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July, 2005 See UI in the New Archive Index

Current News Highlights

UI Study On Brain Damage, Investing Savvy Cited (The Street.com, July 29)
Want to become a better investor? Get brain damage. That's the finding of a rather unusual study by researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It was published in Psychological Science in June, and its conclusions were reported in The Wall Street Journal last week. But don't start playing football without a helmet just yet: It's not any type of brain damage that helped investors in the study, but rather, a very specific form: a site-specific lesion (a kind of tissue damage) in the region of the brain in charge of controlling emotions. The investors who have these lesions are unable to experience fear or anxiety. It turns out that lacking the emotionality ordinary investors exhibit leads to better investment decisions.
http://www.thestreet.com/_googlen/comment/barryritholtz/10235402.html?cm_ven=GOOGLEN&cm_cat=FREE&cm_ite=NA

Smith Deafness Study Cited (New Kerala.com, July 29)
A new study by scientists in Japan may help to prevent a certain type of hereditary deafness, reports UPI. RICHARD SMITH, a research professor in otolaryngology at the University of Iowa, and scientists from Okayama University gave a genetically deafened mouse interfering RNA (Ribonucleic Acid) that specifically prevents a gene from being expressed that would otherwise cause deafness. "By preventing its expression, we prevented the deafness," said Smith, the study's senior author. "Even though this is in the early stages, it is really exciting because it points to other options for people who have hearing loss, other than hearing aids or cochlear implants." The publication is based in India.
http://www.newkerala.com/news.php?action=fullnews&id=10080

Other Recent News Highlights

Alford Comments On New NBA Minimum Age Rule (Chronicle, July 29)
A story about the National Basketball Association's new minimum-age requirement that seeks to prevent players from jumping from high school to the pros quotes STEVE ALFORD, head coach at the University of Iowa and a former standout on Indiana University's 1987 NCAA championship team. Alford says college gives young players the tools they need to ply their trade professionally. The majority of players under 20, he says, are not physically or psychologically prepared for professional play. If they turn pro that young, he says, they often find it difficult to balance all their free time and deal with the people who want a piece of them -- and their professional salaries. Alford says that if he had not played in a structured college environment, where he learned how to handle the glare of the spotlight, he would have faced far more difficulties adjusting to the professional life. "You get to the NBA and suddenly all these people want to get their claws into you, and you're really exposed," he says. "College teaches you how to deal with that."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i47/47a03801.htm

Kurth, Gurnett Comment On Space Sounds (Discovery Channel, July 28)
Saturn is a weirdly noisy planet, say scientists who have been listening to the gas giant's radio broadcasts with the acute electronic ears of the Cassini spacecraft. The loudest and most bizarre sounds are coming from the ringed planet's aurora, or northern (and southern) lights. "Strangely enough, they are very similar to what we hear at Jupiter and Earth," said University of Iowa researcher BILL KURTH. The reason for the similarity is that all three planets, along with Neptune, Uranus, Mercury and even Jupiter's moon Ganymede, generate their own magnetic fields which interact with charged particles steaming out from the sun. When those particles are channeled to the magnetic poles of planets, they can create some strange lights and other electromagnetic radiation -- including radio waves. "What's happening is all of the electrons bundle up together and spontaneously emit the electrical field" that is detectable as radio waves, says DON GURNETT a pioneer of planetary radio emissions, also of the University of Iowa. It's a truly weird thing, he says, and researchers aren't yet precisely sure how planetary magnetic fields are made. Cassini's recordings of Saturn's auroral radio sounds are reported by Kurth, Gurnett and their colleagues in the current issue of "Geophysical Research Letters."
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/briefs/20050725/saturnsounds.html

Dejong: Whirlpool Seeks Edge In Sales Competition (Forbes, July 28)
Whirlpool officials began taking a closer look at Maytag books on Wednesday as the two appliance companies took the initial steps toward a deal that would combine their businesses. Whirlpool Corp. boosted its offer for the Iowa appliance maker on Friday by $1 to $18 a share, or about $1.43 billion. Industry watchers say buying Maytag may help Whirlpool solidify its place in a highly competitive market. University of Iowa accounting professor DOUG DEJONG said 65 percent of all major appliances, including washers, dryers and refrigerators, are sold through retailers such as Sears, Best Buy, Home Depot and Lowes. That narrow channel of distribution creates intense competition for display space. Maytag has seen market share in some appliances slip in recent years, and it was dropped last year as a major appliance supplier to Best Buy, which gave space instead to Korean manufacturer LG Electronics. "Whirlpool is scared that they might be one of the next recipients of increased competition," Dejong said. "For them, trying to purchase Maytag makes a lot of sense. The brands are there, the distribution is there, they have great production facilities and they can offer more volume and more products to the 65 percent of the slice." Versions of this Associated Press story also appeared July 28 on the web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES, NEW ALBANY (Ind.) TRIBUNE, BAY NEWS 9 in Florida, RAPID CITY (S.D.) JOURNAL, TOP TECH NEWS, NEWSFACTOR NETWORK and CIO TODAY in California, CARTHAGE (Mo.) PRESS, PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORDER, TAHLEQUAH (Okla.) DAILY PRESS, NORTH COUNTY (Calif.) TIMES, SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, MLIVE.com in Michigan, WJLA in Washington, D.C., KANSAS CITY STAR, CHICAGO DAILY SOUTHTOWN, CERES (Calif.) COURIER, WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, DETROIT FREE PRESS, CANTON (Ill.) DAILY LEDGER, and CBS NEWS.
http://www.forbes.com/home/feeds/ap/2005/07/27/ap2161216.html

Work Choices Leave Women Vulnerable (Minneapolis Star Tribune, July 28)
A new look at women who describe themselves as conservative Christians suggests that their work choices make them vulnerable in this divorce-prone culture. As a group, these women leave school, marry and have children at younger ages than other women. As a result, they are more likely to work less and to gravitate toward traditionally female jobs, both things that keep hourly earnings low. Their decisions, an expression of the value they place on families, aren't necessarily a problem, said JENNIFER GLASS, a University of Iowa researcher who is analyzing the trends. The problem is that conservative Christian families have a divorce rate just as high as the rest of America. To Glass, that means more single mothers unqualified for good-paying jobs. "Their beliefs are predicated on lifelong marriage, that women are more protected in these marriages," Glass said, "and we know this is not the case."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/5529848.html

Judge Earned Law Degree At UI (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 28)
U.S. District Judge John Coughenour, who presided over the case of Ahmed Ressam, the Algerian man who yesterday was sentenced to 22 years in prison for driving a car full of explosives into Washington state, was appointed to the bench by President Reagan in 1981 after working as a partner for the now-defunct Seattle firm Bogle and Gates. He became chief judge in 1998, though he no longer holds that post. He was raised and schooled in the Midwest, receiving his law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1966.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/234312_coughenour28.html

UI Student Comes From Theatrical Family (Bloomington Pantagraph, July 28)
Attending the Illinois Shakespeare Festival is a summer tradition for thousands of Central Illinois families. But in John Stark's household, the custom calls for a more active role. "I guess you could say (theater) is the family business," said Stark, 50, scenic designer for this season's Victorian-era rendition of "Twelfth Night." Besides his own work on many of the festival's productions, the Illinois State University theater professor's wife, Lori Adams -- also on Illinois State's theater faculty -- and the couple's two children have been hired for roles over the years. Adams and the couple's son, Nathan Stark, 16, a Normal Community West High School sophomore, both appear in this season's "Macbeth." Adams is in "Henry VIII." Daughter Anna Stark, 19, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sophomore studying dance, is no stranger to the job either. In 1998's "Much Ado About Nothing," she took the stage with her brother. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.pantagraph.com/stories/072805/new_20050728015.shtml

New Judge A UI Graduate (Yankton Daily Press, July 28)
Bill Binkard has spent a lot of time in court, but he now sees things from a different angle. Binkard, who has practiced law for 30 years, was sworn in Friday as the newest district court judge for the Sixth Judicial Circuit. The circuit covers northeast Nebraska, including Burt, Cedar, Dakota, Dixon, Dodge, Thurston, and Washington counties. The judgeship signals a remarkable achievement for a man who swore he would never go to law school. "While I was attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, I was walking through the whole (law school) building," Binkard said. "I glanced at all the book shelves, and I was thinking to myself, 'I never want to get involved here with something with all those books.'" But he did choose the profession, graduating from Drake University law school in 1975. The newspaper is based in South Dakota.
http://www.yankton.net/stories/072805/community_20050728012.shtml

UI Deafness Study Cited (Middle East North Africa Financial Network July 28)
Scientists from the University of Iowa and Japan's Okayama University have shown it's possible to cure a certain type of hereditary deafness. Dr. RICHARD SMITH -- research professor in otolaryngology at UI's Carver College of Medicine -- described the study as a proof-of-principle experiment, but said the success may point the way to new treatments for deafness in humans. "We gave a genetically-deafened mouse interfering RNA that specifically prevents a gene from being expressed that would otherwise cause deafness," said Smith, the study's senior author. "By preventing its expression, we prevented the deafness. Even though this is in the early stages, it is really exciting because it points to other options for people who have hearing loss, other than hearing aids or cochlear implants." The study, which was published in the June 15 issue of Human Molecular Genetics, was funded by the National Institutes of Health. A version of this story also appeared July 28 on the websites WEBINDIA123 and MEDINDIA.com.
http://www.menafn.com/qn_news_story.asp?StoryId=CqUCgWeidDxmTzgvHzM5LC3m

New Chief Has University Town Experience (Columbia Daily Tribune, July 27)
A Columbia Police Department captain has been chosen to lead the Iowa City Police Department and is expected to take the helm next month. Capt. Sam Hargadine, 46, was one of six finalists and 67 applicants overall for the job. The Iowa City Civil Service Commission certified him yesterday afternoon at the request of City Manager Steve Atkins. Atkins said Hargadine presented himself very well during the interview process. Columbia's similarity to Iowa City gave him the biggest edge in the hiring process. Iowa City has a population of more than 60,000 and is home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Atkins cited as assets Hargadine's work with university relations and a joint communications system, which Iowa City is considering. The newspaper is based in Missouri.
http://www.columbiatribune.com/2005/Jul/20050727News005.asp

