The University of Iowa
University News Services
Archives Services Contact Us A-Z Search
December, 2005 See UI in the New Archive Index

Current News Highlights

Andreasen Book Reviewed (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 30)
University of Iowa Professor NANCY ANDREASEN has written "The Creating Brain" Andreasen proposes that the creativity of loose association -- a faint shadow of psychosis, if you will, that allows some people to see one step beyond the obvious -- may be more suited to science and math than to literature. Creative writers may profit from the greater range of emotional experience that comes with large mood swings, if they can bank it and reflect on it during periods of euthymia (normal mood). She is now conducting a study of scientists, in whom she expects to find more schizophrenic traits and less mood disorder than she did in writers.  Her laboratory at the University of Iowa was one of the first to use modern MRI technology and IQ testing methods to confirm the suspicion that more intelligent people tend to have larger brains.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB113590448451534309.html?mod=2_1167_1

Ross Advises on Prescription Drug Expiration (Ft. Wayne News-Sentinel, Dec. 30)
If you'd never open your refrigerator and pop the top on the milk jug - two weeks past its expiration date - and chug it down, then why would you open your medicine cabinet and pop a pill that's two months - worse yet, two years - past its expiration date? MARY ROSS, pharmacy supervisor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, poses that not-so-rhetorical question to make a point: People tend to take the expiration dates on their food products much more seriously than expiration dates on their prescription and over-the-counter drugs. "But, over time, the chemical makeup and potency of medications changes," Ross said. "Taking outdated medications may also mean you are taking a pill that is not going to help you. Many medications become ineffective past their expiration date. Heat, cold and moisture can also affect a medication's potency." The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/living/13515782.htm

Iowa Native Closes Restaurant (Muncie Star Press, Dec. 30)
The owner of Muncie's Mezza Luna Ristorante said Thursday that the eatery in will close after New Year's Eve. "I'm broke," Rob Hansen said. Hansen is an Iowa native with a degree in theater from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.thestarpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051230/NEWS01/512300314/1002

Study Examines Self-Assessment (The Leader-Post, Dec, 29)
Thinking about New Year's resolutions this year? If you think you don't need to make a resolution because you're already wonderful--well, science says, you're probably wrong. Human beings, it seems, are notoriously incompetent at self-assessment. In the December issue of Scientific American Mind, David Dunning, professor of psychology at Cornell University, Chip Heath, professor of organization behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, and JERRY M. SULS, professor of psychology at the University of Iowa, give a long list of examples, including studies that show college students who score in the bottom 25 percent on a test walk out thinking they had outperformed the majority of their classmates. The over-prediction of desirable events is just what it sounds like: we think we'll do better in the future than we really do. The newspaper is based in Regina, Saskatchewan.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7b1385e7a67d4712675e10e62df26291&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVA&_md5=27285bf6747392ca9c46fc7a92249523

Other Recent News Highlights

UIHC Performs Stem Cell Transplant (Monmouth Review Atlas, Dec. 29)
Carolu Purtle of Monmouth, Ill., recently received a stem cell transplant in her fight against lymphoma at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Hospitals and Clinics. The Review Atlas is based in Illinois.
http://www.reviewatlas.com/articles/2005/12/28/news/local/news1.txt

Law Grad Named To Governor's Cabinet (Richmond Times Democrat, Dec. 29)
Virginia Gov.-elect Timothy M. Kaine today will name Viola O. Baskerville of Richmond as state secretary of administration in his Cabinet. Baskerville is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD/MGArticle/RTD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1128768980477

'Rambo' Originator Was UI Professor (Pittsburgh Tribune Review, Dec. 29)
As a graduate teaching assistant at Penn State University in 1968, David Morrell connected with many of the Vietnam veterans in his English composition classes. "They were really puzzled by their re-introduction to society and the backlash from protestors," Morrell says. "As a Canadian, I saw what was going on with these returning veterans. Each time my family and I drove from Penn State to Canada to visit relatives, we passed cemeteries with more and more flags on the graves." Hearing the veterans and seeing the abundance of American flags spurred Morrell to write a novel about an angry Vietnam veteran at odds with a police officer, a veteran of the Korean conflict. That novel, "First Blood," introduced the world to the character Rambo. Later, Morrell taught for 16 years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before retiring to write full-time.
http://pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/entertainment/events/s_408307.html

Gallup Attended UI (WQAD-TV, Dec. 28)
A story about the restoration of pollster George Gallup's childhood home in Jefferson notes he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4291881&nav=1sW7

Leighton Pierce Film Selected For Sundance (WQAD-TV, Dec. 27)
A University of Iowa professor's video will be shown at the Sundance Film Festival next month. "Viscera," a short experimental film by LEIGHTON PIERCE, is one of 73 short films to be shown during the January 19th through 26th event in Park City, Utah.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4289491&nav=1sW7

Writer Received Numerous UI Degrees (Ft. Wayne Journal Gazette, Dec. 27)
A story about writer Yiyun Li says she first came to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to earn a Ph.D. in immunology, but switched to the Writers' Workshop after she discovered she loved writing and eventually earned her MFAs in fiction and creative non-fiction.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/13493045.htm

UI Hospitalist Study Cited (Herald News, Dec. 27)
A story about the growing trend of "hospitalists" points out an August 2004 study by the Department of Veterans Affairs Iowa City Health Care System and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that showed patients of hospitalists stayed in the hospital an average of a day less than those treated by non-hospitalists. The Herald News is based in Hackensack, NJ.
http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzNTkmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY4NDY4MzUmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk1

Jones Involved In Arizona Voting Controversy (Arizona Republic, Dec. 26)
A 2004 Republican primary race for an Arizona state house of representatives had been so close that a recount was required. The recount found 486 votes that had not been originally tabulated. As a result, John McComish was declared the winner over Anton Orlich by a mere 13 votes. A preliminary investigation by the county attorney found that voting machines may have been improperly calibrated, which raised questions about the quality of the machines themselves. There were other issues, including some questionable legal advice provided to a representative of the voting-machine manufacturer by an assistant county attorney. As a result, an Arizona state senator tried to persuade the senate president Bennett to pay for an expert in ballot machines from the University of Iowa, DOUGLAS JONES, to examine the machines and the ballots.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/opinions/articles/1227tue1-27.html

Wood Inspired Artist Catlett (Kansas City Star, Dec. 26)
Although role models who were African-American and female weren't that plentiful when she was coming along in the 1930s, Elizabeth Catlett held firm to her desire to be an artist. Yet she did meet an artist who gave her some self-affirming advice. The artist just happened to be white and male. He was Grant Wood, the famous painter and a member of the art department faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where Catlett did her graduate work. His advice: Take as her subject that which she knows best. Now, after a long, illustrious career, Catlett has a body of art that stands out because, more than any other artist, she has succeeded in bringing images of black women into the collective canon of modern Western art. Of course Catlett, 90, knows a lot about black women. Being one herself, she has firsthand understanding of the daily tenor of their lives, their triumphs and pains.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/living/13476211.htm

Preston To Report On Study Of Biology Of Empathy (The Times, Dec. 26)
STEPHANIE PRESTON, of the University of Iowa, has been studying the biological basis of empathy. She scanned the brains of those who work in the caring professions -- firefighters, doctors, clergy -- to find out whether empathic people stand out in terms of mirror neuron activity, and whether the biological process of empathy is measurable. She will report her results next year. The Times is based in London, England.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,20909-1958783,00.html

Conroy Death Noted (Austin-American Statesman, Dec. 23)
In a list of artists, performers and pop culture figures who died in 2005, it's noted that FRANK CONROY, 69, memoirist and  longtime director of famed University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, died on April 6. The newspaper is based in Texas. The Associated Press article also appeared in the DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS-TRIBUNE, MONTEREY (Calif.) HERALD, the HERALD-SUN (N.C.), SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE and BRADENTON HERALD in Florida, KANSAS CITY STAR, NEW ORLEANS TIMES-PICAYUNE, NEW YORK TIMES, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, and several other media outlets.
http://www.statesman.com/news/content/shared-gen/ap/Other_Entertainment/YE_Deaths_25_Arts.html

Arizona Ballot Examination Disputed (Arizona Daily Sun, Dec. 22)
A judge refused Wednesday to order the Maricopa County treasurer to give ballots from last year's legislative race to the chairman of a Senate panel so he could have them examined by consultant DOUGLAS JONES, a professor at the University of Iowa hired by a newspaper.

Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Pendleton Gaines said he heard no evidence from a lawyer for Sen. Jack Harper, R-Surprise, there was any emergency which required immediate action. Instead, Gaines set a hearing for the second week in January to hear arguments on issues -- including the legality of the subpoena issued by Harper. Lotstein said Harper wants access to the ballots for a computer science professor hired -- and paid -- by a Phoenix weekly newspaper. Lotstein said that is an illegal abuse of Harper's powers. Harper defended both the subpoena and the unusual financing arrangement. He said the refusal of Senate President Ken Bennett to hire an expert to examine the ballots forced him to accept the offer by New Times to pay the expenses of Jones. The newspaper is based in Flagstaff, Ariz. http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_includes/story.cfm?storyID=121644

Kerouac Manuscript Appeared at UI Museum (Philadelphia Inquirer, Dec. 22)
A yellowed 36-foot portion of the manuscript for Jack Kerouac's 1957 classic On the Road, considered the greatest of all road sagas and the literary summit of Beat Generation prose, will go on display at the San Francisco Public Library from Jan. 14 to March 19. The manuscript was publicly displayed for the first time in February at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Museum of Art. The same item appeared on the Web sites of the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, GRAND FORKS HERALD, BRADENTON (FL)  HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO (CA) TRIBUNE, MONTEREY (CA) HERALD, MACON TELEGRAPH, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/13461177.htm

Alumnus Delivers Commencement Address in Gambia (Gambia Observer, Dec. 22)
Dr Burang Goree-Ndiaye, the proprietor of Cates International Academy, has affirmed that university education is necessary for a nation's development, insisting that there is a positive correlation between the training of human resources at the university level and a nation's socio-economic development. Delivering the second convocation lecture of the University of The Gambia, entitled: University Education in The Gambia: Challenges and Prospects, on Monday at the Kairaba Hotel, Dr Goree-Ndiaye said: "The university is a place for the production  of knowledge and for engaging populations with the necessary skills and competencies." Goree-Ndiaye has a Doctor of Philosophy in secondary curriculum and instruction from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.observer.gm/enews/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2957&Itemid=33

Alumnus Plays Badminton (Windy City Times, Dec. 21)
A profile of the growing sport of badminton features player Mike Sarna, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.windycitymediagroup.com/gay/lesbian/news/ARTICLE.php?AID=10369

Jones Examines Arizona Voting Machines (East Valley Tribune, Dec. 21)
A state senator could be illegally misusing his powers by allowing a weekly newspaper to pay for an investigation into the results of a 2004 election, the Maricopa County attorney said Tuesday. Sen. Jack Harper, R-Surprise, agreed to allow Phoenix New Times to pay up to $3,000 for an election consultant after he could not get the money from Senate President Ken Bennett, R-Prescott. Harper, chairman of the Government Accountability and Reform Committee, said he wants to find out why an additional 489 votes turned up during a recount of a District 20 House primary race. The recount overturned the election in that district, which covers parts of Mesa, Tempe and Phoenix. On Tuesday, DOUGLAS JONES, a computer expert from the University of Iowa, began examining the voting machines at a county building in downtown Phoenix. Jones, who has worked as a election observer in Eastern Europe, said it was too early to say what or if anything is wrong with the voting machines. The newspaper is based in Arizona.
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/index.php?sty=55590

UI School Nurse Study Cited (News-Leader, Dec. 21)
An analysis of 2004 Census data by USA TODAY showed roughly 56,000 nurses worked full time at schools. That's one for every 950 students, a ratio that fails to meet federal guidelines that call for one nurse for every 750 students. As a consequence, thousands of children with asthma, attention-deficit disorder, food allergies and other increasingly prevalent health problems must rely on teachers, other school staffers or the telephone. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found that almost half of about 600 school nurses surveyed in 2000 reported "medication errors" at the schools in which they worked. The nurses weren't the ones making most of the mistakes. Secretaries, teachers and health aides often were to blame for giving students the wrong medicine or missing their doses, the survey found. The newspaper is based in Springfield, MO.
http://www.news-leader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051221/NEWS/512210383

Kerouac Manuscript Once Displayed At UI (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Dec. 20)
Fans of Jack Kerouac's 1957 book "On the Road" soon will have the chance to see a portion of the original 120-foot manuscript scroll that inspired a subculture of restless beatniks. A 36-foot portion of the yellowed scroll will be displayed at the San Francisco Public Library Saturday, Jan. 14, to Sunday, March 19. The manuscript was displayed publicly for the first time in February at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Museum of Art. The same item also appeared on the Web site of the LEXINGTON (KY) HERALD LEADER and the BUFFALO (NY) NEWS.
http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/113508196988340.xml&coll=2

UI MBA Program Noted (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 19)
In an excerpt from "The Wall Street Journal Guide to the Top Business Schools 2006," the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA TIPPIE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT'S MBA FOR PROFESSIONALS AND MANAGERS is listed as one of the 20 largest part-time MBA programs.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB113474945722824741-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Conversation Location Corrected (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 19)
The conversation recounted in a Dec. 9 Journal article about celiac disease between Irish-born gastroenterologist Joseph Murray and a senior professor who commented on the condition's perceived rarity in the U.S. took place at Beaumont Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. The professor, a fellow Irish specialist, had trained in the U.S. The article incorrectly placed the exchange at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, to which Dr. Murray moved soon afterward. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB113495078408925960-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Golden Girl Reed Wins Broadway Dance Contest (Broadway World, Dec. 19)
The Sweet Charity Dance On Broadway Contest offered Broadway hopefuls everywhere the opportunity to appear in the hit Broadway revival Sweet Charity starring Christina Applegate. Thousands of votes were cast and Diana Reed has been chosen as the winner. On Friday, December 16, Reed, from Norwalk, Iowa, was flown to New York City to prepare for her 'Broadway debut.'  Over the past few days Reed enjoyed private dance lessons with the Sweet Charity choreography team, was fitted for a costume and a wig and attended a performance of Sweet Charity. Reed is a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.broadwayworld.com/viewcolumn.cfm?colid=6450

Kerouac's 'On The Road' Manuscript Visited UI (Mexico Ledger, Dec. 19)
Fans of Jack Kerouac's 1957 book "On the Road" will soon have the chance to see a portion of the original 120-foot manuscript scroll that inspired a subculture of restless beatniks. A 36-foot portion of the yellowed scroll will be on display at the San Francisco Public Library from Jan. 14 to March 19. The manuscript was publicly displayed for the first time in February at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART. The paper's based in Missouri. A version of the story also ran on the Websites of the BUFFALO (N.Y.) NEWS, the ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT GAZETTE, the GLOBE AND MAIL in Canada, the NEW YORK TIMES and many other media outlets.
http://www.mexicoledger.com/articles/2005/12/17/apindex/entertainment/d8eivshg0.txt

Tippie Gives UI $5 Million (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Dec. 19)
The man whose name is on the University of Iowa business college has given the college $5 million to attract a new dean to the school. Henry B. Tippie of Austin, Texas, said he hopes the gift will help the university find a well-qualified candidate to succeed GARY FETHKE, who is retiring as the college's dean in 2006. Tippie gave the college $30 million in 1999 for a variety of uses. Tippie earned an accounting degree from Iowa in 1949 and is involved as an owner, CEO or director in several multi-million-dollar businesses -- including Rollins Truck Leasing. The station is based in Corpus Christi, Texas. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of KLTV-TV, TEAM 4 NEWS, the DENTON RECORD CHRONICLE and KRIS-TV (all in Texas), ABC NEWS.COM, and many other media outlets.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/startelegram/news/state/13439970.htm

