residents of a county in eastern Washington State can pursue one part of their case against the grant maker, which is located in St. Paul. The residents sued the foundation in 2001, saying it had reneged on a promise to pay them for incidental costs -- such as travel, child care and compensation for time away from work -- to help develop a plan to reduce poverty in the region where they live. The foundation said it committed no wrongdoing. The case has been widely watched because of the precedent it could set for legal action against grant makers. But MARK SIDEL, associate professor of law at the University of Iowa, who is following the lawsuit, says that because of the way the case is being handled, the precedent would not apply directly to other cases involving charitable foundations. The online version of this article is available only to the publication's subscribers.
http://www.philanthropy.com

Alumnus To Head Medical Group (San Francisco Business Times, March 17)
The California Medical Association announced late Wednesday that a Kaiser physician will be installed as its president for the first time at the medical association's annual convention on Sunday. Michael J. Sexton, M.D., will take the helm of the association, which represents many, but far from all of the state's physicians. Sexton is a graduate of Drake University and received his medical degree in 1972 from The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. He is a Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians.
http://sanfrancisco.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/stories/2005/03/14/daily33.html

Alumna Is Finalist For Maine Presidency (Austin Business Journal, March 17)
A dean at the University of Texas is a finalist for the presidency of the University of Maine, a newspaper reported Wednesday. Mary Ann Rankin, dean of UT's College of Natural Sciences, is among four finalists for the top job at the University of Maine's flagship campus in Orono, the Bangor Daily News reported. Rankin became dean of the UT college in 1994. She has a bachelor's degree in biology and chemistry from Louisiana State University and a doctoral degree in physiology and insect behavior from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://austin.bizjournals.com/austin/stories/2005/03/14/daily30.html

No Shame Theatre Started At UI (Calendar Live, March 17)
It's Friday night around 9:30 on the outdoor deck behind Santa Monica's Powerhouse Theatre, and the scripts are pouring in. But unlike a movie studio or a traditional theater workshop, there won't be months of waiting while various levels of readers, story editors and creative executives compare notes. There's no time. Scripts are due by 10 p.m. The show starts inside the 75-seat theater at 11. "It's first come, first served," says Mike Rothschild, an associate producer of the weekly show, as he sits at a table in the chill night air, grabbing pages from writers as though taking bets in a back alley. "Everybody who has a piece gives it to me. Once we've got 15 or 16 pieces, that's the show. The only people who are guaranteed a spot are the people who were bumped last week." As free-form as it might appear, No Shame Theatre is actually a 19-year-old theatrical institution -- one with franchises, in fact. It was established at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1986 by student playwrights Todd Ristau and Stan Ruth. The first performance used as its stage the cargo bed of Ristau's green pickup truck, defiantly placed in the middle of the parking lot outside of the university's E.C. Mabie Theatre. Since then, branches have sprung up in New York, Miami, Chicago, Cleveland, Austin, Texas, Charlottesville, N.C., and other cities, some started by original members, others by newcomers. Calendar Live is a section of the Los Angeles Times.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=9e0306f849ce7cb4cd313857840a6991&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=7959143fab3a62380930e5bc4476df95

Skorton: Students Like ‘Facebook’ Communication (Inside Higher Ed, March 16)
DAVID J. SKORTON
, the president of the University of Iowa, has a profile in “The Facebook,” an online “social network” service that students nationwide have flocked to since it was started last year. The Facebook, like Friendster and similar services, lets participants set up profiles of themselves and link those profiles to their friends’ profiles, their friends’ friends’ profiles, etc. The Facebook focuses on college students, and is open only to participants with e-mail addresses at the growing number of colleges that are part of the network. Skorton was encouraged to sign up by two of those who are now among his nearly 1,000 friends: Lindsay Schutte, president of the student government at Iowa, and Josh Skorton, the president’s son and a student at Stanford. David Skorton said via e-mail that “the reaction so far has been terrific and the undergraduates seem to like communicating with me in this way.”
http://insidehighered.com/news/2005/03/16/facebook3_16

Oral Comments On Meth Effect On Children (Omaha World Herald, March 16)
Gov. Tom Vilsack said Tuesday that his passion against methamphetamine stems from his childhood in an abusive home and that he will not allow Iowa lawmakers to weaken his proposal to restrict sales of pseudoephedrine. Vilsack said he went home to Mount Pleasant around Christmas and attended a meeting of families affected by meth in his hometown, fueling his desire attack the epidemic. Pediatrician RESMIYE ORAL of the University of Iowa said more than 11 percent of the children judged to be abused or neglected come from homes with meth involvement. "The number of children at risk is growing every year," she said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1642&u_sid=1361321

Rynes Study Cited (AMEInfo, March 16)
An article about corporate responsibility cites a study conducted in part by SARA RYNES from the University of Iowa. The meta-analysis, "Corporate Social and Financial Performance," was a study of 52 studies over 30 years. They found that a statistically significant association between corporate social performance and financial performance exists, varying "from highly positive to modestly positive." AMEInfo is based in the United Arab Emirates.
http://www.ameinfo.com/news/Detailed/55905.html

UI Major Shows Kutcher No Doofus (USA Today, March 16)
For years Ashton Kutcher has been the goof, not only as Kelso on That 70s Show, but also as the stoner hunting for his ride in Dude, Where's My Car?, the vain boyfriend in Cheaper by the Dozen and the clumsy newlywed in Just Married. (He points out that his character in last year's The Butterfly Effect wasn't IQ-challenged, however.) He's hoping his double-barreled turns as romantic leading men in Guess Who and A Lot Like Love dispel that reputation. As for the doofus rep, Kutcher was a biochemical engineering major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA when he quit to pursue a modeling career in New York. He concedes he sometimes agreed to play Kelso-like characters to appease fans. But often, those were the only options he had, Kutcher says. "I love how people think you can just pick it. There are probably 10 movies that I would have loved to do last year that didn't come my way."
http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2005-03-15-ashton-kutcher_x.htm?POE=LIFISVA

Youngest Robotic Surgery Patient Recovered (Washington Times, March 16)
Amber Vairo has grown two inches and gained nearly a pound, and the three tiny scars on her belly have all but vanished -- along with any doubts she would survive a complex surgery to fix a life-threatening condition. Last month, at just 5.6 pounds and six days after birth, Amber became the smallest patient in the world to undergo robotic surgery of any kind, said her doctors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL AND CLINICS. The same story appeared on the Web site of KERALANEXT.COM (India).
http://washingtontimes.com/national/20050315-120801-9952r.htm

Baby Recovering Well From Surgery At UI (San Diego Union Tribune, March 15)
Amber Vairo has grown two inches and gained nearly a pound, and the three tiny scars on her belly have all but vanished - along with any doubts she'd survive a complex surgery to fix a life-threatening condition.  Last month, at just 5.6-pounds and six days after birth, Amber became the smallest patient in the world to undergo robotic surgery of any kind, according to her doctors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL AND CLINICS. She was born with a hole in her diaphragm, the abdominal muscle that is critical to breathing and forms a wall between the chest and abdomen. The condition, called congenital diaphragmatic hernia, can be fatal because the hole allows the intestines to migrate into the chest, putting pressure on the heart, lungs and spleen that can stunt organ growth or shut them down altogether. The little girl suffered from a particular type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, according to Dr. John Meehan, who led Amber's surgical team. Known as a Bochdalek hernia, it affects about one in 3000 babies and has a 25 percent mortality rate, Meehan said. "Was this life saving? Yes," Meehan said. "But I think what is also interesting is this is a new way of treating a severe medical problems in newborns. We didn't invent a new operation here, but just used a different technique to get it done." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the COLUMBIA (MO) DAILY TRIBUNE, PROVO (UT) DAILY HERALD, CANADA.COM, KLTV-TV, IRISH EXAMINER, KFMB-TV and CNN.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/science/20050314-0131-smallestroboticsurgery.html

