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Fuortes Studies Beryllium Exposure (Bradenton Herald, Jan. 27)
An old report could be the key to unlocking federal benefits for more former employees of Loral American Beryllium Co. A 1997 environmental assessment of the Tallevast plant found high levels of beryllium dust residue on wipe samples taken at various locations throughout the plant. The amounts recorded range from 4.1 micrograms to 120,000 micrograms per square foot, according to the report filed by Tetra Tech, a Tampa environmental firm. Dr. LAURENCE FUORTES, a beryllium expert at the University of Iowa, studied the report at The Herald's request. Fuortes said the data provides evidence that beryllium dust was a significant problem for American Beryllium workers. By Fuortes' calculations, the highest level of dust found above the milling and lathe area is nearly 66,700 times higher than the standard set by the Department of Energy for residual contamination. "Those levels indicate the ventilation system was leaking and that certainly corroborates that there was beryllium dust in the air," Fuortes said. "The work force was certainly more exposed than workers at similar facilities."
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/news/local/10743830.htm

Wallace: Estrogen Therapy Poses Risks (Asheville Citizen Times, Jan. 27)
In yet another piece of bad news for hormone replacement therapy, researchers report that postmenopausal women taking estrogen therapy face an increased risk of gallbladder disease and surgery. The effects were seen whether or not the women were also taking progestin. This is the first time the effect had been seen in a randomized, double-blind study, considered the gold standard for scientific research. "My own personal view is that the association is causal," said study co-author Dr. ROBERT B. WALLACE, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health. "This is the most persuasive level of evidence." The findings appear in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
http://www.citizen-times.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050125/HEALTH01/501250317/1024

Logsdon Study Shows Asexual Protists Are Sexual (The Scientist, Jan. 27)
Scientists have found evidence that Giardia, an ancient protist long considered to be asexual, may have a sex life. The findings are reported in the January 26 issue of Current Biology. "The origin and evolution of sex is one of the central unsolved puzzles for biology, and while we haven't solved it, these findings could bring us one step closer," co-author JOHN LOGSDON at the University of Iowa told The Scientist. Giardia and other diplomonads are thought to be a roughly 2 billion-year-old lineage, making them among the earliest diverging eukaryotes. Despite more than a century of study, they were not known to have sex, suggesting they might represent a premeiotic stage in eukaryotic evolution.
http://www.biomedcentral.com/news/20050126/01/

Damasios Leave UI For USC (The Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 27)
HANNA and ANTONIO R DAMASIO, two internationally known neuroscientists, are leaving the University of Iowa to join the faculty of the University of Southern California's College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences in the fall of 2005. The Damasios will be leaving their posts at Iowa's department of neurology to head a new institute for the study of the brain and creativity in Los Angeles. The new institute will extend the Damasios' reach far beyond the ranks of white-coated researchers by influencing the entire liberal-arts curriculum, says Joseph Aoun, dean of the Southern Cal college. "The idea of the institute came as an expression of the interdisciplinary interests of the various parties," says Mr. Aoun, who started discussing the move with the Damasios about eight months ago. Antonio Damasio says the couple was attracted by "the mixture of creative talent in the sciences and in the humanities and the atmosphere of collaboration and the enthusiasm of the faculty."
http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i21/21a00902.htm

UI Students Comment On No-Tax Proposal (Aberdeen American News, Jan. 27)
A proposal to eliminate state income taxes for everyone under 30 was greeted with skepticism Wednesday by lawmakers in both parties and mixed reviews from Iowa's young people. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student Ryan Thompto said lawmakers might be more successful in keeping young people in Iowa by lowering the cost of a college education. "It's hard for students to graduate from college and have all these bills to pay and are they going to make the money to pay those bills and still lead a comfortable life here in the state or do I go off and go to a city or somewhere where they have better, higher paying jobs?" he said. But for 21-year-old Jason Shore, of Chicago, the estimated $600 a year he would save from not paying income tax might make a difference. "The younger you are, the more $600 means to you, especially when you're first becoming economically stable," said Shore, student government president at the University of Iowa. The American News is based in South Dakota.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/10740996.htm

Robinson Praised For Gilead (Nashville City Paper, Jan. 27)
Do not wait for the paperback, a reviewer writes. Gilead is sure to make the top of the list of book clubs everywhere. It has taken MARILYNNE ROBINSON more than 20 years to write another novel but it was well worth the wait...After reading Gilead, I understand why there is a waiting list to enroll in the author's classes at the prestigious University of Iowa Writer's Program.
http://www.nashvillecitypaper.com/index.cfm?section_id=12&screen=news&news_id=38831

Jarreau Started Jazz Band As UI Student (North County Times, Jan. 27)
A profile of jazz singer Al Jarreau points out that he began his professional life as a straight-ahead jazz singer while attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the early 1960s. "I was 23 or 24. I was a student, and that was my main vocation, but singing was my love," Jarreau said. He and some friends had a weekend gig at a local club in Cedar Rapids called the Tender Trap. Jarreau and his bandmates even got to the point of renting out a studio and cutting some songs. Those tracks later ended up being released as the album "1965" by an independent record label, an album Jarreau long disassociated himself from but is now coming to appreciate. "It was not intended to be for public consumption," he explained. "That record was done just for us to enjoy the music we were making."
http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2005/01/26/entertainment/music/11549.txt

Damasios Heading To University Of Southern California (Chronicle, Jan. 28)
HANNA
and ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, two internationally known neuroscientists, are leaving the University of Iowa to join the faculty of the University of Southern California's College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences in the fall of 2005. The Damasios will be leaving their posts at Iowa's department of neurology to head a new institute for the study of the brain and creativity in Los Angeles. The new institute will extend the Damasios' reach far beyond the ranks of white-coated researchers by influencing the entire liberal-arts curriculum, says Joseph Aoun, dean of the Southern Cal college. Antonio Damasio says the couple was attracted by "the mixture of creative talent in the sciences and in the humanities and the atmosphere of collaboration and the enthusiasm of the faculty." The Damasios are the latest academic stars to be recruited to the college as part of its ambitious campaign, announced in 2002, to bring 100 "world class" professors to the faculty. So far, 58 leading lights are on board.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i21/21a00902.htm

Bell Comments On Public Interest In Multiple Births (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 26)
The feel-good notion of multiple births sometimes draws the media spotlight, generous donations and even advertising deals. But as multiple births become more common, interest seems to be waning. And some families, including an Hispanic family quoted in the story, get very little help or attention at all. In 1934, the Dionne quintuplets--Annette, Cecile, Yvonne, Marie and Emilie--gained fame as one of the first known sets of surviving quintuplets. The Canadian-born girls were such an oddity that nearly 3 million people visited them at the hospital where they lived until they were 9 years old because they were put on display there for the public's entertainment. "They were so rare that almost every set was publicly known," said Dr. EDWARD BELL, director of neonatology at the University of Iowa. "As they've become more common ... quintuplet families no longer generate a lot of media coverage and public interest."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0501260368jan26,1,4214946.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Meyer Comments On Kinnick Renovation (Contra Costa Times, Jan. 26)
At the University of Iowa, a gaping hole exists where the south end zone stands once stood at Kinnick Stadium. By the start of the football season, those stands will be rebuilt, along with a new concourse and three sets of underground locker rooms. At least, that's the hope of Iowa senior associate athletic director JANE MEYER, who oversees the $87 million renovation project. "Right now, there's no south end zone. But we had better have it by September," Meyer said with a laugh, "or I'll be out of a job." Iowa is one of many universities that have undertaken stadium renovation projects. Cal hopes to undertake its own project after the 2005 season. The paper is based in California.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/10736955.htm

Author Of 'Prep' Attended UI Writing Program (New York Times, Jan. 26)
A story about author Curtis Sittenfeld's debut novel, "Prep," says the 29-year-old writer attended the writing program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she was enrolled in the master's program.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/01/26/books/26prep.html

Graber Uses Software for Diagnosis (Newsday, Jan. 25)
A 4-year-old boy arrived at an Iowa hospital with a fever, swollen lymph glands and various visible clues: a diffuse rash, cracked lips and peeling skin around his fingernails. Dr. MARK GRABER, an emergency room veteran at the University of Iowa, quickly suspected Kawasaki's syndrome, a rare heart condition that can lead to fatal aneurysms. The boy had already visited several doctors and ERs "and the diagnosis was missed," Graber said. To ensure he was on the right path, Graber typed his observations into a visual-diagnosis software application that's designed to pinpoint illnesses that appear on the skin, from chicken pox or Lyme disease to AIDS complications or anthrax exposure.
http://www.nynewsday.com/news/health/ny-a4123903jan25,0,4837984.story?coll=ny-health-headlines