Curtis Comments On Single-Sex Classes (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Dec. 18)
New Haven High School in Indiana is one of several schools in the region that separates boys and girls for physical education. Teachers say in same-sex classes the students are less distracted, girls participate more and boys are able to play at a higher level. Despite the reported benefits, such a gender split is against the law for physical education in public schools. The federal Title IX legislation, which often garners headlines and debate at the college athletics level, mandates that physical education classes be coed, unless an activity involves bodily contact, teachers are discussing human sexuality or the teacher objectively separates students based on their ability without regard to their gender. Title IX was passed in 1972 to ensure that women had the same educational opportunities as males in public schools. "It wouldn't stand up in court, I'll tell you that," said MARY CURTIS, associate director of athletics at the University of Iowa. Curtis has done extensive research on the Title IX legislation. "The fact that they have single-sex classes, if someone made a complaint they would not have a leg to stand on according to federal law." The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/fortwayne/news/local/13435962.htm

Baynton Pens Op-Ed On Intelligent Design (Washington Post, Dec. 17)
DOUGLAS BAYNTON, an associate professor of history at the University of Iowa, contributed an opinion article titled "'Intelligent Design' Déjà vu," in which he cites 19th century science textbooks that spoke of early Earth as having been created for humankind's uses. "What is wrong with such comforting thoughts?" Baynton asks. "For one, if you've concluded that the world is designed for humans, there is no compelling reason to stop there. Why not a world made not just for your species but also for your race, your nation, your moment in history? For example, the designer's partiality toward the temperate zones was demonstrated by the fact that they were blessed with the useful animals, while 'the fiercest Carnivora, as the lion, tiger, and jaguar . . . have their homes within the torrid climes of the globe.' Too bad for the people of the torrid climes."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/16/AR2005121601559.html

Squire Comments On House GOP Withdrawal Vote (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 17)
House Republicans, repeating a legislative tactic they used in November, sought to put Democrats on the spot Friday with a proposal opposing timetables for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said Republicans appeared to be calculating "that they can put the Democrats on the political defensive by forcing them to vote against any sort of timetable for troop withdrawals. But many in the public are apt to see it as nothing more than an empty partisan gesture." Referring to the 2006 midterm election, he added, "For better or worse, events on the ground in Iraq will dictate Republican fortunes next November, not votes on resolutions."
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/politics/la-na-usiraq17dec17,1,7540422.story?coll=la-news-politics-national

Analyst: UI In Same 'Tier' As U-Minn., Ohio State (Pioneer Press, Dec. 17)
Many of the nation's best and brightest students consider the University of Minnesota a "medium-quality school," not in the same class as Michigan or Wisconsin. Even honors students who choose Minnesota rate its academic quality lower than the schools they turned down, according to an internal university analysis. Written by a top aide in the provost's office, the analysis speaks volumes about why university officials want to remake the institution. While it aspires to be a "medallion school" it continues to be seen in a tier that includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Indiana University and Ohio State, concluded senior analyst Ronald Matross, who examined survey responses from more than 1,100 University of Minnesota applicants whose high school performance put them in potential honors range. The paper is based in St. Paul, Minn.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/13427417.htm

Achepohl Exhibits Work at Art Institute (Washington Times, Dec. 16)
There's a special exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, but don't look for the bright hues of the French impressionism for which the museum is famous; the colors of these works are the muted earth tones of African mud and clay. The brightest splashes of color in "For Hearth and Altar: African Ceramics From The KEITH ACHEPOHL Collection" come from the huge accompanying photographs on the walls, which show African potters and the techniques they use to create earthenware. The exhibition consists of 125 pieces from the personal collection of Achepohl, a printmaker and professor emeritus at the University of Iowa who plans to donate many of them to the Art Institute.
http://washingtontimes.com/entertainment/20051216-101038-7658r.htm

Turkish Author Was UI Visiting Fellow (Monstersandcritics.com, Dec. 16)
Born into a wealthy family in Istanbul on June 7, 1952, Orhan Pamuk is today Turkey's leading novelist, by far its most famous both within Turkey and in the wider world. Pamuk's seven published novels explore the way Turkey is torn between east and west and how it is split between conservative religious folk and modern western-looking secularists. While a visiting fellow at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, he wrote “The Black Book.” http://news.monstersandcritics.com/europe/article_1069414.php/Profile_Turkeys_leading_novelist_Orhan_Pamuk.

Roth Taught at UI (Pop Matters, Dec. 16)
“Letting Go,” written in a self-consciously literary and earnest style that author Philip Roth was later to discard, follows the lives of three characters: Gabe Wallach (a young, Jewish literary intellectual from the East coast; in other words, a stand-in for Roth), the struggling writer Paul Herz, and Paul's troubled wife Libby. It is somewhat of an academic novel, as most of the story takes place first at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and later at the University of Chicago (two schools at which Roth, like Gabe, spent time as an instructor).
http://www.popmatters.com/books/features/051216-philiproth-shymanik.shtml

Law Alumnus Appointed To Court of Appeals (St. Paul Pioneer-Press, Dec. 16)
Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty has appointed Kevin Ross, a partner in the Minneapolis law firm of Greene Espel, to the state Court of Appeals. Ross, 42, started his career as a police officer in Iowa City, Iowa, before earning his law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A similar article appeard in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE. http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/news/local/13418417.htm

Writer Wins Fiction Contest (Wisconsin State Journal, Dec. 16)
University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate Kevin A. Gonzalez won Playboy magazine's annual College Fiction Contest this year. His story, "Statehood," about a 12- year-old Puerto Rican boy and his dad, is printed in the October issue and he won $3,000. Gonzalez was raised in Puerto Rico, got his MFA in poetry from UW-Madison and is now a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The newspaper is based in Madison, Wisc. http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/column/index.php?ntid=55146&ntpid=49

Jones Comments on Voting Machines (Miami Herald, Dec. 16)
Top computer scientists and voting experts said Thursday that Florida must re-examine the way it tests voting machines and needs to verify claims by a Tallahassee elections official who said hackers could alter some computerized election results. DOUG JONES, a computer-security expert from the University of Iowa was hired by Miami-Dade County two years ago to help fix an auditing function on its touch-screen machines. Jones said that Miami-Dade and Broward also use memory cards similar to the ones manipulated by Finnish computer scientist Harri Hursti, but they're tougher to access and appear to have a harder-to-crack code. In each county, elections workers start up each voting machine by inserting a cartridge that communicates with the memory card and, at day's end, records all the votes. If someone were to get access to these cartridges, figure out the code and then slip them past the counties' multiple security layers, the election results could be electronically rigged, Jones said.  ''That's not likely right now. But that could happen five years down the road,'' Jones said. http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/miamiherald/news/politics/13418976.htm?source=rss&channel=miamiherald_politics

Achepohl Exhibits Work at Art Institute (CNN, Dec. 15)
There's a special exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, but don't look for the bright hues of the French impressionism for which the museum is famous; the colors of these works are the muted earth tones of African mud and clay.The brightest splashes of color in "For Hearth and Altar: African Ceramics From The KEITH ACHEPOHL Collection" come from the huge accompanying photographs on the walls, which show African potters and the techniques they use to create earthenware.The exhibition consists of 125 pieces from the personal collection of Achepohl, a printmaker and professor emeritus at the University of Iowa who plans to donate many of them to the Art Institute. http://www.cnn.com/2005/TRAVEL/DESTINATIONS/12/15/african.ceramics.ap/