Gurnett First To Report Strange Earth Sounds (Scientific American, July 27)
The Cassini spacecraft has collected the first high-resolution spectra of Saturn's sounds, astronomers report. The radio emissions, called kilometric radiation, vary widely in frequency and are closely related to the planet's auroras. Cassini's radio and plasma wave science instrument picked up the signal -- which translates into spooky audio with rising and falling tones that call to mind howling winds -- as it approached Saturn. William S. Kurth of the University of Iowa and his colleagues analyzed more than 347 hours of data collected since April 2002, starting from a distance of 374 million kilometers, and describe their findings in the latest issue of Geophysical Research Letters. Earth emits similarly strange sounds, which study co-author DON GURNETT of the University of Iowa first reported in 1979. Exactly what causes the intense emission remains a mystery, although the new data are providing tantalizing hints.
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa007&articleID=0002F425-8D25-12E6-8D2583414B7F0000

Alford Took Pierce Off Team After Arrest (CNN/SI, July 27)
Pierre Pierce's trial on burglary and assault charges probably will take place at the Madison County Courthouse in Winterset because the Dallas County Courthouse in Adel is temporarily closed, officials said. Dallas County Clerk of Court Gloria Ward said the county's temporary courtrooms aren't large enough to handle the large crowds and media contingent expected for the former University of Iowa basketball player's trial. Ward said the move wasn't the same as a change of venue because it would remain a Dallas County case. Jurors still would be selected from a Dallas County pool and jury selection would take place in Dallas County, said Beth Baldwin, administrator of the Fifth Judicial Court. Pierce, 22, has been charged with two counts of burglary, assault with intent to commit sexual abuse and fourth-degree criminal mischief. The charges resulted from an incident at the West Des Moines home of his former girlfriend in January. Coach STEVE ALFORD kicked Pierce off the team after the junior guard was identified as the lone suspect in the case.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/basketball/ncaa/07/27/pierce.trial.ap/

Columnist Mentions UI Writers' Workshop (Los Alamos Monitor, July 27)
A column that asks whether an MFA program in creative writing is effective at molding a young writer quotes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP Website as saying, "Each year the Workshop faculty selects a class of fiction writers and poets from a large and impressive pool of applicants." The columnist comments: "The pool might be 'impressive' and 'large,' but the group of students chosen to attend programs like Iowa's -- none is more highly esteemed, but several are equally exclusive -- will most likely be imposing and tiny. These programs offer a lot more than education: If you go to Iowa, you get to work with and get advice from poet Mark Levine, whom you've probably heard of if you're applying to an MFA program." The paper is based in New Mexico.
http://www.lamonitor.com/articles/2005/07/26/features/features01.txt

Mystery Author Attended Workshop (Ardmore Main Line Times, June 26)
William Lashner, a Wynnewood resident and the best-selling author of four highly acclaimed legal thrillers -- "Hostile Witness," "Bitter Truth," "Fatal Flaw" and "Past Due" -- has a new novel, "Falls the Shadow." A lifelong Philadelphia-area resident and Abington High School graduate, he attended Swarthmore College and New York University Law School before entering the legal profession. He originally clerked for a judge in Chicago, living in a working-class area near Wrigley Field that has become the setting for a chapter of his new novel. He later became a trial attorney in the criminal division of the United States Justice Department, returning to Philadelphia in 1985 to work with his attorney father in Center City. "I've really wanted to be a writer all my life," he said. "I even took a year off before law school to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, and I only took law jobs that allowed me time to write." The paper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=14923559&BRD=1676&PAG=461&dept_id=43790&rfi=6

Kurth, Gurnett Study Saturn's Sounds (Washington Times, July 26)
University of Iowa scientists say Saturn's radio emissions could be mistaken for a Halloween sound track. Researchers BILL KURTH and DON GURNETT conducted a study of sounds in a phenomenon similar to Earth's northern lights. They based their study on data from the Cassini spacecraft radio and plasma wave science instrument, which was built at the University of Iowa under Gurnett's direction. "All of the structures we observe in Saturn's radio spectrum are giving us clues about what might be going on in the source of the radio emissions above Saturn's auroras," said Kurth. "We believe the changing frequencies are related to tiny radio sources moving up and down along Saturn's magnetic field lines." The same story appeared on the Web site of WEBINDIA123.com,
http://washingtontimes.com/upi/20050725-075703-8167r.htm

Kurth, Gurnett: Saturn Makes Halloween Sounds (Innovations Report, July 26)
Saturn's radio emissions could be mistaken for a Halloween sound track. That is how University of Iowa researchers BILL KURTH and DON GURNETT describe their recent findings, published 23 July in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. Their research investigated sounds that are not just eerie, but also descriptive of a phenomenon similar to Earth's northern lights. The study was based on data from the Cassini spacecraft's radio and plasma wave science instrument, which was built at the University of Iowa under Gurnett's direction. "All of the structures we observe in Saturn's radio spectrum are giving us clues about what might be going on in the source of the radio emissions above Saturn's auroras," says Kurth. "We believe that the changing frequencies are related to tiny radio sources moving up and down along Saturn's magnetic field lines." Innovations Report is based in German.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/physik_astronomie/bericht-47032.html

Kurth Explains Saturn's Sounds (Australian Broadcasting, July 26)
In an interview with the Australian Broadcasting Company, BILL KURTH explains how Saturn's sounds are made: "The same electrons that fall into the atmosphere and excite atmospheric atoms which then de-excite and cause the auroras that we can see with for example, Hubble or Cassini's cameras, they also create radio emissions in the frequency range from about 10 kilohertz to one megahertz, and in fact this is similar, at least part of this frequency range falls in the AM radio band."
http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2005/s1422887.htm

FSU Writing Program On Par With UI (Miami Herald, July 26)
A story about the rapid rise in prominence of the creative writing program at Florida State University notes that it may even be better than the granddaddy of such programs, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/living/education/12214240.htm

Levy: Fluoride Impact Low (Pittsburgh Post Gazette, July 25)
A story about the lack of scientific research into the impact of adding fluoride to municipal water systems points out that most proponents now say fluoridation cuts the rate of tooth decay 18 percent to 25 percent. How much is that? Less than one tooth surface. "The absolute impact of 18 percent or even 25 percent is low," says STEVEN LEVY, who supports fluoridation.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05206/543465.stm

UI: Investors Lacking Emotions May Fare Better (Chicago Tribune, July 25)
People with certain kinds of brain damage may make better investment decisions. That is the conclusion of a new study offering some compelling evidence that mixing emotion with investing can lead to bad outcomes. By linking brain science to investment behavior, researchers concluded that people with an impaired ability to experience emotions could actually make better financial decisions than other people under certain circumstances. The research is part of a fast-growing interdisciplinary field called "neuroeconomics" that explores the role biology plays in economic decision making, by combining insights from cognitive neuroscience, psychology and economics. The study was published last month in the journal Psychological Science, and was conducted by a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/bal-invest0725,1,2798420.story

Nelson Comments On Hurricane Market (Buffalo News, July 25)
A trio of professors at the University of Miami is launching an electronic futures market on hurricanes. Traders who buy or sell the right spot at the right time can cash in, maybe clearing enough profit to buy a small generator. Aptly called MAHEM, the Miami Hurricane Event Market isn't open for trading yet. Organizers are still refining the prospectus and plugging holes in their Web site, mahem.miami.edu, but MAHEM is slated to debut any day now - in the name of research and education. Investors can open accounts by sending any amount from $5 to $500 to the Iowa Electronic Markets, or IEM, which is operated by the University of Iowa, a MAHEM partner. All IEM transactions are made electronically and posted in real time. As soon as a tropical storm earns a name, the market will open, and online trading will begin. Depending where the storm is at the time, it will be declared an Atlantic or a Gulf storm, and only contracts, or shares, for that U.S. coastline will be sold. "With a maximum investment of $500, nobody will get rich," said FORREST NELSON, an economist at the University of Iowa and one of the founding directors of the IEM. "But it might give someone some bragging rights." The paper is based in New York.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20050725/1035085.asp

SU Writing Program On Par With UI (Gainesville Sun, July 25)
A story about the rapid rise in prominence of the creative writing program at Florida State University notes that it may even be better than the granddaddy of such programs, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's. The paper is based in Florida. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the LAKELAND LEDGER, the NAPLES DAILY NEWS and the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, all based in Florida, and other media outlets.
http://www.gainesville.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050725/LOCAL/50724039/1078/news

Bechara Describes Brain-Investment Study (Baltimore Sun, July 25)
People with certain kinds of brain damage may make better investment decisions. That is the conclusion of a new study offering some compelling evidence that mixing emotion with investing can lead to bad outcomes. By linking brain science to investment behavior, researchers concluded that people with an impaired ability to experience emotions could actually make better financial decisions than other people under certain circumstances. The research is part of a fast-growing interdisciplinary field called "neuroeconomics" that explores the role biology plays in economic decision making, by combining insights from cognitive neuroscience, psychology and economics. The study was published last month in the journal Psychological Science and was conducted by a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Some neuroscientists believe good investors may be exceptionally skilled at suppressing emotional reactions. "It's possible that people who are high-risk takers or good investors may have what you call a functional psychopathy," says ANTOINE BECHARA, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, and a co-author of the study. "They don't react emotionally to things. Good investors can learn to control their emotions in certain ways to become like those people." A version of the story also ran on the website of MAINTODAY.COM.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/bal-invest0725,1,7395137.story?coll=bal-business-headlines

UI Alumnus Now Executive VP Of Broadcast Company (The Desert Sun, July 24)
A Q&A with Bob Allen, executive vice president and general manager of Gulf-California Broadcast Company, which operates two radio stations and four television stations in the Palm Springs market, says he began his 45-year career at an AM radio station in Sioux City, Iowa, while he was in high school. He attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and later worked as a reporter, anchor and producer at WLS-TV in Chicago, KYW-TV in Philadelphia and KOA-TV (now known as KCNC-TV) in Denver. The paper is based in California.
http://www.thedesertsun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050724/BUSINESS/507240309/1003/BUSINESS

Story On Faculty Exoduses Mentions UI (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, July 24)
When Purdue University raised tuition for the fall by more than double the rate of inflation, officials said the increase was needed in part to stem a brain drain of professors. But the turnover rate for Purdue faculty had already been cut in half over the past four years, with 2.3_percent leaving last year - a rate slightly higher than the 2_percent national turnover average for all education jobs. Indiana University also increased tuition this year, and although officials bemoaned high faculty turnover at the institution, only the arts and science department, which makes up 60 percent of the university's budget and faculty, tracked the departures this year. About 8_percent of the college's faculty got offers to go elsewhere in recent months and 3_percent left - the same percentage of faculty that IU recently decided to cut from arts and sciences in budget reductions. The cuts mean many of the positions left vacant will not be filled. Schools that do track turnover show similar - or higher - rates as IU and Purdue. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA reported it lost 3.1 percent of its faculty in the 2003-04 school year, and the University of Wisconsin lost 2.7 percent that same year, university officials said. Outside the Big Ten, Indiana State University lost 4 percent of its faculty this year, according to the university. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/fortwayne/news/local/12212527.htm