UI Farm Study Cited (Grist, Jan. 25)
A story about changes in federal environmental laws relating to large production farms cites a 2002 study by Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Study Group that revealed widespread cases of bronchitis in workers exposed to these pollutants.
http://www.grist.org/news/muck/2005/01/24/factory_farms/

Illinois Students Leave State for College (Arlington Heights Daily Herald, Jan. 25)
A story about the number of Illinois high school graduates who attend college in other states says that many of them attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Daily Herald is based in Illinois.
http://www.dailyherald.com/dupage/main_story.asp?intID=3837746

Alumnus Buried By New England Blizzard (Kewanee Star Courier, Jan. 25)
Kewanee native Ryan Stuffelbeam knew his year in Boston would be filled with memorable events, he just didn't count on one them being one of the area's worst-ever snowstorms. Dr. Stuffelbeam is on staff at Boston College, serving one year as a visiting professor. The storm that ripped through the Northeast dumped up to 38 inches of snow in some parts of Massachusetts. Stufflebeam received his PhD from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Star Courier is based in Illinois.
http://www.starcourier.com/articles/2005/01/25/city/city2.txt

Boldt, Lewis Give Talk In St. Louis (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Jan. 24)
University of Iowa educators GAIL MASUCHIKA BOLDT and CYNTHIA LEWIS will present a conversation on "What is a Child?" at 4 p.m. today at Ann W. Olin Women's Building Formal Lounge, Washington University, Forsyth and Skinker boulevards.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/visitstlouis/story/08FACD20905DF2B186256F93000DF37D?OpenDocument&Headline=Get+Out+Monday%3A+Cable+guy+humor

Students Start Internationally Syndicated Radio Show (WQAD-TV, Jan. 23)
A couple of University of Iowa graduate students have started the school's first internationally syndicated college radio show. The one-hour show, called Sesiones, is taped in Spanish at the K-R-U-I studio in Iowa City. Through the program, American independent music is showcased for a university in Chile called the Universidad CatÃ_lica de ValparaÃ_so. 29-year-old Marcelo Mena, is one of the show's hosts. He says the program offers an "unfiltered nexus" to the college indie rock scene and Iowa City's music scene. Mena and 30-year-old co-host Oscar Vega, both are graduates of Chilean universities. K-R-U-I adviser KELVIN SOUKUP says the show is new territory for the college station. The show is scheduled to air at the university in Chile for the rest of the year.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2845849

Alumnus Takes On Global Warming Naysayers (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Jan. 23)
James E. Hansen, a lifelong government employee who heads NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, has inspired both anger and awe in the nation's scientific and political communities since publicly denouncing the Bush administration's policy on climate change last year. Speaking in the swing state of Iowa days before the presidential election, Hansen accused a senior administration official of trying to block him from discussing the dangerous effects of global warming. In the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA speech, Hansen recounted how NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe told him in a 2003 meeting that he shouldn't talk "about dangerous anthropogenic interference" -- humans' influence on the atmosphere -- "because we do not know enough or have enough evidence for what would constitute dangerous anthropogenic interference." But Hansen said that scientists know enough to conclude we have reached this danger point and that their efforts to get the word out are being blocked by the administration. A sidebar profile says that Hansen has a bachelor of science degree in physics and mathematics and a doctorate in physics, both from the University of Iowa.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05023/446585.stm

Alumnus Teaches Art (The Republican, Jan. 23)
A feature on Greenfield Community College art professor Janis Bross says that during his time in college, which included earning a master's degree in fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Bross got into a variety of artistic pursuits, many in what was then called "audiovisual" arts, including photography, film-making, animation and graphics. The paper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.masslive.com/hampfrank/republican/index.ssf?/base/news-9/1106383865259830.xml

Rubright Friendship With, Support Of Quartet Cited (New York Times, Jan. 23)
Patronage of music by individuals may seem like a throwback to the days when noblemen maintained court orchestras with composers to write for them. Today, a few private donors have made names for themselves commissioning new music (notably Betty Freeman, who since the 1960's has supported the likes of John Adams, Steve Reich, Morton Feldman and John Cage), but most of the big patrons of contemporary music are linked with institutions, giving money to symphony orchestras, operas and new concert halls. As it turns out, anyone can commission a piece of music. Maurice and Lillian Barbash were inspired to celebrate their 40th anniversary with music: they asked Yo-Yo Ma which composer he would like to write a cello concerto for him. He chose Leon Kirchner, and the piece went on to win a Grammy. WILLIAM RUBRIGHT, a professor of dentistry at the University of Iowa, befriended the Kronos Quartet over years of attending their performances. He made a major contribution toward Terry Riley's "Sun Rings," a multimedia piece for Kronos that had its premiere in 2002 and came to the Brooklyn Academy of Music in October. Under its president, Heather Hitchens, Meet the Composer is trying to get the word out about private patronage. Recently, it published "An Individual's Guide to Commissioning Music," a compilation of articles about people who have done it, and how others can follow.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/01/23/arts/music/23midg.html

Graber Uses Diagnostic Software (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Jan. 23)
A 4-year-old boy arrived at an Iowa hospital with a fever, swollen lymph glands and various visible clues: a diffuse rash, cracked lips and peeling skin around his fingernails. Dr. MARK GRABER, an emergency room veteran, quickly suspected Kawasaki's syndrome, a rare heart condition that can lead to fatal aneurysms. To ensure he was on the right path, Graber typed his observations into a visual-diagnosis software application that's designed to pinpoint illnesses that appear on the skin, from chicken pox or Lyme disease to AIDS complications or anthrax exposure. Graber teaches family and emergency medicine at the University of Iowa and uses the software most days at the campus hospital in Iowa City. "The beauty of having multiple pictures is you can compare them and say, 'Yeah, this makes sense, let's go from there,'" he said. He regards VisualDx as an invaluable training tool at a time when medical education has become fragmented and trainees "don't see the full spectrum of disease anymore."
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05023/446723.stm

Hlebowitsh Comments On Early Elementary Schools (Detroit News, Jan. 23)
Schools were not always divided into grades. The first elementary schools were called common schools -- so named because they were said to provide a common education for all citizens. Children of all ages learned in one-room schoolhouses, though girls and boys often were taught separately. The first effort to operate a graded school in the United States was under the watch of 19th-century education activist Horace Mann, who saw it at work in Europe and was impressed with it, according to PETER HLEBOWITSH, a professor of education at the University of Iowa and an education historian. German immigrants also advanced the idea. The idea of age-segregated grades is deeply rooted in Europe, going back as far as the 16th century, when boys were educated in classrooms organized by rows of benches according to age; each row was known as a form -- the first form closest to the teacher and so forth, Hlebowitsh said. Europeans still use the term instead of grade.
http://www.detnews.com/2005/schools/0501/23/A08-67368.htm

Snider Offers Tips For Temporary Housing (Portsmouth Herald News, Jan. 22)
If an internship, temporary job or the time gap between selling your old house and closing on a new one means you need to find a place to live for a little while, don't think the only option is a pricey hotel. There are lots of smart ways to keep costs down. From university resources to international organizations to monasteries, it's possible and often fun to save on housing, transportation and food in an unfamiliar place. If living in a tent is not an option, start your search for short-term savings by thinking like a student. "One tip is to follow leads at universities and private research institutions, which tend to attract a transient population of students and visiting faculty," says ALVIN SNIDER, a professor at the University of Iowa who has done short-term stints in Washington and Chicago. The paper is based in New Hampshire.
http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/01222005/biz_nati/60590.htm

Senior Drug Addicts Increasing (USA Today, Jan. 21)
As the elderly population continues to grow and baby boomers move into their senior years,the number of older adults who abuse drugs - from pain pills to marijuana and cocaine - is increasing. Nationwide, there are relatively few drug treatment programs geared toward seniors. Fewer than 20 percent of about 13,700 licensed substance abuse programs offer help specifically for the elderly, according to a 2000 survey by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The article also appeared on the website of the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2005-01-21-senior-addicts_x.htm

Snider Advises on Short-Term Housing (Biloxi Sun-Herald, Jan. 21)
If an internship, temporary work situation or the time gap between selling your old house and closing on a new one means you need to find a place to live for a little while, don't think the only option is an overpriced hotel. There are lots of smart ways to keep costs down. From university resources to international organizations to monasteries, it's possible and often fun to save on housing, transportation and food in an unfamiliar place. Start your search for short-term savings by thinking like a student. "One tip is to follow leads at universities and private research institutions, which tend to attract a transient population of students and visiting faculty," says ALVIN SNIDER, a professor at the University of Iowa who has done short-term stints in Washington, D.C., and Chicago. The newspaper is based in Mississippi. The article, which originally appeared on BANKRATE.COM, also appeared in the VENTURA COUNTY (Calif.) STAR.
http://www.sunherald.com/mld/thesunherald/business/10696362.htm