IWP Journal Published 'Rearrangement' (Salt Lake Tribune, Dec. 15)
The Salt Lake City Library, Community Writing Center and Random House are teaming up to encourage patrons to write short stories using passages taken from work already published. The title of the venture, Purloined Passages, is apt: Every phrase in the stories will be stolen from a book on Random House's list of the 100 Best Novels. The library got the idea from two Utah reporters, Brooke Adams, who writes for The Salt Lake Tribune, and Elaine Jarvik at the Deseret Morning News. They created their own story a couple of years ago using nothing but borrowed phrases from the best-books list, the way musicians sample music. The result, "The Rearrangement," was published in 91st Meridian, an online journal of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM dedicated to experimental writing.
http://www.sltrib.com/outdoors/ci_3310492

UI Political Markets Cited For Accuracy (Bloomberg.com, Dec. 15)
Bettors have been more accurate than most polls in recent elections in Canada and the U.S., according to Thomas Ross, an economics professor at the University of British Columbia's Sauder School of Business in Vancouver who runs the Internet-based UBC Election Stock Market. "Traders use the polls, but somehow they add something." Traders on the UBC exchange predicted the popular vote in the 2000 federal election more accurately than three out of four polling companies. A similar exchange at the University of Iowa beat Gallup polls in the U.S. presidential elections between 1988 and 2000 with an average error of 1.37 percentage points, wrote JOYCE BERG and ROBERT FORSYTHE, professors at the Iowa City university's school of business. In 2004, the market predicted President George W. Bush would get 50.45 percent of the popular vote, short of the actual 51.54 percent. Election markets for Germany and France also did better than polls, Berg and Forsythe found.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000082&sid=aZPsZbFhu.hU&refer=canada

Fisher Surprised By Discount Card Study (Businessweek.com, Dec. 15)
Across the country, a rising tide of complaints about fraud and deception by discount card companies has prompted action by dozens of states. Twenty now require companies that offer discount cards to say expressly that discount plans aren't insurance. As many as 17 percent of the U.S.'s 40 million temporary and part-time workers -- 7 million people -- say they have health insurance when they actually only have discount cards. That's according to a study released in December by the Iowa Policy Project, funded by the Labor Dept. and the Commonwealth Fund and conducted by pollsters Lake, Snell, Perry, Mermin & Associates. The pollsters first asked a sample of nonstandard workers if they had health insurance. They then re-interviewed those who said yes to determine exactly what they had. University of Iowa economics professor PETER FISHER says he and his colleagues were shocked by the findings, which suggest that discount cards are masking an explosion in the ranks of the uninsured far beyond the 46 million reported by the Census Bureau this fall.
http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/dec2005/nf20051215_6922_db016.htm

UI Stuttering Research Cited (WHOI-TV, Dec. 15)
According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, about three million Americans stutter. The condition can affect people of all ages, but is more common among children between two and six. Boys are three to four times more likely than girls to stutter. About 75 percent of children who stutter eventually outgrow the problem. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at Iowa City say those who recover on their own usually do so within six to 36 months of the onset of stuttering. The other 25 percent usually need speech and language therapy to improve their speech fluency. The investigators are studying what risk factors may have the most important influence on persistent stuttering. Their study is called the Iowa Childhood Stuttering Project. It is a joint effort with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and Northern Illinois University at DeKalb. The television news station is based in Illinois.
http://www.hoinews.com/news/features/3/2055626.html

Colengelo Comments On Student's Goal (Daytona Beach News-Journal, Dec. 15)
To deconstruct Cindy Lovell Oliver's dream job is to dissect her life -- mother, voracious reader and avid collector of all things Mark Twain. High school dropout. Doctor of education. Published author. Teacher. All of this adds up to Oliver's goal to someday run a children's writing workshop in Hannibal, Mo. The Mississippi River, its storefronts, caves and cemeteries wait to be explored, as they were when Twain was young Samuel Langhorne Clemens in the 1840s. She believes child authors will be inspired. One of her mentors, NICHOLAS COLANGELO, has seen Oliver tackle challenges and has no doubt she'll start the workshop. "Because Cindy is involved, it's going to work," he said. After earning a bachelor's degree as a nontraditional student she worked as a classroom teacher in the 1990s and simultaneously earned her master's from Stetson University. In 1997, she moved north to study under Colangelo, director of the BELIN-BLANK CENTER FOR GIFTED EDUCATION AND TALENT DEVELOPMENT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Colangelo, an expert in gifted education, said Oliver's story is an example of a bright student whose talents eluded teachers who should have encouraged her, rather than letting her get bored in school. "With Cindy, it's a pretty dramatic case where things were missed," he said. "One thing that Cindy's story tells you is that in education, we always have to be humble. There may be more to every student than we can see."
http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/News/WestVolusia/03WVolWEST01121505.htm

IDT Founder Was UI Professor (New York Times, Dec. 14)
Integrated DNA Technologies Inc., the nation's largest manufacturer of synthetic DNA, has acquired smaller rival GenBase Inc. in an effort to tap California's vast biotech market. Integrated DNA Technologies produces custom DNA and RNA strands, called oligonucleotides, for researchers at universities, hospitals, pharmaceutical labs and other private companies nationwide. IDT was founded in 1987 by Joe Walder, then a biochemistry professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Today, the company has more than 400 workers and satellite offices in Illinois, Toronto and Israel. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared Dec. 14 and 15 on the Web sites of the BALTIMORE SUN, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, LOS ANGELES TIMES, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR-TELEGRAM, NEWSDAY, WASHINGTON POST, TIMES DAILY in Alabama, THE LEDGER in Florida, WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, MSN MONEY, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, FORBES, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, and MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/business/AP-Synthetic-DNA-Deal.html

Conroy's 2005 Death Noted (New York Times, Dec. 14)
A "roll call of notables who died in 2005" includes FRANK CONROY, 69, a memoirist ("Stop-Time") and director of famed University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop. April 6.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/international/AP-YE-Deaths-2005-YE7.html

UI School Nurse Study Cited (USA Today, Dec. 14)
An analysis of 2004 Census data by USA TODAY showed roughly 56,000 nurses worked full time at schools. That's one for every 950 students, a ratio that fails to meet federal guidelines that call for one nurse for every 750 students. As a consequence, thousands of children with asthma, attention-deficit disorder, food allergies and other increasingly prevalent health problems must rely on teachers, other school staffers or the telephone. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found that almost half of about 600 school nurses surveyed in 2000 reported "medication errors" at the schools in which they worked. The nurses weren't the ones making most of the mistakes. Secretaries, teachers and health aides often were to blame for giving students the wrong medicine or missing their doses, the survey found.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-12-13-school-nurses_x.htm

Robinson To Speak At Local Library (Birmingham News, Dec. 14)
The Vestavia Hills Public Library announced Tuesday that Pulitzer Prize-winning author MARILYNNE ROBINSON will make a personal visit to the Birmingham area April 25 and 26. The author is slated to speak and sign books in Vestavia Hills through the library's literary schedule. Organizers said Robinson also has agreed to speak at Samford University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham sometime during those two days. The visit coincides with the end of the inaugural year for the Vestavia Hills-sponsored Mayor's Book Club, which picked Robinson's "Gilead: A Novel" to read this past summer and fall. Robinson teaches writing at the University of Iowa and doesn't do book tours, but agreed to make an exception in this case. The newspaper is based in Alabama.
http://www.al.com/news/birminghamnews/index.ssf?/base/news/113455568970910.xml&coll=2

Schmidt Job Satisfaction Study Cited (International Herald Tribune, Dec. 13)
A story about job satisfaction points to emerging evidence that suggests satisfied and engaged workers are also more productive workers. A study by James K. Harter of the Gallup Organization, FRANK SCHMIDT of the University of Iowa and Theodore L. Hayes of the Immigration and Naturalization Service provides extensive evidence, drawing on Gallup's client surveys, which covered 198,514 workers in 7,939 business units from 36 companies. For each company, they related each unit's profitability, productivity, customer satisfaction, turnover and work accidents to its employees' ratings of job satisfaction and engagement. Engagement included factors like whether employees said they knew what was expected of them and whether they had received encouragement at work.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/12/13/business/workcol14.php