Kim Study Shows Koreans Less Proud of Home (Joon Gang Daily, March 15)
Koreans are relatively less proud of their country in comparison with the confidence level citizens of other countries have for their homelands, an analysis by a renowned sociologist has found. KIM JAE-ON, a distinguished professor of sociology at the University of Iowa, analyzed data from the Korean General Social Survey and the International Social Survey programs. According to Kim's study, only 16.4 percent of Koreans said they were proud of Korea's political influence in the world, while 79.5 percent said they were not proud of their country's political influence. The results ranked Korea 30th on a list of how citizens view their self-esteem and country's political influence. By comparison, 74.4 percent of Americans said they were proud of U.S. political influence in the world, ranking the United States first among the 34 surveyed countries. Japan, with 29.1 percent saying they were proud, ranked 20th among the 34. Russia was ranked 23rd. Joon Gang Daily is based in South Korea.
http://joongangdaily.joins.com/200503/15/200503152221316939900090409041.html

Schulz-Stubner Shows Hypnosis Limits Pain (Medical News Today, March 15)
Although hypnosis has been shown to reduce pain perception, it is not clear how the technique works. Identifying a sound, scientific explanation for hypnosis' effect might increase acceptance and use of this safe pain-reduction option in clinical settings. Researchers at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and the Technical University of Aachen, Germany, used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to find out if hypnosis alters brain activity in a way that might explain pain reduction. The results are reported in the November-December 2004 issue of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. "The major finding from our study, which used fMRI for the first time to investigate brain activity under hypnosis for pain suppression, is that we see reduced activity in areas of the pain network and increased activity in other areas of the brain under hypnosis," said SEBASTIAN SCHULZ-STUBNER, UI assistant professor (clinical) of anesthesia and first author of the study. "The increased activity might be specific for hypnosis or might be non-specific, but it definitely does something to reduce the pain signal input into the cortical structure." The same story appeared on the Web site of MYDNA.COM and SCIENCEBLOG.COM.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=21239

Field, Lynch Study Links Residential Radon, Lung Cancer (News-Medical.net, March 15)
Two University of Iowa researchers were part of a large multi-center study that provides compelling direct evidence of an association between prolonged residential radon exposure and lung cancer risk. The study, an analysis of data pooled from seven different North American residential radon studies, demonstrates an 11 to 21 percent increased lung cancer risk at average residential radon concentrations of approximately 3.0 picocuries per liter of air, during an exposure period of 5 to 30 years. The lung cancer risk increased with increasing radon exposure. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's current action level for residential radon is 4.0 picocuries per liter. "This analysis, based on the largest radon data set assembled in North America, agrees with a similar large-scale radon pooled analysis performed concurrently in Europe. The North American and European pooling provides unambiguous and direct evidence of an increased lung cancer risk even at residential radon exposure levels below the U.S. EPA's action level," according to R. WILLIAM FIELD, UI associate professor of occupational and environmental health and epidemiology, and a co-author of the study, which is reported in the March 2005 issue of the journal Epidemiology. CHARLES F. LYNCH, professor of epidemiology, also contributed to the research.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=8389

Peterson Challenges Torture Article (New Yorker, March 14)
In a letter to the editor, MARK PETERSON, UI associate professor of history, questions an author's claim in an article about torture that historically there have been people so bad -- such as pirates and slave traders -- that they were not protected by law. Peterson cites the most famous piracy case on record, that of Captain William Kidd in 1699. After a trial before an Admiralty Court in the Old Bailey, Kidd was convicted and sentenced to death. "It was brutal punishment for a brutal crime, but it was conducted under very specific legal provisions," Peterson writes.

Soll: Odor Reducing System May Not Hit Market (AgriNews, March 14)
An ultrasound system designed by a University of Iowa professor to reduce odor in hog manure may never hit the market. "The method works, and it wasn't expensive," said DAVID SOLL, a biological sciences professor. "But I'm busy with other things, and it's not my job to promote it." The project was backed by Bruce Rastetter, president and founder of Heartland Pork Enterprises, Iowa's second largest pork producer at the time. Last year, Rastetter sold his company to Christensen Family Farms, of Sleepy Eye, Minn.  A spokesman at Christensen Family Farms said the company knew nothing about the ultrasound project. AgriNews is published in Rochester, Minn.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/282840605335310.bsp

Squire Comments On Huckabee Marathon (Arkansas Democrat Gazette, March 14)
Gov. Mike Huckabee compares the country's pending health finance crisis to a meteor about to strike the earth, pointing to a mix of high health-care costs, ballooning Medicaid and Medicare budgets and aging baby boomers. After completing his first marathon last weekend and a busy week of hammering at the dangers -- physical and financial -- of poor health, Huckabee is beginning to appear on the radar of those who watch a different sort of race. "Clearly, he's acting like somebody who wants to run for president," said Chuck Todd, editor of The Hotline, a Washington, D.C.-based political journal. Within a day of running the marathon -- he was joined by Gov. Tom Vilsack of Iowa -- Huckabee appeared on three television shows to discuss his weight loss, the danger of the country's weight problem and how he wants to solve it. Huckabee will be named chairman of the National Governors Association this summer, a job he says will give him the opportunity to raise the issue even more. Another Arkansan, Bill Clinton, took the same route with another issue, education, and parlayed that and other exposure into a successful bid for the White House in 1992. The similarities have not been lost on presidential race pundits. His decision to run the marathon with Vilsack likely earned Huckabee some coverage in Iowa, a state whose early presidential caucus plays an early role in selecting party candidates, notes Todd and others. But they also note that the issue of improving the nation's health won't carry far into a campaign. It's good for the time being but will give way to meatier issues if Huckabee is serious about running for president. "As a way of breaking the ice and getting to know people who don't know you, it's a nice entree," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "But it probably won't carry a candidacy very far."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=49927f51e0bac6c51315f1ffba0e58ee&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVb&_md5=5bdde7e04a1a50973600212541df9f06

Baby Recovering Well From Surgery At UI (Chicago Tribune, March 14)
Amber Vairo has grown two inches and gained nearly a pound, and the three tiny scars on her belly have all but vanished - along with any doubts she'd survive a complex surgery to fix a life-threatening condition.  Last month, at just 5.6-pounds and six days after birth, Amber became the smallest patient in the world to undergo robotic surgery of any kind, according to her doctors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL AND CLINICS. She was born with a hole in her diaphragm, the abdominal muscle that is critical to breathing and forms a wall between the chest and abdomen. The condition, called congenital diaphragmatic hernia, can be fatal because the hole allows the intestines to migrate into the chest, putting pressure on the heart, lungs and spleen that can stunt organ growth or shut them down altogether. The little girl suffered from a particular type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, according to Dr. John Meehan, who led Amber's surgical team. Known as a Bochdalek hernia, it affects about one in 3000 babies and has a 25 percent mortality rate, Meehan said. "Was this life saving? Yes," Meehan said. "But I think what is also interesting is this is a new way of treating a severe medical problems in newborns. We didn't invent a new operation here, but just used a different technique to get it done." Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared March 14 on the web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES, BOSTON GLOBE, MSNBC, IRELAND ONLINE, EDINBURGH EVENING NEWS, NEWSDAY, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, TIMES PICAYUNE in Louisiana, WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, TUSCALOOSA (Ala.) NEWS, WILKES-BARRE (Penn.) TIMES LEADER, FORT WORTH (Tex.) STAR TELEGRAM, WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, PIONEER PRESS in Minnesota, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, CENTRE (Penn.) DAILY TIMES, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, MIAMI HERALD, ABC News.com, WJLA-TV in Washington, D.C., PROVIDENCE (R.I.) EYEWITNESS NEWS,  WLUC-TV and WOOD-TV in Michigan, KOLD-TV, KPHO and KVOA in Arizona, WKYT and LEX18 in Kentucky, the INDEPENDENT ONLINE in South Africa, KPLC-TV and KATC in Louisiana, WHBF in Illinois, KESQ and KFSN in California, WTVM and WALB in Georgia, KFOR-TV in Oklahoma, KAIT in Arkansas, KTRE in Texas, WAVY-TV and WRIC in Virginia, WBNS in Ohio, WVLT in Tennessee, WCAX in Vermont, WAFF in Alabama, WBOC-TV in Maryland,  KTVO and KFVS in Missouri, KASA in New Mexico, WSTM-TV in New York, and WLBT-TV in Mississippi,
http://www.chicagotribune.com/technology/sns-ap-smallest-robotic-surgery,1,5469909.story?coll=chi-news-hed