Worm Treatment Relieves Crohn's Disease (Globe and Mail, Jan. 21)
Small parasitic worms can help relieve the inflammation, abdominal pain and weight loss in people afflicted with Crohn's disease, according to a study by scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A group of 29 patients with the bowel disorder were given a drink containing 2,500 live eggs of a species of worm known as Trichuris suis, normally found in pigs. The treatment was repeated once every three weeks during the 24-week trial. By the end of the study, 23 of the 29 patients reported that their symptoms had diminished. The paper is based in Toronto, Ontario in Canada.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20050121/HTAYLOR21/TPHealth/

Board Member Criticizes Colleagues (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jan. 20)
In a letter to the Frank L. Weyenberg Library Board of Trustees, former board member Ted Potter has criticized his former colleagues, particularly board President Susan Nelson, saying they have "made it difficult for library directors and library staff to do the job for which they were hired." Potter is leaving Wisconsin to take a job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA law library.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/ozwash/jan05/294829.asp

Alumna Writes California History Book (Union-Democrat, Jan. 20)
Doris Castro of Angels Camp, Calif. has spent most of her 85 years translating and preserving history. Most recently she completed a genealogy project that was more than four decades in the making. "California Colony," a vast reference guide to more than 1,300 of the earliest Spanish colonial families to settle in California, was published in October. Castro graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1943, earning a bachelor's degree in romance languages, which included Spanish, French and Portuguese. The newspaper is based in Tuolumne County, Calif.
http://www.uniondemocrat.com/news/story.cfm?story_no=16324

Squire Says Election Hangover Still Looms (KETV, Jan. 20)
As President George W. Bush prepares to be sworn in Thursday for his second term, Iowans are just as divided now as they were when Bush won the November election.An Associated Press poll shows Bush's approval rating, at 49 percent, lower than any recent second-term president. PEVERILL SQUIRE is a political science professor at the University of Iowa. He said a hangover from the election is still being felt. KETV is a television station based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/news/4110510/detail.html

Cohen Recommends Tennessee Pharmacy School Expansion (WVLT, Jan. 20)
A consultant has recommended the state expand the University of Tennessee pharmacy school in Memphis, rather than starting a new one at East Tennessee State. The suggestion is the primary recommendation from JORDAN COHEN, the dean of the University of Iowa's pharmacy school. Cohen recommends UT expand its school to 800 students. It will enroll 500 next fall. Cohen also recommends 50 student from each class spend their final three years at an East Tennessee State satellite campus in Johnson City. The television station is based in Knoxville, Tenn. The story also appeared on the website of WATE-TV in Knoxville.
http://www.volunteertv.com/Global/story.asp?S=2834466

Cohen Recommends School Expansion (Memphis Commercial Appeal, Jan. 20)
Expand the University of Tennessee pharmacy school in Memphis instead of building another at East Tennessee State University. That's the primary recommendation in a report submitted to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission by consultant JORDAN COHEN, dean of the University of Iowa's pharmacy school. Cohen recommends that UT, which will enroll 500 pharmacy students next fall, expand to 800, or 200 in each year's class. In turn, 50 students in each class would spend their final three years at an ETSU satellite campus in Johnson City. The site requires registration.
http://www.commercialappeal.com/mca/local_news/article/0,1426,MCA_437_3483548,00.html

Snider: Universities May Provide Short-Term Housing (Bankrate.com, Jan. 20)
If an internship, temporary work situation or the time gap between selling your old house and closing on a new one means you need to find a place to live for a little while, don't think the only option is an overpriced hotel. There are lots of smart ways to keep costs down. From university resources to international organizations to monasteries, it's possible and often fun to save on housing, transportation and food in an unfamiliar place. Start your search for short-term savings by thinking like a student. "One tip is to follow leads at universities and private research institutions, which tend to attract a transient population of students and visiting faculty," says ALVIN SNIDER, a professor at the University of Iowa who has done short-term stints in Washington, D.C., and Chicago.
http://www.bankrate.com/brm/news/real-estate/20050118a1.asp

Cirillo Study Shows Estrogen Therapy Risks (Kansas City Infozine, Jan. 20)
A study by DOMINIC J. CIRILLO of the University of Iowa shows the use of estrogen therapy may increase risk for gallbladder disease. Cholelithiasis (gallstones in the gallbladder) is estimated to affect between 10 percent and 15 percent of the U.S. population, with one million new diagnoses yearly.
http://www.infozine.com/news/stories/op/storiesView/sid/5374/

Alumnus Is Visiting Writer (Holland Sentinel, Jan. 20)
Poet Mark Jarman will be a visiting writer at Hope College in Holland, Mich. in February. Jarman has published eight collections of poetry, including "Questions for Ecclesiastes," "The Black Riviera," "The Rote Walker," "North Sea" and "Iris." He received his MFA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.hollandsentinel.com/stories/012005/hap_012005014.shtml

Young Republicans Attend Presidential Inauguration (National Public Radio, Jan. 19)
Five young Republicans who volunteered for the Bush campaign went to Washington, DC.  to attend the presidential inauguration. An NPR reporter interviewed students from Iowa as they prepared for the trip. Zack Johnson, who studies microbiology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, recalls volunteering at a campaign event in Cedar Rapids in 2000. On his desk is his most prized possession: a framed photo of him and President Bush. "And all of a sudden, there just are gasps in the room. I turn around, and I'm face to face with George Bush. And then he started talking to me a little bit. In his eyes, I just--he felt like an uncle to me, and he looked directly--like, the most piercing look I've ever felt. And after that, I thought, `You know what? I'm not working for a completely foreign agenda here. I'm working for a man.'" Johnson said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=9a003d6f1b91951c18b28e38f1696352&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVA&_md5=ce3074a1e93de2212693c0054193e882

Audio available at: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4458062

Hormone Replacement Pills Linked to Gallstones (Daily Post, Jan. 19)
Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) pills dramatically increase the risk of gallstones in post-menopausal women, scientists said today. Researchers found that users of combined pill HRT were 68 percent more at risk of having gallstones than nonusers.  They also faced a 54 percent greater risk of gall bladder inflammation, and were 59 percent more at risk of suffering any kind of gall bladder disease or having to undergo surgery. The new data is the latest to emerge from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study in the United States, which was halted in 2002 after finding that HRT was linked to higher rates of heart attack and stroke.  The scientists, led by DOMINIC CIRILLO from the University of Iowa, presented their findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The newspaper is published in Liverpool, England. The article also appeared in the EXPRESS in the United Kingdom and the HERALD in Glasgow, Scotland.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5d244c6c99da36c2fbd94bca702efffd&_docnum=23&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=b14e4af49dc367de550538ed9e995b0c

UI Alumnus Hansen Takes On Global Warming Naysayers (Washington Post, Jan. 19)
James E. Hansen, a lifelong government employee who heads NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, has inspired both anger and awe in the nation's scientific and political communities since publicly denouncing the Bush administration's policy on climate change last year. Speaking in the swing state of Iowa days before the presidential election, Hansen accused a senior administration official of trying to block him from discussing the dangerous effects of global warming. In the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA speech, Hansen recounted how NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe told him in a 2003 meeting that he shouldn't talk "about dangerous anthropogenic interference" -- humans' influence on the atmosphere -- "because we do not know enough or have enough evidence for what would constitute dangerous anthropogenic interference." But Hansen said that scientists know enough to conclude we have reached this danger point and that their efforts to get the word out are being blocked by the administration. A sidebar profile says that Hansen has a bachelor of science degree in physics and mathematics and a doctorate in physics, both from the University of Iowa.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A19162-2005Jan18.html

Robinson Book 'Gilead' Lauded (Seattle Times, Jan. 19)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON's many Northwest fans had to wait 23 years for her second novel. According to The New York Times, among others, it was worth it -- Robinson's "Gilead," (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 247 pp., $23), was just named one of the 10 best books published in 2004. Robinson's quiet tale of a small-town Iowa minister's struggles with faith, family and history joined a lineup that includes literary star Philip Roth ("The Plot Against America") and Booker Prize winner Colm Toibin ("The Master.") Robinson, now 61, earned her doctorate at the University of Washington, and returns to Seattle Friday for a rare reading. She teaches now at the University of Iowa's writing program.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/books/2002153762_robinson19.html