Malanson Studying Colorado Treeline (Rocky Mountain News, Dec. 13)
A team of researchers is studying vegetation in the Rocky Mountain National park in Colorado to see if the treeline is moving up the peaks as a result of global warming. "The aim is to assess where and why we might expect the tree line to respond to climate change," said University of Iowa ecologist GEORGE MALANSON, one of the research team's leaders. "And we're trying to look at it from the perspective of the environment that a little seedling is going to experience," he said. "The conditions for that initial establishment have to be nearly perfect for it to work in that environment."
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_4310954,00.html

UI On Team Studying Emotions, Investing (Houston Chronicle, Dec. 11)
When it comes to outsmarting the market or almost anything else Whitney Tilson, a value investor and founder of Tilson Capital Partners, has argued that we all suffer from overconfidence. In a popular presentation, he says that 82 percent of people say they are in the top 30 percent of safe drivers; 82 percent of Harvard Business School students say they are better looking than their classmates and 68 percent of lawyers in civil cases believe their side will prevail. A study published in "Psychological Science" co-authored by professors at Stanford University, Carnegie Mellon University and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA pitted people with normal brains against people whose limbic systems, the brain's emotional center, were impaired. The paper asks whether a neural systems dysfunction that curbs emotion can lead, in some circumstances, to more advantageous decisions. The answer, in terms of investing, was yes.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/business/3517831.html

Katz Comments On Liver-Transplant List (Orange County Register, Dec. 11)
A story about alleged mistreatment of patients on the liver-transplant waiting list at the University of California-Irvine Medical Center quotes transplant surgeons at other hospitals, who said it needs to be clear to patients that slots on the list are based on medical criteria. "The very hard part is to tell somebody no," said Dr. DANIEL KATZ, liver-transplant surgeon at the University of Iowa. The paper is based in California.
http://www.ocregister.com/ocregister/homepage/abox/article_884497.php

Robinson's 'Gilead' Wins Award (Pueblo Chieftain, Dec. 10)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON's highly acclaimed novel "Gilead," which won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has been awarded the 2006 Louisville Grawemeyer Award in Religion. The prize, awarded by the Grawemeyer Foundation at the University of Louisville, was announced Thursday. It's the first time a novel has won the award, foundation officials said in a news release. The novel was selected among 53 nominations. The Grawemeyer religion prize, started in 1985, is given jointly by the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary and the University of Louisville. Robinson, who lives in Iowa City, is an instructor at the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop. The paper is based in Colorado.
http://www.chieftain.com/life/1134207045/5

UI's Use Of ChemSkill Builder Mentioned (Chronicle, Dec. 9)
For a "Face-Off" column, Carol Twigg, president of the National Center for Academic Transformation, and Cliff Stoll, an astronomer, a secondary-school teacher, and author of "High Tech Heretic: Why Computers Don't Belong in the Classroom and Other Reflections by a Computer Contrarian," debated whether technology in the classroom improves student learning. Asked how a computer can engage a student as much as a person, Twigg uses as an example the introductory chemistry course at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which involves students' doing lots of problems. "The faculty calculated how many problems teaching assistants had to grade each semester, and the number was something like 16,000 problems. Four teaching assistants can't possibly grade all those problems or give students any kind of meaningful feedback. So what did they do? They'd spot-check and give students a composite score. Now if you're a bad science student, like I am, and you get a 57 on a homework assignment, you have no idea what you're doing right and wrong. Iowa started to use a computer-based homework program called ChemSkill Builder On-line that grades every problem. In addition, the program gives students specific advice about what they needed to work on. You could probably hire 50 teaching assistants to provide that kind of feedback, but it would be prohibitively expensive."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i16/16b01201.htm

Achepohl Collection Featured At Art Institute (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 9)
A new exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago through Feb. 20, "For Hearth and Altar: African Ceramics from the KEITH ACHEPOHL Collection," is a show of African pottery that has been quietly collected by Achepohl, an unassuming printmaker and retired University of Iowa art professor. "We hope [the exhibition] will wake people up to something they hadn't thought of before," Achepohl said. "I am hoping thousands of people see these things." He's lending 125 pieces -- about half of them permanently -- from a collection he amassed during the last two decades and thought to be one of the most important of its kind in the United States.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/arts/chi-0512090358dec09,1,4694425.story

Doctor Recalls UI Mentor's Skepticism (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 9)
John Dryden suffered with constant gastrointestinal complaints from childhood into his 60s. In 1998, the retired engineering designer visited the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. After an intestinal biopsy, a gastroenterologist named Joseph Murray identified Dryden's problem as a seemingly rare condition known as celiac disease. Murray's origins were fortuitous: He is from Ireland. Celiac disease, a condition in which so-called gluten proteins in grains such as wheat and barley trigger an immune-system attack on the small-intestine lining, has a long history in Europe. Doctors there are trained to look routinely for the condition. In the U.S., by contrast, doctors have long assumed the disease was a rare childhood disorder. The story of celiac disease shows how blind spots can develop in the U.S. medical system. Murray recalls that when he was a medical student in Galway, Ireland, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, diagnoses of celiac disease were so common they were "part of the medical wallpaper." After he moved to a job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1988, Dr. Murray once diagnosed a celiac alongside a senior professor. "This will be the last such case you see, since we never see this in America," Dr. Murray remembers the professor saying. As U.S. celiac research dwindled, so did medical awareness. The assumption that celiac disease rarely occurred in the U.S. became a self-fulfilling prophecy, as fewer doctors considered it as an explanation for illnesses.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB113408786563817920.html?mod=home_page_one_us

Zebrowski Comments On Stuttering Treatment (WIS-TV, Dec. 9)
About three million Americans stutter. Most children who begin to stutter between ages two and five will grow out of it on their own, but doctors don't have a good way to predict which children won't and should start therapy. Max Friton, 7, is a bright, outgoing boy who began stuttering around age three. Speech pathologist TRICIA ZEBROWSKI says Max is on his way to outgrowing his stuttering, "About 75 percent of children who begin to stutter between the ages of two and five, uh, really do get better without any formal intervention. And then there's that 25 percent that require some sort of therapy." Researchers at the University of Iowa are monitoring Max in a study to uncover specific risk factors for stuttering. Zebrowski predicts, "There's probably several recipes for creating stuttering and each recipe has different ingredients and different proportions of ingredients." The television news station is based in South Carolina.
http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S=4212139

Achepohl Exhibit On Display In Chicago (Chicago Defender, Dec. 9)
There's a special exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, but don't look for the bright hues of the French Impressionism the museum is famous for; the colors of these works are the muted earth tones of the African mud and clay they stemmed from. The brightest splashes of color in "For Hearth and Altar: African Ceramics from The KEITH ACHEPOHL Collection" come from the huge accompanying photographs on the walls, which show African potters and the techniques they use to create earthenware. The exhibition consists of 125 pieces from the personal collection of Achepohl, a printmaker and professor emeritus at the University of Iowa who plans to donate many of them to the Art Institute. Versions of the story also ran on the Website of Chicago television stations ABC-7 and CBS-2.
http://www.chicagodefender.com/page/entertainment.cfm?ArticleID=3205

UI Mentioned As Possible Blind-School Partner (WQAD-TV, Dec. 8)
Iowa State officials are talking more about the future of Iowa's only school for the blind. About 30 students live at the Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School in Vinton, which also serves more than 500 students in public schools across the state. Officials met with teachers, parents and students yesterday in Johnson to brainstorm about ways to improve the way blind children are educated in Iowa. Some possible options include keeping the school open, but expanding its use, or closing the school and developing an outreach program or partner with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa. The Iowa Board of Regents will discuss the school's future at its February meeting. Officials have threatened to close the school before, saying it isn't cost effective.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4219124&nav=1sW7