UI Online Addiction Study Cited (Wall Street Journal, March 14)
Fears about Internet addiction have been around as long as there's been a consumer Internet to be addicted to. It seems like every few months brings a new warning on the subject -- the latest that caught our eye was a Slashdotted UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study looking at players of massively multiplayer online role-playing games -- those are MMORPGS, in unpronounceable geekspeak. The study found 10% to 15% of players of such games could be considered addicted, which sounds reassuringly low to everyone except the makers of games like EverQuest and Star Wars: Galaxies. What struck us was that MMORPGS are just the latest segment of online life to spark Net-addiction fears, joining worries about porn, gambling, eBay and other pursuits that lend themselves to a certain obsessive-compulsive repetition. (Subscription required)
http://online.wsj.com/home/us

Bloom Chronicles Parking Quest (Chicago Tribune, March 13)
STEPHEN BLOOM
, UI professor of journalism and mass communication, writes of his struggle to secure a new parking spot on campus after his office moved to a new building. “I've been waiting forever for Sheila to call. I've never met Sheila, but she's the most powerful person at the university where I work. On a scale of importance, she is to the university president what skater Michelle Kwan is to the guy who drives the Zamboni. We at the University of Iowa pray to Sheila the Almighty daily. Tenure might protect us in the classroom, but outside we are vulnerable to all kinds of calamity. That's where Sheila comes in…Sheila, you may have guessed, is the parking-lot-assignment queen at the university, which, despite what Chicago readers might think, is not in a cornfield and does not have acres of space available for parking. An assigned spot here is as sought after as 50-yard-line seats at the Iowa-Michigan game.”
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/magazine/chi-0503130415mar13,1,2958258.story

Skorton Finds ‘Friends’ On Facebook (Omaha World Herald, March 13)
For University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON, it isn't lonely at the top. More than 840 people have signed up to be Skorton's friends on a Web site, www.thefacebook.com, that connects college students around the nation. Many of Skorton's cyberpals are Iowa students who think he's pretty cool for registering at the site. Skorton signed up for the site on Jan. 25 after student body President Lindsay Schutte jokingly suggested it. Schutte, 22, was pleasantly surprised when he followed her advice. About 30 people per day ask to be Skorton's friend. He has friends at five universities - including his son, Josh, at Stanford. Students have posted messages on the site praising everything from his ability to play the saxophone to how he handled a break-in at a campus research laboratory.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1359043

Buss Comments On Moral Philosopher Frankfurt (Register-Guard, March 13)
A feature on writer Harry G. Frankfurt, a moral philosopher of international reputation and a professor emeritus at Princeton, says that his small and scrupulous body of work tries to make sense of free will, desire and love in closely reasoned but jargon-free prose, illustrated by examples of behavior (philosophers speak of the "Frankfurt example") that anyone would recognize. "He's dealing with very abstract matters," said SARAH BUSS, who teaches philosophy at the University of Iowa, "but trying not to lose touch with the human condition. His work keeps faith with that condition." The newspaper is based in Oregon. This article originally appeared Feb. 14 in the New York Times.
http://www.registerguard.com/news/2005/03/13/ar.book.bull.0313.html

Robinson Comments On Religion, Politics (The Oregonian, March 13)
A review of writer Anne Lamott's new collection of essays, notes that it is fueled by her dueling identities as a born-again Christian and a “radical.” "Christian" and "liberal" have become identities at war, yet Lamott hangs onto both without dissonance. MARILYNNE ROBINSON, the oft-laureled novelist, essayist and professor at the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, believes that God is life's one great given. During a recent National Public Radio interview with Terry Gross about her latest novel, "Gilead," Robinson said, "I think that in any Western society religious assumptions inevitably affect politics. I think there is a tendency now to promote too narrow an idea of what religion consists of and of what religion requires."
http://www.oregonlive.com/entertainment/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/1110542590153860.xml

Tachau: Protect Academic Freedom (Denver Post, March 13)
In both shouts and murmurs, the Ward Churchill controversy has echoed through universities across the country amid the escalating clash of politics and academic freedom. Even before the furor over the CU professor's writings - he compared some of the Sept. 11 victims to a top Nazi - some college faculty had sensed an erosion of liberty to broach provocative or unpopular views. Legislators in at least eight states, including Colorado, have entertained bills or resolutions in the past several months reflecting the conservative push to balance what they claim is an overbearing liberal bias on campus. And tenure has long been open to attack on the grounds that it too thoroughly insulates even incompetent academics. At the University of Iowa, the faculty senate parried what it fears to be a politically charged challenge to free speech in academia by rattling off a resolution urging the CU regents not to use Churchill's controversial essay to damage his academic career. "I think (the controversy) is being seen across the country as an effort to use ideas that very few people would agree with, and the expression of those ideas, as a wedge issue," said KATHERINE TACHAU, professor of medieval history and president of the faculty senate. Churchill, a tenured professor and then-chair of CU's ethnic studies department, recently came under attack for the essay he wrote on Sept. 11, 2001, shortly after the terrorist attacks. Several legislators and Gov. Bill Owens have called for his removal. Churchill subsequently stepped down as department head but retained his $94,000 annual salary. Meanwhile, CU initiated a review of his academic work scheduled to conclude this week, but a financial settlement to ensure the professor's departure remained possible. "But that leaves the problem that a politically motivated attack from outside the university resulted in somebody being treated in a manner that explicitly attacks their ability to say and publish what they want," said Tachau. "A best-case scenario would be for the university and governor to affirm that we do not like what he says, but we defend his right to say it."
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~53~2760059,00.html

Kopelson Writes On Writers' Desks (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 11)
In a Q&A column, KEVIN R. KOPELSON, professor of English at the University of Iowa, discusses his new book, "Neatness Counts: Essays on the Writer's Desk" (University of Minnesota Press). He says writers form an accord with their work space that suits them: Some choose obsessive tidiness, others overwhelming clutter. "For me, thinking in print feels so chaotic that I need to create order everywhere else around me, so as not to be distracted by any physical disorder," he says. "But for others, writing is a process of creating a literary order out of a mental chaos that requires the objective correlative of a literally messy work space."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i27/27a01302.htm

Kurth Comments on Voyager (Science, March 11)
NASA intends to stop operating more than a half-dozen existing science probes at the end of this year, including the famed Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft now racing toward the edge of the solar system. Although space agency officials say no final decisions have been made, the agency's 2006 budget request includes no money for a host of solar and space physics projects that currently cost a total of $23 million annually. "If the U.S. wants to explore, then turning off Voyager is exactly the wrong signal to send," says WILLIAM KURTH, a space physicist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. NASA spokesperson Dolores Beasley says that "Voyager is not canceled," although no funding is planned beyond October.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/307/5715/1541

Alumnus Serves as Hospital CEO (Spokane Journal of Business, March 11)
Nearly halfway through his first year at the helm of Empire Health Services, acting CEO Jeff A. Nelson serving as the organization's CEO says it's headed in the right direction. Empire owns and operates Deaconess Medical Center and Valley Hospital & Medical Center the Spokane, Wash. He is a certified public accountant with a bachelor's degree in accounting from the University of Minnesota and a master's degree in hospital administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Washington.
http://www.spokanejournal.com/spokane_id=article&sub=2291

First Gallup Poll Noted (Long Beach Press-Telegram, March 11)
In a list of  "amazing" facts it's noted that the first poll taken by George Gallup was to determine the prettiest coed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the early 1920s. Gallup married the winner. The newspaper is located in California.
http://www.presstelegram.com/Stories/0,1413,204~23168~2755786,00.html