Graber Uses Diagnostic Software (Billings Gazette, Jan. 19)
A 4-year-old boy arrived at an Iowa hospital with a fever, swollen lymph glands and various visible clues: a diffuse rash, cracked lips and peeling skin around his fingernails. Dr. MARK GRABER, an emergency room veteran, quickly suspected Kawasaki's syndrome, a rare heart condition that can lead to fatal aneurysms. To ensure he was on the right path, Graber typed his observations into a visual-diagnosis software application that's designed to pinpoint illnesses that appear on the skin, from chicken pox or Lyme disease to AIDS complications or anthrax exposure. Graber teaches family and emergency medicine at the University of Iowa and uses the software most days at the campus hospital in Iowa City. "The beauty of having multiple pictures is you can compare them and say, 'Yeah, this makes sense, let's go from there,'" he said. He regards VisualDx as an invaluable training tool at a time when medical education has become fragmented and trainees "don't see the full spectrum of disease anymore." The paper is based in Montana.
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2005/01/19/build/health/50-skin-software.inc

Wallace Coauthors Hormone Replacement Study (Forbes, Jan. 18)
In yet another piece of bad news for hormone replacement therapy, researchers report that postmenopausal women taking estrogen therapy face an increased risk of gallbladder disease and surgery. The effects were seen whether or not the women were also taking progestin. This is the first time the effect had been seen in a randomized, double-blind study, considered the gold standard for scientific research. "My own personal view is that the association is causal," said study co-author Dr. ROBERT B. WALLACE, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health. "This is the most persuasive level of evidence." The findings, which appear in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, essentially mean that women considering hormone therapy now have one more thing they need to factor into their decision. A version of the story also ran on the website of the ATLANTA (Ga.) JOURNAL CONSTITUTION.
http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/01/18/hscout523467.html

Achepohl Collection on Exhibit (Salem Statesman Journal, Jan. 18)
Some art exhibits are timeless; the new exhibit at Salem Art Association might be considered a snapshot in time, a time that is fast disappearing. "Family Holdings: Turkish Nomadic Flatweaves," at the A.N. Bush Gallery, features work not even crafted as art. The 55 pieces of textile art is the kind of work you might more easily find flopped over the back of a camel, on the floor of a home or used as a bed. The work literally is taken from the homes, animals and even the backs of the nomadic people of Turkey, who travel from the mountains to the plains each winter and summer, a tradition dating back generations. The work is from the collection of KEITH ACHEPOHL, arts professor of the University of Iowa, who has visited the homes of nomadic Turks over the years to collect these pieces, some of which date from the 19th century, with most from the 20th century. The Statesman Journal is based in Salem, Ore.
http://159.54.226.83/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050118/LIFE/501180306/1051

Graber Uses Diagnostic Software (The State, Jan. 18)
A 4-year-old boy arrived at an Iowa hospital with a fever, swollen lymph glands and various visible clues: a diffuse rash, cracked lips and peeling skin around his fingernails. Dr. MARK GRABER, an emergency room veteran, quickly suspected Kawasaki's syndrome, a rare heart condition that can lead to fatal aneurysms. To ensure he was on the right path, Graber typed his observations into a visual-diagnosis software application that's designed to pinpoint illnesses that appear on the skin, from chicken pox or Lyme disease to AIDS complications or anthrax exposure. Graber teaches family and emergency medicine at the University of Iowa and uses the software most days at the campus hospital in Iowa City. "The beauty of having multiple pictures is you can compare them and say, 'Yeah, this makes sense, let's go from there,'" he said. He regards VisualDx as an invaluable training tool at a time when medical education has become fragmented and trainees "don't see the full spectrum of disease anymore." The STATE is based in Columbia, SC. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, SEATTLE TIMES and DAYTONA BEACH  NEWS JOURNAL.
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/news/nation/10669307.htm

Workshop Alumnus Mandelbaum Profiled (Baltimore Sun, Jan. 18)
Author Paul Mandelbaum is profiled. Mandelbaum, the author of the new book "Garrett in Wedlock," is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/lifestyle/bal-to.author18jan18,1,885663.story

Alumnus Creates Abortion Art Exhibit (Portland Press Herald, Jan. 16)
Lihua Lei refuses to avoid painful issues. She confronts them instead. In recent years, the artist from Solon has created installations about breast cancer, her own affliction with polio, and her reaction to the terrorist attacks of 9/11. Given that, it's of little surprise that her current piece, on display this month at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockport, addresses abortion. The piece is her attempt to deal with the grief and guilt she felt after having an abortion - emotions that she knows other women have struggled with as well. "I do not mean for this installation to serve as a judgment about a right decision or a wrong one," she writes in her artist statement. "I mean simply to share my own small story." Lei earned her Master's degree in multimedia art from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Press Herald is based in Maine.
http://entertainment.mainetoday.com/news/050116lei.shtml

Preston Explains Empathy Burnout (Toronto Globe and Mail, Jan. 15)
If Canadians are finding it easier to fight off the sniffles lately, feeling lighter in their step, or sleeping like a dream, a batch of new science has proposed a possible explanation: Good deeds are good medicine. Overdosing on altruism may have a hidden perk. Beyond changing the lives of those being helped, researchers propose it keeps Good Samaritans happier, healthier and living longer. Researchers call it the "helper's high." The trouble is that our giving spirit tends to surface in spurts -- for one thing, all those acts of kindness can be exhausting. A study of volunteers after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks that found that only 25 per cent of them continued to make volunteering a significant part of their lives. STEPHANIE PRESTON, who studies empathy at the University of Iowa, suggests the burnout factor explains why people react more generously to an acute problem than a chronic one -- for instance, tsunami aid versus the AIDS pandemic in Africa. "With the tsunami, you could help in a pulse and move on with your life, and feel your guilt assuaged," Dr. Preston said. She added that the victims in Asia had another edge: People find it easier to feel empathy when they can relate to the other person. North Americans could imagine themselves sunning on a beach holiday when disaster strikes.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20050115/DONATING15/TPHealth/

SUNY Medical School Hires Alumnus (Syracuse Post Standard, Jan. 15)
SUNY Upstate Medical University has recruited a world-renowned psychiatric geneticist who is an expert in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder.  Upstate announced Friday it appointed Stephen V. Faraone to head a new medical genetics research program. He will serve as professor of psychiatry and director of child and adolescent psychiatry research to research ADHD. Faraone received a doctorate and master's degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.syracuse.com/business/poststandard/index.ssf?/base/business-6/1105782046273260.xml

Iowa City Men Enter Plea in Hunting Incident (Hutchinson News, Dec. 15)
Two University of Iowa employees accused of illegally hunting elk in October pleaded guilty to a lesser charge of not wearing required orange clothing. Police say Keith McQueen, owner of Walnut Ridge Elk Ranch, took two farmed-raised elk to a pasture south of Hutchinson and  released them to be hunted by STEVE VULGAMOTT and Paul Schroeder, both of Iowa City, Iowa. McQueen was shot in the arm and abdomen with a .41-caliber handgun bullet fired by Vulgamott that passed through a cow elk before hitting McQueen, police reports say. Vulgamott and Schroeder originally were charged with several misdemeanors, including hunting big game without a valid permit, hunting with center fire firearm during muzzleloader-only season and having no hunting license while hunting big game elk. The newspaper is based in Kansas.
http://www.hutchnews.com/past/12-15-2004/region/region4.html

UI Study Links Church Attendance and Long Life (Belfast Telegraph, Jan. 14)
A 12-year study from the University of Iowa tracking mortality rates of more than 550 adults over age 65 found that those who attend services at least once a week were over three times more likely to live longer than those who never attended. Psychology professor SUSAN LUTGENDORF, who conducted the survey, says: "There's something beneficial involved in the act of religious attendance, whether it's the group interaction or just the exercise to get out of the house." Over one in three of participants who never attended church died before the end of the study. By comparison, over eight out of 10 twice-weekly churchgoers survived. Regular attendance was associated with lower levels of Interleukin-6, a chemical linked to age-related diseases and stronger immune systems, plus reduced risk of heart disease.
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/features/story.jsp?story=600735

Fuortes Comments on Beryllium Screening Program (Bradenton Herald, Jan. 14)
Manatee County Health Department Director Dr. Gladys Branic is urging Tallevast residents, former American Beryllium workers or family members who have signed up for free beryllium tests to check with their physicians on what medicines they are taking. She asks that anyone on a steroid drug who is scheduled for a beryllium test on Jan. 19 or Jan. 26 to cancel the appointment. Examples of commonly prescribed steroids include Prednisone, Deltasone or Orasone, or the generic cortisone often given as an injection for painful joints. Other medications may also compromise the beryllium blood test, according to Dr. LAURENCE FUORTES, who runs a beryllium screening program for the University of Iowa. Fuortes said medications prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis and some chemotherapy treatments can also interfere with beryllium test results. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/10641013.htm

Museum Director Retires (Albuquerque Journal, Jan. 14)
A national search is on for a new leader at the New Mexico Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. Director Duane Anderson, credited with improving the museum's finances and overseeing extensive facility improvements, plans to retire in May after a 38-year career, which included serving as Iowa's state archaeologist, an anthropology and museum studies professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.abqjournal.com/north/venuenorth/288203venuenorth01-14-05.htm