Andrejevic Comments on ‘Friendster’ Website (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 8)
One of the first social-networking sites, Friendster helped pioneer the concept of creating an online community where acquaintances can post photos, personal information and link to others with similar interests. A new feature on Friendster called  "Who's Viewed Me" may force members to become aware of how much information they are putting into the public domain, says MARK ANDREJEVIC, an assistant professor of media studies at the University of Iowa. "We're leaking and trailing clouds of information," he says. "People are becoming increasingly habituated to the notion that technology they use to communicate can be used to check up on them."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB113400562217716935-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22University+of+Iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Achepohl Collection Features African Pottery (ABC7Chicago.com, Dec. 8)
There's a special exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, but don't look for the bright hues of the French Impressionism the museum is famous for; the colors of these works are the muted earth tones of the African mud and clay they stemmed from. The brightest splashes of color in "For Hearth and Altar: African Ceramics from The KEITH ACHEPOHL Collection" come from the huge accompanying photographs on the walls, which show African potters and the techniques they use to create earthenware. The exhibition consists of 125 pieces from the personal collection of Achepohl, a printmaker and professor emeritus at the University of Iowa who plans to donate many of them to the Art Institute. A version of this story also appeared Dec. 8 on the website of the CBS affiliate in Chicago.
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=local&id=3707969

Schmidt Job Satisfaction Study Cited (New York Times, Dec 8)
A story about job satisfaction points to emerging evidence that suggests satisfied and engaged workers are also more productive workers. A study by James K. Harter of the Gallup Organization, FRANK SCHMIDT of the University of Iowa and Theodore L. Hayes of the Immigration and Naturalization Service provides extensive evidence, drawing on Gallup's client surveys, which covered 198,514 workers in 7,939 business units from 36 companies. For each company, they related each unit's profitability, productivity, customer satisfaction, turnover and work accidents to its employees' ratings of job satisfaction and engagement. Engagement included factors like whether employees said they knew what was expected of them and whether they had received encouragement at work.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/08/business/08scene.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1134049258-FUYAzBCGyFLPzXEMm8TI1g

Thorne Study Finds Endotoxins Common In House Dust (KPHO-TV, Dec. 8)
Bacterial allergens called endotoxins are common in house dust in American homes and pose a major asthma risk, a new study finds. "This study clearly demonstrates significant relationships between household endotoxin and diagnosed asthma, recent asthma symptoms, current use of asthma medications and wheezing," researcher PETER S. THORNE, of the University of Iowa Environmental Health Sciences Center, said in a prepared statement. KPHO is based in Phoenix. This story also appeared on the Web sites of KLAS-TV, WFIE-TV, WWAY-TV, Atlanta JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, Austin AMERICAN STATESMAN, HEALTH CENTRAL.com, FORBES and other news organizations.
http://www.kpho.com/Global/story.asp?S=4216021&nav=23Kx

DNR Points To UI Hog Confinement Study (WQAD-TV, Dec. 8)
The state is trying to implement an emergency rule to protect Iowa's waterways from pollution created by hog confinements. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources says confinements have increased significantly in the last two years, many of them in areas vulnerable to groundwater pollution. Their worries are partly based on studies by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which have associated the confinements with complaints of nausea, respiratory problems, headaches, depression and diarrhea. WQAD is based in Moline.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4216238&nav=1sW7

UI's $1 Billion Capital Campaign Noted (Bangor News, Dec. 7)
An editorial on a $150 million capital campaign approved Monday for the University of Maine argues that raising such a large sum of money won't propel the university far ahead nationally as two dozen public universities around the country are currently in the midst of or have recently completed campaigns to raise $1 billion or more. Both the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Kentucky have $1 billion goals. The paper is based in Maine.
http://www.bangornews.com/news/templates/?a=124742

Ghana Poet Was IWP Honorary Fellow (Graphic Ghana, Dec. 7)
A feature story on renowned African poet Kofi Anyidoho says Anyidoho was an honorary fellow with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM. The paper is based in Africa.
http://www.graphicghana.info/article.asp?artid=9443

Cochlear Trials At UI Cited (BusinessWeek Online, Dec. 7)
As Baby Boomers get older and lose their hearing, demand is expected to rise for the cochlear implants that can help deaf people hear again. At least, that's the hope of Chris Roberts, chief executive of Cochlear, the world's largest producer of such implants. The 52-year-old Roberts is pushing Cochlear into hybrid devices that combine an implant with a hearing aid. In a Q&A with Roberts, BusinessWeek asked when the devices might be available for purchase. Roberts responded, "There's a trial going on at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA [with] interesting results. There's real stuff going on. [The timing] is a couple of years off -- it's not months, but it's not decades. There aren't many people in the world working on this. I think we have a unique opportunity to really contribute to this space."
http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/dec2005/tc20051207_737632.htm?chan=db

UI Offers Advice On Double Vision (Austin American-Statesman, Dec. 7)
A Health Tip column reports that double vision occurs when a person sees two images of the same object, sometimes as completely separate items and sometimes as an overlapping image. This can be caused by a multitude of conditions, such as diabetes, cataracts, brain tumors and dry eyes. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA warns that many types of double vision can't be prevented, but safety precautions can be taken. Some of these include wearing safety goggles and headgear for sports and high-risk occupations. Those with the condition should also always wear seatbelts while driving. The paper is based in Texas. A version of the story also ran on the Websites of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, WFIE-TV in Indiana, WWAY in North Carolina and other media outlets.
http://www.statesman.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/eyes/529463.html

Gurnett Reports On Mars Ionosphere (Astrobiology Magazine, Dec. 6)
University of Iowa Space Physicist DON GURNETT and his UI colleagues report that a scientific instrument aboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) Mars Express spacecraft is working perfectly and that its data have so far revealed that Mars' ionosphere -- part of the upper atmosphere -- is very lumpy and complex, and that the instrument can "see" hidden craters and thick layers of ice beneath the planet's surface. Gurnett's findings were scheduled for presentation in the Thursday, Dec. 1, issue of Science Express, an online version of the journal Science, and in talks to be delivered at the Dec. 5-9 fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco.
http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=1796&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0

Author Is Workshop Graduate (Commercial Appeal, Dec. 6)
Writer Tom Piazza's new book is "Why New Orleans Matters" (ReganBooks-HarperCollins, $14.95), an examination of the city's unique nature and a plea for its preservation. Piazza, 50, is originally from New York. He has a degree from the Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Memphis, Tenn.
http://www.commercialappeal.com/mca/books/article/0,1426,MCA_484_4290891,00.html

Weber Says Grant Will Preserve Salmon (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Dec. 5)
Environmental researchers at the University of Iowa have received an additional $6.7 million to study and improve the coexistence of salmon and hydroelectric dams in the Pacific Northwest. The grant was provided by the Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Wash., to study salmon habitat on the Columbia River. Since 1990, the district has given researchers at the University of Iowa's College of Engineering about $25 million. LARRY WEBER, director of the university's IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering, said the additional money will be used to develop bypass systems for the Priest River Dam. Many salmon are killed in the harsh environment inside the dams or by the high levels of nitrogen absorbed as the river mixes with air after passing through the spillway gates. A version of this story also appeared Dec. 5 on the website of KGW, a television station in Oregon.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/6420AP_Salmon_Study.html

Robinson's 'Gilead' Wins Award (Sacramento Bee, Dec. 5)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON
's highly acclaimed novel "Gilead," which won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has been awarded the 2006 Louisville Grawemeyer Award in Religion. The prize, awarded by the Grawemeyer Foundation at the University of Louisville, was announced Thursday. It's the first time a novel has won the award, foundation officials said in a news release. The novel was selected among 53 nominations. The Grawemeyer religion prize, started in 1985, is given jointly by the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary and the University of Louisville. Robinson, who lives in Iowa City, is an instructor at the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop.
http://www.sacbee.com/24hour/religion/story/2950000p-11621266c.html

Robinson Is First Novelist To Win Grawemeyer Award (Chronicle, Dec. 5)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON
, a creative-writing professor at the University of Iowa, has won the 2006 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award in Religion for her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "Gilead," Grawemeyer offi     cials announced on Friday. This is the first time that the $200,000 prize has been awarded for a novel.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2005/12/2005120506n.htm

