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UI in the News

August, 2005

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IEM Helped Create Hurricane Market (Canada Free Press, Aug. 31)
With handheld betting devices making even poolside wagers possible, a new futures market predicting where hurricanes will hit has opened. A trio of University of Miami professors is trying to take over the local weatherman's job. The three are betting on a new way to predict where a hurricane will hit. Their approach may not be as orthodox as Walter the Weatherman, but they believe their way could help people living in hurricane alley decide whether or not to evacuate. "I don't view it as a game," said David Kelly, a Miami associate professor and economist. Along with David Letson, a fellow economist and associate professor, and David Nolan, assistant professor of meteorology, he developed MAHEM, short for Miami Hurricane Event Market, with help from trading specialists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.canadafreepress.com/2005/cover083105.htm

Witt Comments On African-American Recipe-Sharing (Kansas City Star, Aug. 31)
There was a time when generations of African-American cooks learned to reproduce the flavors of home firsthand from their elders in the kitchen. But this recipe exchange was sidetracked during the Great Migration early in the 20th century, when hundreds of thousands of African-Americans left the South for the North. "Until then, mothers passed down recipes to daughters by way of oral tradition," said DORIS WITT, an associate professor of English at the University of Iowa and the author of Black Hunger: Soul Food and America.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/living/12514412.htm

UI Alumna Opens Pilates Studio (Wednesday Journal, Aug. 31)
One year into a master's degree program in social work at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Regan Hoerster realized she didn't have the same passion she had as a women's studies major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A student of the Pilates Method, a strengthening and flexibility-building exercise regiment developed in the early 20th century by Joseph Pilates, Hoerster found that her future lay not in her studies, but in the recreation she'd come to love. "I knew within a month this was what I wanted to do," Hoerster said. So on Aug. 8, Hoerster, 25, opened Village Pilates Studio at 436 S. Ridgeland Ave., hoping to turn her passion into profit. The paper covers Oak Park and River Forest, Ill.
http://www.wednesdayjournalonline.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=9&ArticleID=2352&TM=80289.23

UI Study Measuring Steps Cited (Business Gazette, Aug. 31)
A story about an 84-year-old World War II veteran, who has taken an estimated 4.1 million steps - about 2,050 miles - since 2003 to maintain his fitness says that there are about 2,000 steps in a mile, according to a study performed by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper covers Montgomery, Frederick, Prince George's and Carroll counties in Maryland.
http://www.gazette.net/200535/gaithersburg/news/291761-1.html

Longtime Librarian Studied At UI (Fauquier Times-Democrat, Aug. 30)
A feature story on Ava Lee, who has worked for three decades in the Fauquier County Library in Virginia, says Lee grew up in Iowa and attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She met her husband, Lewis, there when he went west to study taxidermy. "I always said that he came to Iowa to find me," she said with a laugh. Then a couple of years later, the couple came back to Virginia and settled in The Plains. The paper is based in Virginia.
http://www.timescommunity.com/site/tab2.cfm?newsid=15125756&BRD=2553&PAG=461&dept_id=506073&rfi=6

UI Hypnosis Study Cited (The Telegraph, Aug. 30)
Until recently, neuroscientists were puzzled about how hypnotherapy works. Now they are beginning to understand why. Last year, researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA used magnetic resonance imaging scans to find out if hypnosis alters brain activity in a way that might explain pain reduction. Their results, reported in the journal Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, showed patients under hypnosis experienced significantly less pain when exposed to strong heat and had a distinctly different pattern of brain activity when not hypnotized. Researchers concluded that hypnosis somehow blocks signals from reaching parts of the brain that perceive pain. The Telegraph is based in England.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/main.jhtml?xml=/health/2005/08/30/hhyp30.xml&sSheet=/health/2005/08/30/ixhmain.html

McLeese To Discuss The Boss (The Guardian, Aug. 30)
One of the presenters at an upcoming academic conference analyzing the music of Bruce Springsteen is DONALD McLEESE, UI journalism professor, who first saw rock'n'roll's future up close and personal when he interviewed Springsteen in his role as music writer for the Chicago Sun-Times. The Guardian is based in England.
http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/news/story/0,9830,1558662,00.html?gusrc=rss

Malaysian Actress To Attend UI's Writing Program (The Star, Aug. 30)
Sandra Sodhy is one of Malaysia's best-known actresses, but she hopes to expand in a new direction by becoming a playwright. To learn, this fall she will attend the International Writing Program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Star is based in Malaysia.
http://thestar.com.my/lifestyle/story.asp?file=/2005/8/30/lifefocus/11861791&sec=lifefocus

Job Seekers Should Stick To Flattery (Lansing State Journal, Aug. 29)
Those who successfully kiss up to their bosses have mastered a delicate balance between subtle flattery and somewhat preserving the respect their co-workers have for them. Timothy Judge, a business management professor at the University of Florida, conducted a year-and-a-half study about the topic. Judge surveyed more than 100 business and liberal arts majors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He found that flattering the employer during a job interview works better than boasting about oneself. "The overall message is when you have an interview, do your research on the company and the interviewer, and try to find ways to emphasize that you fit the job," Judge said. "Find areas of agreement (and) make genuine compliments."
http://www.lsj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050829/NEWS03/508290312/1001/news

Hurst: Watch Casual Emails When Applying (Springfield News-Leader, Aug. 29)
So you've finally graduated from college and landed your first real job. But do you know the do's and don'ts of workplace etiquette? We asked three workplace etiquette professionals what they thought were the worst faux pas, including DEE HURST, director of human resources at the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business, who warns against forgetting your cyber-etiquette. "A lot of new grads get nailed in their career early for sending really too casual e-mails," Hurst said. Use proper grammar and check your spelling. Visualize any e-mails you send as also going to a manager two levels above you, Hurst said. The paper is based in Missouri. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the News-Journal in Delaware.
http://www.news-leader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050829/BUSINESS/508290333/1092

Aslan's Book Finalist For Guardian First Book Award (IranMania.com, Aug. 29)
The book "No god But God: The Origins, Evolution and Future of Islam" by Reza Aslan has made the shortlist of 10 finalists for the 2005 Guardian First Book Award, according to MNA. The book is a call for reform and a proposal to end the religious conflict between East and West. Aslan, an Iranian writer and journalist who resides in the United States, wrote the book after the Sept. 11, 2001 incidents. Aslan was a visiting assistant professor of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he got an MFA in fiction at the Writers' Workshop. He has written for The Nation, Slate and The New York Times. The publication is based in Iran. A version of the story also ran on the Website MEHRNEWS.COM in Iran.
http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=34904&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs

Carlson: Roberts Poor Choice For Supreme Court (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 28)
In an op-ed column, University of Iowa law professor JONATHAN CARLSON argues that John Roberts is a poor choice for Supreme Court justice because he has spent most of his adult working life in Washington, D.C. As a result, he could suffer from the kind of inside-the-Beltway myopia and bent perspectives of people who have lived too long in Washington, which might color his decisions as a justice.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/chi-0508280005aug28,0,7284617.story?coll=chi-newsopinionperspective-hed

UI Business Alumna Director Of Symphony (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Aug. 28)
A feature on Lindi Roelofse, the new executive director of Symphony Arlington in Texas, says she has a bachelor's degree in arts management and psychology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as well as a master's degree in business administration with an emphasis in marketing management from the UI's HENRY B. TIPPIE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT. It also says the 24-year-old Pretoria, South Africa native was arts coordinator for Project Art in University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. A classically trained pianist, Roelofse also directed several plays and opera productions in Iowa City. The paper is based in Texas. http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/news/12499313.htm

Andrejevic: Cheesy 1-Liners Fact Of Reality TV (Salt Lake Tribune, Aug. 22)
They've struggled on remote islands, danced the Hustle on cue and eaten rotten squid guts for our entertainment. But reality TV show contestants haven't been humiliated to the max until they've been cut down by that catchphrase at the end of every episode. From the old standby "You're fired" (NBC's "The Apprentice") to the less memorable "You can't always get what you want" (VH1's "Kept"), one-liners used to eliminate people have gotten progressively cheesier. So why do producers spend so much time writing them? "Cheesy one-liners have long been a staple of popular culture," much like the Terminator's, "I'll be back," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. Above all else, he adds, one-liners give reality-TV-show addicts a chance to participate.
http://sltrib.com/entertainment/ci_2979573

UI Artists Arranged Failed Gertrude Stein Visit (The Age, Aug. 27)
In a Q&A with Steven Biel, author of the book "American Gothic: A Life of America's Most Famous Painting," Biel is asked about Grant Wood's relationship with Gertrude Stein, who on a lecture tour from Paris praised Wood's "devastating satire." Biel says Wood was to live only another seven years after Stein's abortive visit to Cedar Rapids for the evening of December 10, 1934, organized by the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Speakers, formed by Wood and some colleagues at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA: bad weather grounded Stein in Wisconsin. "At any event," Biel says, "a 'reconstructed' bohemian - he had spent time in Paris in 1920, '23 and '26 - Wood was not about to bite the hand that fed him. Instead, he became a celebrated 'regionalist' painter: that is, rather than critiquing the growing Midwestern domination of American life and values, he embraced it. The temptation must have been strong." The paper is based in Australia.
http://www.theage.com.au/news/reviews/gothic/2005/08/27/1124563061900.html#

Virtual Hospital Site Recommended (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 27)
Back to school often means buying tech equipment, some of which is dauntingly expensive. But as long as you have a way to access the Internet, you can use educational sites in the true spirit of the Web, whether they were established by a corporation, a non-profit group or a lone, lovable geek. One site recommended under the heading of "anatomy" is http://www.vh.org/adult/provider/anatomy/atlasofanatomy/index.html, which the article describes as more modern, detailed look at our inner selves from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The article originally appeared in the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/technology/chi-0508270147aug27,1,218223.story?coll=chi-technology-hed

Article Recalls ALF Break-in At UI (The Japan Times, Aug. 26)
Political terrorism, exemplified by 9/11 and most recently in London, may pose the greatest security threat facing most nations. But other terrorists also lurk among us, mostly in the guise of animal rights and environmental activists. They "see themselves in a war against the entire government and industrial democracy itself," explains Mark Potok, director of the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project. Frankie Trull, president of the Foundation for Biomedical Research, notes: "These are unbelievably mean-spirited people" who "operate in a classic terrorist organization mode." Over the last decade the Animal Liberation Front has committed 700 criminal acts in America, according to the FBI. ALF activists recently broke into a pharmaceutical executive's wife's car, stole her credit cards, and charged $20,000 in charitable "donations." At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. ALF members destroyed laboratory equipment, removed animals, ruined research papers and threatened school employees.
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/geted.pl5?eo20050827db.htm

Martin To Head HIV/AIDS Office (Washington Blade, Aug. 26)
Washington D.C. Mayor Anthony Williams named Marsha Martin, executive director of the national AIDS advocacy group AIDS Action and a former official in the Clinton administration, to head the city's troubled HIV/AIDS Administration. She received a bachelor's degree in psychology and a master's degree in social work from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.washblade.com/2005/8-26/news/localnews/haa.cfm