Author Irving Attended, Taught At UI (Tallahassee Democrat, July 24)
A story about John Irving's new book, "Until I Find You," quotes novelist and former IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP student T.C. Boyle as saying, "John's role in my life was to serve as a model of the serious working writer and a very generous promoter of my work. John gave me what I most needed: encouragement." In addition to teaching English literature and creative writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and at small colleges in Massachusetts and Vermont, Irving taught his beloved sport of Olympic freestyle wrestling at several New England prep schools until he was in his 40s. The story also says that Irving earned an M.F.A at the University of Iowa in 1967. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/tallahassee/entertainment/books/12189935.htm

Summer Gifted Course Modeled On Belin-Blank Center's (Sun-Sentinel, July 24)
A story about a series of weeklong course at HATS, or High Achieving and Talented Students, at West Boca Raton High School in Florida, says elementary school students studied the written structure of "Cinderella" and "Sleeping Beauty," and wrote and illustrated stories to be published in their book during the event, called "A Fairy Tale Festival." Classes are open to the smartest children in the school system: They must participate in a gifted program or score in the top 5 percent on standardized exams, such as the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. Home-schooled and private school students are invited to participate. Cindy Oliver, HATS director at Stetson, started the program on the Stetson campus in 1996. She collaborates with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BELIN-BLANK INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR GIFTED EDUCATION AND TALENT DEVELOPMENT, which researches gifted children and identifies smart children by offering high-level exams. HATS and Belin-Blank offer similar summer courses for young students. The programs resemble the widely known Talent Identification Program at Duke University, which has a summer residential program for gifted students. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/palmbeach/sfl-db24hatsjul24,0,3169059.story?coll=sfl-news-palmcomm

Andrejevic Comments On New Reality Show (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, July 24)
A story about an ESPN reality television show about the Montour High School football team in Pittsburgh, "Bound for Glory -- The Montour Spartans," says that while some at Montour fancy "Bound for Glory" as a jazzy documentary of a football season, skeptics suggest this program meets every definition of reality television, where entertainment value is the highest currency. Already, Thompson noted, the football team's environment has been distorted by a contrived event - NFL Hall of Famer Dick Butkus' arrival as head coach. Reality television is, in effect, a series of distortions, sometimes unintentional. Said University of Iowa professor and reality TV author MARK ANDREJEVIC: "When you boil down scores of raw footage into a weekly show, you can pretty much pick and choose how you portray characters -- and more likely than not, some of these kids and parents are going to feel that they haven't been accurately portrayed, perhaps even that they've been exploited for entertainment value." The paper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05205/542761.stm

Yin Comments On Patriot Act Cited (Cincinnati Enquirer, July 23)
An editorial notes that the U.S. House gave the Bush administration nearly all it wanted when it voted 257-171 Thursday to extend the USA Patriot Act, a complex package of anti-terrorism measures enacted shortly after the 9/11 attacks. "It's troubling that the House - nearly all the Republicans, joined by 43 Democrats - voted to make permanent 14 of the 16 provisions that had so concerned civil libertarians from both parties in 2001 that they insisted on four-year "sunset" clauses to force lawmakers to renew them. And the other two provisions won't be subject to review for 10 years, if the House version prevails," the editorial writer says. "The Senate ought to take a far more cautious, skeptical look when it considers the act this fall. Some portions have potential to erode ordinary Americans' privacy rights and legal protections, once they become fully woven into the fabric of our law." The piece also quotes TUNG YIN, a University of Iowa law professor who has written extensively on the Patriot Act, who views it this way: "It's indecipherable. The haste with which it was drafted caused problems. Some aspects make sense. Some are just not useful. And some not only don't enhance security but also harm liberties." The paper is based in Ohio.
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050723/EDIT01/507230336/1020/EDIT

UI Hospitals Recognized For Excellence In Nursing (Red Nova, July 22)
A Council Bluffs hospital has been recognized for its excellence in nursing. Alegent Health's Mercy Hospital has been granted "magnet" status by the American Nurses Credentialing Center in Washington, D.C. The designation is given to hospitals for attracting and retaining high quality nurses. To be a magnet hospital, a facility must meet more than 65 nursing practice standards and patient care quality indicators developed by the nursing organization. More than 140 hospitals nationwide have earned the designation. In 2004, Methodist Hospital in Omaha became the first in Nebraska to receive magnet designation. St. Elizabeth Regional Medical Center in Lincoln also has been designated a magnet. Two other Iowa hospitals have received the designation, Mercy Medical Center in Dubuque and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS in Iowa City. Red Nova is based in Dallas, Texas.
http://www.rednova.com/news/health/183695/bluffs_hospital_given_special_status/

Robinson's 'Gilead" Reviewed (Asahi Shimbun, July 22)
A review of MARILYNNE ROBINSON's novel "Gilead" says Robinson teaches at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. The paper is based in Japan.
http://www.asahi.com/english/Herald-asahi/TKY200507230143.html

UI Alumnus Performs In One-Man Play 'Martin' (Newport News Times, July 22)
A story about an upcoming performance of "Martin: A life of Martin Luther," at a Church in Lincoln City, Ore., says the original, one-man portrayal was written and performed by Allan Lemke and includes a retelling of the gospel. Lemke graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1977 with a bachelor of arts degree in dramatic art. His secular professional work includes assistant director of "The Collected Works of Billy the Kid," by Michael Ondaatje, which opened in Minneapolis, Minn. at the Guthrie2 Theater, the second stage of the Guthrie Theater. He has directed a range of plays from Shakespearean to modern, and has worked with The Colorful Company of Theatricals for Christ and other Christian theater troupes. The paper is based in Oregon.
http://www.newportnewstimes.com/articles/2005/07/22/community/community13.txt

Ceilley Says Creams May Counter Affects Of Lesion Removal (Forbes, July 22)
While it hardly ever kills, the type of skin cancer known as basal cell carcinoma is far from innocuous. It causes lesions, often on the face, that are frequently difficult to remove without disfigurement. But now, two creams may give dermatologists a new weapon against cosmetic damage. The creams seem to help minor lesions disappear on their own and may also help patients after surgery, said Dr. ROGER CEILLEY, a clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa. The treatments are "becoming more well-used and well-known," said Ceilley, who was to discuss the ointments Friday at the American Academy of Dermatology summer scientific sessions in Chicago.
http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/07/22/hscout527002.html

Levy Supports Fluoridation (Wall Street Journal, July 22)
When health officials decided to add fluoride to the water supply of Grand Rapids, Mich., in 1945, they plunged ahead despite the lack of a rigorous, large-scale study of the risks and benefits. And for most of the next 60 years, fluoridation research has gone pretty much like that. It has not been science's finest hour. Questions about fluoridation have returned with renewed vigor because of allegations of scientific misconduct against a prominent researcher at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Most proponents now say fluoridation cuts the rate of tooth decay 18 percent to 25 percent. How much is that? Less than one tooth surface. "The absolute impact of 18 percent or even 25 percent is low," says STEVEN LEVY of the University of Iowa, who supports fluoridation.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112198680295692723,00.html

Folsom: Many Unfamiliar With First 'Leaves' (Humanities Magazine, July 22)
Despite its prominence, the edition of Walt Whitman's book Leaves of Grass that is being memorialized this year on the 150th anniversary of its publication is one with which most readers are largely unfamiliar. Comprised of a 10-page preface in prose and twelve poems, six titled "Leaves of Grass," the others untitled, this 95-page, first edition was just the beginning of what became a lifelong project for the poet. By the time of Whitman's death in March 1892, Leaves of Grass had grown to a staggering 293 poems printed on 382 pages. "Each edition of Leaves of Grass has a great deal to teach us about the cultural, historical, and biographical moments at which Whitman was constructing it," says ED FOLSOM, Carver Professor of English at the University of Iowa. "These editions remain in a lot of ways unread because people have not yet been able to do the kind of intensive cultural and historical analyses that are now possible because of the availability of the editions on the archive." The variations between the editions of Leaves of Grass range from minor edits to the addition or removal of entire clusters or sections of poems. Whitman made some of these revisions for logistical reasons, breaking single lines into two or three to fit the dimensions of the paper used by the Rome brothers, who helped print the first edition. Folsom notes that the Romes owned a small publishing house that primarily printed legal forms and reports for the city of Brooklyn. Humanities Magazine is a publication of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
http://www.neh.fed.us/news/humanities/2005-07/whitman.html

Bechara Describes Brain-Investment Study (Bradenton Herald, July 22)
People with certain kinds of brain damage may make better investment decisions. That is the conclusion of a new study offering some compelling evidence that mixing emotion with investing can lead to bad outcomes. By linking brain science to investment behavior, researchers concluded that people with an impaired ability to experience emotions could actually make better financial decisions than other people under certain circumstances. The research is part of a fast-growing interdisciplinary field called "neuroeconomics" that explores the role biology plays in economic decision making, by combining insights from cognitive neuroscience, psychology and economics. The study was published last month in the journal Psychological Science and was conducted by a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Some neuroscientists believe good investors may be exceptionally skilled at suppressing emotional reactions. "It's possible that people who are high-risk takers or good investors may have what you call a functional psychopathy," says ANTOINE BECHARA, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, and a co-author of the study. "They don't react emotionally to things. Good investors can learn to control their emotions in certain ways to become like those people." The Herald is based in Florida. The same story appeared on the Web site of the PITTSBURGH POST GAZETTE and THE HINDU (INDIA).
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/business/12195456.htm

UI's Tenure Policy Cited (National Review, July 22)
A story about a non-academic's life in academia points out that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is one of the few institutions to offer tenure-track positions to practitioners, or those who do not have advanced degrees.
http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/salerno200507220826.asp