UI On Team Studying Emotions, Investing (Salon, Dec. 5)
When it comes to outsmarting the market or almost anything else Whitney Tilson, a value investor and founder of Tilson Capital Partners, has argued that we all suffer from overconfidence. In a popular presentation, he says that 82 percent of people say they are in the top 30 percent of safe drivers; 82 percent of Harvard Business School students say they are better looking than their classmates and 68 percent of lawyers in civil cases believe their side will prevail. A study published in "Psychological Science" co-authored by professors at Stanford University, Carnegie Mellon University and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA pitted people with normal brains against people whose limbic systems, the brain's emotional center, were impaired. The paper asks whether a neural systems dysfunction that curbs emotion can lead, in some circumstances, to more advantageous decisions. The answer, in terms of investing, was yes. The paper is based in Ontario, Calif. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the REDLANDS DAILY FACTS, the NAPA VALLEY REGISTER and the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, all in California, the CARTHAGE PRESS in Missouri, the CANTON DAILY LEDGER in Illinois, the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE in Utah, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, CBS NEWS and dozens of other media outlets.
http://www.salon.com/wire/ap/archive.html?wire=D8E90C603.html

UI Graduate Student Arrested After Making Threats (WQAD-TV, Dec. 5)
A University of Iowa graduate student is accused of making threats against the provost's office, referencing campus shootings in 1991 that left six people dead. Police say 43-year-old Reza Hussain, of Iowa City, is facing a first-degree harassment charge. University officials say the Chemistry Department graduate teaching assistant is now prohibited from the campus. University of Iowa Police director CHUCK GREEN says Hussain felt he had been mistreated by the graduate department. According to police reports, Hussain contacted Provost MIKE HOGAN's office in Jessup Hall shortly before 10:30 a.m. Thursday, saying he had a machine gun and threatening to kill everyone. The police reports say he also mentioned the shooting spree that took place in Jessup and Van Allen halls on November 1, 1991. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for Dec. 12. Formal charges are expected before then.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4197586&nav=1sW7

Redlawsk Comments On GOP Corruption Cases (San Jose Mercury News, Dec. 4)
Big money is buying influence in Washington these days on a scale seen rarely, if ever, before, and many of the pending corruption cases involve top-level Republicans and their supporters. Whether Democrats can play off today's ethical mess as successfully is uncertain. "The difference between today and then is today's scandals right now don't come down to the individual district level," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa who has studied the effect of political corruption on voters' decisions. "While Democrats can say, `Look at these corrupt Republicans,' individuals still give their own representatives a lot of support until they see a reason not to." The paper is based in California. Versions of the article also ran on the Websites of the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota, the MIAMI HERALD, the CONTRA COSTA TIMES and MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD, both in California, the WILKES BARRE TIMES-LEADER in Pennsylvania and many other media outlets.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/13325304.htm

'Nation Deceived' Backs Accelerated Education (Kalamazoo Gazette, Dec. 4)
A story about accelerated education, such as grade-skipping, says that many educators see the practice as potentially harmful to a child's social and emotional development. However, a 2004 report published by the INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR GIFTED EDUCATION AND TALENT DEVELOPMENT AT UNIVERSITY OF IOWA says "acceleration clearly deserves greater use in practice than has been the case." The report, "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students," contends acceleration is an easy and inexpensive solution for "students who long for a challenge."
http://www.mlive.com/news/kzgazette/index.ssf?/base/news-15/1133695202180800.xml&coll=7

UI College Of Education, 'Nation Deceived' Cited (Joplin Globe, Dec. 4)
An editorial about a woman whose son is academically gifted and who is worried she won't find support in her school system for helping him reach his potential criticizes the No Child Left Behind Act, which the editor argues puts intense pressure on public schools to push students through a chute of minimally acceptable standards and has helped create a system of winners and losers, and -- too often -- the losers are among the brightest students. "The COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, working through a foundation, studied how bright students are treated in public schools," the editor writes. "Researchers found -- as outlined in their report called 'A Nation Deceived' -- that many districts are reluctant to recognize brighter students. The reasons vary widely, including the fear of offending parents whose children are not advanced, but the additional resources it takes to educate the bright, and the onerous requirements of No Child Left Behind are significant factors." The paper is based in Missouri.
http://www.joplinglobe.com/story.php?story_id=213532&c=96

Federal Law Closes Public Housing Loophole (Roanoke Times, Dec. 3)
Federal legislation signed into law Thursday will close a loophole that dozens of Virginia Tech students are using to live in free or reduced housing. President Bush signed the legislation four days after ESPN aired a story about how athletes, including 19 Virginia Tech football players, were taking advantage of Section 8 housing regulations while still accepting thousands in housing stipends from colleges and universities. The new law, part of an appropriations package, will force students to include parental income and any financial aid received that exceeds tuition when they apply each year for Section 8 housing certification. Students who are 24 or older, married, have children or are military veterans will not need to include their parents' income when applying. Stories by the Des Moines Register last year revealed how children of wealthy parents and students on full scholarships at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA were using the decade-old regulations changes to acquire free or reduced housing. In response to the newspaper stories, Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, proposed legislation to close the loophole. It passed the Senate last month and was on the president's desk Monday. The paper is based in Virginia.
http://www.roanoke.com/news/nrv/wb/wb/xp-43102

Robinson's 'Gilead' Wins Grawemeyer Award (CBS News, Dec. 3)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON, whose novel "Gilead" weaves theological reflections into the memoir of a dying Iowa minister, has been named the winner of the 2006 Grawemeyer Award in Religion. Robinson, who also won the Pulitzer Prize for the 2004 novel, said the Grawemeyer religion award has special significance. "I have sort of studied theology as an amateur for years, and I'm very pleased to have their approval, frankly," she said in a telephone interview from Iowa, where she is an instructor in the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. A version of the story also ran on the Websites of the WYOMING NEWS, HINDUSTAN TIMES in India, PRAVDA in Russia, the DURANT DAILY DEMOCRAT in Oklahoma, NEWSDAY and other media outlets.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/12/03/ap/entertainment/mainD8E8H5I8K.shtml

UI's Progress On Raising $1 Billion Detailed (Chronicle, Dec. 2)
A progress report on the 25 American universities that are seeking to raise at least $1 billion reports that as of Oct. 31, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA had raised $983.4 million (an increase of $23 million from the previous month) and that its goal was to raise $1 billion by the end of 2005. [Editor's Note: The UI Foundation announced on Nov. 29 that it did reach its goal early. For more information, see http://news-releases.uiowa.edu/2005/november/112905gbb_goal.html]
http://chronicle.com/daily/2005/12/2005120208n.htm?rss

Robinson’s ‘Gilead’ Wins Grawemeyer Award (Courier-Journal, Dec. 2)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON
, whose novel "Gilead" weaves theological reflections into the memoir of a dying Iowa minister, has been named the winner of the 2006 Grawemeyer Award in Religion. Robinson, who also won the Pulitzer Prize for the 2004 novel, said the Grawemeyer religion award has special significance. "I have sort of studied theology as an amateur for years, and I'm very pleased to have their approval, frankly," she said in a telephone interview from Iowa, where she is an instructor in the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. The newspaper is based in Louisville, Ky.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051202/NEWS01/512020450