Gurnett: Saturn May Be Slowing (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 14)
As a young upstart, the Huygens interplanetary probe will capture all the attention this week when it goes down in a blaze of glory through the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. In the meantime, its less flashy parent probe, called Cassini, will remain in orbit around Saturn, keeping tabs on its profligate progeny as well as sending back reams of data about the ringed planet. Conceived in the late 1980s and launched in 1997, the Cassini orbiter is midway through the first of four years' circling the ringed planet and its 31 known moons. To get there, it had to travel more than 2.2 billion miles on a meandering seven-year journey. Now the instrument-laden probe is collecting record amounts of information on Saturn and its rings, moons and environment in space. One instrument on Cassini has detected signs of Saturn slowing down. The radio and plasma-wave science instrument recorded a rhythmic radio signal repeating every 10 hours and 45 minutes, about 6 minutes longer than the pulse recorded in 1981 by the Voyager mission. In the past, researchers have taken the radio pulse as a measure of the planet's rotation rate because the cycling signal comes from Saturn's magnetic field, which rotates with the planet. Without something like a radio signal to judge by, it is very difficult to determine the length of a day on Saturn, as it has no solid surface to watch, only a changeable layer of clouds. The Cassini team isn't quite sure what to make of the slower radio pulsing yet. In the understated code of scientific papers, DONALD A. GURNETT, a professor of physics at the University of Iowa, and his colleagues wrote, "The reasons for this shift are poorly understood," when they described their findings in "Science."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i19/19a01601.htm

UI Press Faces Budget Uncertainty (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 14)
The program for the Modern Language Association's annual gathering in December reflected both for gloom and for cheer for university presses. Though 2004 did see some scholarly publishers either shuttered (University of Idaho Press), put under the budget knife (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS and University of Georgia Press), or forced into a consortium of presses (Northeastern University Press), other university presses were surviving and advancing. If the forecast is not exactly sunny, the heavy rain may have slowed to a steady drizzle.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i19/19a01701.htm

Preston: Love Studies Important For Society (Red Nova.com, Jan 12)
The provocatively named Institute for Research into Unlimited Love (IRUL), based in Cleveland, encourages scientific research that examines the source and impact of unselfish, altruistic love. Funded by foundations and an array of individuals, IRUL has a board of directors that includes prominent do-gooders Millard Fuller, founder of Habitat for Humanity; former First Lady Rosalyn Carter; and Dame Cicely Saunders, founder of St. Christopher's Hospice in London. Since its inception in July of 2001, IRUL has awarded $2.5 million to 33 researchers who are working in such diverse fields as evolutionary biology, theology, sociology, positive psychology and medicine. "Many of the research projects have been ongoing for years," says STEPHANIE PRESTON, a psychologist at the University of Iowa who is using functional MRI to study how empathy is processed in the brain. "However, the overarching goal of learning about how people can feel love for other people is new and could have great implications for society." This article originally appeared in the January/February issue of UTNE READER.
http://www.rednova.com/news/display/?id=117969

UI Alumnus Named Hospital President (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Jan. 12)
A 30-year health care veteran who ran a Metroplex urology practice is the new president of USMD Hospital at Arlington, officials announced Tuesday. Steven Kamber of Fort Worth most recently served as chief executive of Urology Associates of North Texas, managing a group of 44 physicians. That practice has close ties to USMD, with about 20 of its doctors among the hospital's investors. Kamber, 54, earned degrees from the University of Nebraska and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/business/10625556.htm

UI Help Sought In Beryllium Exposure Case (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 12)
Labor Secretary Elaine Chao pledged Tuesday to expedite payments to thousands of people, including many in the Bay Area, who may have developed cancer or other serious diseases while working at nuclear weapons research facilities. The slow-moving process has taken a toll on those who have fallen ill and their survivors. "I wanted to find out what caused my husband's death," said Joyce Brooks of Livermore. Her husband, Carl Brooks, a 32-year worker at the Lawrence Livermore and Berkeley labs, died in 2000 at age 69. He died of a lung disease she believes was caused by exposure to beryllium, although she has had a hard time nailing down that diagnosis because Carl Brooks didn't get certain blood tests that would allow for a definitive medical opinion. Working with a specialist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MEDICAL SCHOOL, Joyce Brooks is trying to convince the Labor Department to pay her a survivor's benefit that could be worth $125,000. The latest step was a letter she received recently from the department saying her claim met two of three criteria needed for acceptance.
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2005/01/12/BAGNOAOPIM1.DTL

Shiv: Distraction Makes Food Taste Better (FoodNavigator.com, Jan. 11)
Enjoyment of food may well be linked to distraction, conclude researchers investigating the act of tasting food through recent theories of pleasure and pain. Recent pain research now shows that distraction can actually heighten pain, claim the researchers that worked with this notion to investigate if pain research could be applied to pleasure research and, in particular, the act of tasting food. "It appears that diversion actually leads to increased enjoyment," say study authors BABA SHIV of the University of Iowa and Stephen Nowlis of the Arizona State University. The story also appeared on the Web site of CONFECTIONERY NEWS and NUTRALINGREDIENTS-USA.COM.
http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/news/news-ng.asp?n=57203-food-enjoyment-linked

UI Participates in Emotion Recognition Study (ScienceBlog.com, Jan. 11)
If your mother ever told you to watch out for strangers with shifty eyes, you can start taking her advice to heart. Neuroscientists exploring a region of the brain associated with the recognition of emotional expressions have concluded that it is the eye region that we scan when our brains process information about other people's emotions. Reporting in the January 6 issue of the journal Nature, California Institute of Technology neuroscientist Ralph Adolphs and colleagues at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Montreal, and University of Glasgow describe new results they have obtained with a patient suffering from a rare genetic malady that has destroyed her brain's amygdala. The amygdala are found in each side of the brain in the medial temporal lobe and are known to process information about facial emotions. The patient, who has been studied by the researchers at the University of Iowa for a decade, shows an intriguing inability to recognize fear and other emotions from facial expressions. "The fact that the amygdala is involved in fear recognition has been borne out by a large number of studies," explains Adolphs. "But until now the mechanisms through which amygdala damage compromises fear recognition have not been identified."
http://www.scienceblog.com/cms/node/6652?PHPSESSID=3532111f5de94b041b22bca9b6e91e9e

UI Law School Health Care Study Cited (The Day, Jan. 11)
A columnist writing about health care reform refers to an ongoing study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Urban Institute on how health care costs can be curbed by increasing physician quality. The DAY is based in New London, Conn. The column also appeared on the Web site of the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://www.theday.com/eng/web/news/re.aspx?re=6C756356-6338-48C4-9525-A7367EC9B734

Author Taught At UI (Washington Post, Jan. 10)
Anyone who still believes that old chestnut that you have to endure a miserable childhood to be an affecting novelist needs to consider Meg Wolitzer, the happy daughter of a writer and a school psychologist. She grew up in an idyllic corner of Long Island, rocked in the comforts of suburban bliss, heir to a fascination with language that was indulged, nurtured, even celebrated. She was published by 11, whisked off to the offices of Kids magazine in glittering Manhattan, where she was made a guest editor at an age when some children hardly know how to spell "career." In 1981, the year she graduated from college, she published her first novel, and since then, she's written five more. She has taught writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and Skidmore College, but today she supports her career via the far more lucrative business of screenplays.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A54788-2005Jan6.html

Ghoneim Comments On Pain Monitoring (Charlotte Observer, Jan. 10)
Every year an estimated 20,000 to 40,000 of the 21 million patients who receive general anesthesia wake up during surgery because they are under-anesthetized, usually by mistake or because doctors fear too high a dose of anesthesia could be dangerous. Half of them can hear or feel what is going on but are unable to communicate. Nearly 30 percent feel pain, studies have shown. It is the job of the anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist to continuously monitor the patient's condition through vital signs including blood pressure and heart rate to ensure the patient is unconscious, stable and pain-free. But these signs can be imperfect markers, doctors say, because beta blockers, along with other drugs, can depress blood pressure or affect heart rate. A patient who wakes up during surgery might not show a jump in either sign, anesthesiologists say. Some doctors compare the situation to flying through fog: A pilot relies on instruments and expertise, but can't see clearly. "Anesthesiologists think they can measure the depth of anesthesia, but there are times when this is not true," said MOHAMED GHONEIM, a professor of anesthesiology at the University of Iowa. "It's really difficult to measure, especially in light anesthesia such as cardiac cases or trauma with lots of blood loss." This story originally appeared in the WASHINGTON POST. A version also appeared Jan. 9 in the FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/living/health/10607420.htm