Alumnus Writes Poetry Of Being Persian (Delaware County News, July 21)
Just as a flower can grow from the confining cracks of concrete, a poet can bloom from the stifling oppression of a country like Iran. Recent presidential elections in the Middle Eastern theocracy have done little for human rights or US/Iranian diplomatic relations. Although Havertown, Pa. poet Fereshteh Sholevar claims to be apolitical in her prose, she cannot escape her past or her Iranian heritage. "During the Shah's time, Iranian society was patriarchal but women could still attend university and become doctors and lawyers," recalls Fereshteh, who grew up in the Iranian capital city of Tehran but who refers to herself as Persian-American. "But there was still no equality. I felt very repressed and wanted to get out. Now it is disastrous." Sholevar is an alumnus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop. The News is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1725&dept_id=498331&newsid=14897791&PAG=461&rfi=9

Bechara Describes Brain-Investment Study (Wall Street Journal, July 21)
People with certain kinds of brain damage may make better investment decisions. That is the conclusion of a new study offering some compelling evidence that mixing emotion with investing can lead to bad outcomes. By linking brain science to investment behavior, researchers concluded that people with an impaired ability to experience emotions could actually make better financial decisions than other people under certain circumstances. The research is part of a fast-growing interdisciplinary field called "neuroeconomics" that explores the role biology plays in economic decision making, by combining insights from cognitive neuroscience, psychology and economics. The study was published last month in the journal Psychological Science and was conducted by a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Some neuroscientists believe good investors may be exceptionally skilled at suppressing emotional reactions. "It's possible that people who are high-risk takers or good investors may have what you call a functional psychopathy," says ANTOINE BECHARA, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, and a co-author of the study. "They don't react emotionally to things. Good investors can learn to control their emotions in certain ways to become like those people."
http://online.wsj.com/public/article/0,,SB112190164023291519-rvYW40ZbTjek4HWCDUyijBCigY8_20060720,00.html?mod=tff_main_tff_top

UI Assists With Hurricane Market (Chicago Daily Herald, July 21)
Three University of Miami professors are setting up a futures market that will essentially enable people to bet on where a hurricane will strike. The professors -- two of them economists, the third a meteorologist -- are hoping the collective wisdom of the marketplace will prove more accurate than government forecasters and help homeowners decide with more certainty whether to evacuate. The project is called the Miami Hurricane Event Market, or MAHEM. Using market techniques to make predictions is not new. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has used futures markets to predict winners of presidential elections and forecast where the flu might strike. Futures markets have also predicted Oscar winners and box office receipts. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared July 21 on the websites of the LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR and KNOXVILLE (Tenn.) NEWS SENTINEL.
http://www.dailyherald.com/business/businessstory.asp?id=75522

Blumberg: Heat Can Harm Physical, Mental Health (Kansas City Star, July 21)
It is going to stay hot for a while, the sizzling high-90s by this afternoon and searing triple digits in some places by Sunday, the National Weather Service says. That is hot enough to be harmful not only to our physical health, but to our mental health. "Our brains are just four to six degrees from irreversible damage," said University of Iowa biopsychologist MARK BLUMBERG. "It's no surprise that we can't think straight when it's hot." Psychologists have found that drivers are more likely to honk their horns in extremely hot weather, and that on the baseball diamond, batters are more likely to get beaned. "Our behavior gets more erratic, we become more irritable," said Blumberg, author of "Body Heat: Temperature and Life on Earth." "We hear more stories of crazy violence in summer."
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/12182836.htm

Former UI Student Remembers Forming Co-op (Rutland Herald, July 21)
The closing of a downtown grocery store last month has renewed efforts to form a natural and wholesale food cooperative. Establishing a cooperatively run natural foods and grocery store was the talk of the town four years ago after Buffom's Supermarket -- then the only grocery store in Rockingham -- closed in late 2000. A committee was formed, a community survey was taken and a name for the store was suggested. But the effort fell apart when organizers could not find the proper funding to jump-start the business, said Sidney Wolf, a grant writer who served on the committee. Wolf, who helped form a co-op while a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA several decades ago, said the whole industry has shifted from its "'70s hippie roots" to the upscale establishments of today that blend organic foods with fine cheeses and wine. The newspaper is based in Vermont.
http://www.rutlandherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050721/NEWS/507210369/1003/NEWS02

Katz Says Fear Of Lawsuits Influences Care (Independent Tribune, July 21)
A new study has found emergency room physicians are practicing "defensive medicine" in an attempt to avoid lawsuits. The survey, published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, found that emergency physicians who are concerned about malpractice suits are more likely to admit patients with cardiac symptoms and to order more tests. Researchers surveyed emergency room physicians at two university hospitals and ranked the physicians based on whether they had a low, medium or high fear of malpractice suits. They also examined the records of 1,134 patients who had been treated by those physicians. Dr. DAVID KATZ is with the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City. "Our research provides evidence that fear of lawsuits does drive health care providers to unnecessarily admit some patients, which increases health care costs," he said. The newspaper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.independenttribune.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=CIT%2FMGArticle%2FCIT_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031783971376&path=!news

Hurricane Prediction Market Developed (Washington Post, July 20)
A trio of University of Miami professors are betting on a new way to predict where a hurricane will hit, an unorthodox approach they believe could help people living along the storm's path decide whether to evacuate. The three have founded an electronic futures market that allows the public, students and trained forecasters to invest in shares representing selected coastline spots where they think the hurricane will strike. Those who forecast most accurately will get a payout. David Letson, a fellow economist and associate professor, and David Nolan, assistant professor of meteorology, have developed MAHEM, Miami Hurricane Event Market, with help from trading specialists at the University of Iowa. The Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) of the University of Iowa has used the tactic to inspire health professionals to forecast where influenza might strike, said FORREST NELSON, an economist and one of IEM's founding directors. Nelson, who is involved in the MAHEM project, expects most hurricane traders to be meteorologists and hurricane experts. But other contributions can be valuable, he said. "Animals act strangely when an earthquake is approaching. Maybe someone who watches animals," has a valuable insight. TV forecasters, atmospheric scientists at universities, and longtime residents of hurricane districts might be good traders, too, he said. The Associated Press article also appeared on the websites of the SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, TALLAHASSE DEMOCRAT, MIAMI HERALD, and BRADENTON HERALD in Florida, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRES and DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota, NEW YORK TIMES, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, KANSAS CITY STAR, LOS ANGELES TIMES, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, MSN MONEY, MSNBC, CANADIAN TV NEWS, NEW YORK NEWSDAY, FORBES, ABC NEWS, KABC-TV in California and several other media outlets.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/07/19/AR2005071901031.html

IEM, Partner To Open Hurricane Market (Charlotte Observer, July 19)
Storm watchers, listen up. If you think you have the weather knowledge and financial fortitude, you'll soon have the chance to bet for -- or against -- the coastline nearest you. A trio of professors at the University of Miami is launching an electronic futures market to forecast where a hurricane will make landfall in the United States. Traders who buy or sell the right spot at the right time can cash in, maybe clearing enough profit to buy a small generator. Here's how the market is designed to work: Investors can open accounts by sending any amount from $5 to $500 to the Iowa Electronic Markets, or IEM, which is operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a University of Miami partner. All IEM transactions are made electronically and posted in real time. As soon as a tropical storm earns a name, the market will open, and online trading will begin. Depending where the storm is at the time, it will be declared an Atlantic or a Gulf storm, and only contracts, or shares, for that U.S. coastline will be sold. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the LEXINGTON HERLAD LEADER, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS, MONTEREY (CA) HERALD, BRADENTON (FL) HERALD, BILOXI SUN HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO (CA) TRIBUNE, CENTRE DAILY TIMES (PA), GRAND FORKS HEALD, MACON (GA) TELEGRAPH, KANSAS CITY STAR, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/news/nation/12168131.htm

Book Club Chooses Robinson's 'Gilead' (The State, July 19)
This month's Columbia, SC, Readers' Circle selection is Gilead. As author MARILYNNE ROBINSON, who teaches at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop,  describes it, Gilead is a "quiet novel" about John Ames, a preacher writing his family history for his young son. The buzz surrounding this novel is hardly quiet, however. "Gilead" recently won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, and critics commend Robinson's powerful writing. The State is based in Columbia, SC.
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/living/12163012.htm

UI Has Advanced Driving Simulator (New York Times, July 18)
Pilots log hours in cockpit simulators before taking the controls of an airliner, practicing emergency procedures and learning the layout of a plane's instrument panel. Automakers also rely on simulators, though their intent is to study drivers, not train them. Perhaps the most sophisticated such center in the world, the National Advanced Driving Simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, belongs to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. One recent experiment there tested portable telephones controlled by voice commands, and another is studying teenage drivers to learn why they have so many accidents.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/18/automobiles/18CARS.html?

UI Has Advanced Driving Simulator (International Herald Tribune, July 18)
Pilots log hours in cockpit simulators before taking the controls of an airliner, practicing emergency procedures and learning the layout of a plane's instrument panel. Automakers also rely on simulators, though their intent is to study drivers, not train them. Perhaps the most sophisticated such center in the world, the National Advanced Driving Simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, belongs to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. One recent experiment there tested portable telephones controlled by voice commands, and another is studying teenage drivers to learn why they have so many accidents.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/07/18/business/simulator.php

IEM, Partner To Open Hurricane Market (Ft. Lauderdale Sun Sentinel, July 18)
Storm watchers, listen up. If you think you have the weather knowledge and financial fortitude, you'll soon have the chance to bet for -- or against -- the coastline nearest you. A trio of professors at the University of Miami is launching an electronic futures market to forecast where a hurricane will make landfall in the United States. Traders who buy or sell the right spot at the right time can cash in, maybe clearing enough profit to buy a small generator. Here's how the market is designed to work: Investors can open accounts by sending any amount from $5 to $500 to the Iowa Electronic Markets, or IEM, which is operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a University of Miami partner. All IEM transactions are made electronically and posted in real time. As soon as a tropical storm earns a name, the market will open, and online trading will begin. Depending where the storm is at the time, it will be declared an Atlantic or a Gulf storm, and only contracts, or shares, for that U.S. coastline will be sold. The same story appeared on the Web site of the ORLANDO SENTINEL.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/southflorida/sfl-ccanemarket18jul18,0,2060788.story?coll=sfla-home-headlines

FSU Writing Program On Par With UI (Palm Beach Post, July 18)
A story about the rapid rise in prominence of the creative writing program at Florida State University notes that it may even be better than the granddaddy of such programs, the UNIVERITY OF IOWA's.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/content/state/epaper/2005/07/18/m1a_FSUWRITE__0718.html