UI Press Book Noted (Lincoln Journal-Star, Aug. 26)
Today's alphabet books, simple to complex, reflect the mind-boggling variety that springs from just 26 letters. Claudia McGehee uses a traditional approach in "A Tallgrass Prairie Alphabet" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2004). A black-bordered illustration reminiscent of painted woodcuts is centered on each page. A plant or animal of the tallgrass prairie represents each letter.
http://www.journalstar.com/articles/2005/08/26/hubbub/doc430e3caad0b15213622014.txt

Book Cites Fisher's Research (BusinessWeek Online, Aug. 26)
In his book, "The Great American Jobs Scam: Corporate Tax Dodging and the Myth of Job Creation," Greg LeRoy uses both specific examples as well as broader studies to show how companies pit prospective sites against one another to get the best tax deal -- then usually locate the new facilities in the region they had chosen in the first place. In fact, an estimated 96 percent of company tax breaks are such windfalls, according to work LeRoy cites by University of Iowa professor PETER FISHER.
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_36/b3949137.htm

Singer Recalls Music Heard At UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Aug. 25)
In an interview involving a listening test covering a variety of music, singer Molly Sue McDonald related, "I remember the first piece of music that made me just burst out embarrassingly into tears was also Puccini, "Vissi d'Arte" [from "Tosca"], and it was that spot at the end, the stretch. Man, I didn't even know the piece at the time, and I was sitting in on the Met auditions at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It was, like, wow!" McDonald is part of the "Sopranorama," performance at the Southern Theater.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1646/5569662.html

UI Participant In Electronic Voting Center (Pearland Journal, Aug. 25)
Last week, the National Science Foundation announced that it will provide $7.5 million dollars over five years to ACCURATE (Center for Correct, Usable, Reliable, Auditable, and Transparent Elections). Computer scientists from Rice University, Stanford University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, among others, are participants. "We'll look into ways of making the innards of the (voting) machine more trustworthy," Dave Wagner, a co-principal investigator of the center, said. "This could range from building software that would make it hard for somebody to insert malicious logic without detection, to building machines that include components from multiple vendors, so that the system can cross-check itself." The newspaper is based in Texas. http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=15099042&BRD=1574&PAG=461&dept_id=532247&rfi=6

Cunnigham's New Novel Released (The Guardian, Aug. 25)
"Specimen Days," Michael Cunningham's first novel since "The Hours," was released in the United Kindgom this month. In this interview, it's noted that he is the recipient of a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, a PEN/Faulkner Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and a Michner Fellowship from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://books.guardian.co.uk/departments/generalfiction/story/0,6000,1556438,00.html

Hurricane Futures Market Launched (Orlando Sun-Sentinel, Aug. 25)
It wasn't exactly the pit of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, but a futures market opened Wednesday allowing hurricane experts to put their money on where they think Tropical Storm Katrina will make landfall. Coordinated by the Rosenstiel school and the Iowa Electronic Market at the University of Iowa, the Hurricane Futures Market opened briefly earlier this month for short-lived Hurricane Irene. Katrina, however "will be its first real test," said FORREST NELSON, a University of Iowa economics professor and one of the coordinators of Iowa Electronic Markets. Though the exact number was unclear, by Wednesday afternoon only a handful of investors had traded Katrina shares, Nelson said. The market, which trades at http://hurricanefutures.miami.edu, had just 23 open accounts as of Monday, but that number will almost certainly grow. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/business/local/sfl-zfutures25aug25,0,4015251.story

Andrejevic: Cheesy One-Liners Fact Of Reality TV (Nashua Telegraph, Aug. 25)
They've struggled on remote islands, danced the Hustle on cue and eaten rotten squid guts for our entertainment. But reality TV show contestants haven't been humiliated to the max until they've been cut down by that catchphrase at the end of every episode. From the old standby "You're fired" (NBC's "The Apprentice") to the less memorable "You can't always get what you want" (VH1's "Kept"), one-liners used to eliminate people have gotten progressively cheesier. So why do producers spend so much time writing them? "Cheesy one-liners have long been a staple of popular culture," much like the Terminator's, "I'll be back," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. Above all else, he adds, one-liners give reality-TV-show addicts a chance to participate. The newspaper is based in New Hampshire. A version of this story also appeared on the website of the LEXINGTON (Ky.) HERALD LEADER.
http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050825/ENTERTAINMENT/108250005/-1/SPORTS02

Dad Writes About Paying UI Tuition (Des Plaines Journal, Aug. 25)
A columnist advises even parents of young children to look to the future and consider how they will pay for college. Of his own four children, he writes: "They're young adults now. They're good, smart kids with bright futures who, with hard work, perseverance and determination will succeed in life. But for the time being, one of our main focuses is and will remain on a primary objective: getting through college. Recently, we drove the 130 miles to the cornfields of central Illinois to get Katie settled in her new home at Illinois State University. Three days later, our van headed west, where, after a 3-1/2-hour drive, we pulled onto the beautiful campus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where Erin will start her second year." The costs are enormous, he writes, noting Iowa's out-of-state tuition that boosts annual costs by 75 percent. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.journal-topics.com/columns/offtherecord050824.html

Expert: Pierce May Have To Register As Sex Offender (WQAD-TV, Aug. 24)
A legal expert says there is little doubt that Pierre Pierce will have to add his name to the state Sex Offender Registry after he is sentenced on a sex assault charge in October. The former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball star pleaded guilty Monday to assault with intent to commit sexual abuse and three other crimes. The charges stemmed from a January 27th episode with a former girlfriend. The 22-year-old Pierce agreed to a plea deal. Pierce also pleaded guilty to third-degree burglary, criminal mischief and false imprisonment. He faces up to nine years in prison and up to $8,000 in fines. Prosecutors have agreed to recommend a five-year suspended sentence on the burglary charge. The State says it will argue that Pierce should serve some prison time. Robert Rigg is the director of the criminal defense program at Drake University Law School. He says under the deal, Pierce also will likely have to register as a sex offender. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3757405

UI Tuition Noted (Claremore Daily Progress, Aug. 23)
Tuition at the University of Oklahoma for the coming school year is $1,431 for a 15-credit semester. The price tag read $1,047 when two students began as incoming freshmen three years ago -- a rise of nearly 32.7 percent. Scholarships help some incoming freshmen. In Ottumwa, Iowa, the local Rotary Club chapter sponsors four scholarships each year. They are distributed based on need, academic skill and activities, said Greg Gardner of the Rotary chapter. Gardner has seen the program's scholarship recipients head to private and public colleges in the area. Classes begin Monday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Iowa, where tuition is now $4,342. The paper is based in Oklahoma.
http://www.claremoreprogress.com/archive/article21531

Baldus: Court Decision Difficult To Enforce (KVUE-TV, Aug. 23)
An investigation by the Dallas Morning News shows that attorneys in Dallas County, Texas, frequently use race as a reason to remove potential jurors from the pool, despite the Supreme Court decision in Batson v. Kentucky that prohibits such action. There's a "stigmatization that's associated with overt racism; it's just not accepted any longer," said DAVID BALDUS, a nationally recognized expert on jury selection and a law professor at the University of Iowa. "That is what greatly inhibits the enforcement of Batson." The station is based in Texas.
http://www.kvue.com/news/state/stories/082305kvuejuryjudges-cb.a1267cd7.html

UI Ranks As Top Party School (Concord Monitor, Aug. 23)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ranked as one of the top party schools by Princeton Review. The University of Wisconsin-Madison topped the list. The paper is based in New Hampshire. Versions of this story appeared on the Web sites of many other news organizations.
http://www.concordmonitor.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050823/REPOSITORY/508230351/-1/NEWS01

Barkan: Museveni Harasses Opponents (Christian Science Monitor, Aug. 23)
Uganda's government is becoming more authoritarian, evidenced by its recent crackdown on a critical journalist, as the country's first multi-party election approaches, according to JOEL BARKAN, a University of Iowa professor and expert in East African politics. "President Museveni's approach to the onset of multiparty politics in Uganda is nearly identical to the approach of former president [Daniel arap] Moi in Kenya a decade ago," he says. "Agree to multiparty democracy in form, but harass the opposition and the press, create an unlevel playing field and try to orchestrate the outcome through the disbursement of patronage and money."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0823/p07s02-woaf.html

UI Partners With Illinois Nursing School (Peoria Journal Star, Aug. 23)
Mennonite College of Nursing at Illinois State University is strengthening its emphasis on care for older adults by establishing a doctoral degree program in gerontological nursing. The doctorate in nursing in aging program is made possible through a federal grant and a partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Nursing. This same story appeared on the Web site of the Bloomington (Ill.) PANTAGRAPH.
http://www.pjstar.com/stories/082305/REG_B7BMJRKL.017.shtml

Baldus: Court Decision Difficult To Enforce (Dallas Morning News, Aug. 23)
An investigation by the Dallas Morning News shows that attorneys in Dallas County, Texas, frequently use race as a reason to remove potential jurors from the pool, despite the Supreme Court decision in Batson v. Kentucky that prohibits such action. There's a "stigmatization that's associated with overt racism; it's just not accepted any longer," said DAVID BALDUS, a nationally recognized expert on jury selection and a law professor at the University of Iowa. "That is what greatly inhibits the enforcement of Batson." The story also appeared on the Web site of WFAA TV in Dallas.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/localnews/stories/DN-juryjudges_19pro.ART.Collin_County.Edition2.e70cd40.html

In a sidebar story, Baldus suggested setting up a computerized system to track lawyers' strikes. Each court could then instantly research individual lawyers' strikes to determine trends in how they are using their peremptory challenges. That would allow a judge to better gauge a lawyer's motives.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/localnews/stories/DN-jurytime_19pro.ART.Dallas.Edition3.e70f458.html

UI To Share In Electronic Voting Study Grant (Washington Post, Aug. 23)
Thanks to Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s curious and continuing blind faith in certifiably untrustworthy voting machines, voters in the state will never know whether their election choices were recorded correctly last year or what to believe when the "results" of key state elections are rolled out next year. Computer experts across the country -- and most notably in the governor's back yard, at Johns Hopkins University -- have warned repeatedly that although the touch-screen machines in use in Maryland can, at their best, be as accurate as they are efficient, no one can know for sure, because they are not equipped to produce paper trails showing each vote cast.  At least now important help is on the way: With a grant announced last week from the National Science Foundation, Hopkins is establishing a center to study the reliability of electronic voting machines. The goal is to design the most foolproof, hacker-resistant and accurate voting system possible. Hopkins will share the grant with experts from Stanford University; the University of California at Berkeley; the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; Rice University; and SRI International, an independent, nonprofit research organization in California.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/08/22/AR2005082201236.html

Pierce Pleads Guilty (WOWT-TV, Aug. 23)
Under a deal announced Monday, former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball standout Pierre Pierce pleaded guilty to charges stemming from an assault on a former girlfriend. The 22-year-old Pierce was charged with felony burglary, criminal mischief and assault with intent to commit sexual abuse after the January 27th argument at the woman's West Des Moines home. WOWT is based in Omaha, Neb. The same story appeared on the Web sits of WQAD TV and WHBF TV in the Quad Cities.
http://www.wowt.com/sports/headlines/1789842.html