UI Doctoral Student Studies Gaming Addiction (Slashdot.com, March 10)
Jeffrey Parsons - a doctoral candidate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA - has recently conducted a research on MMORPG (Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game) addiction which found that about 15 percent of gamers meet the criteria for Internet addiction as provided by Kimberly Young, a leading researcher in Internet addiction. Using more strict criteria, a minimum of 10 percent of gamers met criteria for Internet addiction. Compared to national studies of Internet addiction, these numbers are somewhat elevated. However, given the sheer number of hours MMORPG gamers spend online (in comparison to the general population), even a 15 percent addiction rate is somewhat low. To illustrate the point, the college student spends 10 hours on the Internet per week. The average MMORPG gamer (addicted or not) spends 20-25 hours per week just playing MMORPGs, and an additional 10-15 hours per week in other Internet use. In other words, MMORPG players are spending four times as much time online as non-gamers. Slashdot.com is a website devoted to "news for nerds" and other technophiles.
http://games.slashdot.org/games/05/03/10/1436220.shtml?tid=186&tid=10

African Professor Earned Doctorate at UI (AllAfrica.com, March 10)
Professor Francis Imbuga is a lecturer of Literature at the Kigali Institute of Education in Rwanda, was interviewed about his experiences in the world of academia, film and writing. He earned a Ph.D. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1991. He is the author of "Miracle of Remera." The article originally appeared in the NEW TIMES in Rwanda.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200503100973.html

UI Buys Science Fiction Collection (Omaha World Herald, March 10)
The University of Iowa has bought 250,000 specialty science fiction magazines found on eBay. The UI contacted the seller, longtime collector Martin Horvat, and persuaded him to remove the collection from eBay, then negotiated the sale for $75,000. The magazines, called fanzines, are publications made by amateurs from around the world for a small audience of science fiction fans. BROOKS LANDON, who chairs Iowa's Department of English, said the magazines are a window into a number of cultural issues. The Associated Press story also appeared on the website of WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/news/4272808/detail.html

Casino Executive Endowed Writers' Workshop (Las Vegas Mercury, March 10)
 Last month, the Nevada Gaming Commission approved the $7.9 billion MGM Mirage-Mandalay Resort Group merger, a corporate megamerger that sent ripples into the art world..  Now as key corporate execs are expected to leave--in what might amount to a veritable fleet of golden parachutes--questions surround the future of one executive in particular: Mandalay President and Chief Financial Officer Glenn Schaeffer. Published reports have gaming honchos predicting his departure from the merged company, walking away with $13.7 million in stock options. What's Schaeffer's next move? It's a question circulating not only in business circles, but more bohemian ones: the arts and literary community. Well-known as an avid supporter of the arts, Schaeffer might be called a renaissance executive, a 1977 Iowa Writers' Workshop graduate-turned-businessman who, over the last several years, has personally bankrolled a number of arts and literary endeavors, and endowed the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP with $1 million for expansions. The newspaper is based in Nevada.
http://www.lasvegasmercury.com/2005/MERC-Mar-10-Thu-2005/26024729.html

UI Gifted Student Study Cited (Philadelphia Daily News, March 10)
A plan to transform 50 Philadelphia schools to better serve the needs of academically gifted students, while helping students at all kindergarten-8th-grade schools rise to the gifted level, was unveiled by school officials yesterday. The contention of district officials that gifted inner-city students nationally are under- served by their schools is supported by a growing number of studies with titles such as, "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students." Giving gifted students accelerated work makes them feel "academically challenged and socially accepted, and they do not fall prey to the boredom that plagues many highly capable students who are forced to follow the curriculum for their age-peers," according to the authors of that 2004 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study.
http://www.philly.com/mld/dailynews/news/local/11100426.htm

McLeod Book Details Limits On Expression (Hartford Advocate, March 10)
We've come a long way since music industry executives warned that trading cassette tapes would ruin them, but according to author KEMBREW MCLEOD, the current state of affairs is a very mixed bag. In "Freedom of Expression: Overzealous Copyright Bozos and Other Enemies of Creativity," McLeod celebrates information-sharing, in particular the electronic sampling innovated by groups like Public Enemy. But McLeod, a music critic and University of Iowa professor, also says a legal overreaction to the digital revolution is hampering civil liberties and free expression in widely disparate areas. The newspaper is based in Connecticut.
http://hartfordadvocate.com/gbase/Lifestyle/content?oid=oid:103312

UI Alumnus Makes Gift To Journalism School (Omaha World Herald, March 10)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumnus has donated $800,000 to the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, school officials said. Benjamin A. Bankson of Brooklyn, N.Y., donated the money to be used for the Benjamin Bankson Endowed Journalism Fund and scholarships. The scholarship recipients should have an interest in journalism careers focusing on religion and ethics, which was Bankson's field. Bankson, a Sioux City native, graduated from the U of I in 1954. He spent 15 years as a writer and an editor covering religion for the former Lutheran Council and 16 years as a freelancer. Bankson has retired from journalism and runs a bed-and-breakfast in Brooklyn Heights, N.Y.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1356421

Tranel, Buchanan Co-Author Memory Study (Science Daily, March 10)
Those of us who are old enough to remember the Kennedy assassination are usually able to remember the initial announcement almost as if it's a movie running in our heads. That's because there is a well-known tendency for people to have enhanced memory of a highly emotional event, and further, a memory that focuses especially on the "gist" of the event. In other words, people who remember the words "President Kennedy is dead" will remember the news extraordinarily well. But at the same time, they will likely have no more recollection of extraneous details such as what they were wearing or what they were doing an hour before hearing the news than they would for any other day in 1963. Neurobiologists have known both these phenomena to be true for some time, and a new study now explains how the brain achieves this effect. In the new study, researchers from the California Institute of Technology and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE show how the recollections of gist and details of emotional events are related to specific parts of the brain. In an article appearing in this month's Nature Neuroscience, the authors report that patients with damage to an area of the brain known as the amygdala are unable to remember the gist of an emotional stimulus, even though there is nothing otherwise faulty in their memory. The study shows that the amygdala somehow focuses the brain's processing resources on the gist of an emotional event. Ralph Adolphs, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Cal Tech and lead author of the study, worked with UI neurologists DANIEL TRANEL and TONY W. BUCHANAN.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050307220638.htm

Hemley, Bell To Teach In Local Program (The Chattanoogan, March 10)
The Meacham Writers' Workshops will be held March 17, 18 and 19 at UTC and Chattanooga State. Visiting faculty include ROBIN HEMLEY, who directs the Non-Fiction Writing Program at the University of Iowa, and MARVIN BELL, a poet and faculty member in the Iowa Writers' Workshop. The newspaper is based in Tennessee.
http://www.chattanoogan.com/articles/article_63769.asp

UI Program Protects Elders (The Shelby Promoter, March 10)
If you have concerns about the mistreatment or potential for mistreatment of an elder, a new program sponsored by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Montana State University-Bozeman, may be helpful. The Family Care Conference uses an empowering model to bring family members together to address their concerns by developing a plan for safety and well-being of the elder. The newspaper is based in Montana.
http://www.goldentrianglenews.com/articles/2005/03/09/glacier_reporter/news/news5.txt

Man Receives Second Kidney At UI (Hancock County Journal-Pilot, March 10)
Matt Tubbs is living testimony of the changes in the kidney transplant field. Tubbs, the son of Dennis and Ellie Tubbs of Carthage, underwent his second kidney transplant Jan. 27 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL AND CLINICS in Iowa City, Iowa. The surgery was to replace a kidney donated to him by his dad nearly 11 years ago. His new one is from his mom, meaning he now has one kidney from each parent, in addition to the two he was born with. Kidneys are not removed unless they are cancerous. "It's pretty unusual for a child to have a kidney donated from each parent," said Dennis. The 11 years between kidney replacements gave the family an up close look at the changes in medicine. Everything was easier and shorter this time, from surgery preparation to surgery to recovery. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.journalpilot.com/articles/2005/03/09/news/news1.txt

