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February, 2005 See UI in the New Archive Index

 

Current News Highlights

ESPN Coverage Of Pierce Case Cited (Chronicle, March 4)
A story about ESPN2's decision to cover the Grinnell College Pioneers playing rival Beloit College says it was believed to be the first regular-season Division III men's basketball game ever shown on national television. The story also says that ESPN's basketball coverage could use some wholesomeness: The main story in Iowa sports that day was the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's dropping Pierre Pierce from its basketball team after he was arrested for domestic abuse.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i26/26a03902.htm

UI Medical Alumnus Named ACP Fellow (South Bend Tribune, Feb. 28)
Brian Sucharetza M.D., FACP, a nephrologist practicing in Michiana, has been elected a fellow of the American College of Physicians. Elected upon the recommendation of peers and review of the ACP's board of regents, the distinction recognizes achievement in internal medicine and subspecialties. A graduate of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Sucharetza earned a medical degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore and completed his residency and subspecialty training at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2005/02/28/business.20050228-sbt-MICH-C7-PEOPLE.sto

Schoen: Some N.C. Sterilizations Voluntary (Journal Now, Feb. 28)
Legislation to help victims of the North Carolina eugenics sterilization program is slowly moving ahead almost two years after it was proposed, though the possibility of reparations remains a long shot, according to one official. More than 7,600 people were sterilized, many against their will, between 1929 and 1974 under the authority of the Eugenics Board of North Carolina. Gov. Mike Easley apologized for the program in December 2002, and in 2003 he approved recommendations that those sterilized receive health-care and education benefits, that a memorial be set up, and that information about the sterilization program be included in the state's history curriculum. But one detail could complicate any plan for compensation -- some of the sterilizations were voluntary. JOHANNA SCHOEN, a scholar from the University of Iowa who first gained access to the eugenics board records and provided them to the Journal, found 446 cases in which she believed that the patients clearly desired the operation. The paper covers northwest North Carolina.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031781281386&path=&s=&tacodalogin=no

Peace Corps Volunteers Include UI Students (WQAD-TV, Feb. 28)
When it comes to joining the Peace Corps, students who graduate from Grinnell College are answering the call. The private school has the nation's highest per-capita volunteer rate, with 23 this year. Statewide, more than 130 graduates from Iowa colleges are Peace Corps volunteers this year. That includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and Luther College in Decorah. The Peace Corps was started by President John F. Kennedy in 1961. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3006901

UI Journalism Alumnus' Life Remembered (Hernando Today, Feb. 27)
A story about the recent death of Don Deedrick, a former advertising executive and the director of the annual Swamp Fest festival in Weeki Wachee, Fla., after a two-year battle with lung cancer says he was born in the foothills of Hilton, Ky., the son of missionaries at Beech Fork Methodist Church. Deedrick never forgot his church or the creek even when he left home to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he graduated with a journalism degree with a specialty in advertising in 1949. He would return to church when he could. He donated money to it every year after he left Kentucky. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.hernandotoday.com/MGB8GC6AO5E.html

School Psychology Alumnus Profiled (Staunton News Leader, Feb. 27)
Often people ask why so many young people of color leave Staunton after high school to pursue their careers in other states. Julius Gaines was one of those young persons. He graduated from the former Booker T. Washington High School in the early fifties. Gaines was an extremely bright student who had the honor of being the salutatorian of his graduating class. His general quest, besides an interest in history, included seeing more of the world and helping with positive change in individuals. He learned of a possible opportunity in Iowa. Though it seemed so far away mentally and physically, he moved westward to Iowa. He had an adventuresome personality and persistence to pursue and pioneer unheard of professions as a person of color. Preparing himself academically, he enrolled in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM, department of educational psychology, where he graduated with a master's degree in 1959. A position of public school psychologist had been created and approved months earlier by the county Board of Education. Well qualified and highly recommended, Gaines became the first black to be employed in school work in Webster County, Iowa, in 1960. The paper is based in Virginia.
http://www.newsleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050227/LIFESTYLE/502270316/1024

Sidel: Lawsuit Reinstatement Against Nonprofit Rare (Seattle Times, Feb. 26)
A U.S. Court of Appeals recently reinstated a lawsuit filed against a nonprofit agency that promised it would provide funding to fight poverty in Yakima, Wash. University of Iowa law professor MARK SIDEL, who teaches about philanthropy and nonprofit institutions, said the decision marks one of the few times that potential grantees of a foundation have been able to fight a foundation in court.  "It's very rare that community plaintiffs can actually get into court against a foundation," he said. This story also appeared in the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2002190777_charity26m.html

Freedman Decries Social Security Arguments (New York Times, Feb. 26)
In a letter to the editor, JAMES O. FREEDMAN writes that whenever he hears President George Bush talk about the need for Social Security reform, he thinks of George Orwell's warning in the essay 'Politics and the English Language' against the immorality implicit in the use, especially by government officials, of intentionally misleading words. Freedman is identified as president emeritus of Dartmouth College and the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/26/opinion/l26social.html

Other Recent News Highlights

Jarreau Earned Degree At UI (Redlands Daily Facts, Feb. 25)
Al Jarreau is performing Feb. 25 to Feb. 27 at the Orange County Performing Arts Center's Jazz Club in Founders Hall. With more than 15 albums to his name, Jarreau is one of the rare artists to have won a Grammy in three categories including jazz, pop and R&B. Jarreau started singing at age four, harmonizing with his brothers in Milwaukee. An above-average student in high school and college, he graduated with a degree in psychology from Ripon College in Wisconsin, before earning his master's in vocational rehabilitation from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in California.
http://www.redlandsdailyfacts.com/Stories/0,1413,209~32648~2730563,00.htm

Beeghly Comments On Antidepressants (Fort Wayne News Sentinel, Feb. 25)
The antidepressant Zoloft did not drive a 12-year-old to murder his grandparents, a jury decided last week, but the news was hardly comforting to parents who have children on the medication. Antidepressants now come with ominous new governmental warning labels that describe a frightening link between the drugs and increased suicidal thought and behavior in children. So what is a parent to do? First, ask yourself if the medication your child is taking is working, and how long he has been on it, said child psychiatrist JAMES BEEGHLY, an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa. "The greatest risk of suicidal thought is when they first start," Beeghly said. "If the child has been on for a couple of months, they have passed the major risk of suicidal use." The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/living/10989579.htm

Sidel: Poorly Worded Laws Pose Problems (NPR/The Connection, Feb. 25)
MARK SIDEL, University of Iowa professor of law, says that state prosecutors are using state anti-terrorism laws to prosecute a range of crimes that may only be marginally connected to terrorism because many anti-terrorism laws are poorly worded and received only cursory debate in state legislatures. "The problem here is the breadth and the speed in which these laws were enacted after September 11. The language is used outside the scope of what legislators intended."
http://www.theconnection.org/

Man Pleads Guilty In UI Student Death (WQAD-TV, Feb. 25)
The man behind the wheel of a car that struck and killed an Illinois woman in 2003 pleaded guilty today to involuntary manslaughter. Amanda Skolnick, of Woodstock, Ill., was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in September of 2003 when she was struck by a car while crossing a street. Police say twenty-two-year old Thomas Eldridge struck the 20-year-old woman. His car dragged then her body for about 30 feet before it finally stopped. Skolnick died the next day.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2995419

Mendieta Exhibit Shown In Des Moines (National Post, Feb. 25)
"Ana Mendieta: Earth Body, Sculpture and Performance, 1972-1985," was organized by the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C., where it appeared before coming to the Des Moines Art Center. "It's exciting, of course, but it's really amazing that it took so long for her work to come back to the place where she lived and worked as an artist," said HANS BREDER, who mentored Mendieta through the Intermedia Program for the New Performing Arts at the University of Iowa. "It is a real homecoming for the things she did and the influence she had on so many others," said Breder, who also was romantically involved with Mendieta. She earned a bachelor's degree at the University of Iowa and then a master's degree in fine arts under Breder's tutelage. Founded a decade earlier, his program for experimental art -- the first of its kind on a college campus -- gained world renown in the 1970s. The article appeared on Canada.com, the website of the National Post, a Canadian newspaper, and on the websites of several other Canadian newspapers.
http://www.canada.com/news/national/story.html?id=d324f61d-bf2b-41ce-b5f1-4752ad8faa93&page=1

Former UI Professor Elected To Board (Capital Press, Feb. 24)
Robert Barker is the newest member of the Washington State Conservation Commission. He now lives in Whatcom County, Wash., and was elected to the commission in December by the Washington Association of Conservation Districts.  It's noted that his academic career included being a professor of biochemistry in the ROY J. AND LUCILLE A. CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Salem, Ore.
http://www.capitalpress.info/Main.asp?SectionID=67&SubSectionID=792&ArticleID=15437

Kutcher Talks About His Iowa Past (Oprah Winfrey Show, Feb. 24)
On the show, actor Ashton Kutcher talked about his youth in Iowa, saying that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but decided to leave college. He dreamed of going to Hollywood, and was later discovered in a local bar and earned an audition, which landed him a role on "That 70s Show."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=beee7764f7de8b48c6df46f68829a0b6&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=c2efac69f3f32ef43dd473fe139885b0

Frisbie: ITBS Instructions Are Key For Teachers (Naples Daily News, Feb. 24)
This year 20,000 kindergartners nationwide took the Iowa Test of Basic Skills, a three-hour test spread over several days aimed at assessing their verbal and math skills. Since the test targets children who may not yet be able to read, the booklet was all pictures. Page "numbers" were distinguished by pictures, each question was "numbered" with its own picture and the answer choices themselves were also pictures. Several of kindergarten teacher Arielle Derby's students interpreted this as an invitation to color. But bit by bit, the children got the hang of it. They filled in the circles under the image corresponding to each vocabulary word that Derby read aloud. They stayed quiet. They managed to track which question was where. Then a slight change in page-layout gummed up the works. Suddenly, there were four questions crowded onto each page instead of three. Derby could no longer simply identify them as top, middle or bottom. The author of the Iowa Test of Basic Skills pointed out that most of the problems faced by Derby's class can be avoided. "The teacher probably didn't follow the instructions in the administration manual," said Dr. DAVID FRISBIE, one of three University of Iowa professors who developed the exam. He said the students are supposed to slide strips of cardstock down the page, one question at a time, to ensure everyone stays together. Derby defended herself by saying that she had enough trouble keeping pencils out of the air and off the floor without throwing pieces of cardboard into the mix.
http://www.naplesnews.com/npdn/neapolitan/article/0,2071,NPDN_14939_3570829,00.html