UI Ranks As Top Party School (Newsday, Aug. 23)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ranked as one of the top party schools by Princeton Review. The University of Wisconsin-Madison topped the list. Versions of this story appeared on the Web sites of the BOSTON GLOBE, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, USA TODAY, PORTSMOUTH (N.H.) HERALD, WASHINGTON POST, NEWSDAY, CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER, GAINESVILLE (Fla.) SUN, LAKELAND (Fla.) LEDGER, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, NEW YORK TIMES and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.nynewsday.com/news/local/wire/newyork/ny-bc-ny--partyschools0822aug22,0,2651552.story?coll=ny-region-apnewyork

Columnist Questions UI Indian Policy (College Hockey Online, Aug. 23)
A columnist writing about the NCAA's recent decision to prohibit Indian mascots and imagery points out that while the organization recommends the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as a model for other universities to follow in part because it does not schedule games against other schools with Indian nicknames, it does play the University of Illinois in Big 10 events.
http://www.uscho.com/news/2005/08/22_010692.php

McCray: Insect Virus May Help Hemophilia Cure (Innovations Report, Aug. 23)
A virus that typically infects insects could help with the development of gene therapy treatment for Hemophilia A, a condition in which even a bump on the knee can cause serious internal bleeding in people. Researchers at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine improved a vector -- a vehicle that delivers gene therapy to cells -- in two ways to create a sustained, partial correction to bleeding problems in mice engineered to have Hemophilia A, which is also known as factor VIII deficiency. The findings appear in the Sept. 1 issue of the journal Blood (published Aug. 19 online). The laboratory findings have significant potential for developing improved treatment for hemophilia but are not yet applicable to people, cautioned PAUL MCCRAY, a University of Iowa professor of pediatrics and the study's corresponding author. "It's an exciting finding, but we are still many steps away from a possible gene therapy for people with hemophilia," he said. The same story appeared on the Web site of MYDNA.com.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/biowissenschaften_chemie/bericht-48124.html

Baldus: 'Blatant Disregard' Of Discrimination Law (COURT TV, Aug. 22)
As recently as 2002, Dallas County prosecutors were excluding eligible black prospects from juries at more than twice the rate they turned down whites, a newspaper reported Sunday. The issue surfaced earlier this year when the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the 1986 murder conviction of a black man accused of killing a white motel clerk, saying the Dallas County jury that convicted Thomas Miller-El was unfairly stacked with whites. The Supreme Court cited a manual, written in 1969 and used until at least 1980, that instructed prosecutors on how to exclude minorities from Texas juries. Justice David Souter wrote that racial discrimination in the Miller-El case was unquestionable. The dueling tactics of defense attorneys and prosecutors during jury selection produce only an illusion of equal rights that flouts the intent of several U.S. Supreme Court rulings, said University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS, a leading researcher on jury selection. Racial discrimination in selecting jurors has long been federally prohibited. A 1986 Supreme Court ruling cited in the Miller-El case barred prosecutors from disqualifying potential jurors based on race. "We're talking about the court of law, and there is blatant disregard and violation of the law going on," Baldus said. Versions of this story also ran on the Web sites of CNN, WXXA-TV (New York), SHERMAN (Texas) DENNISON HERALD DEMOCRAT, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, BALTIMORE SUN, WASHINGTON POST and other news organizations.
http://www.courttv.com/news/2005/0822/juryissue_ap.html

Cornell, Lee Study Zebrafish Link To Cancer (Munster Times, Aug. 22)
The embryo of the 2-inch striped zebrafish, usually the last living swimmer in your kid's aquarium, is providing cancer researchers at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine with new insights into the development of the deadliest form of skin cancer, malignant melanoma. A study described in the August issue of Developmental Dynamics Magazine reports that skin cancer cells stopped growing when injected into zebrafish embryos. The laboratory groups of Dr. Mary Hendrix, president and scientific director of the Children's Memorial Research Center in Chicago, and ROBERT CORNELL, assistant professor at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, conducted the research and experiments. "Putting human cells into embryos is quite rare," said LISA M.J. LEE, University of Iowa graduate student and the study's lead author, who conducted hundreds of experiments. "In fact, this is the first time skin cells have been injected into zebrafish embryos." The Times is based in Munster, Ind.
http://www.thetimesonline.com/articles/2005/08/22/news/illiana/59ad99167be9c743862570650052d555.txt

Alumnus Joins Company (South Bend Tribune, Aug. 22)
Brian Finn has recently joined Interlogic Outsourcing Inc. as a sales representative for the company's Oak Brook, Ill., office. Finn previously worked with the Chicago Board of Trade as an employee of Niko Trading. He has also served as sales representative for Southern Wine and Spirit in Chicago, where he led the company's division in sales seven months in a row and was responsible for the largest grossing route in his division. He is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he earned a bachelor of science degree.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2005/08/22/business.20050822-sbt-MICH-C7-PEOPLE.sto

Drowning Victim Attended UI (Peninsula Daily News, Aug. 22)
Victor Porter loved basketball so deeply he changed careers so he could coach the game. Porter, 58, who took the Chimacum High School Cowboys to the Class 2A state finals in March, died Saturday morning while scuba diving on a reef near Tatoosh Island off Cape Flattery. An autopsy Sunday afternoon determined that Porter drowned. "Basketball was his joy in life, coaching basketball and playing basketball," said Colum Tinley, Porter's brother-in-law and partner on Saturday's dive. Porter graduated in 1968 from Michigan State University with a mechanical engineering degree and worked in that profession in Iowa. He left the field, however, for his love of basketball, returning to school and receiving his teaching degree in 1973 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Port Angeles, Wash.
http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/sited/story/html/215538

UI: Investors Lacking Emotions May Fare Better (Albany Times Union, Aug. 22)
People with certain kinds of brain damage may make better investment decisions. That is the conclusion of a new study offering some compelling evidence that mixing emotion with investing can lead to bad outcomes. By linking brain science to investment behavior, researchers concluded that people with an impaired ability to experience emotions could actually make better financial decisions than other people under certain circumstances. The research is part of a fast-growing interdisciplinary field called "neuroeconomics" that explores the role biology plays in economic decision making, by combining insights from cognitive neuroscience, psychology and economics. The study was published last month in the journal Psychological Science, and was conducted by a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in New York.
http://timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=391040&category=BUSINESS&BCCode=HOME&newsdate=8/22/2005

Doern Comments On Risks Of Antibiotics Overuse (Boston Globe, Aug. 22)
The federal government and the commercial farming industry are beginning to take action to protect the effectiveness of antibiotics in people by restricting their use in farm animals. At the end of July, the Food and Drug Administration told the poultry industry to stop using the antibiotic Baytril, which is effective against many different germs, fearing that its continued use would weaken the use of similar antibiotics in people. And earlier this month, pig-farming giant Smithfield Foods announced it would reduce the number of antibiotics it feeds its animals. Although it is difficult to quantify the impact on the public, studies have shown that antibiotic-resistant bacteria from farm animals are present in the neighborhood grocery store, and can reach and survive in the human intestines. There is also some evidence that exposure to bacteria can make people sick. The fear is that an older person, who has spent a lifetime eating meat, will get the kind of food poisoning that would leave most people with an uncomfortable few days in the bathroom. But because the older person has a weaker immune system, the stomach ailment will land them in the hospital. Then, when the hospital tries to treat the illness with antibiotics, the drugs may fail. "There are numerous examples of where antibiotic usage in the animal industry impacts what happens in humans," said GARY V. DOERN, a clinical microbiologist at the University of Iowa.
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/health_science/articles/2005/08/22/the_tide_turns_in_battle_to_rid_farms_of_antibiotics/

UI Animal Lab Vandalism Cited (Washington Times, Aug. 22)
In an opinion piece a writer says that international terrorism, exemplified by the September 11 attacks and most recently in London, may pose the greatest security threat facing America. But domestic terrorists also lurk among us, mostly in the guise of animal-rights and environmental activists. Over the last decade, the Animal Liberation Front has committed 700 criminal acts, according to the FBI. ALF activists recently broke into a car belonging to a pharmaceutical executive's wife, stole her credit cards and charged $20,000 in charitable "donations." At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, ALF members destroyed laboratory equipment, removed animals, ruined research papers and threatened school employees.
http://washingtontimes.com/op-ed/20050821-103902-4686r.htm

Baldus: 'Blatant Disregard' Of Discrimination Law In Case (MSNBC, Aug. 22)
As recently as 2002, Dallas County prosecutors were excluding eligible black prospects from juries at more than twice the rate they turned down whites, a newspaper reported Sunday. The issue surfaced earlier this year when the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the 1986 murder conviction of a black man accused of killing a white motel clerk, saying the Dallas County jury that convicted Thomas Miller-El was unfairly stacked with whites. The Supreme Court cited a manual, written in 1969 and used until at least 1980, that instructed prosecutors on how to exclude minorities from Texas juries. Justice David Souter wrote that racial discrimination in the Miller-El case was unquestionable. The dueling tactics of defense attorneys and prosecutors during jury selection produce only an illusion of equal rights that flouts the intent of several U.S. Supreme Court rulings, said University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS, a leading researcher on jury selection. Racial discrimination in selecting jurors has long been federally prohibited. A 1986 Supreme Court ruling cited in the Miller-El case barred prosecutors from disqualifying potential jurors based on race. "We're talking about the court of law, and there is blatant disregard and violation of the law going on," Baldus said. Versions of the article also ran on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, TALLAHASSEE.COM in Florida, the FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE in Indiana, MIAMI HERALD, NEW YORK NEWSDAY and other media outlets.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/9033376/

Andrejevic: Cheesy One-Liners Fact Of Reality TV (Journal-Gazette, Aug. 21)
They've struggled on remote islands, danced the Hustle on cue and eaten rotten squid guts for our entertainment. But reality TV show contestants haven't been humiliated to the max until they've been cut down by that catchphrase at the end of every episode. From the old standby "You're fired" (NBC's "The Apprentice") to the less memorable "You can't always get what you want" (VH1's "Kept"), one-liners used to eliminate people have gotten progressively cheesier. So why do producers spend so much time writing them? "Cheesy one-liners have long been a staple of popular culture," much like the Terminator's, "I'll be back," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. Above all else, he adds, one-liners give reality-TV-show addicts a chance to participate.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/living/12440022.htm

Weightlifting Champ Played Football At Iowa (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 21)
Call Naperville police officer Mike Geiger the strong arm of the law. The 14-year patrolman recently won the push-pull weightlifting competition in the 2005 World Police and Fire Games in Quebec, Canada. Geiger, 39, stands 6 feet tall and competes in the 275-pound weight division. In the push-pull, competitors must bench press as much weight as they can and dead lift as much weight as they can. Geiger got involved in power weightlifting to better his skills as a football player, first at Notre Dame High School in Niles and then as a nose tackle for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. An injury ended his football playing in his freshman year of college, but not his love of weightlifting. Geiger competes frequently in law enforcement weightlifting competitions.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/west/chi-0508210483aug21,1,4921971.story?coll=chi-newslocalwest-hed

UI Professional Staff Says No To Union (WQAD-TV, Aug. 20)
A group of white collar employees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has voted overwhelmingly against joining a union. Workers turned down the Service Employees International Union Local 199 by a vote margin of 66 percent to 34 percent. Seventy-four percent of the more than 25-hundred eligible employees voted in the election, which was conducted by mail. Those eligible to vote included non-unionized professional and scientific staff, a group that includes scientists who are not on the faculty, librarians and information technology employees. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3746558

Downie Discusses Table Manner Class For Business Students (WQAD-TV, Aug. 20)
Iowa Before hitting the books this week, the University of Iowa's newest batch of MBA candidates got a crash course in table manners. As part of their orientation program, 62 new students at the university's Tippie College of Business learned the proper way to eat dinner rolls, twirl pasta and eat soup without spilling down their shirts. School administrators say good grades, impressive resumes and bright ideas are essential to landing jobs after graduation. But they also say firm handshakes, making small talk and impeccable table manners are also important to wheeling and dealing in the business world.