Achepohl Collection Featured At Art Institute (Chicago Sun-Times, Dec. 2)
When the Chicago-born artist KEITH ACHEPOHL looks at a potential addition to the impressive collection of African pottery he's been amassing over the past 30 years, he spends little time pondering what it might reveal about its cultural context. What he wants to know, mainly, is whether it's beautiful. Over the years, the pots have chattered away, and more than 125 of these terracotta masterpieces will be on display in a new exhibition, "For Hearth and Altar: African Ceramics from the Keith Achepohl Collection," opening Saturday at the Art Institute of Chicago. A distinctive feature of Achepohl's holdings -- about half of which he's donating to the Art Institute, singlehandedly establishing the largest museum collection of traditional African pottery in the world -- is that he chose them primarily for their appeal to the eye: the elegance of their shapes, the intricate decorations and variegated patinas of their surfaces. "I have a lot of friends in the African Studies world, and most of them seem to talk about the anthropology of the work but not as much about its aesthetics," says Achepohl, a retired art professor at the University of Iowa whose prints and watercolors are on display at the Elmhurst Art Museum through Jan. 15. "You can give me all the background information you want, but if the piece can't speak for itself as art, it's not as much of value to me. I think all of these speak for themselves as beautiful objects."
http://www.suntimes.com/output/nance/wkp-news-achepohl02.html

Redlawsk Comments On Scandal, Voters (San Jose Mercury News, Dec. 2)
In what would be an audacious abuse of that nexus of money, power and influence, two defense contractors now stand accused of bribing Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham, R-Calif. - a power on the House Defense Appropriations subcommittee - in exchange for top feed at the Pentagon trough. Cunningham resigned from Congress this week after pleading guilty to accepting $2.4 million in bribes, including a Rolls-Royce and a $7,200 antique Louis-Philippe commode. That case and other high-profile corruption investigations under way have enormous implications for next year's congressional elections. The out-of-power party blasting incumbents as corrupt isn't a new tactic. Rep. Newt Gingrich, R-Ga., played a similar card in 1992, citing widespread House Bank overdrafts by Democratic lawmakers as evidence that they were arrogant and out of touch. His party gained 10 seats in the House of Representatives even as Democrat Bill Clinton won the presidency. But whether Democrats can play off today's ethical mess as successfully is uncertain. "The difference between today and then is today's scandals right now don't come down to the individual district level," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa who's studied the effect of political corruption on voters' decisions. "While Democrats can say ‘look at these corrupt Republicans,’ individuals still give their own representatives a lot of support until they see a reason not to." Versions of this Knight Ridder article also appeared Dec. 2 on the web sites of the MONTEREY HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO TRIBUNE and CONTRA COSTA TIMES in Californa, PIONEER PRESS in Minnesota, CHARLOTEE (N.C.) OBSERVER, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, KENTUCKY.com, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, KANSAS CITY STAR, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, THE STATE in South Carolina, and FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/politics/13304960.htm

Thorne Asthma Study Cited (New Kerala.com, Dec. 2)
A new study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine has found that exposure to endotoxins - toxic substances associated with the outer membrane of certain gram-negative bacteria - in house dust pose a serious risk for asthma. According to researchers, led by PETER S. THORNE of the University of Iowa, inhalation exposure to endotoxins is common in homes, and its sources include dust, pets, humidifiers, pests, and outdoor air. The news website is based in India. A version of this article also appeared Dec. 2 on WEBINDIA123.com.
http://www.newkerala.com/news.php?action=fullnews&id=60130

McCray Comments On Modified Stat1 Molecules (Science Central, Dec. 1)
When our bodies spot a virus, the first responders are a group of proteins called interferons. They carry the equivalent of warning messages to the outer borders -- or membranes -- of our cells. Here, the interferons hand these warnings off to Stat1 molecules, which in turn alert genes inside the cells to activate our bodies' virus-fighting response. In essence, interferons and Stat1 molecules work as a team to keep viruses from replicating in our bodies. A research team from Washington University changed the shape of Stat1 so that it could move more efficiently inside cells, ultimately becoming a better messenger, and activating our immune systems faster. They named the new version of Stat1 "Hyper-Stat1." In terms of the flu, University of Iowa pulmonologist and gene therapy expert PAUL MCCRAY says one benefit of Hyper-Stat1 might be that it would strengthen people's immune systems in a broader manner so that they would have increased resistance to multiple strains of influenza instead of just one, as is the case with annual flu vaccines. But he cautions, this technique would "not necessarily be a replacement for a vaccine."
http://www.sciencentral.com/articles/view.php3?type=article&article_id=218392695

Ellison's Widow, A UI Alumna, Dies (New York Times, Dec. 1)
Fanny McConnell Ellison, who was involved in the theater, politics and civil rights before she married Ralph Ellison and helped him edit his masterpiece, "Invisible Man," died on Nov. 19 at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in Manhattan. She was 93. Fanny McConnell was born on Nov. 27, 1911, in Louisville, Ky. Her mother took her to Pueblo, Colo., to Denver and finally to Chicago, where Fanny finished high school. She enrolled at Fisk University, but was forced to leave because of finances. She received a scholarship to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, from which she graduated.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/01/arts/01ellison.html

Music Director Is UI Alumnus (Norwich Bulletin, Dec. 1)
David Belles, a faculty member at the Eastern Connecticut State University in Willimantic, is the new music director and conductor of the Concert Choir of Northeastern Connecticut. Belles holds a doctorate of musical arts in choral conducting and pedagogy from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.norwichbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051201/NEWS01/512010327/1002

UI Study Shows Slight Risk Of Defects With IVF (Science Daily, Dec. 1)
Babies conceived through in vitro fertilization (IVF), a method of assisted reproduction, have a slightly increased risk of major birth defects, such as heart, muscle and skeletal defects, compared to babies conceived naturally, according to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study. A version of this article also appeared Dec. 1 on MyDNA.com.
http://www.mydna.com/genes/genetics/news/news_20051130_birth_defects_in_vitro_fertilization.html

Man Seeks Patron To Finance UI Degree (Washington Jewish Week, Dec. 1)
David Harris-Gershon of Washington, D.C., is inviting prospective patrons to find him on ePier, an online auction site. Harris-Gershon's asking price is $100,000, the amount he figures it would take to send him back to school full time while maintaining his family for the next several years, until he obtains a master's degree in fine arts, with a focus on creative writing. If $100,000 should come his way, Harris-Gershon, who earned an undergraduate degree in English at the University of Georgia and a degree in Jewish education at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, would like to attend a fine arts program either at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA or at George Mason University in the District.
http://www.washingtonjewishweek.com/main.asp?SectionID=4&SubSectionID=4&ArticleID=4468&TM=60.152

Van Voorhis: Defects Not A Factor For Majority Of IVF Babies (UPI, Nov. 30)
A study at the University of Iowa of in vitro fertilization shows a slight increase in birth defects but doesn't show a link between the process and defects. The study by researchers at Iowa found 6.2 percent of IVF babies were at a higher risk of birth defects and 4.4 percent of naturally conceived babies were at risk. Dr. BRAD VAN VOORHIS said the study shows "the vast majority of IVF-conceived babies are not affected by major birth defects."
http://www.upi.com/ConsumerHealthDaily/view.php?StoryID=20051130-042302-2475r

Gurnett Reports 'Lumpy' Ionosphere (Mars Today, Nov. 30)
University of Iowa Space Physicist DON GURNETT and his UI colleagues report that a scientific instrument aboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) Mars Express spacecraft is working perfectly and that its data have so far revealed that Mars' ionosphere -- part of the upper atmosphere -- is very lumpy and complex, and that the instrument can "see" hidden craters and thick layers of ice beneath the planet's surface. Gurnett's findings were scheduled for presentation in the Thursday, Dec. 1 issue of Science Express, an online version of the journal Science, and in talks to be delivered at the Dec. 5-9 fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco.
http://www.marstoday.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=18413

Bezanson Suggests Redirecting Libel Suits (Editor & Publisher, Nov. 30)
RANDALL BEZANSON
, University of Iowa professor of law, and Gilbert Cranberg, former opinion editor of The Des Moines Register, suggest in a column that in the not-too-distant future, plaintiffs in libel cases may realize they have been aiming at the wrong targets in going after reporters and editors. In shorthanded newsrooms where reporters must scramble to fill space and editors don't have sufficient time to verify their work, blame for flawed stories might just reside with corporate management.
http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/columns/shoptalk_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1001612385

 

 

 

 

The University of Iowa All rights reserved copyright 2006