Field, Lynch Study Radon (Lancaster Newspapers, March 10)
A major new radon study co-authored by a Lancaster County native provides more direct evidence that living in homes with even low levels of radon gas puts residents at risk from lung cancer. "This topic should be of particular interest to residents of Lancaster County since the counties surrounding Three Mile Island have the highest regional radon concentrations in the United States," says Dr. R. WILLIAM FIELD, a University of Iowa associate professor who graduated from McCaskey High School in 1972 and has two degrees from Millersville University. Field was recently asked by the World Health Organization to study the radon problem around the world. The new radon study by Field and Dr. CHARLES F. LYNCH, a University of Iowa epidemiologist, claims to be the largest ever performed in North America and is published in the current issue of the journal Epidemiology. The study, a pooling of seven other residential radon studies around the country and Canada, finds a significant risk of lung cancer for residents who live in a home for five to 30 years.
http://www.lancasteronline.com/pages/news/local/4/12613

Rosenbaum Collaborates With Video Producer (Cincinnati Enquirer, March 9)
Lisa Kaplan's LifeWorks business began with a death. One of Kaplan's friends who is a member of the family medicine faculty at the University of Iowa had asked her to videotape informal conversations with terminal cancer patient Cathy Tingle of Monterey for use in teaching medical students about end-of-life care. "My friend, MARCY ROSENBAUM, had interviewed Cathy as part of her dissertation and believed Cathy had some really important stories to tell," Kaplan recalled. "Cathy had been expected to live for one year, but lived for 10, and had had both phenomenal and horrendous experiences with medicine." Kaplan, the editor of Health & Wellness magazine and creative director of a small Lexington publishing company, bought a camera and editing equipment to produce a documentary about Tingle's life and death -- "Like Rembrandt Draperies: A Portrait of Cathy Tingle." Her continued interviews with Tingle's friends after the woman's death convinced Kaplan of the healing value of their being able to preserve their stories and memories on tape.
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050309/NEWS0103/503090428/1059/NEWS01

UI Presidential Search Costs Cited (Rocky Mountain News, March 9)
It took seven months and $142,000 to hire a new president last year at the University of Nebraska, a Big 12 school like the University of Colorado. Other public universities spent more in their presidential searches. In the last year, the University at Buffalo in New York spent $219,824 and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA $177,204. The University of Michigan spent $334,600 in 2002 to find a top executive.
http://rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_3606391,00.html

Read Critiques Book On Jiang Zemin (Wall Street Journal, March 9)
Robert Lawrence Kuhn, a 60-year-old American investment banker and managing director at Citigroup Inc.'s Smith Barney unit, is the author of "The Man Who Changed China: The Life and Legacy of Jiang Zemin," a biography of the former Chinese leader, who stepped down last year after 15 years in power. While the Chinese publisher, a division of Shanghai Century Publishing Group, says it is printing a million copies, Crown Publishers has printed just 15,000 of the English-language version. U.S. sales have been poor since the title hit the market in January, and some reviewers have panned the 709-page book as a fawning work of hagiography. The book "quickly departs from the realm of analysis and ends up somewhere close to cheerleading," wrote University of Iowa political scientist BENJAMIN L. READ in the Far Eastern Economic Review.

UI Dorm Rates To Increase (Omaha World Herald, March 9)
Students living in dorms at the state's three public universities may have to pay more for a double-occupancy room, according to a proposal presented Tuesday to the Iowa Board of Regents. Rates for a double-occupancy room, including a meal plan, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA would increase by 3.2 percent, raising rates $191 to $6,073 for the 2005-06 school year.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1355411

Parents Drop Suit In Death Of UI Student (Omaha World Herald, March 9)
The parents of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student killed in 2003 when she was hit by a sport utility vehicle have dropped their lawsuit against the driver of the SUV. The lawsuit filed by Robert and Janet Skolnick, of Woodstock, Ill., was dismissed Friday.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1638&u_sid=1355232

Universities Consider Health Insurance Requirement (National Public Radio, March 8)
Each year, hundreds of students leave school because they can't pay huge medical bills from accidents or unexpected illnesses. Some public universities now require students carry health insurance, and more are considering that, though some students say they can't afford it. Stephen Beckley, a health-care and benefits consultant for universities, notes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is one of several universities considering an insurance requirement.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=d2ecc401191046a7e2f7f1f6f60d8107&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVb&_md5=005867510aed874127676aebc1946d02

Soll Ultrasound System Stalled (Omaha World Herald, March 8)
An ultrasound system designed by a University of Iowa professor to reduce odor in hog manure may never hit the market. "The method works, and it wasn't expensive," said DAVID SOLL, a biological sciences professor. "But I'm busy with other things, and it's not my job to promote it." The project was backed by Bruce Rastetter, president and founder of Heartland Pork Enterprises, Iowa's second largest pork producer at the time. Last year, Rastetter sold his company to Christensen Family Farms of Sleepy Eye, Minn. A spokesman at Christensen Family Farms said the company knew nothing about the ultrasound project. Soll said the prototype ultrasound system was still on the farm where it was tested, and he didn't know if he had the right to retrieve the equipment.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=46&u_sid=1354321

Parents Of UI Student Drop Lawsuit (Chicago Tribune, March 8)
The suburban Chicago parents of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student killed in 2003 when she was hit by a sports utility vehicle have dismissed a lawsuit against the driver of the SUV. Robert and Janet Skolnick, of Woodstock, dismissed the lawsuit Friday against Thomas Eldridge, 22, of West Des Moines. Eldridge pleaded guilty last month to involuntary manslaughter in the death of the Skolnicks' daughter Amanda. Eldridge's SUV struck Amanda Skolnick, 20, on a downtown Iowa City street on Sept. 4, 2003. She was dragged about 30 feet before the vehicle stopped, court records show. Skolnick died the next day at University Hospitals. Police said Eldridge admitted to smoking marijuana before the accident. He faces up to five years in prison when he's sentenced in April.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-050308crash,1,3912525.story?coll=chi-news-hed=1=true >

UI Dorm Rates May Increase (WQAD-TV, March 8)
The cost of dorm life may be going up at Iowa's three public universities. According to proposal to the state Board of Regents, rates for a double-occupancy room, including a meal plan, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA would increase by about three percent. That's almost $200 more for a total of over $6,000. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3047906

Hovenkamp Comments On Pairing Of Drugs (International Herald Tribune, March 8)
A drug that could be one of the most promising new heart treatments in a decade is generating controversy even before it is approved, because its maker, Pfizer, plans to sell it only in combination with the company's best-selling cholesterol treatment, Lipitor. At a cardiology conference in Orlando, Fla., today, researchers sponsored by Pfizer are expected to present positive new results about the drug, called torcetrapib, which has been shown in preliminary studies to substantially raise levels of what is known as good cholesterol, a novel approach to preventing heart disease. "It's the F.D.A. that's doing the tying," said HERB HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa. "Assuming the F.D.A. accepts Pfizer's test results and certifies this drug only when it's taken in conjunction with Lipitor, then that would then become the government's restraint, not Pfizer's restraint." This story also appeared on the Web sites of the TUSCALOOSA (AL) NEWS and SPARTANBURG (SC) HERALD JOURNAL.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/03/07/business/drug.html

Law Alumnus Doesn't Swear (San Diego Union Tribune, March 8)
In those rare moments when he gets all worked up in anger, attorney Chuck Dick has been known to utter the word "darn." When he wants to add some pizazz to his wardrobe, he'll put on a seersucker sport coat, bow tie and two-toned Spectator shoes.  And, apparently no one has ever heard Dick say a bad thing about another human being. "It's a reflection of his Midwestern upbringing," said Mike Weaver, a colleague who has known Dick for more than 20 years. "He's fundamentally a decent human being." There may not be any profanity in the Manhattan, Kan., native's vocabulary, and he may not speak ill of others, but over nearly three decades, he has established himself as one of the region's toughest litigators and securities law specialists. Dick, managing partner of Baker & McKenzie's San Diego office, is a 1967 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/business/20050308-9999-1b8dick.html