In the next 21 months, students will immerse themselves in learning business fundamentals, corporate financing and other business subjects. But school officials say their mission in teaching the next generation of executives is much broader. Assistant Dean COLLEEN DOWNIE says the program also emphasizes team-building and developing leadership skills. And that approach appears to be paying dividends. Last week, Forbes magazine ranked Tippie Number 12 among the nation's graduate business colleges, up from Number 26 in 2003. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3746312

Lee: Driver Inattention Cause In Many Deaths (Capital Hill Blue, Aug. 20)
"Shut up and drive" has become as popular an entry in the motorist lexicon as "get out of the way" and less printable admonitions, and states are moving to address problems associated with behind-the-wheel cell-phone use in the name of public safety. Since 1999, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, every state has dealt with proposals related to wireless phones and driving. Twenty-two states, plus the District of Columbia, have enacted laws that restrict mobile communications _ most of them centered on requiring those using a cell phone while driving to use a hands-free device. No state thus far has adopted a prohibition on cell-phone use, although five states contemplated the move this year. Several states have banned novice drivers _ those under 21 _ from talking on cell phones while driving. States are looking to improve those numbers by limiting distractions. One researcher, JOHN D. LEE, a professor of industrial engineering at the University of Iowa, estimates that driver inattention could cause as many as 10,000 deaths and about $40 billion in damages in the United States annually. A version of the story also ran on the website of SUN HERALD in Mississippi.
http://www.capitolhillblue.com/artman/publish/article_7249.shtml

UI Education Alumna Leads Parapsychology Club (Ocala Star-Banner, Aug. 20)
Stevie Wonder's hit song, Superstition, asked, "Do you believe in things you don't understand?" Well, the paranormal, or the subject of parapsychology, falls right into step with the lyrics. Psychic phenomena, occurrences which cannot be proven, is at the heart of what's sometimes been described as "New Age" beliefs. Dr. Ina Anderson and Bobbie Roberts, co-coordinators of The Parapsychology Club of the Villages, have spent a good part of their lives delving into this somewhat mystical area. Anderson's Ph.D. is in Educational Administration, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.ocala.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050820/NEWS/208200302/1015/news01

UI Alumnus Leaving ESPN (Mercury News, Aug. 20)
ESPN is losing its quarterback. Mark Shapiro, the programming prodigy who expanded the sports cable giant's lineup to include debating sportswriters, dream-job seekers, flying skateboarders and original movies is taking his considerable creative energies to the theme-park industry. Shapiro, known for creativity and candor, will become chief executive officer on Oct. 1 of Red Zone, a private investment company focusing on entertainment. Shapiro, 35, a Chicago native who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has been at ESPN for 12 years. The paper is based in San Jose, Calif.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/sports/12428617.htm

Charges Against Former Hawkeye Stand (WQAD-TV, Aug. 19)
The charges against former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball player Pierre Pierce will stand. Judge Gregory Hulse rejected a defense motion to dismiss the charges. The decision allows jury selection to continue on Monday. Pierce, from the Chicago suburb of Westmont, is accused of assaulting his former girlfriend at her West Des Moines home in January. He's charged with burglary, criminal mischief and assault with intent to commit sexual abuse. Defense attorney Alfredo Parrish wanted the charges dropped because he says he didn't get a key police report until last week. He says the report could help clear Pierce. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3744356

UI Notes Success In Online Courses (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 19)
For many of today's gifted students, honors programs at their own schools aren't challenging enough anymore. So some are signing up for online courses offered by such colleges as Stanford University, Johns Hopkins University and the University of Missouri. These online courses offer classes mainly in advanced math and English, but subjects such as history, philosophy and anatomy also are offered. Programs are available for students of all ages, kindergarten through 12th grade, and some courses for high-school students follow college freshmen curricula. After a pilot program this year, Duke, Durham, N.C., is offering an online program this fall in subjects including philosophy and psychology. The University of Washington plans to begin a pilot program next year. Northwestern University, the University of Missouri and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA report rising enrollment in their online programs. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the PITTSBURGH (Penn.) POST-GAZETTE.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112441510387517433,00.html

UI Alumna, Former British Minister Mo Mowlam Dies (BBC, Aug. 19)
British government minister and former Northern Ireland secretary Mo Mowlam has died at age 55. She was admitted to hospital following a fall at home and never regained consciousness. She had previously suffered a brain tumor. Mowlam, Labour MP for Redcar between 1987-2001, oversaw the talks which led to the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. Tony Blair paid tribute saying Mowlam was one of the shrewdest political minds he had encountered as well as a "remarkable personality." Marjorie 'Mo' Mowlam was born in Watford on September 18, 1949 and attended Coundon Court Comprehensive School, in Coventry, before going on to study at Durham University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/4126986.stm

Bibas Article Cited In Story About Ohio Governor (Toledo Blade, Aug. 19)
Charged with four misdemeanors for breaking state ethics laws, Ohio Gov. Bob Taft had several options yesterday. He could have pleaded guilty, not guilty, no contest, or, even, not guilty by reason of insanity. The governor chose no contest, also known in its Latin form as nolo contendere, a plea dating back to medieval England that verified the truth of the charges without admitting any guilt. By definition, the plea contrasted sharply with the governor's statement outside the courtroom that he accepted full responsibility for failing to report golf outings and other gifts to the Ohio Ethics Commission. Despite its long history, the nolo contendre plea is controversial among some legal scholars even though it provides efficiency to what can be a slow-moving justice system by eliminating the need for a trial. "They allow guilty defendants to avoid accepting responsibility for their wrongs," University of Iowa law professor STEPHANOS BIBAS wrote in a 2003 article for the Cornell Law Review. "Guilty defendants' refusals to admit guilt impede their repentance, education and reform."
http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050819/NEWS24/508190390

UI Alumnus Leaves ESPN For Six Flags (Philadelphia Inquirer, Aug. 19)
ESPN is losing its quarterback. Mark Shapiro, the programming prodigy who expanded the sports cable giant's lineup to include debating sportswriters, dream-job seekers, flying skateboarders and original movies is taking his considerable creative energies to the theme-park industry. Shapiro, known for creativity and candor, will become chief executive officer on Oct. 1 of Red Zone, a private investment company focusing on entertainment. Red Zone, founded by Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder, is aiming to gain control of Six Flags Inc., which owns and operates more than 30 theme parks in North America. Shapiro attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web site of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.
http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/sports/12420019.htm

Alumnus Shapiro Destined To Lead ESPN (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 19)
Not long after graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Mark Shapiro, a Chicago native, was on the fast track. In 1993, when he was 22, he landed a job as a production assistant on an ESPN2 show, "Talk2," that was taped in Hollywood. Jim Rome was the host. "I'd been on the job about a week when Mark came in my dressing room and introduced himself," Rome recalled Thursday. "He said, 'If you do a four-hour radio show and a one-hour TV show, when do you find time to do your prep work? Would you mind if I helped you prep for tomorrow's show?' "I said, 'Knock yourself out.' The guest the next day was Warren Moon, and Mark came back with the perfectly crafted, eight-page research paper on Moon. I was blown away. "He said, 'Did it help?' I said, 'Yeah.' He said, 'Do you want me to do it again?' I said, 'Yeah.' He was off and running. About a week later I called my agent and told him this kid would be running ESPN someday."
http://www.latimes.com/sports/baseball/mlb/dodgers/la-sp-tvcol19aug19,1,281999.column?coll=la-headlines-sports-mlb-dodger

Talent Scout Found Kutcher While At UI (Monterey County Herald, Aug. 19)
Jeff and Mary Clarke of O'Fallon, Mo., change lives, directions, fate. They are fashion scouts, the people who walk malls, circulate at parties and scan bus stops and convenience stores in search of the next Tyra or Giselle. The year was 1997 when Mary, then owner of an Iowa-based modeling agency, contemplated leaving the business. It was around this time that she and a group of friends headed out to the Airliner bar in Iowa City. Her buddies made the Cedar Rapids native promise not to talk business. And she didn't, for a while. But then she spotted a young chap with a crown of tousled brown hair, deep eyes and an infectious, full-mouthed smile. "You should be a model," she told the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from Homestead, Iowa. Their conversation lasted much longer than usual. Soon after, Mary entered the then-unknown Ashton Kutcher in an area modeling contest, which he won. The Herald is based in California.
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/living/12424110.htm

Alumna To Take D.C. Public Health Post (D.C. Business Journal, Aug. 18)
The District of Columbia Department of Health is expected to name Marsha Martin, executive director of Washington-based AIDS Action, the new head of its HIV/AIDS Administration, Martin, a longtime activist in the HIV/AIDS community, has been executive director of AIDS Action since 2002. She also served for three years as special assistant on HIV/AIDS policy to Secretary Donna Shalala at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Martin earned her bachelor's and Master's degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://washington.bizjournals.com/washington/stories/2005/08/15/daily27.html

Golfing Alumnus Profiled (Lake Forester, Aug. 18)
The merry life of Don Utroska Sr. began in Iowa and expanded from there. Between his double major of biology and chemistry, he played football at Cornell College and was drafted by the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the CFL. Instead of playing ball, he moved on to study zoology and biochemistry at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. That led to a stint in the Peace Corps in Nigeria. A great deal of his working career was spent at Smith-Kline Pharmaceuticals. His experience and gift of language led to his adventures in Switzerland.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/sports/current/lf/08-18-05-661813.html

Alumnus Teaches High School Music (Mundelein Review, Aug. 18)
As he went through college, Matt Farmer of Mundelein often thought about returning to his alma mater to teach. This year his dream came true. The 2001 Mundelein High School graduate started back at the Hawley campus on Tuesday, the first day of classes, as a director of instrumental music. "I always wanted to come back," Farmer said. "I feel real lucky that I got the opportunity to do it." Farmer, who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in May, studied music and music education there. "As I was going through college, it was in the back of my mind that there's great stuff going on at Mundelein (High School)," he said. "I never thought I'd be presented with the chance to come back and do it." The Review is based in Illinois.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/mu/08-18-05-659857.html

Irving Remembers Days As UI Student (The Daily Show, Aug. 17)
In an interview on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show," novelist John Irving mentions he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This interview is not available online.