Sanders To Head Oregon Foundation (The Oregonian, Feb. 24)
Oregon Health & Science University has hired a new president for its fund-raising arm. STEPHEN T. SANDERS, vice president for development at the University of Iowa Foundation, will take over as head of the OHSU Foundation, effective April 1.
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/1109164561124960.xml

Ceilley Offers Advice For Winter Skin Care (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Feb. 23)
A guide to winter skin care says that indoor heat can be as much of an enemy to your skin as outdoor cold. While we can't control nature's humidity levels, we can offset the dry heat at home. Too little humidity can make skin feel rough, scaly and dry. It can also aggravate breathing problems and make your throat scratchy. The relative humidity in your home should be between 30 percent and 35 percent, said Dr. ROGER CEILLEY, a dermatologist and certified professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa.  "The more the skin dries out, the more it loses the protective barrier that retains moisture," he says. "Keeping the humidity regulated at home is important because you can't always do so at work." The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/living/10969712.htm?1c

Fuortes Comments On Beryllium Exposure (Bradenton Herald, Feb. 23)
The Bush administration will expand a free medical screening program to former workers of the now-defunct Loral American Beryllium Co. in Tallevast, U.S. Rep. Katherine Harris announced Tuesday. Known as the "Cold War warriors," workers at the Tallevast plant machined beryllium to produce parts for atomic weapons and missile guidance systems, starting in the 1960s. Exposure to the dust, produced when the exotic metal was milled, can lead to a severe and often fatal lung disease if not treated. Manatee County commissioners allocated $60,000 to test 241 former workers and residents in December and January. Seven people, including four residents, tested positive for beryllium sensitivity during that first phase of local testing. Six workers who paid for their own tests also tested positive, bringing the total number of known positives to 13. Dr. LAURENCE FUORTES, a beryllium expert at the University of Iowa, recently called those results a clear indication that the community and workers were exposed to the dangerous levels of beryllium dust. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/10967223.htm

Former UI Punter Roby Dies (New York Times, Feb. 23)
Reggie Roby, who was one of the finest and most durable punters in National Football League history, died yesterday in Nashville. He was 43. Nancy Knox, a business associate, said Roby collapsed after a morning shower and was pronounced dead at St. Thomas Hospital. She said a doctor at the hospital told her that Roby apparently had a heart attack. Roby, a big man for a punter, at 6 feet 3 inches and 258 pounds, spent 16 seasons in the N.F.L. and had a career average of 43.3 yards a punt. He played for the Miami Dolphins (1983-92), the Washington Redskins (1993-94), the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1995), the Houston Oilers and their successors, the Tennessee Titans (1996-97), and the San Francisco 49ers (1998). He appeared in three Pro Bowl games. In high school, Roby, a native of Waterloo, Iowa, was a linebacker, tight end, punter and place-kicker, and a pitcher. At that time, Dan McCarney, now Iowa State's football coach, was an assistant at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. In 2003, he told The Des Moines Register about the first time he saw Roby. "I was at his first game his senior year," McCarney said. "On the opening kickoff, it went through the uprights." At Iowa, Roby averaged 49.8 yards a punt (an N.C.A.A. record) as a junior and 48.1 as a senior.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/23/sports/football/23roby.html

Business Alumnus Discusses Money Management (Wall Street Journal, Feb. 23)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
alumnus David Altig, vice president and associate director of research in the research department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, was one of two bloggers invited to take part in a printed discussion about whether Americans are spending too much and saving too little and what might be done to alter their behavior. Altig, who received a bachelor's degree in business administration from the UI, runs a blog called Macrblog at http://macroblog.typepad.com/.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB110908026627860780,00.html

Study Shows Racial Graduation Gap at Iowa (KETV-TV, Feb. 22)
A new study shows that black students are much less likely to earn undergraduate degrees than their white counterparts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The report shows that Iowa is the whitest school in the Big 10 athletic conference and has the largest gap between graduate rates for white and black students among conference schools. KETV is based in Omaha, NE.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/news/4218720/detail.html

Alumnus Profiled for Black History Month (Utica Observer Dispatch, Feb. 22)
It's a long road from the steel yards of Chicago to the halls of Utica College. But to Paul Young, it was a road well-taken -- and one whose many turns provided the avenue of experience that helped him earn a Ph.D in history from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Observer Dispatch is based in New York.
http://www.uticaod.com/archive/2005/02/22/news/20783.html

Somek: Complaining Isn't Good Enough for Europe (Der Standard, Feb. 21)
UI law professor ALEXANDER SOMEK says in an interview that a vigorous civil society in Austria and Europe needs active civic engagement. He observes that civic associations and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) are increasingly becoming absorbed by international bureaucracies such as the European Commission. By funding projects run by NGOs and by inviting cooperation, international organizations have become adept at enlisting them to their cause. In Europe, "international" and "supranational" are considered "good" by default, but Somek believes Europeans should be more skeptical about that. Der Standard is based in Austria. The article is in German.
http://derstandard.at/?url=/?id=1955485

Kurth Comments On Saturn Auroras (Space.com, Feb. 21)
When a large storm of charged particles leapt from the Sun in January 2004, scientists jumped at the chance to observe what would happen when the tempest reached Saturn. The storm kicked up bright lights above the planet and created radio emissions that sound like an eerie, hissing heartbeat. The auroras were imaged in ultraviolet light over several weeks by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Cassini spacecraft, still en route to the planet at the time, recorded radio emissions, which fluctuated in lockstep with the intensity of the aurora. "We had expected that this might be the case, based on our understanding of auroral radio signals from Earth's auroras, but this is the first time we've been able to compare Saturn's radio emissions with detailed images of the aurora," said WILLIAM KURTH of the University of Iowa. "This is important to our on-going Cassini studies because this association allows us to have some idea of what the aurora are doing throughout the mission from our continuous radio observations."
http://space.com/scienceastronomy/050216_saturn_aurora.html

UN-Lincoln Tries To Compete With UI For Students (Lincoln Journal Star, Feb. 21)
A story about the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's efforts to market itself to prospective students, especially those concerned about tuition costs. The university is trying to clue out-of-state high school students into UNL's existence even as it tries to convince students from Broken Bow and Table Rock they can afford a Husker education. In the past two years, the admissions office has flown in dozens of high school counselors from the Minneapolis/St. Paul, Chicago and Kansas City metropolitan areas so they can see the campus for themselves. That tactic and more time spent recruiting out-of-state students is allowing UNL to compete for the first time with the region's public universities, like the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Kansas. The paper is based in Nebraska.
http://www.journalstar.com/articles/2005/02/21/local/doc4217bf1eee272873374136.txt

UI Study Finds Opposites May Not Be Best Partners (Globe and Mail, Feb. 21)
"Opposites may well attract, but the odds are they won't be as happy together as couples who are more alike," writes Stacey Burling in The Philadelphia Inquirer. "According to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study of 291 newlyweds, the happiest couples scored similarly on a host of personality traits such as openness, conscientiousness, agreeableness and something called disinhibition -- a measure of recklessness or irresponsible behavior. Ironically, the husbands and wives apparently hadn't chosen one another with personality in mind. Their personalities were no more alike than they would have been if a computer had thrown them together randomly. That similar people were happier together held true even for qualities like anxiety." The paper is based in Canada.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20050221/FASS21/TPComment/Features

Kurth On Team Studying Saturn (North Texas eNews, Feb. 21)
Scientists studying data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft and Hubble Space Telescope have found that Saturn's auroras behave differently than scientists have believed for the last 25 years. The researchers, led by John Clarke of Boston University, found the planet's auroras, long thought of as a cross between those of Earth and Jupiter, are fundamentally unlike those observed on either of the other two planets. The team analyzing Cassini data includes Dr. Frank Crary, a research scientist at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas, and Dr. WILLIAM KURTH, a research scientist at the University of Iowa, Iowa City.
http://www.ntxe-news.com/artman/publish/article_23653.shtml

Lutz: Crying Not Appropriate In Workplace (New York Times, Feb. 20)
You've cried in your boss's office several times: over a dispute with a co-worker, a draining deadline-packed week and a stressful client relationship. It didn't seem a big deal the first time, but your boss is starting to look uncomfortable. How can you dam up the waterworks before you're called the office crybaby? Although many executives extol the business benefits of developing "emotional intelligence," crying at work, over work, is still taboo, said TOM LUTZ, a professor of American literature and cultural history at the University of Iowa and author of "Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears" (W. W. Norton, 2001). "In general, it's clear that crying in the workplace is not acceptable," he said. "It's simply against the rules. The office is rationalized space organized around getting tasks accomplished, not processing emotion."
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/20/business/yourmoney/20advi.html?