Hovenkamp Comments On Pairing Of Drugs (New York Times, March 7)
A drug that could be one of the most promising new heart treatments in a decade is generating controversy even before it is approved, because its maker, Pfizer, plans to sell it only in combination with the company's best-selling cholesterol treatment, Lipitor. At a cardiology conference in Orlando, Fla., today, researchers sponsored by Pfizer are expected to present positive new results about the drug, called torcetrapib, which has been shown in preliminary studies to substantially raise levels of what is known as good cholesterol, a novel approach to preventing heart disease. "It's the F.D.A. that's doing the tying," said HERB HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa. "Assuming the F.D.A. accepts Pfizer's test results and certifies this drug only when it's taken in conjunction with Lipitor, then that would then become the government's restraint, not Pfizer's restraint." A version of the article also ran on the websites of the LAKELAND (Fla.) LEDGER, the ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER-PRESS and the SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/07/business/07pfizer.html

Trevor's 'Julius Caesar' Introduction Cited (Newsday, March 7)
Had enough of unsavory politicians? Tired of voters changing positions with the latest political winds? Well, Hofstra University has a play for you. The 56th Hofstra Shakespeare Festival features a production of "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar," which runs through this coming Sunday. William Shakespeare's Roman tragedy is presented on Hofstra's replica of the original Globe Theatre stage. This is fitting as DOUGLAS TREVOR, from the University of Iowa, speculates in his introduction to "Julius Caesar" in "The Complete Pelican Shakespeare" that this may have been the first play performed by Shakespeare's company "in the Globe theater in the early summer of 1599." Most striking are the familiar political themes running through this play written some 400 years ago about men living more than 1,600 years before then. In this sense, "Julius Caesar" speaks to the constancy and pitfalls of human nature.
http://www.newsday.com/news/opinion/ny-opkea074167675mar07,0,6412116.column?coll=ny-viewpoints-headlines

Deadwood Creator Milch Attended UI (Denver Post, March 6)
A story about the HBO series "Deadwood" says that the show's creator, chief writer and executive producer, David Milch, graduated with high honors at Yale, where he studied with poet-novelist Robert Penn Warren. After getting an MFA at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, he returned to Yale as a lecturer in English literature and co-edited (with Warren and others) "American Literature: The Makers and the Making."
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~78~2743390,00.html

Poet Wright Attended UI MFA (Knoxville News, March 6)

Charles Wright, 1998 Pulitzer Prize winner in poetry, will read from his works and answer questions in "An Evening of Poetry with Charles Wright," part of the Writers in the Library series at the University of Tennessee. Wright, who grew up in Kingsport, will begin reading at 7 p.m. Monday, March 7, at the University Club, the corner of Neyland Drive and Kingston Pike. The Writers in the Library series is sponsored by the University of Tennessee Library Friends, and is free and open to the public." Wright is a professor of English at the University of Virginia. He was born in Pickwick Dam, Tenn., but grew up in Kingsport. He earned a degree in history at Davidson College, and did a tour of duty with the Army in Italy, where he began writing poetry. He earned a master's of fine arts in writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. After a teaching stint at the University of California at Irvine, he landed at UVA in 1983. http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/books/article/0,1406,KNS_306_3592259,00.html

UI Presidential Search Consultant Cited (Christian Post, March 6)
Earlier last week, presidential search committee and advisory group were named at Baylor University, Waco, Texas, committed to selecting the right successor to Baylor President Robert Sloan. And yesterday, the Board of Regents Chair, Will Davis, announced the appointment of a presidential search consultant to engage in its search for Baylor's new president. William (Bill) Funk of Dallas, head of Korn/Ferry International's National Education Practice, who has considerable expertise in such searches, will now assist the board with its search. Funk has conducted over 250 university and college presidential and chancellor searches within the nation, including some of the nation's distinguished and respected institutions such as Vanderbilt, Syracuse, Miami, Tulane, Purdue, University of Washington, University of Wisconsin-Madison, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Texas-Austin.
http://www.christianpost.com/article/education/666/section/baylor.appoints.presidential.search.consultant/1.htm

Longtime Teacher, Husband Were UI Alums (Durham Herald-Sun, March 5)
A feature on Ruth Hubbard Smith, who recently observed her 101st birthday, says that in the 1950s she became a special education teacher in the Iowa City public schools and enrolled in a master's degree program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which she completed at the age of 60. During her professional career, she was a delegate to the International Teachers of Reading assemblies in Paris and Copenhagen. After she retired from teaching, she married Ray V. Smith in 1970. He taught dentistry for more than 50 years at the University of Iowa. The couple moved to Durham in 1991. He died in 1993 -- at 102
http://www.herald-sun.com/durham/4-583572.html

Lohman Study On Testing Gap Cited (Los Angeles Times, March 5)
A high school student writing about the new SAT says the College Board should institute an aptitude test that equitably measures underprivileged students and levels the playing field in the college admissions process. Rather than testing these students on subjects that they often have been inadequately taught, offering aptitude tests that gauge the innate abilities of individual students would be fairer. He cites a study conducted by DAVID LOHMAN, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa, who determined that the gap between disadvantaged minorities and whites on cognitive-abilities tests was significantly lower than the gap on curriculum-based tests.
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-vo-zhou5mar05,0,4805207.story?coll=la-news-comment-opinions

HBO Series Creator Is Alumnus Of Writers' Workshop (Salon, March 5)
A story about HBO's "Deadwood" says the series' creator David Milch took a roundabout path to Hollywood, earning his MFA in fiction at the WRITERS' WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, then teaching literature at Yale University for nine years before writing his first script, a "Hill Street Blues" episode that won an Emmy, a Writers Guild Award and a Humanitas Prize. Taking the awards as a less-than-subtle hint that he had a talent for dramatic writing, Milch left New Haven, Conn., to join the staff of "Hill Street Blues" for five seasons. Later, he co-created "NYPD Blue" with Steven Bochco, and during his seven years on the show, helped transform the procedural drama into something far richer and more dynamic than audiences had seen before.
http://www.salon.com/ent/feature/2005/03/05/milch/index.html

President's Residence Opened at UI (Omaha World Herald, March 4)
The public has finally had a chance to see renovations at the president's residence at the University of Iowa. Work on the 1908 house began in autumn 2003. Crews installed large windows and mahogany woodwork reminiscent of the early 1900s. Though work on the $2.9 million project was completed in August, a literary lunch held Wednesday marked the first public event at the house since renovations were completed. "It is an icon of this campus," ROD LEHNERTZ, the university's director of campus and facilities planning, said Wednesday as he led a tour of the home. "And it is one that promotes outreach." The article also appeared on the website of WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1351452

Foster Speaks at Publishing Conference (Tallahassee Democrat, March 4)
PATRICIA FOSTER
of the University of Iowa is listed as panelist speaking about writing memoir and nonfiction at "Other Words: A Book Fair and Conference of Literary Magazines, Independent Publishers and Writers" this weekend at Florida State University. "This conference is more about the nuts and bolts of writing and publishing," organizer and Anhinga Press publisher Rick Campbell said. "The idea was to get a lot of different people - the grant-givers, the (writing) festival organizers, the small-press publishers, the distributors, the writers - together for a dialogue." The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/tallahassee/entertainment/11042060.htm

University Name Change Debated (Springfield News Leader, March 4)
Two House members from Columbia, Mo. have submitted constitutional objections to the name change for Southwest Missouri State University. The action won't keep Gov. Matt Blunt from signing the legislation. But some wonder whether it suggests a possible court challenge when the switch to Missouri State University takes effect Aug. 28.  Democrats Jeff Harris, the House minority floor leader, and Judy Baker submitted the objections after their chamber voted 120-35 this week to grant SMS its long-sought name change. The lawmakers argued that Senate Bill 98, the name-change measure conflicts with Article IX of the constitution, which references "the state university." Harris and Baker said the use of the word "the" shows that the General Assembly meant previously to designate one institution as "the state university," namely the University of Missouri-Columbia. Therefore, a law naming an additional institution as a "state university" conflicts with the constitution, they said. SMS spokesman Paul Kincaid said his research shows that Iowa - home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University - has language in its constitution that refers to "the state university." The newspaper is based in Missouri.
http://springfield.news-leader.com/news/today/20050304-Namechangeuncon.html