Shiv: Distraction Aids Food Enjoyment (Food Navigator.com, Jan. 10)
Enjoyment of food may well be linked to distraction, conclude researchers investigating the act of tasting food through recent theories of pleasure and pain. Recent pain research now shows that distraction can actually heighten pain, claim the researchers that worked with this notion to investigate if pain research could be applied to pleasure research and, in particular, the act of tasting food. "It appears that diversion actually leads to increased enjoyment," say study authors BABA SHIV of the University of Iowa and Stephen Nowlis of the Arizona State University.
http://www.foodnavigator.com/news/news-NG.asp?n=57184-diversion-ups-food

Freedman Calls Tenure Revocation Rare (Boston Globe, Jan. 10)
Yale University has asked for and received the resignation of a prominent, tenured professor -- and former faculty member at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government -- citing "financial misconduct and irregularities" at his institute as the reason for his departure. In a statement released yesterday, Yale officials said that Florencio Lpez-de-Silanes, 38, a professor at the university's School of Management and director of the International Institute for Corporate Governance, would be placed on unpaid leave until June, when his resignation would take effect. "It is extremely rare for a university to withdraw tenure from a member of the faculty or to ask him to resign," said James Freedman, the former president of Dartmouth College and of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who now lives in Cambridge. "There are a whole series of actions the university has to go through if they want to take away tenure involuntarily. Usually, people fight it."
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2005/01/10/yale_drops_economist_for_irregularities/

UI Malpractice Study Cited (Boston Globe, January 10)
An editorial about medical malpractice says that problem is not that a jury occasionally awards $1 million in pain and suffering damages to a victim but that so much malpractice occurs in the first place. This is often overlooked by those whose approach to the malpractice problem begins and ends with putting a cap on damages to victims. While the Bush administration favors such a cap, it has, to its credit, sponsored research on preventing medical injuries as well. That is the best approach to reducing malpractice payments and doctors' insurance premiums. The magnitude of medical malfeasance was spelled out in a groundbreaking 1999 report by the Institute of Medicine, which estimated that up to 98,000 deaths are caused annually by medical errors. Specialists in improving quality of care do not believe that the total would be substantially less now. The administration-sponsored study by a team from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Urban Institute focuses on better disciplining of problem doctors by state licensing authorities. According to members of the team, the state licensing boards are often under funded and find it difficult to discipline doctors based on incompetence, as opposed to more black-and-white cases like substance abuse or sexual assault. Study members believe that more aggressive disciplining of incompetent doctors could curb the kind of negligence that results in malpractice cases. This editorial also appeared Jan. 10 in the BENNINGTON (Vt.) BANNER.
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/editorials/articles/2005/01/10/a_cure_for_malpractice/

UI Offers Domestic Partner Benefits (Wisconsin State Journal, Jan. 10)
The issue of the state providing health insurance to domestic partners is caught in a power struggle involving the Republican Party, the private sector and colleges and universities around the nation looking for world-class faculty and staff members. The Republican Party is on a mission to ban same-sex marriages and keep them banned via the Wisconsin Constitution. At the same time, the party is not interested in spending taxpayer dollars to provide benefits to same-sex couples in or out of wedlock, at least not the most expensive one -- health insurance. The issue of a state employee with a domestic partner being offered family health insurance has been debated for years. The current system restricts a family plan to married couples and their dependants. While all state employee groups, including the unionized bargaining units, want the flexibility of coverage for domestic and same-sex partners, the issue has reached critical mass at the University of Wisconsin System. With Penn State now offering domestic partner health insurance as of the first of the year, Wisconsin remains the only school in the Big Ten that fails to do so. Because of significant budget cuts over the past four years, UW System officials claim the system's campuses are becoming target-rich areas for recruiting headhunters. Peer institutions cannot only offer higher salaries, but better benefit packages including domestic and same sex partner health insurance. At competing Big Ten schools, offering domestic and same sex partner health insurance is not breaking the banks. It set the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA back about $100,000, Michigan $223,000 and Minnesota $100,000.
http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/biz/index.php?ntid=23940&ntpid=3

UI Malpractice Study Cited (Winston-Salem Journal, Jan. 10)
As President Bush travels the country pushing for limits on pain and suffering awards for Americans who win medical malpractice, he should remember that these cases often begin with an incompetent doctor. Bush aides are aware of that. An administration study recently demonstrated that one of the major factors in medical malpractice is the medical industry's unwillingness to discipline incompetent doctors. According to The New York Times, the administration commissioned the study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Urban Institute. The researchers who wrote the final report offer great hope of significantly reducing the number of malpractice injuries through better disciplining of doctors.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_ColumnistArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031780108035&path=!opinion&s=1037645509163

UI Researchers Study Hoarding (The Times of London, Jan. 10)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are studying the tendency to collect things, or hoard -- a universal if baffling trait shared by at least 70 species of animals. The researchers took 86 brain-injured people and asked close relatives to assess whether they indulged in "abnormal" collecting behavior, such as hoarding useless or unattractive items, being resistant to a clear-out even after interest had waned and having a very extensive collection. Thirteen patients showed such traits, filling their homes with, among other objects, junk mail and broken appliances. All were brain-scanned. "A pretty clear finding jumped out at us: damage to a part of the frontal lobes of the cortex, particularly on the right side, was shared by the individuals with abnormal behavior," said Dr STEVEN ANDERSON, who led the investigation. The insight could help those researching obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia and dementia, which can all be associated with pathological collecting.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,1072-1433278,00.html

UI, Other Schools Ban Alcohol In Fraternity Houses (New York Times, Jan. 9)
University administrators, alarmed by the extent of binge drinking on their campuses, are cracking down on the excesses of Greek life, saying it's high time for fraternity boys to shape up and sober up. Across the country, some 30 colleges -- including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Oklahoma and the University of Oregon -- have banned alcohol in all their fraternity houses.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/01/09/magazine/09FRATS.html

Achepohl Collection On Display (Salem Statesman Journal, Jan. 9)
Family Holdings: Turkish Nomadic Flatweave" opens at Bush Barn Art Center in Salem on Friday. The collection, on loan from KEITH ACHEPOHL, professor of the arts at the University of Iowa, consists of hand-crafted weavings used for utilitarian purposes, from shelter to rugs. The newspaper is based in Oregon.
http://159.54.226.83/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050109/LIFE/501090308/1051

UI Study Cited In New Book (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Jan. 9)
A review of the new book "Blink" by Malcolm Gladwell, notes that the power of the "blink" or "thin-slice" is our brain's ability to take a miniscule amount of information about an unfamiliar situation or subject and come to a conclusion that lets us act accordingly. It's a survival instinct. Faced with a saber-toothed tiger or cave bear, our primitive ancestors were able to read the situation quickly, save themselves and pass on their genes. Gladwell didn't discover this phenomenon, but he does a nice job of explaining it and anchoring his arguments with examples from everyday life. "Blink" is full of accounts of fascinating experiments that almost beg you to repeat them -- or at least turn into great cocktail-party chatter. Take this UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study, for example: Subjects were presented with four decks of cards and asked to play a simple gambling game involving selecting cards from each pile. Some cards awarded money; others deducted it. However, unbeknownst to the players, the game was stacked so that decks A and B had more penalties than rewards. The only way to win was to play decks C and D. The researchers found out that most people got a hunch the game was rigged after turning over 50 cards; after 80 cards, most could explain why they stayed away from decks A and B. So far, so simple. However, by monitoring sweat glands in the players' palms, the scientists found that subjects generated stress responses to decks A and B by the 10th card they turned over and began adjusting their games accordingly. That was 40 cards before being consciously aware that something was wrong. The gamblers had figured out the game before they were aware they had done so.
http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/110519465165050.xml

Johnson Comments On Rainforest Project (Boston Globe, Jan. 8)
In a state that claims the world's biggest truck stop and a baseball diamond in a cornfield as two of the top visitor destinations, the search for a better tourist attraction is serious business. In Iowa, where winter winds whip across the plains with ferocity, that quest has led to plans for an 18-story, $180 million environmental learning center anchored by an indoor rain forest -- also the world's largest. "Iowa, in the eyes of many, is seen as flyover country," said David Oman, executive director of the Iowa Environmental Project. "We don't have seashores, we don't have large mountains. From a destination perspective, it usually doesn't hit people's Top 10 list. We aim to change that." Project boosters cite projections by three different organizations, including the state of Iowa and ConsultEcon Inc., a Cambridge, Mass., consulting firm, that predict annual attendance of 1.1 million to 1.5 million, figures that equal one-third to one-half of the state's population. The environmental project -- part of a larger urban redevelopment effort located along Interstate 80 just across the Iowa River from Iowa City and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- will create 300 permanent jobs and produce a ripple effect of 2,500 jobs in eastern Iowa and an annual economic impact of $187 million statewide, according to the Cambridge consultants. NICK JOHNSON, a University of Iowa law professor, called the project's attendance predictions unrealistic. He added that Coralville, population 15,000, wasn't even the first choice; city leaders in Des Moines rejected Townsend's overtures in favor of building a convention center and minor league arena. "We're not one of the places in the United States that are destinations in their own right," he said. "Coralville is not a destination in the way New Orleans or Miami or Washington, D.C., is. And it's certainly not a destination like Disneyland."
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2005/01/08/if_they_build_it_who_will_come/