Two Slingshot Suspects Students At UI (Omaha Channel 7, Feb. 19)
Three teenagers are accused of causing $50,000 in damage to property in eastern Iowa using nothing but their slingshots. The three young men were arrested Friday in Iowa County, one of three counties that suffered property damage in the vandalism spree. The men are accused of using Wrist Rocket slingshots to shoot out store fronts, house windows and windshields with BBs and ball bearings. They were arrested Friday in Marengo after a vandalism victim in Amana reported their vehicle to authorities. Each is charged with first-degree criminal mischief and could face additional charges. The men are Nicholas Mullnix, 18, of rural North English; Tyler Stutzman, 19, originally from rural Kinross; and Quincy Harris, 18, formerly of rural North English. Stutzman and Harris are freshman engineering majors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/news/4214379/detail.html

UI Alumnus Composer Of Amabile Choir (London Free Press, Feb. 19)
It's not often all 300 voices of the Amabile choirs are gathered in one place on one day. For 2005, tomorrow is that day. The 15th annual Amabile festival offers two concerts at First-St. Andrew's Church. It is billed as the once-a-year chance to hear all six Amabile core choirs. For the occasion, the Amabile organization has invited one of its acclaimed admirers to the celebration. Kingston composer and conductor Mark Sirett says the Amabile organization and its 300-voice instrument are "world-class . . . it's important for (Londoners) to realize what a world-class organization it is. Not just one choir, but the whole system they have." Sirett, a graduate of Queen's University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is an award-winning choral composer whose works have been published in Canada, the U.S. and Sweden and often heard on CBC Radio. The paper is based in Canada.
http://www.canoe.ca/NewsStand/LondonFreePress/Today/2005/02/19/935647-sun.html

Clarke Speaks On Informed Consent (Scripps News Service, Feb. 18)
Experts speaking at a scientific meeting in Washington D.C. Friday said the tests have helped save lives and that stringent watchdog requirements have kept safety problems at a minimum, but there still is concern that the rules may be too strict for some therapies to be tried. "The prospect of experimenting on people who may die is obviously very serious when they can't give their consent," said Dr. Roger Lewis, an emergency-room physician and researcher at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "But if we don't do research in this setting, we may never figure out ways to improve treatment. It's a Catch-22 situation." Lewis cited at least two instances in which drug and medical-device makers decided not to go forward with tests of new products under the waivers after concluding that the costs of setting up the complex experiments would exceed the likely reward from marketing the innovations. WILLIAM CLARKE, a biostatistician at the University of Iowa, cited another study, on whether inducing hypothermia helped people with brain injuries, as a success from the waivers. But he said the design of some emergency interventions have not always been as careful as they might be, such as in deciding which patient gets which treatment, leaving the results less scientifically sound. A version of the story also ran on the website of TIMES RECORD NEWS in Texas.
http://www.knoxstudio.com/shns/story.cfm?pk=ERTRIALS-02-18-05&cat=WW

Writers' Workshop Graduate Named Poet Laureate (Courier Journal, Feb. 18)
Louisville, Ky. author Sena Jeter Naslund, whose two most recent novels have been critically acclaimed bestsellers, is Kentucky's new poet laureate. Naslund, a professor at the University of Louisville and Spalding University, was appointed to the two-year term by Gov. Ernie Fletcher. Naslund, 62, and was educated at Birmingham-Southern College and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, where she received her doctorate. The newspaper is based in Louisville, Ky.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050218/NEWS01/502180420/1008/NEWS01

UI Press 'Spared'; Workshop Seeks New Director (Chronicle, Feb. 18)
The paper's "Hot Type" column features a roundup of news about the University of Iowa. UI officials decided not to slash the UI Press's budget. Only $20,000 will be pared from the press's annual subsidy of $521,000, and not the $200,000 originally feared. HOLLY CARVER, the director of the press, says she can only be grateful for how relatively small the reductions will be. "Certainly, now, we won't have to cut staff," she says. "It's weird to be happy about a $20,000 cut, but I really am happy." Opponents of the original budget-reduction recommendation argued that the university owed it to the academic publishing system to maintain its high output and continue to do its fair share for the tenure-and-promotion system, which depends on scholarly publication. WILLIAM F. DECKER, Iowa's interim vice president for research, agrees with that logic -- and the decision to go easier on the press's budget. Separately, the UI Writers' Workshop is looking for a new director to replace FRANK CONROY, who announced last August that he's stepping down to make room for "new blood." The four finalists are: Richard Bausch, Lan Samantha Chang, Ben Marcus, and Jim Shepard. LINDA MAXSON, dean of the university's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said a search committee assembled to find Conroy's successor hopes to announce the winning candidate by the summer, or soon afterward.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i24/24a02001.htm

Collinson: Manuscript Has Character Of Art (San Jose Mercury News, Feb. 17)
For the first time, fans of Jack Kerouac, compatriot Neal Cassady and beatniks old and new have a chance to see every word, edit and smudge of the original manuscript for Kerouac's American classic "On the Road," unrolled end to end and under glass at the University of Iowa Museum of Art. It is the first time during its international tour that the yellowed and brittle manuscript has been shown unspooled. "This is the first time people anywhere will be able to get the full effect of the work," said HOWARD COLLINSON, the museum's director. "It does have the character of a piece of artwork, like some kind of performance art. But at the same time, I don't think it was an act of convenience that he put his novel together this way." This Associated Press article also appeared Feb. 17 in the CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/living/10921578.htm?1c

UI Fertility Study Cited (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Feb. 17)
Doctors used to routinely place two, three, four and five embryos after in vitro fertilization. But with better techniques for growing and selecting the best quality embryos, fertility specialists have started offering some patients the option of avoiding the complications of multiple births by betting on a single embryo. The stress and additional work of caring for more than one baby is just one of the potential drawbacks of multiple births, say doctors. In a recent survey of 449 women being treated for infertility, 20 percent said they would prefer multiples to a single baby. Less than half were aware of the health problems associated with twins, including an increased risk of cerebral palsy and low birth weight, according to researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who published the results last March in the journal of Fertility and Sterility.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/212389_hcenter17.html

Kurth Comments On Saturn Aurora, Radio Emissions (MSNBC.com, Feb. 17)
When a large storm of charged particles leapt from the sun in January 2004, scientists jumped at the chance to observe what would happen when the tempest reached Saturn. The storm kicked up bright lights above the planet and created radio emissions that sound like an eerie, hissing heartbeat. The effects were not unexpected. Solar storms charge the upper atmosphere of Earth in a similar manner, creating auroral displays in the polar regions sometimes called the Northern Lights or Southern Lights. Jupiter has aurora, too. Researchers expected Saturn's aurora to have characteristics in between the lights of Earth and Jupiter. Instead, they found some surprises. The auroras were imaged in  ultraviolet light over several weeks by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Cassini spacecraft, still en route to the planet at the time, recorded radio emissions, which fluctuated in lockstep with the intensity of the aurora. "We had expected that this might be the case, based on our understanding of auroral radio signals from Earth's auroras, but this is the first time we've been able to compare Saturn's radio emissions with detailed images of the aurora," said WILLIAM KURTH of the University of Iowa. "This is important to our on-going Cassini studies because this association allows us to have some idea of what the aurora are doing throughout the mission from our continuous radio observations." A version of this article also appeared Feb. 17 at SPACE.com.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6982799/

Bell Comments On Multiple Births Interest (Biloxi Sun Herald, Feb. 16)
The feel-good notion of multiple births sometimes draws the media spotlight, generous donations and even advertising deals. But as multiple births become more common, interest seems to be waning. And some families, including an Hispanic family quoted in the story, get very little help or attention at all. In 1934, the Dionne quintuplets--Annette, Cecile, Yvonne, Marie and Emilie--gained fame as one of the first known sets of surviving quintuplets. The Canadian-born girls were such an oddity that nearly 3 million people visited them at the hospital where they lived until they were 9 years old because they were put on display there for the public's entertainment. "They were so rare that almost every set was publicly known," said Dr. EDWARD BELL, director of neonatology at the University of Iowa. "As they've become more common ... quintuplet families no longer generate a lot of media coverage and public interest." The paper is based in Mississippi. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE; GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD; CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER; BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD; COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER; MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS; MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD; CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania; MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH; KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR; DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE and other media outlets.
http://www.sunherald.com/mld/sunherald/news/nation/10913299.htm

Collinson Comments On Kerouac's 'On The Road' (Cincinnati Enquirer, Feb. 16)
For the first time, fans of Jack Kerouac and beatniks old and new have a chance to see every word, edit and smudge of his original manuscript of "On the Road," unrolled end to end and under glass at the University of Iowa Museum of Art. It is the first time during its international tour that the yellowed and brittle manuscript, now owned by Indianapolis Colts' owner Jim Irsay, has been shown unspooled. "This is the first time people anywhere will be able to get the full effect of the work," said HOWARD COLLINSON, the museum's director. "It does have the character of a piece of artwork, like some kind of performance art. But at the same time, I don't think it was an act of convenience that he put his novel together this way." The paper is based in Ohio. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the EVANSVILLE (Ind.) COURIER & PRESS, NPR and other media outlets.
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050216/ENT/502160331/1025/LIFE

Alford Rejects Pierce Appeal (Chicago Sun-Times, Feb. 16)
Iowa coach Steve Alford on Tuesday rejected an appeal by PIERRE PIERCE to reconsider his dismissal from the Hawkeyes. Alford met with Pierce for about 15 minutes Tuesday. Pierce, originally of Westmont, lll., was dismissed from the team two weeks ago after police confirmed he was the focus of an investigation into an incident at a woman's home in West Des Moines. ''It was Alford's decision this morning not to allow him back on the team,'' university spokesman STEVE PARROTT said. The next step for Pierce is to appeal Alford's decision in writing to Iowa athletic director BOB BOWLSBY. ''We haven't heard anything about whether they plan to take the next step,'' said Bowlsby, who was not at the meeting and unable to comment on details. Pierce was charged last week with burglary, domestic assault, assault with intent to commit sexual abuse, false imprisonment and criminal mischief.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/campus/cst-spt-pierce16.html

Former UI Wrestler Charged With Indecent Exposure (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 16)
Former Mount Carmel wrestling star Joe Williams surrendered to Iowa City police Tuesday after being charged with indecent exposure. Williams, 30, was released on his own recognizance. The charge stems from a visit he made to an Iowa City apartment on Nov. 14, 2003, when he was an assistant wrestling coach at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Williams resigned from his coaching job three months after the alleged incident to focus on making the U.S. freestyle team for the 2004 Athens Olympics. He made the team but failed to medal, losing one match short of the medal round. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS, ALLENTOWN (Penn.) MORNING CALL, PITTSBURGH (Penn.) TRIBUNE-REVIEW and other media outlets.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/sports/cst-spt-joe16.html