Carver Responds to 'Foetry' Accusations (Inside Higher Ed, March 4)
In recent weeks, an anonymous Web site has begun a campaign against the University of Iowa Press, arguing that it favors entries with connections to the University of Iowa. The Web site, Foetry, calls itself "the poetry watchdog" and boasts of its role "exposing the fraudulent 'contests,' tracking the sycophants, naming names." The Web site is urging poets to send letters to consumer advocates, state officials and the university's president, and to lawyers who might help with a class action lawsuit (based on Foetry's view that participants are duped into paying the $20 entry fee, unaware that they may have little chance of winning if they don't have Iowa ties). At the Iowa Press, officials are astonished to find themselves under attack by an army of poets and poetry fans -- most of them anonymous. "It's hard to have a useful dialogue with an anonymous Web site," said HOLLY CARVER, director of the press. She noted that Iowa's contests are "blind," meaning that names, affiliations, dedications and other identifying facts are removed before judging. "It's just a little hard to say how our contest could be more democratic than it already is."
http://insidehighered.com/insider/poets_v_u_of_iowa_press

Capsule Endoscopy Shows Bleeding Cause (Napa Valley Register, March 3)
Capsule endoscopy involves a patient swallowing a miniature video camera just like they would a pill. It snaps thousands of photos while making its way through the gastro-intestinal or tracheal system, giving doctors an accurate view of a host of internal goings on, painlessly and in just minutes. It has proven effective for patients who show clear evidence of intestinal bleeding, but where conventional tests did not turned up a cause. In a recent case at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS, a patient with such bleeding was determined to have radiation burns in the small intestine left over from cancer treatment seven years earlier. The patient's bleeding was exacerbated by a prescription blood thinner. She was taken off the thinner, and most of the bleeding stopped. The newspaper is based in California.
http://www.napanews.com/templates/index.cfm?template=story_full&id=E36FD3ED-DA03-475F-8C34-AE9F054CC46C

Rubik's Cube Still Popular (Omaha World-Herald, March 3)
More than 100 million Rubik's Cubes have been sold since its debut in 1980, making it the best-selling puzzle of all time. There are cube clubs and competitions around the globe, including the Midwest.  Christine Wilkinson, a 33-year-old student working on her accounting doctorate at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, became a member of the Midwest Cube Club six months ago. She had been searching for others to talk to about the favorite childhood toy. "My attraction to it is that it's something you can solve. I can do this thing that not everyone can do," she said. "And also, it's a constant intellectual challenge. There are so many ways to do it, that you can just keep doing it for years and never get tired of it."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=1350178

Dramatist Taught at UI (Playbill, March 3)
Dramatist Erik Ehn has been appointed Dean of CalArts School of Theater. He will begin his position on July 1. Currently, Ehn serves as director of CalArts Writing for Performance Program. He began teaching at the Institute in the 2002-03 academic year. Before coming to CalArts, Ehn taught in a number of theatre programs including those at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Princeton University.
http://www.playbill.com/news/article/91518.html

Tse Noted as Past Winner in Music Competition (Jazz Times, March 3)
The 17th Annual Yamaha Young Performing Artist Competition (YYPA) deadline for entries is approaching, with applications requiring a postmark date of March 14 or earlier. The competition is designed to provide early recognition to young musicians in the United States and serves as the inaugural event for the annual Bands of America Summer Symposium. Past winners include saxophonist KENNETH TSE, who is on faculty at the University of Iowa. http://jazztimes.com/columns_and_features/news/detail.cfm?article=10348

Incoming UI Student Comments On Competition (Chicago Tribune, March 3)
At New Trier Township High School, well-known for super-achievers, some students start an hour early, eager to squeeze in an extra class among trumpet lessons, Japanese and zoology. Snacking on the run, they can take a staggering nine classes a day. But in a move to get students to slow down and enjoy life, a school committee has proposed a controversial change: a mandatory lunch period. It's part of a wide-ranging plan that encourages hard-charging students to focus on finding subjects that interest them instead of ones that might interest Harvard or Yale. The objective, officials say, is to replace a culture that emphasizes overachieving with one that discourages overscheduling. The plan also would eliminate class rankings in a few years. Eliminating class rank, which is being tried at other local high schools, comes as competition increases to get into top-ranked colleges. At New Trier, where it is especially difficult to rank in the top percentages, students feel as if they are at a disadvantage when compared with their classmates. "It would be a lot less stressful, a lot less competitive" without class rank, said senior Alan Cosby, who plans to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the fall.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0503030265mar03,1,5222068.story

Former UI Athlete Loves Kansas Arena (Lawrence Journal-World, March 3)
Lew Perkins, who played college basketball at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and worked as athletic director at Connecticut, Maryland and Wichita State, has attended games in some fabulous, historic hoops venues. "You name it, I have been there. I have seen them all -- Madison Square Garden, Rupp Arena, Cameron, the Palestra," said Perkins, KU's second-year AD. "There is none better than Allen Fieldhouse. None." Perkins, who is committed to improving the building by sandblasting the outside, and by adding a new floor, windows, seating, lights and sound system, said it was more than the structure itself that made the 50-year-old building so spectacular.
http://www.ljworld.com/section/kusports/story/197833

Folsom: Each Edition Of 'Leaves' A Different Book (The Ledger, March 2)
This year marks the 150th anniversary of the initial printing of "Leaves of Grass," American poet Walt Whitman's uncontested masterwork that gave exuberant voice to an American everyman. Whitman issued six editions of "Leaves of Grass" throughout his career, culminating in the so-called deathbed edition of 1892. Through constant revisions and additions, the book changed from a slender volume of gushing language to a weighty, authoritative tome that moved with the measured pace of old age. "Each of those editions is really a different book that responds to a different moment in his own life, as well as a different historical moment," said ED FOLSOM, an English professor at the University of Iowa. The paper is based in Lakeland, Fla.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050302/NEWS/503020303/1021

Andreasen Comments on Summers Statement (ABC World News Tonight, March 1)
Harvard University's president, Lawrence Summers' suggestion that differences between the sexes might help explain the lack of women in math and science departments, got him in all sorts of trouble. Neuroscientist NANCY ANDREASEN of the University of Iowa says men and women may have different brains, but the cause is societal influences, not intrinsic aptitude. "I, as a young woman, was brought up to believe that I had great verbal abilities, but that I couldn't do math and science. And you know, here I am, now, I'm a very successful scientist."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a6b7f046da48d34d0a7e0693486eba43&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=9f8a2e25fb1b60b18ff82ffb992971b8

Squire: Vilsack May Be Positioning Presidential Run (CBSNews.com, March 1)
Iowa Governor Tom Vilsack continues to rule out a run for a third term in 2006, possibly positioning himself for a run at the presidency in 2008. "He's been focusing on an agenda in this state that would position him to run as a centrist Democrat," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. Gov. Vilsack's agenda includes balancing his budget via spending cuts rather than tax increases, boosting economic development, and protecting K-12 education. "I think he's hoping to have things go well enough in the next two years, so he leaves office with a record that doesn't haunt him on the trail," says Squire.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/03/01/politics/main677300.shtml

UI Study: Hormone Therapy, Gallbladder Disease Linked (Maclean's, March 1)
Postmenopausal women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have a higher risk  of developing gallstones and other forms of gallbladder disease, a recent study has shown. The gallbladder is a sac that stores bile, a digestive fluid produced in the liver. To look for a possible relationship between HRT and gallstone disease, Dr. ROBERT WALLACE and his colleagues at the University of Iowa analyzed data from the Women's Health Initiative, a study involving more than 22,500 postmenopausal women ages 50 to 79. The women had been randomly assigned to take HRT or inactive pills. All women assigned to HRT took estrogen, and women who still had a uterus also took progestin to prevent an overgrowth of cells in the uterine lining that can lead to cancer. Maclean's magazine is based in Canada.
http://www.macleans.ca/topstories/health/article.jsp?content=20050301_104620_5360