Cranberg Ponders Iraq War Deception (Louisville Courier Journal, July 18)
President Bush says the mission in Iraq is to spread democracy in the Middle East, writes GIL CRANBERG, former editor of the Des Moines Register editorial page and professor emeritus of journalism at the University of Iowa. It would be bizarrely ironic if the administration knowingly hoodwinked Americans and thereby subverted a basic tenet of democracy in the name of advancing it. The widespread belief by Americans that their government deceived them makes it urgent that Congress quit ducking the questions the Senate Intelligence Committee promised the country to address.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050717/OPINION04/50716006

Blumberg Writes On Spence Labs Attack (Washington Post, July 17)
MARK BLUMBERG
, a behavioral neuroscientist at the University of Iowa, writes a first-person account of the attacks on Spence Labs and Seashore Hall by animal right activists last fall. In the piece, he likens the attacks to terrorist attacks and expresses disgust at the activists' tactics. He also expresses frustration at a U.S. Senate hearing into animal rights groups degenerated into partisan bickering.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/07/15/AR2005071502181.html

Nancy Drew Writer Was UI Alumnus (Nashua Telegraph, July 17)
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Millie Benson, who would go on to write most of the Nancy Drew girl sleuth mystery books under the pen name Carolyn Keene. The books have sold more than 200 million copies since 1930. Benson, who died three years ago, was the first person to receive a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Telegraph is based in New Hampshire.
http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050717/BOOKS/107170059

Pierce Case Cited (Lexington Herald Leader, July 17)
When a high-profile athlete is accused of rape, the legal system moves onto a playing field lined with complications. Cases of acquaintance rape are among the most difficult to investigate and resolve, often marked by conflicting stories, little physical evidence and raw emotions. The scrutiny is intense, with the backgrounds and reputations of the accuser and accused dragged into the spotlight. The pattern has played out in case after case across the country. It's playing out in Lexington, where a 29-year-old woman has accused a former University of Kentucky basketball player of drugging and raping her at UK's Wildcat Lodge. Parrish, the Iowa defense attorney, said he's seen judges who are so afraid of appearing to give the accused athlete a break they become overly cautious. A judge recently denied a request by former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball player Pierre Pierce to review medical and counseling records of a woman he is accused of assaulting in January. Pierce, 21, is scheduled for trial Aug. 16 on two counts of burglary, criminal mischief and assault with intent to commit sexual abuse stemming from an incident involving his former girlfriend. He faces 56 years in prison. The former Hawkeye guard, who was kicked off the team midseason when the allegations came to light, has pleaded not guilty. The Herald Leader is based in Kentucky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/news/12153266.htm

Former Hawk Now Superintendent (Sunbury Daily Item, July 17)
Barry Tomasetti truly believes getting involved in all the activities offered by the Mifflinburg School District makes sense, and sets a good example for students and administrators alike. That said, it should come as no surprise to find him pacing the sideline with a clipboard and stopwatch Saturday for the fourth annual Linemen Competition at Mifflinburg High School. He was making his contribution towards the success of the project sponsored by the Wildcats' football staff and program. And while it may come as a surprise to some to find the school superintendent out on a hot, muggy Saturday morning working up a sweat while timing players involved with flipping tractor tires, to Tomasetti it's just another enjoyable day at the office. "Our philosophy here at Mifflinburg is to support all extra-curricular activities regardless of whether it's sports or the school musical," said Tomasetti. "This is fun for me to come out here and watch not only our players, but all of the individuals competing. The enjoyment starts with the coaches and goes right down to the people working all of the events and the concession stand." Tomasetti can also appreciate the goings-on out on the field. He was a standout performer on the offensive line for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA from 1974-78. The Item is published in Pennsylvania.
http://www.dailyitem.com/archive/2005/0717/sports/stories/01sports.htm

UI Tops in Creative Writing Programs (Baltimore Sun, July 17)
On six Maryland campuses, graduate-writing programs flourish; nationally, more than 200 such programs. The idea originated in the 1930s, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which still tops the merit ratings. No. 2 in such rankings nationally, Johns Hopkins, always No. 2.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/booksmags/bal-bk.maryland17jul17,1,2211270.story?coll=bal-society-utility

Alumna is Art Festival Judge (Daytona Beach News Journal, July 16)
Among the judges at the Florida International Festival is Laura Stewart, who has a Master's degree in art history from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/Entertainment/Arts/03SceneSTAGE01071605.htm

Alumna Helps Build Habitat for Humanity Home (Dayton Daily News, July 16)
Anna Magnuson, director of development for Dayton, Ohio, Habitat for Humanity, has chaperoned the Shirley White family from the initial qualification process through the ground-blessing. Magnuson, whose history with Habitat for Humanity traces back to her undergraduate years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, recalled her solo, late-night trips into some of west Dayton's most unforgiving neighborhoods. "I've had to pick up her children to take them to some speaking events," Magnuson said. "I just cranked up the 50 Cent CD in my car to kind of let people know I was baad, too. But I have seen, up close, her housing conditions, and the safety of her children is definitely an issue." In spite of the progress, fellowship and good intentions of IMFR and Habitat officials, Magnuson said the interfaith build faces some stiff financial challenges. "All the funding for this project has to be in by the end of July for the build to start in August," Magnuson said.
http://www.daytondailynews.com/life/content/life/daily/0716faith.html

UI Alumna to Be Ordained as Priest (Canada National Post, July 15)
An English literature instructor from Vancouver Island says she will be ordained as Canada's first woman Roman Catholic priest in a ceremony conducted in international waters between the Ontario and United States border. Michele Birch-Conery of Parksville said Friday she expects the church to threaten her with excommunication, but she believes she is fighting a human rights issue. Birch-Conery, 65, is one of eight woman from North America who will attend a special ordination service July 25 on the St. Lawrence River near the Ontario vacation community of Gananoque. Organizers want the ceremony to take place in international waters between the United States and Canada where no church diocese has jurisdiction. Birch-Conery said she wants to become part of the struggle to change church canon law that prohibits women from entering the priesthood. "We're taking a stand that to keep that canon law which says women cannot be ordained is a violation of our human rights as women in the church," she said. "We'll have to see what it unfolds into. I don't know where it is going to go." She received her doctorate in English Literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web sites of MACLEAN'S, VANCOUVER SUN, VANCOUVER PROVINCE and CANOE.ca.
http://www.canada.com/national/nationalpost/news/story.html?id=b4df9d2f-3345-4d86-90a7-b8eb844fe9e9

Irving's New Book Reviewed (Wichita Eagle, July 15)
John Irving's new book, "Until I Find You," the protagonist of this new novel, Jack Burns, is a young man in search of his father. With his mother, a tattoo artist from Toronto known as Daughter Alice, he sets forth at age 4 to Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway in search of William Burns. Irving studied at the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Kansas.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/charlotte/entertainment/books/12087243.htm

Columnist Remembers Time at UI (Cleveland Jewish News, July 15)
In a column about his connections to Jews throughout his life, the writer says he was "oblivious to Jews until I went off to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Although I attended classes with Jews and worked with several on the Daily Iowan, the nomenclature was tossed at me only after I started dating an advertising student. My previous girlfriend Dorie asked if I were dating Greta. "You know she is Jewish, don't you?"__I had not thought about that; what did she mean? Was Jewish like a disease? I had no idea except that Jews went to their own church. Now, I discovered that Greta's sorority house was filled with Jews, and they were not admitted to other sororities, just as there was a fraternity for Jewish men organized on the same premise._
http://www.clevelandjewishnews.com/articles/2005/07/14/news/local/qcommentary0715.txt

Meditation Linked To Longer Life (Columbus Dispatch, July 14)
More than 600 studies have linked Transcendental Meditation to myriad health benefits, including improvements in blood pressure and sleep patterns.A recent study identifies the endpoint of such benefits: a longer life. People who employed the technique enjoyed a 23 percent decrease in death rates, according to an analysis published in the May issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.Faculty members from Harvard University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Medical College of Georgia conducted the analysis, funded by the National Institutes of Health Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. The newspaper is based in Ohio.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b16ef0ed78014ce280f36d2830bb9105&_docnum=5&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=5943ff546aac6324aa01fb00dfcdc43e

UI Graduate Named Interim Bank President (Fulton County News, July 14)
The Fulton County National Bank and Trust Co.'s (FCNB) parent company, Fulton Bancshares Corp., announced that it has appointed George W. Millward, 55, as interim president and CEO. He is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a MBA in finance.  The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://news.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?show=localnews&pnpID=541&NewsID=646073&CategoryID=1441&on=1

UI Study Shows Fear Of Malpractice Affects Treatment (MedIndia.com, July 14)
Physicians treating people in emergencies may be asking patients to go for more tests and procedures if they are afraid of being named in a lawsuit for malpractice. A study done by researchers from UNIVERSITY OF IOWA said that fear of being sued for malpractice may be the guiding point in treating patients by the emergency doctors, especially for those who are more afraid of a law suit than their colleagues. These physicians may be prescribing more tests for patients even when they are at low risk from serious health complications. Versions of this story appeared July 14 on the websites REDNOVA.com, eMAXHEALTH.com, NEWS-MEDICAL.net, and WEBINDIA123.com, and July 13 on the website of the WASHINGTON TIMES.
http://www.medindia.net/News/view_news_main.asp?t=gn&x=3980

Playwright Gilman Attended UI (Chicago Tribune, July 13)
Rebecca Gilman gets mad. Not politely upset, as her reserved, genial demeanor or her soft, faintly Southern lilt might indicate, but obsessively angry and ferociously direct. Just listen to the characters who inhabit her plays: murderers, stalkers, racists and self-consumed egoists. Gilman broods over an issue, and her deep, thoughtful convictions bubble up through her writing. Muscular and witty, her plays target ugly, disturbing issues in life that people readily overlook or actively ignore. "In murder and mayhem there is a high drama, so if you're a playwright, you look for the highest stakes situation possible." That might mean a violent crime, a personal demon or a life crisis -- as in "Dollhouse," Gilman's modern adaptation of Henrik Ibsen's 1879 play, playing at the Goodman through July 24. Gilman adheres to the broad outlines of the original drama, a commentary on gender roles and middle-class consumerism. But she skillfully updates the 19th Century trappings. As in Ibsen's time, audiences are expected to identify with the characters and see their contemporary lives reflected on stage. When Robert Falls, artistic director of the Goodman, decided to mount an adaptation, he headed straight to Gilman with the project. "I wanted a writer, I didn't want a simple translation," says Falls, who first collaborated with Gilman in 1999 on "Spinning Into Butter," her most acclaimed play. "Dollhouse" is her fourth work to premiere at the theater since 1999. At this point in her career, Gilman is savvy about what works on stage, but she didn't always have that dramaturgical instinct. After college, the Alabama native wandered from a graduate program in English to a master's of fine arts degree in theater at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, landing as a writer of standardized educational tests in Chicago. Miserable, she eventually chucked the job and returned to playwriting, temping by day and scribbling away at night.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/printedition/chi-0507120342jul13,1,1755740.story