Collinson Speaks About 'On The Road' (NPR-All Things Considered, Feb. 15)
The legend behind the writing of Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" is well known, if not entirely accurate. Fueled by inspiration, coffee and Benzedrine, Kerouac sat down at his typewriter and -- in one burst of creative energy -- wrote the novel that would make him the voice of his generation in just 20 days, typing it out on a single, 120-foot-long scroll. Kerouac actually spent much more time laying the groundwork for his novel than that creation myth suggests, but the part about the giant scroll manuscript is true. Now for the first time, the unfurled scroll has gone on display at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART in Iowa City. The giant scroll, which can be seen from end to end, is being housed under glass in a gallery long enough to contain its full length when unrolled. However, its ending is missing -- it was reportedly chewed by a dog. NPR's Melissa Block discusses the display with HOWARD COLLINSON, the museum's director.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4500593

Kerouac Manuscript Unspooled At UI Museum (Baltimore Sun, Feb. 15)
For the first time, fans of writer Jack Kerouac and beatniks old and new have a chance to see every word, edit and smudge of his original manuscript, unrolled end to end and under glass at the University of Iowa Museum of Art. It is the first time during its international tour that the yellowed and brittle manuscript has been shown unspooled. "This is the first time people anywhere will be able to get the full effect of the work," said HOWARD COLLINSON, the museum's director. "It does have the character of a piece of artwork, like some kind of performance art. But at the same time, I don't think it was an act of convenience that he put his novel together this way." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the ALBEQUERQUE JOURNAL, NEW YORK TIMES, NEWARK (N.J.) STAR LEDGER, BOSTON HERALD, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, NEWSDAY, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE REVIEW, LOS ANGELES TIMES, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, WASHINGTON TIMES, PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORD, RAPID CITY (S.D.) JOURNAL, DURANT (Okla.) DAILY DEMOCRAT, MUNSTER (Ind.) TIMES, CBSNEWS.COM, WBAY-TV, WTVO-TV, KATC-TV, and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/sns-celebrity-0215kerouac,1,225474.story

UI Study Shows Opposites Don't Attract (ABCNEWS.COM, Feb. 14)
It's highly likely that most couples are birds of a feather and that's why they decide to nest together, according to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study that puts the boot to that old saying that opposites attract. The same story appeared in the SOUTH AFRICA STAR, THE SCOTSMAN, the TIMES OF OMAN, CALCUTTA (INDIA) TELEGRAPH, CBSNEWS.COM, WTOP-TV, and FORBES.
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Healthology/story?id=500229

Buss Comments On Moral Philosopher Frankfurt (New York Times, Feb. 14)
A feature on writer Harry G. Frankfurt, a moral philosopher of international reputation and a professor emeritus at Princeton, says that his small and scrupulous body of work tries to make sense of free will, desire and love in closely reasoned but jargon-free prose, illustrated by examples of behavior (philosophers speak of the "Frankfurt example") that anyone would recognize. "He's dealing with very abstract matters," said SARAH BUSS, who teaches philosophy at the University of Iowa, "but trying not to lose touch with the human condition. His work keeps faith with that condition."
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/14/books/14bull.html?

Klohnen, Luo Try To Uncover What Makes Couples Click (The Chronicle, Feb. 14)
The paper's daily email feed to subscribers, providing a glance at the current issue of the "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology," says a new article tries to uncover what makes for a happy couple. If you and your Valentine share the same values and attitudes, should you tie the knot? Maybe, but having similar personalities  is a better predictor of  marital bliss, say SHANHONG LUO, a doctoral student in psychology, and EVA C. KLOHNEN, an assistant professor of personality and social psychology, both at the University of Iowa. "People may be attracted to those who have similar attitudes, values, and beliefs and even marry them (at least in part) on the basis of that similarity," they write. "However, once individuals are in a committed relationship, it may be primarily personality similarity that influences marital happiness." The article, "Assortative Mating and Marital Quality in Newlyweds: A Couple-Centered Approach," is online at
http://www.apa.org/journals/releases/psp882304.pdf

Klohnen Leads Study On Married Couples (New Kerala, Feb. 14)
A study conducted by researchers at the University of Iowa suggests that people tend to marry those who are similar in attitudes, religion and values. However, it is similarity in personality that appears to be more important in having a happy marriage. The researchers led by psychologist EVA C. KLOHNEN looked at assortative mating issues (mating based on similar or opposite characteristics) among 291 newlyweds who had participated in the Iowa Marital Assessment Project. The publication is based in India. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of WEBINDIA123, the HINDUSTAN TIMES, and EXPRESSINDIA.COM, all based in India.
http://news.newkerala.com/india-news/?action=fullnews&id=71863

UI Study On Compatible Couples Cited (MSNBC, Feb. 14)
Shared moral values are less important than compatible personalities as a recipe for a good marriage, according to a study released Sunday. Married couples often share the same attitudes about faith and other values, researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found. But those with personalities similar to their spouses were the happiest. "People may be attracted to those who have similar attitudes, values and beliefs and even marry them," the researchers said, and those qualities are easy to spot in a potential mate. Attitudes toward subjects such as religion or politics "are highly visible," they said. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the TOLEDO (Ohio) BLADE, REUTERS, SABC NEWS in South Africa, ABC NEWS,
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6967536/

Klohnen Studied Couples' Personalities (Philadelphia Daily News, Feb. 14)
Opposites may well attract, but the odds are they won't be as happy together as couples who are more alike. According to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study of 291 newlyweds, the happiest couples scored similarly on a host of personality traits such as openness, conscientiousness, agreeableness and something called disinhibition - a measure of recklessness or irresponsible behavior. Ironically, the husbands and wives apparently hadn't chosen one another with personality in mind. Their personalities were no more alike than they would have been if a computer had thrown them together randomly. Personality similarity accounted for 40 percent to 50 percent of marital satisfaction, said lead researcher EVA KLOHNEN, a psychologist.
http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/entertainment/10893408.htm?1c

Klohnen, Luo Find Similar Personalities Attract (Science News, Feb. 14)
With Valentine's day here again, many singles may be hoping Cupid's arrow will strike. And if you're wondering whether a new mate is marriage material, the results of a new study hint that you're better off looking for a bird of the same feather instead of waiting for an opposite to attract. EVA C. KLOHNEN and SHANHONG LUO of the University of Iowa analyzed data collected from nearly 300 couples that participated in the Iowa Marital Assessment Project. The questionnaires covered personality characteristics and attitudes as well as a number of indicators of marriage quality, including how couples approach conflict and how satisfied they feel with their union. The findings, published today in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, show that people marry mates with highly similar attitudes and values. The authors suggest that the attraction arises "because attitudes are highly visible and salient characteristics and they are fundamental to the way people live their lives."
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa003&articleID=00081076-30D2-120D-B0D283414B7FFE9F

New Journal Publishers Attended Workshop (Fort Wayne News-Sentinel, Feb. 14)
Carla Spataro and Christine Weiser started Philadelphia Stories, a thin but classy little publication of fiction, art and poetry. Spataro, 42, was an aspiring opera singer when she moved to Philadelphia in 1988. Weiser, 39, is publisher of the Convention Center Visitors Guide and the author of four novels, so far unpublished. Since then, they have attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS WORKSHOP, comforted one another through the inevitable heartaches that come with the inevitable rejection letters, and encouraged one another to persevere.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/living/10896377.htm

Klohnen Study On Formula For Marital Bliss Cited (BBC News, Feb. 14)
People who pick partners with a similar personality to themselves could be helping to guarantee matrimonial bliss. When dealing with the day-to-day stresses of life, opposites do not attract, US scientists say. Personality clashes make for more rows, even if the couples initially had the same values, they say in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. The University of Iowa team studied 291 newlyweds who had been dating for around three-and-a-half years. Psychologist EVA KLOHNEN, who conducted the research, said it was likely that people were initially attracted to those with similar attitudes and beliefs.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4257121.stm

UI Study: Opposites Don't Necessarily Attract (ABC Science Online, Feb. 14)
If your loved one asks you to marry them this Valentine's Day you may want to remember that when it comes to a happy marriage we are better off with someone just like ourselves, US researchers say. Psychologists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studied 291 couples married for less than a year. They found while similar attitudes, values and beliefs are the initial attraction, similar personality traits are more important when it comes to marriage satisfaction. The publication is based in Australia.
http://abc.net.au/science/news/health/HealthRepublish_1300081.htm

Berkowitz Comments On Media's Diana Obsession (Monterey Herald, Feb. 14)
In 1995, Princess Diana looked back on her broken marriage to Prince Charles in an interview with the BBC program ''Panorama.'' ''There were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded,'' she said, referring to her husband's ongoing love for Camilla Parker Bowles. Now, almost 10 years later, another marriage is planned, one that will also have three people in it: Charles, Parker Bowles and the ghost of Diana. If ever there was a Great Media Wallow to match the worldwide coverage of Diana's wedding in 1981 (estimated worldwide viewership of 750 million), it was the wall-to-wall wallow over Diana's death in 1997 (estimated worldwide viewership between 2 billion and 2.5 billion). ''The coverage of Diana's death is legendary in contemporary culture,'' said DAN BERKOWITZ, a professor of communication at the University of Iowa, who studied coverage of Diana's death. The paper is based in California. A version of the story also ran on the website of the TALLAHASSEE (Fla.) DEMOCRAT.
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/living/10896203.htm