UI Developing Anhydrous Additive (Williston Daily Herald, Jan. 8)
An article about the battle to curb methamphetamine production notes that in addition to new laws, area legislators and law enforcement officials are hopeful UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research that seeks to develop an additive that would render anhydrous ammonia useless for making meth. The newspaper is based in North Dakota.
http://www.willistonherald.com/articles/2005/01/08/news/news1.txt

UI Students Involved In Deadly Car Crash (Chicago Daily Herald, Jan. 7)
Jordan Ray Kline of Gurnee, Ill. was traveling to participate in one of his favorite winter sports when tragedy struck this week. Kline, 21, was killed when the sport-utility vehicle he was riding in veered out of control due to icy conditions on a Nebraska highway and flipped onto its roof, authorities said. He was a University of Iowa student majoring in business. Four other young men -- including Timothy Matzl, 21, of Libertyville, Ill. -- were injured in the one-vehicle crash, which occurred on I-80 about 5:50 a.m. Monday, said Hall County Sheriff Jerry Watson. Matzl was treated and later released from Good Samaritan Hospital in Kearney, Neb., a spokeswoman said Thursday. Watson said the five UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students were heading to Colorado for a ski outing when the crash happened roughly 100 miles west of Lincoln, Neb. Kline enjoyed skiing, fishing and snowboarding. Stephen McTigue of Iowa City, Iowa, was driving the 1995 Ford Expedition when he lost control of it on westbound I-80 and struck a median, Watson said.
http://www.dailyherald.com/news_story.asp?intid=38359123

UI Alumna Founded N.J. Baroque Orchestra (Star-Ledger, Jan. 7)
A story about an upcoming performance by the Baroque Orchestra of North Jersey says that conductor Robert Butts founded the mixed amateur and professional group in 1996. A lutenist and recorder player who studied 17th- and 18th-century music at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Butts went on to a career playing guitar and singing bluegrass at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. The paper is based in Newark, N.J.
http://www.nj.com/entertainment/ledger/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-2/1105084275312620.xml

Bloom Comments On Packing Plant Complaint (Tallahasse Democrat, Jan. 6)
After the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals animal-rights group released an undercover video that it claims represents inhumane killing practices at the Agriprocessors slaughterhouse, Postville found itself at the center of an international squall involving religion, grass-roots politics, the news media and the humble cow. Agriprocessors has launched a public-relations campaign against what plant manager Sholom Rubashkin calls an "extreme political group" that "will do whatever it can for publicity" and "wants to turn you into a vegetarian." Rubashkin's claim that PETA is using the plant as a symbol in a broader attack against all kosher slaughter doesn't surprise writer STEPHEN BLOOM, a University of Iowa journalism professor who spent five years researching his 2000 book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." "The Lubavitchers in Postville look at the world in terms of Jewish and not Jewish," said Bloom, a Reform Jew. The article also appeared in the MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS and DULUTH TRIBUNE in Minnesota; BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD; KANSAS CITY STAR; and several other newspapers.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/tallahassee/news/nation/10579749.htm

Professor Sued Over Nigerian Fraud Case (Miami Herald, Jan. 6)
University of Miami law professor Enrique Fernandez-Barros said a purported Nigerian official promised in late 2003 to pay him for legal services if he would help the government and a well-connected Nigerian businessman recoup $1.68 million from a U.S. truck-leasing company. His incentive: $200,000 in fees for this and other work. Fernandez-Barros, who holds three doctoral degrees, said he received the whopping check from Penske Truck Leasing, deposited it in his credit-union account and later had the money wired to Nigeria -- a sequence of extraordinary events that landed him in the middle of a U.S. Secret Service investigation and a federal lawsuit over the vanished funds. In the civil suit filed a week ago in Miami, Penske claims that Fernandez-Barros helped rip off the company -- although the 73-year-old legal scholar says he believed that the Nigerian transactions were legitimate and he never received a penny. Fernandez-Barros is noted as a former professor of Spanish at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/10576205.htm

Feld Notes TIAAA-CREF Fund Delay (Wall Street Journal, Jan. 6)
Some investors who hold TIAA-CREF funds within their retirement plans are griping because it hasn't yet updated those investors' account records to reflect the Dec. 29 reinvestment of fund distributions. Investors checking their accounts online may see balances that are lower than they should be, but also see a notice from the New York entity -- the collectively operated Teacher Insurance & Annuity Association and College Retirement Equities Fund -- that it is "aware of the problem and working to retroactively correct your accounts." TIAA-CREF investor RON FELD, an associate professor of pathology at the University of Iowa, complains there was a similar delay a year ago. Stephanie Cohen Glass, a spokeswoman for TIAA-CREF, says it is in the process of replacing older computer systems. Meanwhile, she says, the reporting delay affects fewer than 1 percent of TIAA-CREF investors and doesn't at all affect their account values. Data online will be correct by tomorrow, she says, but the printed fourth-quarter statements mailed to investors won't be accurate.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB110496869741318164-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%27university+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

Study Targets Brain Area That Reads Emotion (Pasadena Star News, Jan. 5)
For the first time, Caltech neuroscientist Ralph Adolphs and his colleagues have determined that if a part of a person's brain, called the amygdala, does not function properly, a person will not naturally hone in on others' eyes to read emotion the way most people do. Without that skill, such a person will be much less successful at identifying fear. The finding, published in the current issue of the British scientific journal Nature, may lead to therapies for people with disorders such as autism who have difficulty recognizing emotion in others, Adolphs said. The group has studied an unusual 38-year-old female patient for more than a decade. Nicknamed SM, the patient has significant, disease-caused amygdala damage. Her condition offers scientists a rare opportunity to try to discern the amygdala's role in brain function and perception. Ten years ago, Adolphs and his team, then at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, published work establishing that SM did not display normal responses to fear and indiscriminately trusted others. The newspaper is based in California. The article also appeared in the WHITTIER DAILY NEWS in California.
http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/Stories/0,1413,206~22097~2637309,00.html

Hirokawa Named Dean In Hawaii (KITV, Jan. 5)
A Kauai native has been named dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Hawaii-Hilo. RANDY HIROKAWA comes to the Hilo position from the University of Iowa, where he served as chairman of the communications studies department. He replaces Stephen Hora, who held the dean's post on an interim basis. KITV is a televisions station based in Hawaii. The article also appeared on the website of KPUA radio in Hilo, Hawaii.
http://www.thehawaiichannel.com/news/4052295/detail.html

Clark Studies Depo-Provera Use (Epoch Times, Jan. 5)
The results of a new study confirm that using the contraceptive Depo-Provera is associated with bone loss. Depo-Provera, also known as DMPA, is a long-lasting contraceptive hormone that is injected every three months. DR. M. KATHLEEN CLARK and colleagues at the University of Iowa in Iowa City compared changes in bone mineral density in 178 women starting on Depo-Provera for the first time and 145 women not using hormonal contraception. Average bone density at the hip fell 2.8 percent one year after starting Depo-Provera and 5.8 percent after two years. Loss of bone density in the spine was similar. In contrast, average bone loss at the hip and spine was less than 0.9 percent among the comparison group of women, the team reports in the medical journal Fertility and Sterility. "We clearly show that bone density is lost with DMPA use," Clark told Reuters Health. The web publication is based in New York.
http://english.epochtimes.com/news/5-1-5/25403.html

Study Examines Brain Recognition Of Fear (National Georgraphic.com, Jan. 5)
Scientists have long known that the amygdala, an almond-shaped part of the brain, is critical for the perception of fear. But exactly what role it plays in recognizing facial expressions has remained a mystery. A new study shows that the amygdala actively seeks out potentially important information in the face of another person. In particular, it focuses our attention on a person's eyes, the facial features most likely to register fear. "These findings provide a much more abstract and general account of what the amygdala does," RALPH ADOLPHS said. Adolphs is a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Caltech University in Pasadena, California, and the University of Iowa in Iowa City.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/01/0105_050105_brain_fear.html

Alumnus Candidate For City Manager Job (Tacoma News Tribune, Jan. 5)
Anthony Piasecki, who earned a bachelor of science in political science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is noted as a candidate for city manager in Lakewood, Wash.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=20872e3d96cafaefeb5245b3e927f23c&_docnum=48&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=e48521247a443fb14cd6af6448b007da