UI Student Walks For Breast Cancer Research (Chicago Tribune, July 13)
A group of women whose family has been hit hard by breast cancer will join in a 60-mile walk outside Detroit this weekend to raise money for research and prevention. Some 2,500 walkers will participate in the Breast Cancer 3-Day, sponsored by the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. Among them is Tess Feldman, 19, whose mother was diagnosed five years ago. "We're fighting for a cure because we desperately need it," says the Riverside resident, a sophomore at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/printedition/chi-0507120333jul13,1,1690204.story

UI Study On Vision Problem Cited In Viagra Story (Gulf Daily News, July 13)
Patients in Bahrain are being warned that the anti-impotence drug Viagra can cause blindness. This follows a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) order that warnings be included on labels for the drug, after some users developed a form of blindness. The vision problems, known as non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), leads to swelling around the optic disc, a connection point where the optic nerves reach the back of the eye. Ultimately, this swelling compresses the optic nerves and causes a rapid drop in vision. The symptoms are painless and often appear without notice. In a study on NAION led by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA several years ago, about three quarters of patients first discovered their vision was blurry and impaired after waking up in the morning. The paper is based in Bahrain.
http://www.gulf-daily-news.com/Story.asp?Article=116944&Sn=BNEW&IssueID=28115

Rice Visits Thai Village Ravaged by Tsunami (New York Times, July 12)
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice traveled to Bang Bang Sak, Thailand, on Monday to visit a village ravaged by the tsunami nearly seven months ago, saying she wanted to show that the United States "cares about Southeast Asia." From Phuket, Rice flew here in a Thai military helicopter and drove to a school destroyed in the tsunami on Dec. 26. It is being rebuilt, this time on high ground, with help from the United States, including several students from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Rice's visit lasted 41 minutes, and her driver kept the engine running. Local officials reported to her on the progress of construction. The old school housed about 180 children. The new one, a large complex of dormitories and buildings, will house 1,000 children, including 300 tsunami orphans, said Barbara Franklin, a former president of the school's parent-teacher association. http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/12/international/asia/12rice.html

UI Student Attends Counter Terrorism Seminar (Los Alamos Monitor, July 12)
A 10-part summer seminar series on emerging techniques in counter terrorism is being presented by the Center for Homeland Security at Los Alamos National Laboratory complex. The series is directed toward undergraduate scholars and graduate-school fellows visiting LANL this summer from around the country. The students are interested in pursuing basic science and technology innovations applicable to the Department of Homeland Security mission. Stephen Lindemann, 23, is a Department of Homeland Security Fellow attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. "This series is a great way to get an overall view of what the Department of Homeland Security is doing," Lindemann said. "We all sit in our individual cubby holes and what we do is part of the total mission but this series gives us a great overall view." Lindemann said he is most interested in chemical-bio-defense threat reduction. "I wouldn't know anything about radiological-nuclear policies or technologies being researched here if not for this series," he said. "This gives us an opportunity to cross-fertilize and that's important for homeland security." The newspaper is based in New Mexico.
http://www.lamonitor.com/articles/2005/07/11/headline_news/news03.txt

UI Vision Study Cited In Story On Anti-Impotence Drugs (ABCNews.com, July 11)
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has ordered the makers of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra to add new warnings about rare cases of sudden vision loss. A recent study also noted these vision problems, known as non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), in seven men who had taken Viagra. The agency is advising patients to stop taking these medicines or call a doctor or right away if they experience sudden or decreased vision loss in one or both eyes. The symptoms of NAION are painless and often appear without notice. In a study led by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA several years ago, about three quarters of NAION patients first discovered their vision was blurry and impaired after waking up in the morning. The condition starts in one eye and can cause complete blindness if both eyes are eventually affected.
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Healthology/story?id=837161&CMP=OTC-RSSFeeds0312

Rice To Visit UI Volunteers In Thailand (ABC Radio Australia, July 11)
U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice has arrived in Thailand's resort island of Phuket on the second leg of her Asian tour. Rice arrived from Beijing to assess post-tsunami reconstruction efforts in Thailand. Her schedule of meetings will begin with Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra and Foreign Minister Kantathi Suphamongkhon. Rice will then be taken on a tour of the region battered by December's deadly waves that left some 5,400 people dead in the kingdom. The tour will include hardest-hit Phang Nga province north of Phuket, a tsunami-damaged school under renovation, a meeting with volunteers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who are rebuilding homes, and a briefing by senior Thai military officials in the region.
http://www.abc.net.au/ra/news/stories/s1411156.htm

Flannery O'Connor Attended UI Workshop (Voice Of America News, July 10)
A story on author Flannery O'Connor says that she always wanted to be a writer and that after she graduated from Georgia State College for women she asked to be accepted at a writing program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The head of the school found it difficult to understand her southern speech. He asked her to write what she wanted. Then he asked to see some examples of her work. He saw immediately that the writing was full of imagination and bright with knowledge, like Flannery O'Connor herself.
http://www.voanews.com/specialenglish/2005-07-10-voa2.cfm

Colangelo Talks About Gifted Education (Boston Globe, July 10)
Over the years, NICHOLAS COLANGELO, a professor of gifted education at the University of Iowa, has written and presented a number of papers on what schools can do to challenge their students. Colangelo spoke at a conference on gifted education in April in Westford. He co-authored "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students," a two-volume report published last year to familiarize schools and parents about the various options for bright or gifted students. In an interview with Globe correspondent Cyra Master, Colangelo talked about his research on gifted students. "What does it cost the school to send a fourth-grader to a fifth grade? At the most, desk space. They're not hiring a new teacher; they're not building a new building. They can do something really worthwhile and not always have to pay a heavy price," he said.
http://www.boston.com/news/education/k_12/articles/2005/07/10/professor_advocates_for_the_gifted/

Dyer Comments On Drew Author's Centennial (Toledo Blade, July 10)
A story about the centennial of Millie Benson's birth today says that her enduring legacy was a fictional character named Nancy Drew. In 1929, Benson took a brief plot outline and some character sketches from book syndicator Edward Stratemeyer and - under the pen name Carolyn Keene - fashioned the gutsy, glamorous Nancy Drew. The first book in the best-selling mystery series, "The Secret of the Old Clock," was published April 28, 1930. Since then, more than 200 million copies of the books about the girl sleuth have been sold. "Nancy Drews were no ordinary children's books. Reading Nancy Drew was a pivotal childhood experience for millions of girls,'' writes CAROLYN STEWART DYER in the introduction to Rediscovering Nancy Drew, a series of essays presented at the first-ever Nancy Drew Conference at the University of Iowa in 1993. The paper is based in Ohio.
http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050710/ART02/507090313/-1/ART

'Extreme Makeover' Host Attended UI (Chicago Tribune, July 10)
When producers of ABC's "Extreme Makeover" were searching for a style host, they found a guy from the northwest suburbs who had the ability to mix his Midwestern charm with high fashion. Sam Saboura, a 1991 graduate of Johnsburg High School in McHenry County, completed his second season with the reality show, which takes ordinary people through overhauls that include plastic surgery, cosmetic dentistry and wardrobe and hairdo makeovers. Saboura was in the Chicago area last week promoting his book "Real Style: Style Secrets for Real Women with Real Bodies." After graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Saboura moved to L.A. and got a job at Fred Segal, an upscale clothing store. He worked as a personal shopper with hundreds of celebrities--including Sarah Jessica Parker, Jennifer Aniston and Brad Pitt--who liked his sense of style.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/northwest/chi-0507100280jul10,1,7059517.story?coll=chi-newslocalnorthwest-hed

UI Hog Manure Research Cited (Billings Gazette, July 10)
A story about research showing horseradish reduces hog manure odor cites other attempts to mitigate hog odors, including UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers who developed a system that would reduce odor by bombarding manure with ultrasound. However, the process to get a patent has stalled. The paper is based in Montana.
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2005/07/10/build/business/52-horseradish.inc

UI Frustrated By Research Grant Block (Lexington Herald-Leader, July 9)
A Lubbock congressman has angered UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and federal officials who are seeking research funding for a psychology study using pigeons. The study uses pigeons as models of vision and perception. But Republican Representative Randy Neugebauer said the study doesn't focus on serious mental illnesses and shouldn't receive $598,000 in funding over the next two years. The congressman blocked the funding by amending a House appropriation bill. The measure has not come up for a Senate vote. Neugebauer's chief of staff said using pigeons -- quote -- "adds to the silliness" of the study. University of Iowa officials have said the research could lead to a better understanding of how the human brain is organized and could foster learning therapies for people with and without brain disorders. The paper is based in Kentucky. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, DENTON (Texas) RECORD CHRONICLE, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, and other media outlets.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/sports/12095929.htm

UI Graduate Assistant Discusses Child Abductions (KETV-7, July 9)
Experts say increased media coverage and heightened awareness of sex offenders is giving the public a false impression that child abduction cases are on the rise. Sarah Spilman is a doctorate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who specializes in child abduction and violence against children cases. She said the stereotype of someone lurking behind a tree waiting to snatch a child is not a correct image. Instead, she said most cases involve someone known to the family or even a family member. Tina Schwartz, a spokeswoman for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, said the "stranger danger" concept hasn't been very effective in protecting children. Of the 58,000 children who are abducted by non-family members, just 115 involved stranger abductions. The station is based in Omaha.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/news/4703463/detail.html