UI Part Of Team To Study E-Voting (Washington Times, Aug. 17)
The University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University are part of a $7.5 million national research initiative that will focus on improving the reliability of electronic voting systems, officials announced Monday. The five-year effort is funded by the National Science Foundation and aims at addressing public concerns about the growing use of electronic voting. The money will create a research center, called A Center for Correct, Usable, Reliable, Auditable and Transparent Elections, or ACCURATE, that will unite researchers from five universities, including Berkeley, Stanford, Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Rice University in Houston and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web site of WEBINDIA123.com.
http://washingtontimes.com/upi/20050817-124413-4457r.htm

Talent Scout Found Kutcher While At UI (Fort Wayne News-Sentinel, Aug. 17)
Jeff and Mary Clarke of O'Fallon, Mo., change lives, directions, fate. They are fashion scouts, the people who walk malls, circulate at parties and scan bus stops and convenience stores in search of the next Tyra or Giselle. The year was 1997 when Mary, then owner of an Iowa-based modeling agency, contemplated leaving the business. It was around this time that she and a group of friends headed out to the Airliner bar in Iowa City. Her buddies made the Cedar Rapids native promise not to talk business. And she didn't, for a while. But then she spotted a young chap with a crown of tousled brown hair, deep eyes and an infectious, full-mouthed smile. "You should be a model," she told the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from Homestead, Iowa. Their conversation lasted much longer than usual. Soon after, Mary entered the then-unknown Ashton Kutcher in an area modeling contest, which he won. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/living/12404082.htm

UI Part Of Team To Study E-Voting (Salon, Aug. 17)
The University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University are part of a $7.5 million national research initiative that will focus on improving the reliability of electronic voting systems, officials announced Monday. The five-year effort is funded by the National Science Foundation and aims at addressing public concerns about the growing use of electronic voting. The money will create a research center, called A Center for Correct, Usable, Reliable, Auditable and Transparent Elections, or ACCURATE, that will unite researchers from five universities, including Berkeley, Stanford, Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Rice University in Houston and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. SRI International, an independent research institute in Menlo Park, also will participate. The paper is based in California. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the SAN MATEO COUNTY TIMES, the DAILY REVIEW and the NORTH COUNTY TIMES, all based in California, the RAPID CITY (S.D.) JOURNAL, MSNBC.com and other media outlets.
http://www.salon.com/wire/ap/archive.html?wire=D8C16T3O0.html

Andrejevic: One-Liners Fact Of Reality TV (Winston-Salem Journal, Aug. 17)
They've struggled on remote islands, danced the Hustle on cue and eaten rotten squid guts for our entertainment. But reality TV show contestants haven't been humiliated to the max until they've been cut down by that catchphrase at the end of every episode. From the old standby "You're fired" (NBC's "The Apprentice") to the less memorable "You can't always get what you want" (VH1's "Kept"), one-liners used to eliminate people have gotten progressively cheesier. So why do producers spend so much time writing them? "Cheesy one-liners have long been a staple of popular culture," much like the Terminator's, "I'll be back," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. Above all else, he adds, one-liners give reality-TV-show addicts a chance to participate. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_RelishArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031784470115&path=!news!entertainment!television!sub!article&s=1037645508994

Gas Prices Stun Man Driving To UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Aug. 17)
Soaring energy prices in July lifted the overall level of the consumer price index to its fastest pace in three months, but consumers who staggered away from the gas pump found most other prices tame. Jim Paulsen, chief investment strategist at Wells Capital Management, said he was feeling poorer Tuesday as he drove his daughter to college at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I just filled up my van this morning [with gas] and was shocked," Paulsen said. "It was 45 bucks." He said he could understand if consumers become more cautious about spending on other things.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/5563951.html

UI Alumnus On Panel To Discuss Job Market (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 16)
The paper asked economist bloggers Max Sawicky and Tom Walker of Max Speak! You Listen and David Altig of Macroblog to take a closer look at the level of participation in the labor market and what it tells us about the job market and the economy as a whole. Altig, in a brief bio sidebar, is introduced as vice president and associate director of research in the research department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He received a bachelor's degree in business administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and master's and doctoral degrees in economics from Brown University.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112419322049714334,00.html

Andrejevic: Cheesy One-Liners Fact Of Reality TV (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 16)
They've struggled on remote islands, danced the Hustle on cue and eaten rotten squid guts for our entertainment. But reality TV show contestants haven't been humiliated to the max until they've been cut down by that catchphrase at the end of every episode. From the old standby "You're fired" (NBC's "The Apprentice") to the less memorable "You can't always get what you want" (VH1's "Kept"), one-liners used to eliminate people have gotten progressively cheesier. So why do producers spend so much time writing them? "Cheesy one-liners have long been a staple of popular culture," much like the Terminator's, "I'll be back," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. Above all else, he adds, one-liners give reality-TV-show addicts a chance to participate. This story also appeared Aug. 16 on the website of the DAILY PRESS in Virginia.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-0508150295aug16,1,2474148.story?coll=chi-entertainmentfront-hed

Incident Before UI-Illinois Game Cited (St. Petersburg Times, Aug. 16)
The NCAA executive committee recently banned American Indian mascots, nicknames and imagery used by 18 colleges, including Florida State University, from NCAA postseason tournaments. Hostile. Abusive. That was the committee's rationale. FSU has appealed the NCAA's decision. While some students and others who are members of the Seminole Tribe say they're honored by FSU's Seminole mascot, others say using American Indian names and symbols in sports gives people freedom to insult American Indians when they don't intend to. Nearly 15 years ago, before a game between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Illinois, Iowa fraternity members hung Chief Illiniwek, the Illinois mascot, in effigy. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.sptimes.com/2005/08/16/Floridian/FSU_s_Seminole_symbol.shtml

UI On Team Seeking To Improve E-Voting (San Jose Mercury News, Aug. 16)
UC Berkeley will join four other universities and a research institute to improve electronic voting technology. The new center will be led by Johns Hopkins University and will also include Rice University, Stanford University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and SRI International. The National Science Foundation will provide $7.5 million over five years for the initiative, of which UC Berkeley will receive about $1.3 million. This news was also reported Aug.16 on the websites of the BALTIMORE SUN, BALTIMORE BUSINESS JOURNAL, the ARGUS in California, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES and OAKLAND (Calif.) TRIBUNE.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/local/states/california/counties/alameda_county/12394798.htm

Langbehn Says Stomach Bugs Last More Than 24 Hours (Parents.com, Aug. 16)
It's almost a given that stomach flu will strike your family sometime this season. And while this highly contagious illness usually doesn't require a trip to the pediatrician, most parents don't know all the facts about how best to treat their child at home. Don't panic if your child is sick longer than you expect. "It's a misconception that stomach bugs last only 24 hours," says SUE LANGBEHN, M.D., an assistant professor of family medicine at the University of Iowa, in Iowa City. In fact, kids may throw up or feel nauseated for three days and then have diarrhea for a week, she says. How long each bout lasts depends on the particular virus and on how your child's intestines react to it.
http://www.parents.com/articles/health/5172.jsp

Jones Comments On Computer Service Plans (Bankrate.com, Aug. 15)
If you've shopped for a computer lately, you've probably heard the hard sell. "Whatever you do," the sales guy says, "sign up for our service plan." Then you do the math. Most plans run between $249 and $299 for two or three years of service. For some laptops, that nearly doubles the cost, and for a $2200 machine, you're adding more than 10 percent. The big question is: Is it worth it? "It's like any insurance policy," says DOUG JONES, a professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. "The insurer wants to make money selling the insurance, and you can bet that they do on that $249 plan. On the other hand, you want the protection. If your machine breaks, you're going to be out far more, not just in the cost of replacement, but in the inconvenience and hassle.” He explains the math behind the plan. "Assuming that the service plan is offered on a not-for-profit basis, which is very unlikely, and assuming that they simply give you a new machine instead of trying to fix anything that breaks, which is not uncommon," Jones says, "you can figure that a service plan costing $250 on a machine costing $1,000 is a prediction that one in four of those machines will require replacement." The numbers are actually skewed toward computer vendors, which is no surprise. "My understanding is that the normal failure rate for consumer electronics is closer to one in six," Jones says.
http://www.bankrate.com/brm/news/advice/customer-service/20050815a1.asp

Doctor, A UI Graduate, Retires (The Ledger, Aug. 15)
Today, on the 44th anniversary of the day he began practicing in Lakeland, Dr. John William Glotfelty, 76, is retiring from the Lakeland Eye Clinic. During his long career, he's been chairman of the Board of Medicine, president of the Lakeland Regional Medical Center medical staff, president of the Polk County Medical Association and president of the Florida Society of Ophthalmology, to name a few of his activities. Glotfelty, an Iowa farm boy, put himself through high school and college by working as a professional photographer at a time when he said people would pay more for pictures of their prizewinning animals than they would for pictures of their children. Glotfelty got a master's degree in biochemistry and physiology at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA-Iowa City. He received his medical degree in 1953 from the University of Louisville in Kentucky, followed by eight years with the U.S. Public Health Service. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050815/NEWS/508150326/1134

UI Offers Accelerated Nursing Doctorate (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Aug. 14)
Facing not only a shortage of nurses but a shortage of professionals to train them, colleges are developing programs to get more nurses into teaching roles faster. Nursing colleges are now turning away qualified applicants, in part because there are not enough teachers. Facing the impending crunch, a quarter of the country's 93 doctoral programs in nursing either have fast-track programs or are developing them. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF NURSING already offers an accelerated doctoral program for nurses.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/business/stories.nsf/0/24F2C2EC01CDA0378625705D00822BBC?OpenDocument

Hunnicutt Writes On Overtime (Newsday, Aug. 14)
BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a historian of leisure at the University of Iowa and author of "Work Without End: Abandoning Shorter Hours for the Right to Work," writes about overtime in the wake of a new contract for Nassau corrections officers that limits overtime earnings for individuals and reduces overtime rates. “If in fact paying overtime is preferable to hiring more workers,” Hunnicutt writes, “perhaps it is time to revisit the Fair Labor Standards Act, the law that first mandated overtime pay after 40 hours. Congress passed the act in 1938 to create jobs. If the act is encouraging fewer hires, perhaps amendments to double overtime pay or taxes (both considered in the last century) might restore the act's original purpose. But more troublesome is that the correction officers' story is but a small part of a larger phenomenon: Americans are working more hours than is healthy for them.”
http://www.newsday.com/news/opinion/ny-ophun134382743aug14,0,3383670.story?coll=ny-viewpoints-headlines