Gitler Leads Malpractice Study (New York Times, Jan. 5)
Experts retained by the Bush administration said on Tuesday that more effective disciplining of incompetent doctors could significantly alleviate the problem of medical malpractice litigation. As President Bush prepared to head to Illinois on Wednesday to campaign for limits on malpractice lawsuits, the experts said that states should first identify those doctors most likely to make mistakes that injure patients and lead to lawsuits. The administration recently commissioned a study by the University of Iowa and the Urban Institute to help state boards of medical examiners in disciplining doctors. "There's a need to protect the public from substandard performance by physicians," said JOSEPHINE GITTLER, a law professor at Iowa who supervised part of the study. "If you had more aggressive policing of incompetent physicians and more effective disciplining of doctors who engage in substandard practice, that could decrease the type of negligence that leads to malpractice suits." Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, the HOUSTON (Texas) CHRONICLE, the SPARTANBURG (S.C.) HERALD-JOURNAL
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/01/05/politics/05docs.html

UI Alumnus Appointed To Alaska Arts Council (Capital City Weekly, Jan. 4)
Governor Frank H. Murkowski has announced the appointment, reappointment or nomination of 44 Alaskans to cover openings on 12 boards or commissions. Named to the Alaska State Council on the Arts was James Evenson of Kenai, an accomplished painter and lithographer, working for 25 years as an art teacher and 40 years as a commercial fisherman. Evenson, named to a two-year seat, holds a Masters of Fine Art in Painting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Anchorage, Alaska.
http://newspapers.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?show=localnews&pnpID=475&NewsID=600665&CategoryID=9945&on=0

Ponseti Technique Helps 4-month Old (Grand Rapids Press, Jan. 4)
Sarah and John Pellegrini said they received a special Christmas present. Their 4-month-old son, Nathan, born with feet turned severely inward, now has normal-looking feet, thanks to a non-surgical treatment that is relatively new in West Michigan. "I cried, I was so surprised at the dramatic results," said Sarah Pellegrini, of East Grand Rapids. The treatment is called the Ponseti Method, named after Dr. IGNACIO PONSETI, a doctor at the University of Iowa who has used this method on 16,000 patients over four decades. His method was first published in 1966. But orthopedic specialists didn't think it would work, and they ignored it.
http://www.mlive.com/news/grpress/index.ssf?/base/news-19/1104767123280070.xml

Holden Cancer Center Cited (St. Louis Post Dispatch, Jan. 4)
The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis has achieved the National Cancer Institute designationa s a comprehensive cancer center. The Siteman is one of only three centers in the Midwest, including the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/business/stories.nsf/0/6DE7C63932549CD086256F7F0014049B?OpenDocument&Headline=Siteman+Cancer+Center+here+achieves+highest+designation

Cell Phone Study Noted (Newark Star-Ledger, Jan. 2)
New research by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and independent experts indicates that so-called hands-free equipment can be as dangerous as holding a cell phone -- because the mental act of talking creates a distraction whether the phone is hands-free or not. One study NHTSA has been doing with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA concludes that some hands-free devices can be more time-consuming to dial than the phone itself. "We don't think hands-free legislation is going to have the desired impact on safety," said Rae Tyson, a spokesman for NHTSA. "It's the cognitive distraction of the conversation that is the greater concern than the physical manipulation of the phone itself." The newspaper is based in New Jersey. http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-8/1104646338238310.xml

Ghoneim Comments On Anesthesia Problem (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 2)
Every year an estimated 20,000 to 40,000 of the 21 million patients who receive general anesthesia wake up during surgery because they are under-anesthetized, usually by mistake or because doctors fear too high a dose of anesthesia could be dangerous. "Anesthesiologists think they can measure the depth of anesthesia, but there are times when this is not true," said MOHAMED M. GHONEIM, a professor of anesthesiology at the University of Iowa. "It's really difficult to measure, especially in light anesthesia such as cardiac cases or trauma with lots of blood loss." The best way to detect whether a patient is sufficiently anesthetized is by using a specialized EEG machine that monitors brain waves, Ghoneim said. He predicts such monitoring will become the standard of care in a few years.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/technology/chi-0501020436jan02,1,5208137.story?coll=chi-technology-hed

Rowley Retires From FBI (New York Times, Jan. 2)
A career FBI agent who wrote a blistering memo to the agency's director alleging missteps by the bureau before the Sept. 11 attacks retired from the agency on Friday. The agent, Coleen Rowley, retired 11 days after turning 50, when she became eligible for a full pension. Rowley signed up for the FBI in 1980 after earning a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, becoming one of the few female agents at the time. The article also appeared in the WASHINGTON POST, TIMES DAILY in Alabama, the FRESNO (Calif.) BEE, THE GUARDIAN in the United Kingdom; NEW YORK NEWSDAY; TIMES PICAYUNE in Louisiana, ST. PAUL PIONEER-PRESS in Minnesota; SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, KANSAS CITY STAR, DOW JONES NEWSWIRES, and several other media outlets.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/01/02/politics/02FBI.html

Wolfe To Lead Master Class (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Jan. 2)
The winter lineup of master classes at the MacPhail Center for Music has been announced. KATIE WOLFE, instructor at the University of Iowa, will lead a violin class Jan. 29.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/5163198.html

Ex-Iowan Remembers Hawkeye Football (Times-Picayune, Jan. 1)
Times-Picayune reporter Mike Triplett recounts his memories of Hawkeye football in this article in advance of the Capital One Bowl. "Watching the campers cruise in from every corner of the state reminded me of my alma mater, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where you didn't have to search far for a hawk-emblazoned garage door or spare-tire cover. But don't underestimate the zeal of the Midwesterners you will meet up with in sunny Orlando. They'll be the ones sporting the "farmer's tans" by the pool and the black-and-gold everything everywhere else."
http://www.nola.com/sports/t-p/index.ssf?/base/sports-15/1104562732254380.xml

Coach's Son Attends UI (Indianapolis Star, Jan. 1)
In a recap of top stories, it's noted that a pass during a high school basketball game captured the attention of the entire state. During a Feb. 24 game, Justin Ray, a junior at Indian Creek, passed the ball to teammate J.R. Angle -- who was sitting on the bench. Ray later said two adults paid him less than $50 for the stunt. There was some discontent in the community about the way coach Larry Angle was running the team. Angle resigned as coach at the end of the season. His son, J.R. Angle, graduated in May and is now a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.indystar.com/articles/3/206143-2063-016.html

Blanck: Not Time to Re-Examine ADA (Report on Disability Law, January 2005)
Disability groups plan to proceed cautiously with the ADA Restoration Act proposed last month by the National Council on Disability. While advocates embrace the need to stem further narrowing of the ADA, many worry about creating an opportunity to weaken the law. PETER BLANCK, the Kierscht Professor of Law at the University of Iowa, agreed. "In this political climate, ADA restoration is not on the top of the agenda," said Blanck, who directs the university's Law, Health Policy and Disability Center. One person's amendment could be another person's cutback, Blanck noted. This article is not available online.

Regents Vote On Insurance Talks (WQAD-TV, Dec. 30)
The Iowa Board of Regents has voted to give the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA more latitude in negotiations with health insurance provider Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield. The regents voted 5-2 in an emergency meeting on Wednesday to give the university more freedom in its talks with the health insurance company. University officials must decide this week whether to renew its contract with Wellmark, which pays about $200 million dollars a year to University Hospital and its clinics. Talks between the university and Wellmark have stalled, but both sides are optimistic an agreement can be reached. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2749438

Bibas Comments On Jury Selection (WQAD-TV, Dec. 30)
The increase in young voters this year will likely boost the number of young people called for jury duty. That trend is changing the way attorneys present their cases in court. Jury experts and law school professors are stressing a more visual, sound-bite approach to sway jurors. The University of Iowa law school expects to introduce a more technological approach in its trial advocacy classes in six months. The classes will train students to use power point and other video tools, such as digital accident reconstruction when arguing a case. STEPHANOS BIBAS, an associate law professor at Iowa, says visual presentations will help keep the attention of young jurors. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2748265

Student Arrested In Software Piracy Case (Dow Jones Newswires, Dec. 29)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student admitted to illegally distributing software, games, movies and music online, becoming the first conviction stemming from a major international crackdown on online piracy in April, the Iowa City Press-Citizen reports. Jathan Desir, 26, faces up to 15 years in prison. His arrest was part of "Operation Fastlink," which targeted the global piracy underground, involved more than 120 searches in 24 hours in 27 states and 11 foreign countries. It netted nearly 100 leaders and high-ranking members of international piracy groups. Records show one of the two online libraries Desir helped create held 13,000 titles before FBI agents arrived at his home this spring.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,BT_CO_20041229_003091-search,00.html?collection=autowire%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

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