House Strips Funding For UI Research Study (Chronicle, July 8)
The U.S. House of Representatives has approved a $602-billion health-and-education-spending bill that would strip federal funds from two academic studies -- both related to behavior. In terms of higher-education spending, the plan (HR 3010) largely mirrors the one approved by a House appropriations panel last month. It differs in a slew of amendments added on the House floor as the chamber debated the bill, which provides funds for the Education Department, the National Institutes of Health and other federal agencies for the 2006 fiscal year, which begins October 1. A few of the amendments may run into trouble in the Senate, which has yet to take up its companion bill. Lawmakers from the House and Senate will meet later this year to iron out any differences between the two bills. One such amendment would eliminate NIH funds for two studies financed by the National Institute of Mental Health. This is the third consecutive year that the House has considered amendments to remove funds from NIH-approved grants, although none has yet passed the full Congress because of opposition in the Senate. In the debate last month, Rep. Randy Neugebauer, a Texas Republican, proposed removing funds from the two grants, one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the other at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Both projects, Mr. Neugebauer said, failed to promote treatments for serious mental illness, which he said should be a priority. In the Iowa project, scientists are studying how pigeons react to visual stimuli. The work may help improve understanding of disorders in humans like schizophrenia and autism that involve abnormal perception, according to the project's description.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i44/44a02002.htm

UI Research Shows Melanoma Cells Can Become Different Types (Baltimore Sun, July 8)
When malignant melanoma cells are injected into the embryos of zebra fish, they do not form tumors but disperse and form a variety of different cell types, according to a new study reported in The Hartford Courant. The results showed that, like embryonic stem cells, metastatic melanoma cells can become many different cell types, according to results of the study published in the journal Developmental Dynamics. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA added a fluorescent tag to melanoma cells and then injected the cells into zebra fish embryos, which are transparent. Instead of developing into tumors, the cancer cells acted like embryonic stem cells, dispersing into the embryo and becoming a variety of different tissue types. The same brief appeared on the Web site of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE. (second item)
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/health/bal-hs.briefs08jul08,1,7874794.story?coll=bal-health-headlines

Poet Contributes to UI Press Frost Anthology (Roslyn News, July 8)
A story about poet Norbert Krapf refers to one of his recent poems, Dark and Deep, that was written for the book “Visiting Frost: Poems Inspired by The Life and Work of Robert Frost,” published this year by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press. The News is based in Roslyn, NY.
http://www.antonnews.com/roslynnews/2005/07/08/news/krapf.html

Skorton Meets with Singapore Government Minister (Radio Singapore, July 7)
As part of its centennial celebrations, the National University of Singapore and the Association of American Universities - Association of Pacific Rim Universities (AAU-APRU) jointly held a dialogue with Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew of Singapore on the role of universities as the world globalizes.  Presidents and Deans from many prestigious universities from all over the world were part of the dialogue and during his keynote address. Among them was UI President DAVID SKORTON.
http://rsi.com.sg/english/singaporescene/view/20050707182523/1/.html

Van Allen: Human Spaceflight Too Costly (Christian Science Monitor, July 7)
Every generation of Americans since the opening of the Space Age has seen astronauts don spacesuits only to pay the ultimate price in the risky enterprise of human spaceflight. Next Wednesday, a world that witnessed tragedy in the skies over the southwestern United States in early 2003 will watch with anticipation as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launches the first space shuttle since the orbiter Columbia disintegrated on reentry, killing its seven-member crew. As President Bush pushes his blueprint to return humans to the moon no later than 2020 and eventually send them to Mars, even space enthusiasts are asking anew why the US should pursue manned spaceflight when machines can so far do more for far fewer dollars. "I'm one of the most durable advocates for space exploration around," says JAMES VAN ALLEN, one of the deans of U.S. space science and a professor emeritus at the University of Iowa. But beyond Apollo's moon landings and missions to service the Hubble Space Telescope, he adds, human spaceflight hasn't contributed as much to humanity's understanding of the cosmos as increasingly sophisticated unmanned probes. "It's the cost," he says. "If it was easy to do, I'd be all for it." But with record federal deficits, an increasingly expensive war in Iraq, problems with Social Security, and other demands on the federal purse, the benefits to science from human spaceflight over the past 10 to 15 years have not justified the cost, he adds.
http://search.csmonitor.com/search_content/0707/p14s02-stss.html

Colangelo Offers Tips On Academic Acceleration (Detroit Free Press, July 7)
A story about a 14-year-old who will be possibly the youngest student ever to attend Michigan State University, includes a sidebar with tips about accelerating a gifted student. NICHOLAS COLANGELO, director of the Connie Belin and Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development at the University of Iowa, provided the information.
http://www.freep.com/news/metro/cooper7e_20050707.htm

UI Graduate Wins Teaching Fellowship (San Diego Union-Tribune, July 7)
La Jolla Country Day School educator Sarah Bakhiet doesn't just teach history, she's lived it. She was born in Sudan, but her family's political ties forced her family to flee the war-torn country when she was an infant. They settled in Libya, living under a dictatorship for almost 15 years until immigrating to the United States. Now the 40-year-old teacher is in Washington, D.C., developing a curriculum for her classes back home by gathering footage of recent Supreme Court developments, congressional hearings and speeches by government officials. She's one of this year's four C-SPAN Middle and High School Teacher Fellows. Studying U.S. government in an American school in Libya, Bakhiet was struck by how different the American political system was from the governments she knew. Her interest in civics led her to study international politics at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts and to attend law school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/education/20050707-9999-1m7teacher.html

California Doctor, A UI Graduate Charged (Ventura County Star, July 7)
A Thousand Oaks doctor with a reputation for working late into the night and having lengthy consultations with his patients is being charged with illegally transferring firearms and distributing a controlled substance while armed, authorities said. Dr. William Coburn, 72, is expected to be formally charged today and will appear in court Friday morning, according to the Ventura County District Attorney's Office. Coburn graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine in 1960 and received his medical license in July 1961. He has come under scrutiny by the Medical Board of California in the past, having been cited twice and been disciplined by a hospital.
http://www.venturacountystar.com/vcs/county_news/article/0,1375,VCS_226_3909344,00.html

Summer Job Takes UI Student 'Home' (Stars and Stripes, July 7)
For UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student Nathan Joyce, working as a Camp Adventure counselor at Camp Red Cloud in South Korea is a chance to get in touch with his roots. Joyce, one of two counselors supervising soldiers' children at the camp this summer, was born to a South Korean mother in Pusan but grew up in Iowa after American parents adopted him, he said. The 21-year-old does not speak Korean and had never visited the land of his birth until last month. Other South Koreans are surprised when they try to talk to him in their own language.
http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=30201

Fisher Book Questions Economic Rankings (Forbes, July 6)
In a new book, "Grading Places: What Do the Business Climate Rankings Really Tell Us?" University of Iowa professor PETER FISHER points out that 34 of the 50 states can brag they placed in the top 10 in at least one of the ratings produced by five free-market, anti-tax think tanks. Fisher's book was published by the liberal-leaning Economic Policy Institute. But that doesn't undercut the economist's main point. While all these ratings are "designed to promote a particular, usually anti-tax, political agenda," they don't even produce consistent results, making them of questionable value as a tool for business folks evaluating potential locales.
http://www.forbes.com/home/2005/07/06/development-best-places-states-cz_jn_0606beltway.html

UI Libraries Archives Document 80-Year Book Club (Chicago Tribune, July 6)
When it started in 1925, the Black Women Book Lovers Club in Des Moines had few books readily available by black authors. Members had to request the books at their local libraries because they weren't kept in stock in the days before desegregation. Eighty years later, the club -- long integrated and renamed the YWCA Book Lovers Club -- is still meeting, and its progressive tradition remains. Today's members include a retired nun, a published author, the first black clerk at the downtown Younkers store and a former dancer who has appeared in movies. Their common bond is a love for reading, and they have formed lasting relationships. At monthly meetings, the women usually come prepared to share with the group a report on a book they have read. The group, which started with 10 members, began as a program of the black branch of the Des Moines YWCA, known as the Blue Triangle branch. When the city's YWCA integrated in 1946, the Blue Triangle branch shut down its location, upsetting many members. The Black Women Book Lovers moved meetings to the central YWCA headquarters. Though members had moved to the desegregated headquarters, the group didn't integrate until 1958, when the first white member joined. Today the group is the Des Moines YWCA's oldest program. It remains predominantly black, but has several white women members. Several people have been coming for more than 30 years. But new women continue to join, and members say they bring fresh ideas to the group. New members got the group's history documented in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's library archives.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/printedition/chi-0507050298jul06,1,7195242.story

Amendment Bars Wasserman Research Funding (Inside Higher Ed, July 6)
EDWARD WASSERMAN, the Stuit Professor of Experimental Psychology at the University of Iowa, and Sandra Murray, an associate professor of psychology at the State University of New York at Buffalo, were singled out when the House of Representatives voted last month to approve an appropriations bill for the National Institutes of Health. Rep. Randy Neugebauer, a Texas Republican, successfully sponsored an amendment to bar the National Institute of Mental Health from providing any additional support to two research projects that they head. He said that the projects -- one (Murray's) dealing with marriage and one (Wasserman's) dealing with pigeons -- were outside the institute's mission, despite strong backing from the institute. The amendment has infuriated many researchers, who say that members Congress should not block projects that have been approved through the NIH's respected peer review system. The pair discussed the situation with the publication in a Q&A titled "Blacklisted Professors." Asked what it is like to have his research project become the target of a member of Congress, Wasserman responded, "It's frankly startling that, after thorough evaluation by multiple layers of peer scientists and professional administrators for both scientific excellence and mental health relevance, a currently funded NIMH research project can be subject to de-funding by Congress without thorough debate and accountable voting. So, instead of finalizing my presentation to an international psychological congress, finishing three scientific papers for publication and mentoring a visiting high school student in my laboratory, I've had to direct virtually all of my attention to Congressional actions and political maneuvers."
http://insidehighered.com/news/2005/07/06/nih

Fisher: City Indexes Politically Motivated (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, July 6)
Like beauty, competitiveness seems to be in the eye of the beholder. At any rate, says University of Iowa economist PETER FISHER, several well-publicized competitiveness rankings aren't very good at predicting which states or cities will do well economically. Rather, Fisher contends in a new study published by the Economic Policy Institute, many of these authoritative-sounding indexes are politically motivated. The Small Business Survival Index, for instance, turns out to have little to do with either business or survivability. It includes 23 variables, but only one seems to matter: The top rate for a state's personal-income tax. The index's sponsor, the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council, tends to lobby for low taxes, so perhaps it's not surprising that low-tax states always rank ahead of high-tax states.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/business/columnists.nsf/davidnicklaus/story/DF36A40DE8636BB18625703600323CFC?OpenDocument