Squire: Vilsack May Be Positioning Presidential Run (Christian Science Monitor, March 1)
Iowa Governor Tom Vilsack continues to rule out a run for a third term in 2006, possibly positioning himself for a run at the presidency in 2008. "He's been focusing on an agenda in this state that would position him to run as a centrist Democrat," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. Governor Vilsack's agenda includes balancing his budget via spending cuts rather than tax increases, boosting economic development, and protecting K-12 education. "I think he's hoping to have things go well enough in next two years, so he leaves office with a record that doesn't haunt him on the trail," says Dr. Squire. This story also appeared on ABCNEWS.com
http://search.csmonitor.com/search_content/0301/p01s01-uspo.html

Weinstock Leads Maggot Renaissance (The Independent, March 1)
Maggots have been used to clean infected wounds for centuries, and their therapeutic qualities were exploited by battlefield surgeons from Waterloo to the Somme. As the use of antibiotics gathered pace in the early 20th century, the medicinal maggot was discarded. But now, despite seeming like the very antithesis of 21st-century science, maggot therapy has staged something of a comeback. With reason. Anecdotal evidence and small-scale trials suggest that, for ulcer wounds in particular, a compress of sterilized maggots can be more effective than conventional treatments. Now, the largest clinical study into maggot therapy ever mounted aims to find out just how beneficial it can be. In an experiment last year by Dr. JOEL WEINSTOCK, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa, 70 per cent of Crohn's sufferers went into remission after treatment with a drink containing thousands of whipworm eggs. A version of the concoction is in production in Germany, pending approval by the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products. While the results did not surprise Weinstock - IBS is rare, he'd noted, in countries where digestive parasites are common - a few of his colleagues were taken aback. "A lot of researchers couldn't believe this treatment was effective, but people are always sceptical when confronted with new ideas," he said. The Independent is based in England.
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health_medical/story.jsp?story=615569

Freedman Comments on Summers Controversy (Christian Science Monitor, March 1)
To James Freedman, president emeritus of Dartmouth College and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the mixed reception to Harvard University President Lawrence Summers' controversial comments about women and science has been largely "a question of [Summers's] appreciation of the culture of academia" - the consequence, perhaps, of an age in which college presidents are often chosen as much for managerial skills as for ivory-tower expertise. Freedman points to presidential luminaries of the past century: Nicholas Murray Butler, president of Columbia from 1901 to 1945; Abbott Lawrence Lowell, at Harvard's helm from 1909 to 1933 (a bronze statue of his beloved dog Phantom remains on campus); and Robert Hutchins of the University of Chicago, president from 1929 to 1945. The same story appeared on the Web site of ABCNEWS.com.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0301/p02s01-ussc.html

Beeghly Comments on Antidepressant Use in Children (Stockton Record, March 1)
The antidepressant Zoloft did not drive a 12-year-old to murder his grandparents, a jury decided recently, but the news was hardly comforting to parents who have children on the medication. Antidepressants now come with ominous new governmental warning labels that describe a frightening link between the drugs and increased suicidal thoughts and behavior in children. Once, parents agonized over whether to start their kids on antidepressants. Now they wonder: should they stop? First, ask yourself if the medication your child is taking is working, and how long he has been on it, said child psychiatrist JAMES BEEGHLY, an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa. "The greatest risk of suicidal thought is when they first start," Beeghly said. "If the child has been on for a couple of months, they have passed the major risk of suicidal use." The Record is based in Stockton, Calif. This article also appeared on the Web site of the Spokane SPOKESMAN REVIEW.
http://www.recordnet.com/daily/lifestyle/articles/030105-l-1.php

Folsom: Whitman Editions Reflect Moments in His Life (Inside Bay Area, March 1)
The 150th anniversary of the publication of Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" is an opportunity to discuss the unique character of that first 1855 edition, scholars said. The poet issued six editions of "Leaves of Grass" throughout his career, culminating in the so-called deathbed edition of 1892. Through constant revisions and additions, the book changed  from a slender volume of gushing language to a weighty, authoritative tome that moved with the measured pace of old age. "Each of those editions is really a different book that responds to a different moment in his own life, as well as a different historical moment," said ED FOLSOM, an English professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.insidebayarea.com/bayarealiving/ci_2589592

Alumnus Retires From Teaching, Takes Second Job (Corvallis Gazette Times, March 1)
Following a 30-year double-duty career as a university professor and organic farmer, anyone, it seems, would be ready for a relaxing retirement, but Harry MacCormack keeps making things happen. After moving to Corvallis in 1967 to teach creative writing at Oregon State University, MacCormack, with a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, eventually landed in the theater department, teaching screen- and playwriting. In addition to writing two screenplays and six stage plays - two of which have been produced in Corvallis - MacCormack has published five books of his poetry. MacCormack is perhaps best known, though, for his contributions to organic farming.
http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2005/03/01/news/business/monbiz01.txt

Breder: Mendieta Exhibit is Homecoming for Late Artist (CNN.com, Feb. 28)
Ana Mendieta and her sister were shipped off to the United States from Cuba by their parents, landed in a Dubuque orphanage and were shuffled among several foster homes -- all before graduating from high school. Friends say such turmoil on the cusp of adolescence was the reason Mendieta, who died in 1985, spent the rest of her life trying to claim a sense of belonging through her art. In an exhibit at the Des Moines Art Center, Mendieta's photographs, sculpture, drawings and performance art convey her deep longing to define her identity. The exhibit is the first of Mendieta's work in Iowa. "It's exciting, of course, but it's really amazing that it took so long for her work to come back to the place where she lived and worked as an artist," said HANS BREDER, who mentored Mendieta through his Intermedia Program for the New Performing Arts at the University of Iowa. "It is a real homecoming for the things she did and the influence she had on so many others," said Breder. The same story appeared on the Web site of CUBANET and KERALNEXT (INDIA),
http://www.cnn.com/2005/TRAVEL/DESTINATIONS/02/28/ana.mendieta.exhibit.ap/

Schoen: Some N.C. Sterilizations Voluntary (WTVD-TV, Feb. 28)
Legislation to help victims of the North Carolina eugenics sterilization program is slowly moving ahead almost two years after it was proposed, though the possibility of reparations remains a long shot, according to one official. More than 7,600 people were sterilized, many against their will, between 1929 and 1974 under the authority of the Eugenics Board of North Carolina. Gov. Mike Easley apologized for the program in December 2002, and in 2003 he approved recommendations that those sterilized receive health-care and education benefits, that a memorial be set up, and that information about the sterilization program be included in the state's history curriculum. But one detail could complicate any plan for compensation -- some of the sterilizations were voluntary. JOHANNA SCHOEN, a scholar from the University of Iowa who first gained access to the eugenics board records and provided them to the Journal, found 446 cases in which she believed that the patients clearly desired the operation. WTVD is based in Raleigh-Durham, N.C. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the WINSTON-SALEM JOURNAL, WILMINGTON (NC) MORNING STAR, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, WRAL, WCNC, WVEC and numerous other North Carolina news organizations.
http://abclocal.go.com/wtvd/news/022805_APstate_sterilization.html

UI Fees For Late Dropped Courses Cited (Seattle Times, Feb. 27)
You think college tuition costs are high? Many schools have come up with new ways to empty your wallet through university fees. Drop a course a day late, register 10 minutes after the deadline or park in the wrong place on campus and you could be hit with hefty fines that can add hundreds to your annual bill. In some cases, if you don't drop a class in time, you can be billed for the entire course. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, just a week of delay can mean a bill of several thousand dollars - for a course you didn't stay in. A version of the story also ran on the Web site of the DETROIT NEWS. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/shopsmart/2002190392_shopsmart27.html

 

 

 

 

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