Berry Speaks At Black History Month Event (Grand Forks Herald, Feb. 13)
VENISE BERRY
, an associate professor of mass communication and journalism at the  University of Iowa, recently spoke at the University of North Dakota as part of Black History Month. She discussed modern racism in the news, sex, violence in rap music, black male and female stereotypes in film and problems in advertising. Berry received her bachelor's degree at the University of Iowa. She worked in radio news in Texas for 12 years and earned her doctorate at the University of Texas, Austin. She started teaching in 1991. She is the author of three best-selling novels: "So Good, An African American Love Story," "All of Me, A Voluptuous Tale" and "Colored Sugar Water"; she also co-authored "The 50 Most Influential Black Films." She lives in Coralville, Iowa, with her 8-year-old daughter, Averi. The paper is based in North Dakota.
http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/news/10888283.htm

Johnson: FCC Does Poor Job Of Handling Complaints (Kansas City Star, Feb. 13)
An entertainment columnist critiquing the tenure as Federal Communications Commission chairman of Michael Powell quotes NICHOLAS JOHNSON, onetime FCC commissioner and currently a teacher at the University of Iowa law school, on the debates over decency on television. The columnist says that Johnson has no problem with the government telling broadcasters and cable companies what they can put on the air. But he can think of a hundred concerns more important than decency, and none would do as much harm to free speech. "Take for instance the matter of regulation of commercials," Johnson said. Commercial clutter is something everybody complains about, and it's an issue that the FCC long ago used to regulate. Nowadays, though, it's the Federal Trade Commission that calls TV sponsors to task, usually in their marketing to kids. So the FCC steps back, as though from a rattlesnake, and says, 'Oh, no, we have the FTC to regulate commercials,'" Johnson said. "Well, we also have a Department of Justice that has indecency laws on the books. When I was a commissioner I always said to the others, 'Hey, if you have any problems with indecency, why don't you refer it to Justice and see what they think?' It's just rife with hypocrisy."
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/entertainment/10868394.htm?1c

Fuortes Reacts To Beryllium Exposure Results (Bradenton Herald, Feb. 13)
Seven out of 241 people screened in a county-funded program have tested positive for beryllium sensitivity, according to new findings. The results announced by Dr. Gladys Branic of the Manatee County Health department stunned Dr. LAURENCE FUORTES of the University of Iowa, who said the results indicate Tallevast residents and workers' families were exposed to beryllium dust from a former plant there. "These results are going to force the hand of federal agencies to look into community exposure," said Fuortes, a medical doctor who specialized in the treatment of beryllium disease. "Seven out of 241 is about 3 percent. That's a high rate." Six former Loral American Beryllium Co. employees who paid for their own tests also tested positive, according to a Jan. 11 report from Ray Stephens, a former union negotiator at the Tallevast plant. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/10888029.htm

Kirchhoff Provides Statistics On Chagas Infections (Washington Times, Feb. 12)
Contagious diseases are entering the United States because of immigrants, illegal aliens, refugees and travelers, and World Health Organization officials say the worst could be yet to come. In addition to a list of imported diseases that includes tuberculosis, sickle cell anemia, hepatitis B, measles and the potentially deadly parasitic disease Chagas, officials fear what could happen if the avian flu, which is flourishing among poultry in Southeast Asia, mutates so that it is capable of human-to-human transmission through casual contact. Federal data suggest that as many as 10 percent of the approximately 1,000 Mexicans who emigrate to the United States daily probably are infected with Chagas, said Dr. LOUIS V. KIRCHHOFF, a Chagas specialist and a professor at the University of Iowa's medical school.
http://washingtontimes.com/specialreport/20050212-112200-6485r.htm

Pierce Attorney Seeks Drop Of Burglary Charge (WLS-TV, Feb. 12)
Pierre Pierce's attorney has filed a motion seeking the dismissal of a burglary charge against the former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball player. The 21-year-old Pierce, originally of Chicago suburb of Westmont, was arraigned this week on charges of burglary, domestic abuse assault, assault with intent to commit sexual abuse, false imprisonment and criminal mischief. The charges stem from a Jan. 27 incident at a woman's West Des Moines home. Pierce has said the woman was his girlfriend. The most serious charge is first-degree burglary, a felony that carries a maximum penalty of up to 25 years upon conviction. Pierce's attorney, Alfredo Parrish, filed a motion today seeking dismissal of the charge, arguing that it lacks aggravating circumstances required under Iowa law. The station is based in Illinois.
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/news/021205_ap_ns_pierce.html

Summer Writers' Workshop Noted (CNN, Feb. 12)
In a story about the best summer college campus getaways on the "CNN Live Saturday" program with Christine Romans, the Summer Writing Festival at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is noted. "If you can't get into their master's program, maybe you can do this for a week or weekend in the summer for not much money. Study fiction, journalism, playwriting, how to get your book published. You name it, they have it on offer," said Pauline Frommer, executive editor of  Frommer's Budget Travel Online.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=55c3e34f8491a23d97da8b711141f60a&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=6097bed3e9b04b169b553eb8dca86317

Berkowitz Studied Coverage of Princess Diana's Death (Sydney Morning Herald, Feb. 11)
If ever there was a great media wallow to match the coverage of Diana's wedding in 1981 (estimated worldwide viewership of 750 million), it was the wall-to-wall wallow over Diana's death in 1997 (estimated worldwide viewership between 2 billion and 2.5 billion). "The coverage of Diana's death is legendary in contemporary culture," said DAN BERKOWITZ, a professor of communication at the University of Iowa, who studied coverage of Diana's death. In a matter of hours, she went from being a figure of some complexity and even occasional controversy to being an instant saint. "The picture of her has become a kind of sacred memory of a fairytale," said Berkowitz. The newspaper is based in Australia. The article also appeared in THE STATE in South Carolina.
http://www.smh.com.au/news/World/Ghost-of-Diana-will-haunt-marriage/2005/02/11/1108061874399.html?oneclick=true

Aviator's Father Studied Law at UI (Joplin Globe, Feb. 11)
Before becoming a millionaire, Howard Robard Hughes Sr. worked as an engineer in Joplin area lead mines and tried to elope with a 16-year-old Joplin girl. Hughes' son, Howard R. Hughes Jr., is the billionaire eccentric profiled in Martin Scorsese's movie "The Aviator." The father, 1869-1924, also led an interesting and scandalous life.

Hughes Sr. was born in Lancaster, in northeastern Missouri, and lived as a child in Keokuk, Iowa. He studied law at Harvard and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Missouri.
http://www.joplinglobe.com/story.php?story_id=162303&c=87

UI Art Graduates, Faculty Exhibit Works (Poughkeepsie Journal, Feb. 11)
"A 21st Century Salon," which is open through March 25 at the LoRiver Arts Gallery, mimics the style of the late 19th- and early 20th-century Paris salons. JESSIE FISHER and SCOTT SEEBART, who live in Iowa City, Iowa, were part of LoRiver's "Flora/Fauna" exhibit last September and are in the current show. Seebart's figurative landscapes focus heavily on color, while Fisher's animal paintings are oddities, such as a goat with several eyes.  As she talked about her work, the topic of paintings by RON COHEN surfaced and how the term "realism" becomes tricky when discussing art. Cohen is another exhibiting artist and one of Fisher's professors at the University of Iowa, where she obtained her graduate degree. Cohen's work includes human figures and fantasy elements -- themes that could actually apply to most of the work in the show, from the images of public baths depicted by Melissa Furness to Emily Orling's paintings of humans balancing pigs on their feet. The newspaper is based in New York.
http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/today/lifeentertainment/stories/li021105s5.shtml

Vijh Comments on Corporate Mergers (Wall Street Journal, Feb. 10)
Amid the most vigorous merger market in five years, the failings of Carly Fiorina's $19 billion link-up between Hewlett-Packard Co. and Compaq Computer is a reminder of the risk that lies at the heart of all large takeover deals. The reality is that big mergers, like the stock market itself, perform all over the map. Academic research on mergers has revealed a few broad conclusions, however, says ANAND M. VIJH, finance professor at the University of Iowa , who studied hundreds of acquisitions during the 1970s and 1980s. Cash deals tend to perform better than stock deals, he says, because of the disciplines it creates in buyers. So-called mergers-of-equals tend to do worst of all, he says. "Companies in declining industries have no alternative," Prof. Vijh says. Those deals may do poorly, he says, "but not as badly as if they didn't merge."
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB110800166292250918-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%27university+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

Franciscus Examines Bones to Study Neanderthals (BBC, Feb. 10)
Is it possible to tell if the Neanderthal man could have spoken? A tiny bone in the throat, called the hyoid, offered a clue. This bone supports the soft tissue of the throat, and several groups of scientists are attempting to model that soft tissue from the bones and discover what Neanderthal might have sounded like. Professor BOB FRANCISCUS, an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Iowa, is one of a multi-national group attempting to do just this. By making scans of modern humans, he can see how the soft tissue of the vocal tracts depends on the position of the hyoid bone and the anchoring sites on the skull.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4251299.stm

Former UI Player Pierce Charged (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 10)
Former University of Iowa basketball star Pierre Pierce was charged with six counts Wednesday in connection with domestic incidents last month at the apartment of a female acquaintance. Pierce, 21, who was dismissed from the team Feb. 2, turned himself in to West Des Moines police and was charged with first-degree burglary, two counts of domestic abuse/assault, assault with intent to commit sexual abuse, false imprisonment and fourth-degree criminal mischief. Iowa athletic director BOB BOWLSBY was out of town Wednesday and unavailable for comment, and coach STEVE ALFORD had no comment. Pierce's attorney, Alfredo Parrish, said Pierce, who will remain on scholarship, has a meeting scheduled with Alford on Tuesday to appeal for reinstatement to the team.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/chi-0502100404feb10,1,6139356.story

Gift Honors Late UI Faculty Member (The Forum, Feb. 10, 2005)
A North Dakota State University alumnus has bequeathed his estate -- valued at more than $1.3 million -- to benefit the NDSU college of pharmacy in honor of his late daughter, Mary Berg, an internationally known pharmacist and member of the Iowa Women's Hall of Fame, who died Oct. 1 at age 53 after a long illness. She graduated from NDSU in 1974 and was a longtime faculty member at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Fargo, N.D.
http://new.in-forum.com/articles/index.cfm?id=82889&section=Columnists&columnist=Mike%20Nowatzki