Dorfman Comments On Retired Academics (East Valley Tribune, July 6)
Many retirees discover that concluding their career means they must find a new focus, or they will feel disconnected, perhaps even longing to return to their old jobs. Arizona State University is taking a step toward helping its academic retirees stay active while allowing them to broaden their knowledge in areas outside their specialties. It is opening an Emeritus College this month. Most academics successfully adapt to retirement. But, getting involved in any new activity -- on or away from campus -- helps ease the transition, said LORRAINE DORFMAN, who explored the issue of how professors cope with retirement in her book, "The Sun Still Shone." Dorfman, a University of Iowa social work professor, said she believes academics are a unique bunch because many devote decades to their institutions. The paper is based in Arizona.
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/index.php?sty=44153

Hovenkamp Comments On Qualcomm Suit (Orange County Register, July 6)
For the second time in three months, Broadcom Corp. has sued Qualcomm Inc., this time accusing its larger competitor of blocking competition and inflating prices in the market for cell-phone chips. Broadcom is concerned that Qualcomm is attempting to use its near-monopoly of a chip technology called CDMA to gain a stranglehold on sales of chips for next-generation phones called 3G, Scott McGregor, Broadcom's chief executive, said in a statement. Irvine-based Broadcom, a maker of chips for cable-TV set-top boxes, is branching into chips for mobile phones, where Qualcomm trails only Texas Instruments. In the latest suit, filed July 1, Broadcom alleges that Qualcomm threatened to cut off supplies to companies that bought from rivals and "coerced" users to support Qualcomm products over competing ones. San Diego-based Qualcomm has 90 percent market share of a chip technology called Code-Division Multiple Access, or CDMA, which is used by two of the three largest U.S. carriers, Verizon Wireless and Sprint Corp. Qualcomm might be using its market monopoly in one area to dominate an emerging market, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust law at the University of Iowa. Qualcomm spokeswoman Emily Kilpatrick said the company believes Broadcom's complaint is without merit. The paper is based in California.
http://www.ocregister.com/ocr/2005/07/06/sections/business/business/article_585924.php

UI Hog Manure Research Cited (Madison Daily Leader, July 5)
A story about research showing horseradish reduces hog manure odor cites other attempts to mitigate hog odors, including UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers who developed a system that would reduce odor by bombarding manure with ultrasound. However, the process to get a patent has stalled. The paper is based in South Dakota.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1302&dept_id=181978&newsid=14808113&PAG=461&rfi=9

D'Orisio Refers Patient To Switzerland (Lawrence Journal World, July 5)
A Kansas woman undergoing cancer treatment in Switzerland was referred there by Dr. THOMAS D'ORISIO of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, because the treatment she needs is not available in the United States. The Journal World is based in Kansas.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2005/jul/05/switzerland_only_hope_resident_rare_cancer/?city_local

UI Hog Manure Research Cited (Jackson Clarion Ledger, July 5)
A story about research showing horseradish reduces hog manure odor cites other attempts to mitigate hog odors, including UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers who developed a system that would reduce odor by bombarding manure with ultrasound. However, the process to get a patent has stalled. The Clarion Ledger is based in Mississippi. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the WASHINGTON POST, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, WILKES-BARRE (Pa.) TIMES LEADER, NEPANEWS.com, WKMG-TV, NORTHWEST ALABAMA TIMES DAILY, CANTON (Ohio) REPOSITORY, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050705/BIZ/507050348/1005

Herky, Cy Pilferer Pleads Guilty (Chicago Daily Southtown, July 5)
A Chicago area businessman has agreed to pay $3.1 million to settle a trademark infringement case involving unauthorized use of university logos. Donald Bruno, of Burr Ridge, was placed on probation for 2 1/2 years after pleading guilty to unauthorized use of a trademark. Bruno, president of Romeoville-based American Family Products, agreed to pay $1.15 million in criminal fines and $1.74 million in civil fines, penalties and restitution, according to court records in Will County, Ill. The company and Bruno were accused of illegally using logos from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and nearly 60 other universities and companies on sports memorabilia. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the PEORIA JOURNAL STAR, CHICAGO SUN TIMES, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT and WQAD TV.
http://www.dailysouthtown.com/southtown/dsnews/054nd1.htm

Folsom Discusses Leaves Of Grass, Whitman Impact (NPR, July 4)
On July 4, 1855, a book of poetry by an unknown by the name of Walt Whitman came out to mixed reviews and widespread disinterest. Eventually, it changed the way poets thought, and sang, of themselves. A discussion on the book and its impact on the program Talk of the Nation included ED FOLSOM, professor of English at the University of Iowa; editor of the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review; co-director of the online Walt Whitman Archive, the most comprehensive Web-based collection of Whitman's writings and biographical information; and author of "Rescripting Walt Whitman."
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4728290

UI Alumna Practices In Georgia (Gainesville Times, July 4)
A profile of Dr. Carolyn Felton,  the second rheumatologist to practice in Gainesville, Ga., says that Felton is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/news/stories/20050704/localnews/119173.shtml

Alumnus's English Major Led To Computer Science (Charlotte Observer, July 4)
Why don't you major in something useful? Why am I paying $30,000 a year for you to sit around and read poetry? If you majored in English as an undergraduate, chances are these are familiar questions. The people who ask them -- parents, grandparents, peers with more "practical" degrees -- probably mean well, but that doesn't make the questions any less annoying. Even more annoying are the constant warnings that you'll wind up shelving books for the rest of your life.  It is true that an undergraduate English degree won't prepare you for a specific career. Instead, like other liberal arts degrees, it serves as a broad base for a range of careers, many quite lucrative. Michael Dinsmore, 35, thought he was going to be a teacher when he graduated with his bachelor's degree in English and master's degree in teaching from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. But he spent just one year inside a classroom, and that was teaching computer science. After that, he decided he would rather "implement" computer science than teach it. His path is instructive to other recent grads with English degrees. The same story appeared on the Web site of the NEW LONDON (Conn.) DAY,
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/business/12050793.htm

Story Cites UI Tiny Baby List (Arkansas Democrat Gazette, July 3)
A story about a baby born in Arkansas at just 25 weeks cites an unofficial list kept by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA pediatrics department that indicates the baby falls just short of being among the 50 smallest known babies to survive but comes within 5 ounces of the smallest ever -- Rumaisa Rahman, an 8.6-ounce girl born last December in Chicago.
http://www.nwanews.com/story.php?paper=adg&section=News&storyid=120927

UI Establishes Wellstone Center For Research (Duluth News Tribune, July 2)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA announced Friday that it has received a $7.3 million federal grant to establish a muscular dystrophy research center named for former Minnesota Sen. Paul Wellstone. The grant, from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, will fund research into the genetic disease that leads to progressive muscle wasting and weakness and affects more than 1 million people nationwide. Wellstone, a Democratic senator who died in a plane crash in northern Minnesota in 2002, was a leading supporter in Congress for research on Duchene muscular dystrophy. A similar story appeared on the Web site of MEDICAL NEWS TODAY,
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/news/local/12041111.htm

Ceramist's Works On Display (Denver Rocky Mountain News, July 1)
Ceramist Maynard Tischler has an exhibition on view through Aug. 5 in the Victoria H. Myhren Gallery at the University of Denver. He has taught at the university's School of Art and Art History and been an administrator there (including this year, as interim director during a colleague's sabbatical). But last year, Tischler pulled back to one course so he could meet a tough schedule of finishing ceramic works in a huge wood-fired kiln at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Four times in 15 months, Tischler made the trek to Iowa to submit dozens of works to the lengthy and precarious process of wood-firing. http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/entertainment_columnists/article/0,1299,DRMN_84_3893640,00.html

Sidel Attends Vietnam Conference (Thanh Nien Daily, July 1)
Professor MARK SIDEL of the University of Iowa was among a group of scholars attending at an international conference to review the first 20 years of policy reform in Vietnam. The conference held Thursday brings together prominent international experts with Vietnamese policymakers and scholars to discuss the impact of doi moi (renovation) on economic, political and social change and the implications of these policies for the future. The two-day meeting was held by the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences (VASS) under the project Assistance to the 20-Year Review of Doi Moi, with support from the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA). http://thanhniennews.com/politics/?catid=1&newsid=7595

Barkan Comments on Uganda (Voice of America, July 1)
Uganda's success, including steady economic growth and a 20 percent decline in poverty rates since 1992, has made President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni a darling of the West. Now, however, some analysts say the country's success is threatened by several factors. Although many observers say that it appears he is reluctantly moving toward multi-party democracy, President Museveni has said he wants to amend the constitution to allow him to stay in office past 2006 when his second term expires. JOEL BARKAN, who researches politics and development policy in sub-Saharan Africa at the University of Iowa, says this has been highly controversial. Some 60 percent of Ugandans surveyed in a recent poll oppose attempts to alter the constitution. Professor Barkan says the Museveni government has defended its actions on the grounds that Uganda is a sovereign state that will set its own laws. "Part of the point is valid, but it is not the donors and people of the north who are simply calling for an adherence to the two term limit," says Professor Barkan. "A number of other African countries have amended their constitutions to insert a two-term limit, South Africa, for one, Tanzania, Kenya, Namibia, Zambia. This is by no means a foreign phenomenon."
http://www.voanews.com/english/NewsAnalysis/2005-06-29-voa55.cfm

Author Attended Writers' Workshop (The Australian, July 1)
John Murray is the author of A Few Short Notes on Tropical Butterflies, a collection of fiction. Murray will attend next week's Adelaide Festival of Ideas. Despite never having studied literature, he applied to the respected IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa and was accepted. Iowa City proved an ideal environment for an aspiring author. "I was sitting in this little town in the middle of nowhere where everybody was a fiction writer; the guy pumping gas in the gas station would be working on a novel. It was that kind of town," he says. http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,15782625%255E16947,00.html

Pogue Comments On Prisons (Z Magazine, July/August 2005)
In an article contending that some rural communities have a dependence on the prison industry, University of Iowa economist THOMAS POGUE (now an emeritus professor) is quoted, saying that rural "prisons are being located where people don't have much of a choice."
http://zmagsite.zmag.org/JulAug2005/street0705.html

West Nile Virus Found in Iowa (KETV, June 30)
Two dead birds found in two Iowa counties have tested positive for the West Nile virus. A test at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA lab confirmed that a blue jay from Clarke County and a crow from Linn County had the disease, according to a news release from the Iowa Department of Public Health. No humans or horses in Iowa have been confirmed with the virus this so far year, the release said. The TV station is based in Omaha, Neb. http://www.theomahachannel.com/news/4670783/detail.html

 

 

 

 

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