Kerber Comments On History Gap (Philadelphia Inquirer, Aug. 14)
When the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic (SHEAR) met in Philadelphia for its annual conference last month, overexposed founders turned up, but only from an angle. They did not, as in mass media and popular book publishing, tower over their time period, marble statues sucking up all available media air while somehow remaining immobile. LINDA KERBER, professor of history at the University of Iowa and a scholar who co-launched the subject of Revolutionary-era women's history with her study Women of the Republic (1980), acknowledges and regrets the gap between popular and scholarly work. "There is a disconnect, but there needn't be," Kerber says. She places the blame on a desire for simplicity, comfort with boosterish and patriotic tale-telling, and the inalienable truth that for many Americans it's still "much easier to listen to stories of tradition and authority" than to tales of race, gender, ethnicity and sexuality. "The men of the founding generation," Kerber points out in a brief interview, "are part of what happened in ways that involve women, slaves, indentured servants and so forth. But I think there's a great public hunger for joy, for pride, for reassurance. Working historians find some of those elements, but we also find very disconcerting parts of the American Revolution. So many people also seem to want their history either to be of good people only, or to be brought down to a single individual's choice. It's a kind of romanticism: If an individual chooses good or evil, all else will follow."
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/entertainment/books/12367289.htm

Barkan Speaks On Rwandan Genocide, U.S. Aid (Aspen Times, Aug. 14)
The terrifying genocide in the small African nation of Rwanda just 11 years ago is slowly becoming apparent to Americans. Films like the Academy Award-nominated "Hotel Rwanda" are bringing the horror to the United States through fictionalized accounts of the political conflict in Rwanda.  Dr. JOEL D. BARKAN, professor of political science at the University of Iowa, spoke about the genocide and its implications for Rwanda today at Paepcke Auditorium Friday evening as part of the Aspen Institute's summer speakers series. Barkan's film of choice for putting the tragedy in historical context is "Sometimes in April," an HBO film inspired by the true events of the 100 days of genocide that began in April 1994. Barkan served as the Regional Democracy and Governance Advisor for East and Southern Africa to the United States Agency for International Development from 1992 to 1994. He currently is the senior consultant on governance in the Public Sector Reform Unit of the Africa Region at the World Bank. The United States typically lends humanitarian relief to situations like Rwanda because it has widespread popularity among the American public, Barkan said. When action involves military intervention, Americans tend to hang back, he said. He also noted that the Rwandan genocide came quickly on the heels of an attempted U.S. military intervention in Somalia in 1993, when 18 Marines were killed in action. At the time, President Clinton was also down in the polls. "Domestic politics trumped intervention," Barkan said, "and this was probably not the last time we sat on the sidelines." Currently, the United States offers logistical and financial support for peacekeeping in Darfur, where ethnic cleansing has been reported as part of a conflict since 2003, but is depending on military troops from other countries to intervene.
http://www.aspentimes.com/article/20050814/NEWS/108140013

Reader Recalls Irving’s Iowa City Heimlich (Kansas City Star, Aug. 14)
John Irving gave 20-minute reading from his new novel, and then answered questions that the audience of more than 900 had submitted to him — and the result was a comic masterpiece. One audience member said his parents had insisted to him that, years ago, they’d seen Irving perform the Heimlich maneuver at a party in Iowa City, where he taught in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA’s writing program. Grinning, Irving confessed he remembered the incident.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/entertainment/12360580.htm

UI Collaborates On Hurricane Futures Market (Orlando Sentinel, Aug. 14)
Just in time for the beginning of peak hurricane season, the University of Miami's controversial hurricane-futures market is open for trading but with a new name and new rules limiting who can bet on where a storm will strike. Originally known as MAHEM, the Miami Hurricane Event Market, the Hurricane Futures Market debuted Friday for Tropical Storm Irene but only for up to 100 meteorologists who have been invited to participate. As of early Friday night, six had signed up and were authorized to begin gambling away a $100 incentive provided through a UM grant. That's how much the UM professors who launched the market as a research venture will place in the account of every trader who accepts the invitation. They say they hope to persuade the commission not to regulate their market. If they prevail, the market could one day open to the general public. In the meantime, UM and collaborators, which include the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, say they hope the market will lead to improvements in hurricane forecasting by providing a window on how people, in this case experts, react to and interpret available forecast resources. The newspaper is based in South Carolina. A version of this article also appeared Aug. 12 and 13 on the websites of the MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, KANSAS CITY STAR, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, and DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/orl-locmarket13081305aug13,0,7204134.story?coll=orl-home-promo

UI Study Demonstrates “Couric Effect” (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Aug. 13)
Researchers have informally dubbed the phenomenon "the Katie Couric effect." Katie Couric, co-anchor of NBC’s "Today Show" underwent a colonoscopy live on national television in March 2000. Almost immediately, colonoscopy rates jumped more than 20 percent. Since then, Couric, whose husband died of colon cancer, has continued to be a visible advocate for colon cancer awareness and prevention. With the deaths last week of ABC anchor Peter Jennings and actress Barbara Bel Geddes from lung cancer and the word that Dana Reeve, widow of actor Christopher Reeve, has lung cancer, it might be happening again. However unwittingly, celebrities are once again raising awareness of a disease. In some cases, celebrity attention makes it easier to speak more openly and without embarrassment about diseases once only whispered about. Think of the silence surrounding breast cancer until women such as first ladies Betty Ford, Nancy Reagan and Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor went public. The trend has attracted attention from researchers. Scientists from the University of Michigan and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA published a study that showed increases in awareness of the benefits of colonoscopy after Couric’s on-screen screening. Versions of this article also appeared Aug. 14 in the COLUMBIA (Mo.) TRIBUNE, and the SUN HERALD in Mississippi.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/stlouiscitycounty/story/6B9E540F834FF6D08625705C006746A3?OpenDocument

Nelson Hopes For Public Trading (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 13)
The next time the National Hurricane Center in Miami names a storm system in the Atlantic Ocean or Caribbean Sea, scientists around the globe might profit from forecasting where it will hit the U.S. mainland. That's the concept behind the Hurricane Futures Market, an online trading network in which meteorologists will buy and sell contracts representing stretches of shoreline from Texas to Maine. Contracts covering the area where the storm first crosses the coast pay out $1. The market was developed by three University of Miami professors investigating why the public's expectations for hurricane landfalls sometimes differ from the center's forecasts. "We're trying to improve the overall hurricane warning problem," says David Letson, 43, an associate professor of marine affairs who thought up the market. Letson teamed with meteorology professor David Nolan, 36, and economics professor David Kelly, 38. The University of Iowa in Iowa City will host the market alongside others that trade on potential Nobel Prize winners and economic indicators. Trading may open to the general public in the future, said FORREST NELSON, a University of Iowa economics professor who helps run Iowa Electronic Markets. A version of this article also appeared Aug. 13 on the website of the HOUSTON (Texas) CHRONICLE.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0508130171aug13,1,2623421.story?coll=chi-business-hed

Cram: Stars Can Help, Hurt Spread Of Health News (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 13)
Since Peter Jennings died of lung cancer Sunday, calls to the American Lung Association's quit-smoking hot line have increased by a third. The number of smokers signing up for the online program has increased by half. That's no surprise, experts say. Celebrities who contract diseases, or take up the cause for a stricken relative or friend, can make a major difference in public awareness and fundraising. The phenomenon is known in the trade as the "Couric effect," after Katie Couric, the NBC Today show host whose televised colonoscopy five years ago encouraged thousands to schedule the unpleasant but valuable test for colorectal cancer. Several studies have examined what happens when stars focus on an illness. In the most recent, scientists found that there was a 20 percent rise in colonoscopies in the nine months after Couric underwent the test on live TV. "It clearly can make a difference," says University of Iowa researcher PETER CRAM, one of the study's authors. "The benefits can be tremendous." But Cram warns that celebrity involvement doesn't automatically improve public health. He worries that in the aftermath of Jennings' death and the announcement this week from Reeve's wife, Dana, that she too has lung cancer, thousands will rush out for lung cancer screenings. But these tests are unproven and might produce a significant number of false positives, resulting in unnecessary biopsies and anxiety for many people. Even worse, stars sometimes use their fame to spread inaccurate and even harmful information. In June, actor Tom Cruise denounced Brooke Shields for treating her postpartum depression with antidepressants rather than vitamins. On the Today show, he called psychiatry a "pseudoscience," and told host Matt Lauer that "there is no such thing as a chemical imbalance." "Is [Cruise] really the person who should be telling us about the physiology of depression?" Cram asks. "Probably not."
http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/bal-to.celebrity13aug13,1,5469543.story?page=2&coll=bal-features-headlines

Andrejevic: Cheesy One-Liners Fact Of Reality TV (Sun-Sentinel, Aug. 13)
They've struggled on remote islands, danced the Hustle on cue and eaten rotten squid guts for our entertainment. But reality TV show contestants haven't been humiliated to the max until they've been cut down by that catchphrase at the end of every episode. From the old standby "You're fired" (NBC's "The Apprentice") to the less memorable "You can't always get what you want" (VH1's "Kept"), one-liners used to eliminate people have gotten progressively cheesier. So why do producers spend so much time writing them? "Cheesy one-liners have long been a staple of popular culture," much like the Terminator's, "I'll be back," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. Above all else, he adds, one-liners give reality-TV-show addicts a chance to participate. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/lifestyle/sfl-lirealityphrasesaug13,0,4803073.story?coll=sfla-features-headlines

Incoming UI Freshman Discusses Dorm Decor (Bloomington Pantagraph, Aug. 13)
Eighteen-year-old Katie Bergethon is taking a TV, laptop computer, desk lamp and other essentials when she leaves for her freshman year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. But one item won't be found on any packing-tips list: a quilt she created her senior year at Bloomington High School. Stitched into the blanket are blocks with photo images of her high school pals. "Dorm rooms are so cookie-cutter" that personalizing the area is a priority, she said, adding she's taking older sister Hannah's advice to not overdo it. "She said it took her a whole year to get the room just how she wanted it ... and that I shouldn't try to get it perfect right away."
http://www.pantagraph.com/stories/081305/new_20050813018.shtml

Case Of UI Students' Suicide Cited (Chronicle, Aug. 12)
A Massachusetts judge has handed down a key ruling in a student-suicide lawsuit against the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, stirring concerns among some college officials that the case heralds a storm of wrongful-death litigation. In late June, the judge ruled that the parents of Elizabeth H. Shin, an MIT student who committed suicide on the campus in 2000, can proceed with their claims against MIT administrators and staff members for failing to prevent her death, although the plaintiffs cannot seek damages from MIT itself. Ms. Shin's parents originally sought $27.7-million from the institution, administrators and members of MIT's medical staff. The ruling clears the way for a jury trial. Gary Pavela, director of student judicial programs and student ethical development at the University of Maryland at College Park and the editor of a weekly newsletter on campus legal issues, says the MIT ruling increased the likelihood that the "imminent probability" theory would gain cachet nationally. However, similar wrongful-death lawsuits decided recently have not increased colleges' legal responsibilities. In 2000, for instance, the Iowa Supreme Court found that officials at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA had no duty to notify parents that their son was in "impending danger" before he took his own life.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i49/49a00101.htm

ESPN Features UI Alumnus (Black Hills Pioneer, Aug. 12)
ESPN's 50-50 tour stopped at the Sturgis motorcycle rally in South Dakota. Among the South Dakota natives featured on the show was Lincoln McIlraivy, who later wrestled for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Pioneer is based in Spearfish, SD.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1300&dept_id=156930&newsid=15021172&PAG=461&rfi=9