Armstrong Comments On Maps, Technology (NewsFactor Network, Feb. 10)
Google, the world's most-used search engine, unveiled a beta version of its Google Maps service. The most apparent benefit of Google's new map, found at maps.google.com, is its size and ease of use. The expanded view includes the entire U.S. with the capability of zooming to street level, where the image takes on a 3-D effect. Searching is possible at any level. The possibility to plot one's way with a mobile device -- considering the availability of global positioning technologies -- is intriguing. But cell phone map services may not be lucrative. "Maps require a high degree of resolution," said MARC ARMSTRONG, head of the geography department at the University of Iowa and an expert in cartography and geographic information technologies. "It becomes difficult when you consider you have to decide what will go on a map and what won't. There are a lot of limitations to the technology." NewsFactor Network comprises a collection of websites focused on information technology news.
http://www.newsfactor.com/story.xhtml?story_title=Maps-Beta-Inches-Toward-Monetizing-Search&story_id=1714.52009616&category=ecommerce

Squire Comments on Nussle and Budget (National Journal.com, Feb. 9)
The publication Roll Call is quoted, saying says Rep. Jim Nussle (R-IA) "is caught between a rock and a hard place." As House Budget Committee chair, he "is charged with crafting a federal budget that can pass muster" with Congress, but as a GOV candidate he "also has to worry about how everything he does ... will play back home." Nussle: "If somoene wants to take pot-shots at me, they'll find a target-rich environment. I've never seen a perfect budget -- other than the one I wrote for myself."  Nussle also "will have to defend" proposed cuts in farm subsidies. University of Iowa Professor PEVERILL SQUIRE: "It won't make you a lot of friends in Iowa."
http://nationaljournal.com/cgi-bin/ifetch4?ENG+HOTLINE-_-HOTLINE_WORLD_EXTRA-_-HOUSE_RACE_HOTLINE-_-POLL_TRACK-_-AD_SPOTLIGHT+7-hotindex+1121713-REVERSE+0+1+1413+F+1+32+1+Peverill+AND+Squire

UI Tiny Babies Registry Cited (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 9)
An infant girl who is the smallest surviving baby was checked out of a hospital Tuesday after 141 days in intensive care. Four-month-old Rumaisa Rahman, who weighed 8.6 ounces at birth -- or about three times the weight of a top-of-the-line cell phone -- was discharged from Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood weighing 5 pounds 8 ounces, hospital officials said. Rumaisa and a twin sister, Hiba, were born in September via Caesarean section 14 weeks premature. Hiba, who weighed 1 pound 4 ounces at birth, was released from the hospital Jan. 8. Dr. Jonathan Muraskas, professor of neonatal and perinatal medicine at Loyola University Chicago, said her prognosis is very good. He will submit Rumaisa's birth weight and other information to a worldwide registry kept by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on babies who have survived after being born under 14.1 ounces. This story also appeared Feb. 9 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0502090412feb09,1,6709896.story?coll=chi-homepagenews-utl

Johns Quoted In Column On First Amendment Knowledge (Indianapolis Star, Feb. 9)
An opinion article written by Andrea Neal, a teacher at St. Richard's School in Indianapolis and adjunct scholar with the Indiana Policy Review Foundation, says a recent study uncovered a shocking level of student ignorance about the First Amendment, in particular its free speech and free press guarantees. Neal asks, Have the emphasis on standardized testing and increased math and science requirements pre-empted the chance to elevate the role of journalism and civics? "Schools face an increasing amount of pressure to educate every child to meet certain levels of achievement and comprehension of the basic subject core material," said RICHARD JOHNS of the School of Mass Communication at the University of Iowa. "Increased graduation requirements have limited the opportunity for students to pursue electives in the curriculum."
http://www.indystar.com/articles/2/220806-9172-021.html

UI Presidential Search Costs Cited (Newark Star-Ledger, Feb. 9)
The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey chose an insider as its new president, but it spent $349,000 trying to find him. There is no national standard for how much a university should spend on a presidential search. The bills for public universities vary depending on whether school officials hire a search consultant, as UMDNJ did, or conduct the search on their own. Private universities usually do not report the cost of their presidential searches.  In the last year, the University of Buffalo spent $219,824, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA spent $177,204 and the University of Nebraska spent $141,605 on their hunts for new leaders. The University of Michigan spent $334,600 to find its new president in 2002. The paper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-20/1107929792199410.xml

Cooper Studied Bathroom Breaks At Schools (Knoxville News Sentinel, Feb. 9)
Some schools have designated rest-room breaks for students. Others encourage them to go between classes. In some cases, students have to be escorted by a teacher. When Knox County students get the urge to go at school, they are at the mercy of individual teachers and principals. The system does not have a written or official policy about when students are allowed use the rest room. Some urologists worry that students are not allowed to go often enough during the seven-hour school day. And at least one parent has threatened to sue Knox County Schools for not allowing her daughter to leave English class to use the rest room. CHRISTOPHER COOPER, an associate professor of urology at the University of Iowa, said he was troubled by students' comments and their bladder problems, so he surveyed elementary school teachers about how often they grant restroom breaks and what they know about abnormal restroom behaviors. His results were published in The Journal of Urology in September 2003. Cooper boils down his research to this: "It's not rocket science. If somebody needs to go to the restroom, they need to go to the restroom. And that's what's good for them." The paper is based in Tennessee.
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/local_news/article/0,1406,KNS_347_3533411,00.html

Robinson Discusses New Novel (Fresh Air, Feb. 8)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON
, faculty member in the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, was a guest on the program, discussing her second novel, "Gilead."
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4490635

Worker Injured In Fire Taken to UI Hospitals (WHBF-TV, Feb. 8)
One person was seriously hurt Tuesday in a fire at a Muscatine factory. The fire broke out at the GPC Plant around 8 a.m. Tuesday morning. A company spokesperson says the fire started in the expeller building. One worker was inside during the fire. He was taken to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS where he's being treated for burns. The fire only did minor damage to the factory. It should be back in business by Wednesday. Officials haven't said yet how the fire started. The paper is based in Illinois.
http://www.whbf.com/Global/story.asp?S=2920326&nav=0zGoW8jX

Clark: Clinics Stop Prescribing Depo-Provera (Seattle Post Intelligencer, Feb. 8)
Teenagers recover bone loss while taking Depo-Provera once they stop using the injectable contraceptive, according to a new study from Seattle researchers. Three months ago, the Food and Drug Administration added a black-box warning to the packaging, advising consumers that bone loss associated with Depo-Provera may be irreversible. KATHLEEN CLARK, an epidemiologist and nurse practitioner at the University of Iowa who studies bone loss and Depo-Provera, said the black-box warning has affected physicians' prescribing practices. "We've heard of whole clinics who've made a decision they won't prescribe it after two years," Clark said.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/national/211137_bones08.html

Vandervelde: Bloggers May Not Be Protected From Firings (USA TODAY, Feb. 7)
The Society for Human Resource Management surveyed 279 human resources professionals and found that 3 percent had disciplined employee bloggers. Armed with access to the Internet, just about any computer user can create an online web log - or blog -- adding entries at will; the most prolific bloggers update their blogs every few hours or minutes. As for free speech, government employees and union members may have special protections, and some states - including California and Washington - strictly protect the privacy of workers. "The rules vary widely," says LEA VANDERVELDE, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law. But "it's clear that if [employees] write about issues related to their employment that might reflect upon their employer, they get very little protection in the courts." What to do if you've still got the itch to blog? "My own personal advice is to live your dream," VanderVelde says. "But don't be surprised if you're fired."
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/techpolicy/2005-02-07-blogging-danger_x.htm

Vandervelde: Bloggers May Not Be Protected From Firings (CBSNEWS.com, Feb. 7)
The Society for Human Resource Management surveyed 279 human resources professionals and found that 3 percent had disciplined employee bloggers. Armed with access to the Internet, just about any computer user can create an online web log - or blog -- adding entries at will; the most prolific bloggers update their blogs every few hours or minutes. As for free speech, government employees and union members may have special protections, and some states - including California and Washington - strictly protect the privacy of workers. "The rules vary widely," says LEA VANDERVELDE, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law. But "it's clear that if [employees] write about issues related to their employment that might reflect upon their employer, they get very little protection in the courts." What to do if you've still got the itch to blog? "My own personal advice is to live your dream," VanderVelde says. "But don't be surprised if you're fired." The story originally appeared in THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/02/02/tech/main671144.shtml

Author In Tsunami Aid Event Attended IWP (Scoop, Feb. 7)
Eight top New Zealand writers will appear together at an 11 February event in Wellington to raise funds for the New Zealand Red Cross's relief work in tsunami-affected areas of Asia. Writers' tsunami aid, a night of readings and music, will feature leading poets Kate Camp, Bill Manhire, Vivienne Plumb, Tusiata Avia, Vincent O'Sullivan, Hinemoana Baker and Emily Dobson, and writer/actor Jo Randerson. Plumb is a poet, novelist and playwright. Her books include the novel "Secret City" (2003) and the newly released poetry collection "Nefarious: poems and parable"s (2004). In 2004 she held a writing residency on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAMME. Scoop, based in New Zealand, describes itself as an Internet news agency accredited to the New Zealand Parliament Press Gallery and also fed by a multitude of Business, Non-Government-Organization, Regional Government and Public Relations communication professionals."
http://www.scoop.co.nz/mason/stories/PO0502/S00061.htm

New Journal Publishers Attended Workshop (Philadelphia Inquirer, Feb. 6)
Carla Spataro and Christine Weiser started Philadelphia Stories, a thin but classy little publication of fiction, art and poetry. Spataro, 42, was an aspiring opera singer when she moved to Philadelphia in 1988. Weiser, 39, is publisher of the Convention Center Visitors Guide and the author of four novels, so far unpublished. Since then, they have attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS WORKSHOP, comforted one another through the inevitable heartaches that come with the inevitable rejection letters, and encouraged one another to persevere.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/10798049.htm

Printmaker Holds MFA From UI (Grand Rapids Press, Feb. 6)
Japanese native and Minneapolis resident Keiko Ishii considers herself a "stranger in paradise" as she's made her way through her adopted homeland, collecting ephemera and other tidbits that document various aspects of her life and travels. The 28-year-old printmaker and book artist examines and regenerates the memories associated with these collected materials to create a new, time-filtered reality reflected in artwork ranging from map-books to 3-D constructions to paintings. One such investigation on display through March 5 at the Holland Area Arts Council (HAAC) offers West Michigan viewers an intriguing, multi-layered look at the ripple effect across generations of an immigrant's life in the United States. According to Ishii's artist statement, handwritten words have a vital role in her artistic process: "Handwritten text leaves traces of emotional impact in the visual form of the writing. This is a conscious decision to provide a personal form to convey more humble and secretive information." So, Ishii, a printmaker with a master of fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, one of the best programs in the United States, uses handwriting as a simple, subversive technique to reveal the emotional heart of this exhibit. The paper is based in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/grpress/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/110768850060511.xml

McLeod's 'Freedom Of Expression' Is Reviewed (Chicago Sun-Times, Feb. 6)
Two recent books on copyright and trademark law are reviewed, including "Freedom of Expression(r): Overzealous Copyright Bozos and Other Enemies of Creativity," by KEMBREW MCLEOD. "McLeod is a professor at the University of Iowa and a bit of a prankster -- he trademarked the phrase 'freedom of expression' to show how stupid Fox News was in trying to privatize its 'fair and balanced' slogan," the reviewer states. " Of course Fox was laughed out of court by Al Franken, but this sort of thing happens all the time, and people without Franken's fame and deep pockets can't afford to fight."
http://www.suntimes.com/output/kisor/sho-sunday-kisor06.html

UI Press-Published 'In Gatsby's Shadow' Award Finalist (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Feb. 5)
This year's crop of Minnesota Book Awards finalists includes many familiar names along with 14 first-time authors. Winners in 13 categories will be announced at 8 p.m. April 16 at the Woman's Club of Minneapolis. Among the finalists, in the category of history and biography, is "In Gatsby's Shadow: The Story of Charles Macomb Flandrau," by Larry Haeg (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA).
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/5224872.html

UI Faculty Discuss Grant Wood (Investor's Business Daily, Feb. 4)
Eastern Iowa wasn't exactly a hotbed of modern art when Grant Wood was growing up there. Wood didn't have a large group of other artists to exchange ideas with. And he never finished art school. Yet through tireless and devoted work, he crafted one of the best-known icons in U.S. art history: "American Gothic." Few images have been so widely mimicked as Wood's portrait of an old bald man and stern-faced woman posing with a pitchfork in front of a plain white farmhouse and Gothic arched window. Painted in 1930, "American Gothic" still endures as one of the top attractions at the Art Institute of Chicago. The painting has captivated generations of viewers by both revering and gently mocking the traditional customs of rural life, says JONI KINSEY, associate professor of art history at the University of Iowa, where Wood taught in the 1930s. " 'American Gothic' was immediately compelling to people with that remarkable, mysterious couple in the foreground," Kinsey said. "That image struck a universal chord with its arresting directness." Most of Wood's life was governed by a strong sense of place, says PAMELA TRIMPE, curator of painting and sculpture at the University of Iowa Museum of Art. "Grant Wood said you don't need to go to Europe to look for subject matter," she said. "He decided that you can make great art from what's already here." Convinced that art was a necessary part of national heritage, Wood joined in the efforts of the federal Works Progress Administration during the Depression. During this time he oversaw the design of numerous murals as head of the Iowa WPA arts project. Wishing to share his vision with younger artists, Wood accepted a job teaching art at the University of Iowa in 1935. But he was fired just three years later after clashing with some scholars in the department, says WALLACE TOMASINI, who joined the school's art faculty in 1957. "Wood saw himself as an outsider," said Tomasini. "That created some friction with this group of academic professionals."
http://biz.yahoo.com/ibd/050203/lands_1.html

N.M. Writing Program Chair Comments On Iowa Workshop (Santa Fe New Mexican, Feb. 4)
Are writers born or can they be taught? It's an old question, but the undergraduate creative-writing department at the College of Santa Fe has a new answer. Writers, they say, can be incubated, nourished on the milk of human kindness, equipped with the tools of the trade, and taught to stand tall when skewered by the slings and arrows of penetrating criticism. Poet Dana Levin, who serves as the department's chairwoman, says that undergraduate writing programs are the rare and often-neglected stepchildren of graduate programs that lead to a Master of Fine Arts degree. She commented that even the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, widely recognized as having one of the nation's most prestigious writing programs, does not offer an undergraduate major in creative writing but rather a major in English with a focus on creative writing.
http://www.freenewmexican.com/artsfeatures/10137.html

Alleged Victim's Attorney Disputes Pierce's Account (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 4)
One day after he was dismissed from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball team, Pierre Pierce made a public plea to consider the incident in which he is currently under criminal investigation as simply "an argument" between him and his longtime girlfriend. But the attorney for the alleged victim told the Tribune that characterization is wrong and that his client is cooperating with investigators, who could file charges that include assault with intent to commit sexual abuse as early as Friday.  "I believe it is inaccurate to describe her as a girlfriend," said attorney Mark McCormick, a former Iowa state Supreme Court justice. "The two had what I believe is more accurately described as an intermittent social relationship. The description of the incident as an argument is a distortion that minimizes the incident because it did involve physical force." The article also appeared in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/chi-0502040239feb04,1,2464751.story?coll=chi-sportsnew-hed

Trimpe Comment's on Grant Wood's Life (Investor's Business Daily, Feb. 4)
To show others the beauty he saw in his surroundings, Wood cast off the abstract art forms of his day and fiercely clung to his realistic roots in the Midwest. He refused to move away to the art centers of New York City or Paris, choosing instead to remain in Cedar Rapids and Iowa City, Iowa, where he said he found the strongest inspiration. Indeed, most of Wood's life was governed by this strong sense of place, says PAMELA TRIMPE, curator of painting and sculpture at the University of Iowa Museum of Art.

"Grant Wood said you don't need to go to Europe to look for subject matter," she said. "He decided that you can make great art from what's already here."
http://www.investors.com/editorial/lands.asp?v=2/4

Hornbuckle Comments on Synthetic Musk in Water (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Feb. 4)
Fragrance chemicals themselves may be non-toxic, but some can increase vulnerability to other, more toxic compounds, according to a new study by researchers at Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove, Calif. About 90 percent of the most common synthetic musks are removed by wastewater treatment, said Staci Simonich, an environmental chemist at Oregon State University. The remaining 10 percent, though, is still a big number, said KERI HORNBUCKLE of the University of Iowa Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. And, she said, what's removed from the water goes into wastewater sludge. "These chemicals are essentially non-biodegradable," she said, and they accumulate in animal tissue. The article also appeared in the KANSAS CITY STAR, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, and several newspapers.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/nation/10816154.htm

Turvey Defines Bi-Polar Disorder (Potomac News, Feb. 4)
Paul Krese heard the television news about a homeless man who died Tuesday in a Maryland Metro station after he was hit by a train. On Wednesday night he learned the man was his son, Matthew Krese. Matthew Krese, 46, had a hard life. He lost his right leg in an auto accident when he was 16. He managed to finish three years of college, but then bipolar disorder struck. "Bipolar disorder, formerly known as manic-depressive illness, is a psychiatric condition that causes drastic shifts in a person's mood, energy level, and ability to function," according to CAROLYN TURVEY, assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, on the Virtual Hospital Web site at http://www.vh.org. The newspaper is based in Virginia.
http://www.potomacnews.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WPN%2FMGArticle%2FWPN_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031780637308&path=&tacodalogin=no

Regents' Resignation Noted (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 4)
Two members of the Iowa Board of Regents have resigned in response to complaints that they had conflicts of interest because of their ties with an insurance company involved in negotiations with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL AND CLINICS. John Forsyth, who had been the board's chairman, is chief executive officer of Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield. David Neil, who had been a board member, holds a seat on Wellmark's Board of Directors.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i22/22a02304.htm

Field Conducted Radon Study (CBS2 Chicago, Feb. 3)
Radon is a gas that occurs naturally in soil, rock, and water. The average level in outdoor air is a .4 concentration. In indoor air it's 1.3. But if your home is 4 or above, the EPA says you need to take action. It kills 21,000 people every year. If levels get too high, you're at risk. But you don't have to be.  "It's something that's so preventable that it's sort of senseless not to know what concentrations you have in your house. It's easy to test for, and if you do have elevated radon concentrations, it's easy to fix," said DR. BILL FIELD, a research scientist at the University of Iowa.  Field conducted a landmark study of radon at the University of Iowa. He found that with exposure to level 4 radon -- the EPA's upper guideline -- the risk of lung cancer jumped 40 percent. He believes lower levels, between 2 and 4, are just as dangerous over time.
http://cbs2chicago.com/health/local_story_034173519.html

Pierce Dismissed From Basketball Team (USA Today, Feb. 3)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
basketball player Pierre Pierce was dismissed from the Hawkeye program Wednesday, less than a week after a West Des Moines incident involving a female friend made him the focus of a criminal investigation. This story and variations of it appeared on the Web sites of dozens of news organizations, including the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, ESPN.COM, INDIANAPOLIS STAR, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, CNN/SI.COM, CHICAGO SUN TIMES, KNOXVILLE NEWS SENTINEL, WASHINGTON POST, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, BALTIMORE SUN, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, ABCNEWS.COM, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, LOS ANGELES TIMES and others.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/mensbasketball/bigten/2005-02-02-pierce-dismissed_x.htm?POE=SPOISVA