Doctor Completed Residency At UI (Fort Morgan Times, Aug. 12)
Colorado Plains Heart and Lung Center has officially opened its doors. The new clinic, located at 500 Main St., will be able to meet the cardiology and pulmonary needs of area residents on a full-time basis. Dr. Ahmad Shihabi, cardiologist, and Dr. Khalid Ismail, pulmonologist and critical care specialist, will be staffing the new practice. Shihabi completed his undergraduate and his doctor of medicine degree from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Jordan. He ranked sixth out of 111 students in his graduating class. His internal medicine residency was performed at th UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and at the University of Illinois. He recently finished his fellowship in cardiology at the University of Minnesota.
http://www.fortmorgantimes.com/Stories/0,1413,164~8315~3006295,00.html

UI Report Sees Substance Abuse Treatment Up in Iowa (WQAD-TV, Aug. 11)
Non-alcohol substance abuse treatment is on the rise in Iowa. According to new health statistics, 6,500 Iowans were treated for marijuana abuse last year. That's up from 6,100 in 2000. Big jumps have been seen in the number of people treated for other substances, especially for meth users. Those numbers rose from 5,700 in 2000 to about 8,100 last year. The statistics, and many others, are in the 2005 Iowa Health Fact Book, a report released by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH and the Iowa Department of Public Health. The numbers, compiled every other year, are used to identify and address health issues in Iowa. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3709306

Artist Is UI Graduate (Walker Pilot Independent, Aug. 11)
Eleven years after retiring from a 38-year career as a college and university art professor and administrator, designer and goldsmith James Roy has plenty of time and enthusiasm for the second chapter of his artistic career. Roy and wife Ruth, a retired music teacher, spend half the year at their Laporte lake home and the other half in Green Valley, Ariz. At both locations, Roy spends hours in his well-equipped studio designing and creating custom jewelry pieces (rings, pendants and bracelets), hollowware (chalices and cups), medallions and other commissioned works from gold or silver plus gemstones. Saturday, area residents will have a chance to see some of Roy's unique jewelry creations -- wearable adornments, he calls them -- at a special showing at Walker Art Gallery. Roy will be present at the showing as the featured artist. Roy holds an undergraduate degree from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn., and graduate degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Pennsylvania State University. The newspaper is based in Minnesota.
http://www.walkermn.com/placed/index.php?sect_rank=1&story_id=206543

NCAA’s Citing UI As Example Is Shortsighted (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 11)
A columnist notes that last week, the National Collegiate Athletic Association announced that it would ban the use of Native American team names and mascots in all NCAA-sponsored postseason tournaments. If a team turns up wearing uniforms with words like "Indians," "Braves" or similar nicknames the association deems "hostile and abusive," that team will be shown the locker-room door. He writes: “Surely I was not the only reader who noticed that this edict came out of the NCAA's headquarters in Indianapolis, Indiana… As a matter of policy, the NCAA now encourages schools to imitate the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which won't allow its Hawkeyes to compete against nonconference schools that ‘use Native American nicknames, imagery or mascots,’ although ‘Iowa,’ itself, is a tribal name.”
http://www.opinionjournal.com/la/?id=110007090

UI Mascot Policy Praised (Clarion-Ledger, Aug. 11)
The NCAA's ban on American-Indian mascots during its post-season tournaments is more than fun and games. This is about decency, respect and doing the right thing. Of the 33 schools the NCAA last year asked to review their mascots, 13 removed all references to Native-American culture. Other schools took the initiative long before that request. St. John's University converted from the Redmen to the Red Storm. Marquette University, once the Warriors, is now the Golden Eagles. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1994 adopted a policy that bans American-Indian mascots from its facilities. Iowa does not schedule opponents with American-Indian mascots, except for conference rival the University of Illinois. Neither does the University of Wisconsin. The newspaper is based in Mississippi.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050811/COL0601/508110384/1189/NEWS01

UI Freshman Gives Dorm Advice (Charlotte Observer, Aug. 11)
The first order of business in decorating a dorm room is to talk to your roommate and decide which large items are sharable and negotiate who's going to bring what, they say. "Because I live so far away from college, I talked to my roommate, to figure out what we would both bring," says Hannah Lawrence, 18, who will be a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA this fall. "We decided that because she lives in Iowa, she's going to bring the heavy stuff, like a television and microwave. I'm bringing a CD player and a mirror, my own laptop and iPod." The newspaper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/living/home/gardening/12353992.htm

UI Alumna Is Advertising Club Leader (Cincinnati Enquirer, Aug. 11)
The board of the Advertising Club of Cincinnati on Wednesday announced it has hired advertising veteran Judy Thompson as its new executive director. The 101-year-old organization's five-year strategic plan includes a push to increase the American Advertising Federation affiliate from fewer than 250 members to more than 500. Clubs in similar markets have 500 members or more. A graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Thompson started her advertising career at Meredith Corp. in Des Moines. Since moving to Cincinnati in 1971, she has been an Ad Club volunteer while working in advertising roles for companies such as Griswold-Eshleman, Cincinnati Bell, Northlich-Stolley, Cinergy and LAO Advertising. She founded her own free-lance writing company, Words by JT, in early 2005.
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050811/BIZ01/508110303/1002/BIZ

Artist is UI Graduate (Lincoln Journal, Aug. 11)
Robert Arnold is one of New England's most accomplished media artists, using computers in the creation of his short looping videos. His short pieces, combining wit and elegance with an intellectual rigor, sometimes takes years to complete. His most recent work, Zeno's Paradox (2003) is both an intellectual exercise in visually demonstrating a philosophical concept and a thrilling roller coaster ride of a short video. Zeno's Paradox will be on display at DeCordova Museum’s Phyllis and Jerome Lyle Rappaport Media Space Sept. 10 through Jan. 8, 2006. Arnold is currently associate professor of film at the College of Communication at Boston University. He received a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Illinois, Champaign Urbana, and an master's in sculpting and a doctor of philosophy in film theory and production from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www2.townonline.com/lincoln/artsLifestyle/view.bg?articleid=302368

UI Art Museum Organized Melodrama Exhibit (ArtDaily.com, Aug 11)
Acting Out: Invented Melodrama in Contemporary Photography explores significant contemporary photography that features fabricated melodrama, characterized by pathos, over-wrought emotion, moral polarization, nontraditional plotting, and extraordinary events. The exhibition is a lively display of 32 works by 13 artists who investigate melodrama as an aesthetic system of representation influenced by literature, theater, film, media stills, and historic photography. Acting Out has been organized and traveled by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART.
http://www.artdaily.com/section/news/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=14583

Editorial Blasts UI As Mascot Example (Claremore Daily Progress, Aug. 10)
An editorial notes that the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has banned the use of American Indian names and symbols by schools during postseason sports playoffs and tournaments. In its attempt at being politically correct, the NCAA recommends schools follow the example of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which refuses to schedule games with schools that use American Indian names and symbols. “As for the example being set by the Iowa Hawkeyes, is the NCAA unaware that ‘Iowa’ is the name of a great Indian tribe, and that ‘Hawkeyes’ can be traced back to the courageous chief of the Sauk tribe Black Hawk, whose Indian name was Makataimeshekiakiak. Maybe Iowa teams could change its name to the ‘Makataimeshekiakiaks.’ We can hear the cheerleaders now: ‘Give me an M, give me an A, give me a K, ...’ They’d finish the yell midway the second quarter.” The newspaper is based in Oklahoma.
http://www.claremoreprogress.com/archive/article21338

Andrejevic Criticizes Use Of Children On Reality TV (Boston Globe, Aug. 10)
"Brat Camp" which consistently garners high ratings on Wednesday nights, marries two burgeoning reality TV trends: a focus on personal crises (as in A&E's "Intervention") and the increased use of minors as "characters." Most reality-show kids seem vaguely well adjusted in front of the cameras, as they take part in mother-swapping social experiments and domestic games. But for "Brat Camp," ABC went looking for teens who were decidedly unstable. Networks should use different standards when minors are involved, said MARK ANDREJEVIC, a University of Iowa professor and the author of "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched." "If adults want to go on reality shows and make fools of themselves, or worse, that's their prerogative," Andrejevic said in an e-mail from Australia. "But we ought to do our best to protect kids -- especially troubled teens -- from being used by TV producers as cheap labor to sell advertising."
http://www.boston.com/ae/tv/articles/2005/08/10/these_kids_face_harsh_reality/?page=full

Andrejevic: Cheesy One-Liners Fact Of Reality TV (Newsday, Aug. 10)
They've struggled on remote islands, danced the Hustle on cue and eaten rotten squid guts for our entertainment. But reality TV show contestants haven't been humiliated to the max until they've been cut down by that catchphrase at the end of every episode. From the old standby "You're fired" (NBC's "The Apprentice") to the less memorable "You can't always get what you want" (VH1's "Kept"), one-liners used to eliminate people have gotten progressively cheesier. So why do producers spend so much time writing them? "Cheesy one-liners have long been a staple of popular culture," much like the Terminator's, "I'll be back," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. Above all else, he adds, one-liners give reality-TV-show addicts a chance to participate. The article also appeared Aug. 10 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.nynewsday.com/entertainment/ny-2know4376484aug10,0,7583790.story?coll=nyc-swapspan

Writer Questions 'Hawkeyes' Origin (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Aug. 10)
A columnist reports that the NCAA has "determined that political correctness requires that no NCAA college or university may display 'hostile or abusive' mascots, nicknames or imagery at any championships sanctioned by this renowned organization. ... Do have to ask how far this nonsense will go. For example, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is cited by supporters of the NCAA mascot policy as a 'model institution' because it refuses to schedule any games with schools that employ 'Native American nicknames, imagery or mascots.' However, even this policy is suspect, and this school, too, needs to be investigated by the NCAA Praetorian Guard. The very name of the state (in which I was born, I must admit) - Iowa -- clearly constitutes a 'Native American imagery' because it is the name of a Native American people. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA team name - the 'Hawkeyes' -- cannot be said to pass NCAA scrutiny either, because the term apparently was coined as a tribute" to Black Hawk, an Indian warrior.
http://www.ajc.com/opinion/content/opinion/0805/10edbarr.html

Robinson Book Captures Heartland Prize (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 9) "Gilead," a novel by University of Iowa professor MARILYNNE ROBINSON, has won the 2005 Heartland Prize for fiction, awarded by the Chicago Tribune.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-0508080235aug09,1,1032354.story?coll=chi-entertainmentfront-hed

Columnist Cites Hawkeye Name (Chicago Sun Times, Aug. 9)
A columnist criticizes the NCAA's recent ruling on colleges and universities that use American Indian nicknames and imagery, a ruling that points to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Hawkeyes as an example of not using such names or imagery. However, the columnist points out that some claim the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Hawkeye nickname is traced to Black Hawk, an Indian warrior.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/quicktakes/cst-nws-qt09.html