Writers' Workshop Looks For New Director (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Feb. 3)
Known for turning out such acclaimed writers as Flannery O'Connor and Raymond Carver, the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop is seeking a replacement for longtime head FRANK CONROY, who said last summer that he was stepping down because the program needed "new blood." A committee headed by Iowa executive associate dean RAUL CURTO is expected to announce the successor this spring. "We're looking for someone to continue Frank Conroy's record of success, a superb writer with energy and enthusiasm and passion for the workshop," LINDA MAXSON, dean of the school's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said. The four finalists are Jim Shepard, Ben Marcus, Lan Samantha Chang and Richard Bausch. The same story appeared on the Web site of WAVY-TV, SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, EVANSVILLE (Ind.) COURIER AND PRESS, WVEC-TV, BALTIMORE SUN and SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/675/5219070.html

Sayre Helps Honor Environmentalist (MSNBC.com, Feb. 3)
A group of people interested in celebrating the legacy of famed naturalist and wildlife ecologist Aldo Leopold has formed in his hometown of Burlington. Jerry Rigdon, who will serve as facilitator of the Leopold Heritage Group, said retired University of Iowa English teacher BOB SAYRE approached him last fall with a desire to do something in Burlington and possibly statewide to give Leopold the recognition he deserves as a native son and to talk about how important his philosophy regarding man's interaction with nature remains today. Both Rigdon and Sayre noted that the author of "A Sand County Almanac" is revered by naturalists, environmentalists and ecologists worldwide, yet has received very little formal recognition in the town where he grew up and the state in which he was born. Sayre said he used Leopold's writings in his course work and would ask his students how many had heard of him. "Typically, only two students out of 30 had ever heard of him, and most of those students were from Iowa," Sayre said.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6890446/

Murray Decides To Stay At Iowa (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 3)
JEFFREY MURRAY
, 55, was all set to leave the University of Iowa for a plum job at Children's Hospital Boston, a teaching affiliate of Harvard University, but he has decided to stay put. While Harvard's offer was very attractive says the professor of pediatrics, "I didn't think the fun quotient was going to be as high there."
http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i22/22a00601.htm

New Study Supports UI Cell Phone Finding (National Geographic, Feb. 3)
A new study by the University of Utah backs up studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that suggest that in some cases, hands-free cell phone devices could pose a greater risk, because tasks like dialing can be more difficult and take longer.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/02/0202_050202_phone.html

Award To Van Allen Cited (Las Vegas Sun, Feb. 3)
A story about this year's winner of the Desert Research Institute's Nevada Medal points out that a past winner was University of Iowa professor JAMES A. VAN ALLEN, a pioneer in the use of unmanned space probes who discovered the "Van Allen Radiation Belt" surrounding the Earth.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nevada/2005/feb/02/020210092.html

Alumna Artwork On Exhibit (Wellesley Townsman, Feb. 3)
Nan Rumpf began painting late in life, about nine years ago. But in that short time, she's managed to have several paintings commissioned. The Wellesley resident's "Vegetables from the Garden," Watercolors by Nan Rumpf, is currently on view at the Wellesley College Greenhouses Visitor Center. The exhibit will be on display through March 14. Rumpf is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Townsman is based in Wellesley, Mass.
http://www2.townonline.com/wellesley/artsLifestyle/view.bg?articleid=177127

Bezanson Questions Whether Bloggers Are Journalists (USA Today, Feb. 2)
A story asks whether bloggers are journalists with an obligation to check facts, run corrections, and disclose conflicts of interest? Or are they ordinary opinion-slingers, like barbers or bartenders, with no special responsibilities - or rights? Ultimately, the issue comes down to whether bloggers act like traditional  journalists, says University of Iowa law professor and First Amendment specialist RANDALL BEZANSON. Simply expressing opinions to a tiny audience doesn't count, he says. If so, "then I'm a journalist when I write a letter to my mother reporting on what I'm doing. I don't think the [constitutional] free-press clause was intended to extend its protections to letters to mothers from sons." A version of the article also ran on the website of the CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR.
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/techpolicy/2005-02-02-about-a-blog_x.htm

Ceilley Offers Advice For Winter Skin Care (Sacramento Bee, Feb. 2)
A guide to winter skin care says that indoor heat can be as much of an enemy to your skin as outdoor cold. While we can't control nature's humidity levels, we can offset the dry heat at home. Too little humidity can make skin feel rough, scaly and dry. It can also aggravate breathing problems and make your throat scratchy. The relative humidity in your home should be between 30 percent and 35 percent, said Dr. ROGER CEILLEY, a dermatologist and certified professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa.  "The more the skin dries out, the more it loses the protective barrier that retains moisture," he says. "Keeping the humidity regulated at home is important because you can't always do so at work."
http://www.sacbee.com/content/lifestyle/story/12216611p-13080734c.html

N.H. Lawmaker Cites UI Study On Cell Phone Use, Driving (Union Leader, Feb. 2)
In a guest column about proposed legislation in New Hampshire to prohibit teens from using cell phones, state Rep. Michael J. Scanlon, R-Bedford, cites a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study from 2001 that reported "drivers engaged in wireless telephone conversations were unaware of traffic movements around them. Safety board accident investigations in several transportation models have documented the relationship between poor situational awareness and poor performance." The paper is based in New Hampshire.
http://www.theunionleader.com/articles_showfast.html?article=50336

Pierce Cited As Subject Of Investigation (Omaha Channel 7, Feb. 1)
West Des Moines Police hope to have a statement issued Tuesday regarding a criminal investigation launched that sources said Monday involves Hawkeyes basketball player Pierre Pierce. The investigation stems from a crime reported Friday in the Villas of Bridgewood Point townhouse complex in West Des Moines, sources told Des Moines television station KCCI on Monday. West Des Moines police have released a police report, but it does not name the suspect or the victim. Pierce has not been charged with any crime nor is he named in the police report. The police report states that detectives are investigating a series of four crimes at the apartment complex: a break-in, the destruction of $1,300 worth of property, a crime of holding someone against their will and assault with intent to commit injury. In Iowa City, Pierce practiced Monday with the Hawkeye team. A spokesman said coach STEVE ALFORD was aware of the investigation, but would have no comment at this time. The station is based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/news/4150366/detail.html

Lutz Says Tears Take Over When Words Fail (The Australian, Feb. 1)
After spending our childhoods being told to "stop crying", "don't be a sooky pants" and, as we matured, "get a grip" or "don't be a girl", crying is back on the public agenda for men and women alike. TOM LUTZ, an English professor at the University of Iowa and author of "Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears," says that "weeping often occurs at precisely those times when we are least able to fully verbalize complex, overwhelming emotions and least able to fully articulate our feelings".
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,12108651%255E7583,00.html

Former Law Professor Named Legal Aid Director (Louisville Business First, Feb. 1)
The Louisville Legal Aid Society has named Jeffrey Been, a veteran of the organization, as its executive director. Been is a former prosecuting attorney whose experience includes teaching at the University of Louisville's Louis D. Brandeis School of Law. He also served on the faculty at the Indiana University and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA schools of law.
http://louisville.bizjournals.com/louisville/stories/2005/01/31/daily5.html

Robinson, Penningroth Study Cited (Psychiatric Times, Jan. 2005)
The prevalence and evolution of neuropsychiatric symptoms following a stroke warrant periodic psychiatric screenings, two experts recently told Psychiatric Times. Everybody who has had a stroke is at risk for a wide variety of emotional disorders ranging from depression, to pathological laughing and crying, to agnosia, said ROBERT G. ROBINSON, head of the department of psychiatry and PAUL W. PENNINGROTH, professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa.
http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleId=60400128

Bowlsby, Alford Decline To Comment On Case (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 31)
Police are investigating University of Iowa basketball player Pierre Pierce in connection with a report of burglary, assault and vandalism at a female friend's home last week in West Des Moines, the Des Moines Register reported on its Web site Monday night. Officials confirmed to the newspaper that Pierce, 21, is the subject of a criminal probe relating to an alleged incident. Police records indicate that incident happened either late Thursday night or early Friday morning. The newspaper said Iowa officials, including athletic director BOB BOWLSBY and coach STEVE ALFORD, declined to comment. Iowa athletic officials could not be reached by the Tribune for comment. Des Moines TV station KCCI-TV's Geoff Greenwood also reported that Pierce was under investigation but that "neither the subject nor the victim" were named in the police report. A police operator referred calls by the Tribune to the department's public information officer, who wouldn't be in until Tuesday morning.
http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/college/cs-050131pierce,1,4992316.story?coll=cs-college-headlines

Sale: Apologies Can't Be Used Against Companies in Court (Marketplace, Jan. 31)
UI Law Professor HILLARY SALE says that companies that reach out of court settlement for illegal activity can apologize for wrongdoing without admitting guilt because an apology cannot be used against it in court in a civil lawsuit. However, if regulators push too hard to get a company to admit guilt, they might not be able to reach a settlement with the company. Marketplace is produced by American Public Media and heard over public radio stations.
http://marketplace.publicradio.org/pm.html (click on "today's newscast")

Logsdon Study Shows Asexual Protists Are Sexual (Science News, Jan. 29)
Scientists have found evidence that Giardia, an ancient protist long considered to be asexual, may have a sex life. The findings are reported in the January 26 issue of Current Biology. "The origin and evolution of sex is one of the central unsolved puzzles for biology, and while we haven't solved it, these findings could bring us one step closer," co-author JOHN LOGSDON at the University of Iowa told The Scientist. Giardia and other diplomonads are thought to be a roughly 2 billion-year-old lineage, making them among the earliest diverging eukaryotes. Despite more than a century of study, they were not known to have sex, suggesting they might represent a premeiotic stage in eukaryotic evolution. This story is not available online.

 

 

 

 

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