UI Freshman Gives Dorm Decorating Advice (Arizona Republic, Aug. 8)
The first order of business in decorating a dorm room is to talk to your roommate and decide which large items are sharable and negotiate who's going to bring what, they say. "Because I live so far away from college, I talked to my roommate, to figure out what we would both bring," says Hannah Lawrence, 18, who will be a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA this fall. "We decided that because she lives in Iowa, she's going to bring the heavy stuff, like a television and microwave. I'm bringing a CD player and a mirror, my own laptop and iPod."
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0808moredormdecor-ON.html

Women Of Faith Risk Economic Disadvantages (Miami Herald, Aug. 8)
A look at women who describe themselves as conservative Christians suggests that their work choices make them vulnerable in this divorce-prone culture. As a group, these women leave school, marry and have children at younger ages than other women. As a result, they are more likely to work less and to gravitate toward traditionally female jobs, both things that keep hourly earnings low. Their decisions, an expression of the value they place on families, aren't necessarily a problem, said JENNIFER GLASS, a University of Iowa researcher who is analyzing the trends. The problem is that conservative Christian families have a divorce rate just as high as the rest of America. To Glass, that means more single mothers are unqualified for good-paying jobs. "Their beliefs are predicated on lifelong marriage, that women are more protected in these marriages," Glass said, "and we know this is not the case."
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/special_packages/business_monday/12315210.htm

Weiler: Athletes Often Hide Asthma (Foster's Daily Democrat, Aug. 7)
So many people -- both recreational athletes and professionals like Catchings -- are being diagnosed with exercise-induced asthma that the nation's largest group of athletic trainers has drawn up its first guidelines for dealing with the condition. The National Athletic Trainers' Association's asthma guidelines, released Tuesday during its annual meeting in Indianapolis, are aimed at familiarizing trainers, health professionals, parents and coaches with asthma's symptoms and treatments. Dr. JOHN WEILER, a professor emeritus of internal medicine at the University of Iowa who has studied exercise-induced asthma for more than 20 years, said many athletes keep their asthma secret, fearing it could hurt their chances of a professional career. "A guy who's played four years of football at state college and is looking at the NFL, it just isn't something he wants to (let) get out," he said. The paper is based in New Hampshire.
http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050807/NEWS40/106150207

Former UI Cancer Researcher Focus Of Story (Winston-Salem Journal, Aug. 7)
Mike Robbins always approached his job in cancer research with passion. For years, he worked with the kidney. Six or seven years ago he developed an interest in the brain. He was working at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA when he received a job offer from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Here, he knew he would be working with Dr. Edward Shaw, an expert on brain tumors. Robbins arrived here in August of 2001. Three weeks later, he and his wife, Lucy, discovered that the breast cancer she thought she had beaten nearly six years before had returned, this time in her brain. Mike Robbins' work took on a new sense of urgency. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031784276155&path=!living!article&s=1037645509005

Damasio Remarks On Emotion, Consumer Products (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 6)
Across the consumer electronics industry, traditionally geeky manufacturers are embracing their sensitive side to develop products that evoke feelings, including joy, desire, comfort and nostalgia. Neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO believes that tapping into emotions is more than just a nice touch. In many cases, he said, emotions help drive decisions. In his studies of patients whose brain injuries impaired their ability to express emotions, Damasio found that many had difficulty making decisions, even though they were able to clearly articulate the pros and cons of various options. "Some people think it's best to reason with a cool head," said Damasio, professor of neurology at the University of Iowa. "Others think they should always follow their feelings. The truth is that emotion is part of the mechanism of reasoning. The lack of it is very detrimental to decision making."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0508060063aug06,1,3737537.story?coll=chi-business-hed

UI A Model School For Non-Native American Mascot (Deseret News, Aug. 6)
The University of Utah -- nickname: the Utes -- is one of 18 schools targeted Friday by the NCAA for using Indian imagery or references in their logos and for their mascots. As a result of a new NCAA policy announced Friday, if any university athletic team wants to host a championship tournament after Feb. 1, 2006, the school may have to cover up or silence any Native American image or reference, and possibly nix the nickname Utes. The NCAA wants the schools to follow "model" institutions like the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Wisconsin, which don't use any Native American mascots or imagery. The paper is based in Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,600153966,00.html

Carver: Most Faculty Promote Books On Department Sites (Chronicle, Aug. 5)
In a column, Michael J. Bugejaadded, director of the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication at Iowa State University, argues that creating a Website to promote a book may enhance a faculty member's chances for tenure and promotion. He quotes HOLLY CARVER, director of the University of Iowa Press, as saying that most academic authors continue to have Web sites associated with their home departments. "Thus," she says, "the design depends on each department's sophistication, updates are infrequent and there are no links to publishers or bookstores." http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i48/48c00101.htm

Vandalism Of UI Psychology Labs Cited (Chronicle, Aug. 5)
A feature about Steven Best of Santa Teresa, N.M., says Best has been accused of being a mouthpiece for terrorists who attack university laboratories, factory farms and pharmaceutical companies. An associate professor of philosophy at the University of Texas at El Paso, Best is one of the leading scholarly voices on animal rights. In the past year, though, he has taken on a role that, he believes, has gotten him into hot water in Washington and in his own department. In December, he co-founded the North American Animal Liberation Press Office, which answers questions and helps disseminate information about actions by the Animal Liberation Front. In November members of the Animal Liberation Front broke into laboratories used by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's psychology department. They took 88 mice and 313 rats. They destroyed computers and poured acid on papers and equipment, causing about $450,000 worth of damage. In an anonymous message sent after the attacks, the perpetrators wrote: "Let this message be clear to all who victimize the innocent: We're watching. And by ax, drill, or crowbar -- we're coming through your door." The attacks sparked debate and outrage at Iowa, which was heightened two months later when a law-student group invited Best to speak at the university. Some psychology professors tried unsuccessfully to get the university's president to cancel the speech. Although the professors managed to retrieve much of their research data from the damaged computers, they were later hit with 400 unsolicited magazine subscriptions after their home addresses were posted by ALF activists. At the Iowa speech, Best compared the Animal Liberation Front to 19th-century abolitionists, likening their "direct actions" to the Boston Tea Party.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i48/48a00801.htm

Meyer Comments On NCAA Rule Change (Chronicle, Aug. 5)
A controversial rule passed this spring by the National Collegiate Athletic Association promises more scholarships for female athletes, but now the measure is in jeopardy after more than 100 Division I colleges voted to override it. The rule would allow institutions to offer a total of seven more scholarships, or about 13 percent more than they can now, in women's gymnastics, soccer, track and field, and volleyball, beginning on August 1, 2006. Proponents say the increase is necessary to accommodate female athletes in fast-growing sports, such as soccer, and to help teams that lose players to injuries. But many college officials, particularly those at smaller institutions, oppose the change, in part because they think it could disturb the already shaky competitive balance between richer institutions that can afford to use the scholarship slots and those that cannot. Officials at some large institutions say that despite concerns about competitive balance, they see this rule as an opportunity to provide more awards for female athletes on their campuses. "It would allow more women to participate in athletics at our institution," says JANE C. MEYER, senior associate athletics director at the University of Iowa and a member of the NCAA's Committee on Women's Athletics. "We already have good levels of participation, but there's always room for growth."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i48/48a03401.htm

Robinson Discusses Writing (Washington Times, Aug. 5)
In this question-and-answer interview, MARILYNNE ROBINSON talks about writing "Gilead," She won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for fiction for the novel that centers on the character of the Rev. John Ames, and which drew praise for its serious treatment of Christianity. She teaches at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop in Iowa City. When asked about what advice she gives to her students, Robinson said, "You simply try to help them enhance their strengths. You can't make a good writer by trying to impose assumptions on how he or she should write. You have to help them discover for themselves."
http://washingtontimes.com/culture/20050804-110410-1984r.htm

Principal Is UI Graduate (Bloomington Pantagraph, Aug. 5)
Summertime is a time to relax for Olympia High School students, but new Principal Lance Thurman has spent the time studying Olympia and preparing for school. Thurman has a bachelor's degree in special education from Western Illinois University and a master's degree in education administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Illinois. http://www.pantagraph.com/stories/080505/new_20050805007.shtml

Cunningham To Appear At Festival (Dowagiac Daily News, Aug. 4)
Michael Cunningham will appear at the 2006 Dogwood Fine Arts Festival, May 12 in Dowagiac, Mich. He won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for fiction for his novel "The Hours," which became an Academy Award-nominated movie. He received the PEN/Faulkner Award, also for "The Hours," a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and a Michener Fellowship from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Michigan.
http://www.dowagiacnews.com/articles/2005/08/05/news/dnnews2.txt

Popular Play Written At UI (Pittsburg Post-Gazette, Aug. 4)
"Dark of the Moon," by Howard Richardson and William Berney, is a 60-year-old perennial favorite among community, high school and university theaters. So what's the appeal for Quantum Theatre, so often the purveyor of new and/or alternative work? Maybe first and foremost it's the subject matter, which lends itself to probing exploration and continued contemplation. At its heart, "Dark of the Moon" is a love story. Based loosely on a 17th-century folk song, one of the many versions of "The Ballad of Barbara Allen," it tells of a witch boy in love with a human. According to author Richardson in his 1966 foreword to the edition of the play that is still in print, he wrote "Dark of the Moon," then called "Night Song," during his 1941 Christmas vacation for a writing class he was taking at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05216/548193.stm

UI Alumna Mowlam Ill In London (The Scotsman, Aug. 4)
Mo Mowlam, the former Northern Ireland Secretary, was in a "critical but stable" condition in hospital last night. King's College Hospital in London would not say what her illness was, but the former Labour MP Alice Mahon, a friend of Ms. Mowlam, said she had been quite frail for some time. Ms Mowlam suffered a brain tumor in the late 1990s while serving in Northern Ireland and received treatment while trying to revive the peace process. A determined and often pugnacious operator, Marjorie Mowlam -- universally known as Mo -- oversaw the negotiations that led to the landmark 1998 Good Friday agreement and the revival of power-sharing in the province. Observers of the 22 months of negotiations that led to the deal cited Mowlam's approachability as a key factor. Ms. Mowlam grew up in Coventry, in a family of modest means. After earning a Ph.D. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she worked as a research assistant for the former Labour minister Tony Benn.
http://news.scotsman.com/politics.cfm?id=1725592005

Radio Hosts Ask Clarkson About Pornography Class (Detroit News, Aug. 4)
With a litany of news, talk and sometimes-racy interviews, morning radio hosts push the limit in their never-ending pursuit of the Metro Detroiter commuter. Despite the array of choices, many motorists say they tune in regularly to favorite hosts and stations. Some just want to be entertained, but others tune out when the zaniness goes too far. Ratings hog Drew and Mike is a powerhouse for 101.1 WRIF FM and a pain for unwitting guests. Wednesday, the duo phoned Jay Clarkson, who is scheduled to teach a pornography course, the first of its kind, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA this fall. "How did you get this job? Do you have a big collection of porn?" Clarkson was asked.
http://www.detnews.com/2005/commuting/0508/04/A02-269700.htm

UI Student Working On Conservation Project (Free-Lance Star, Aug. 4)
A morning shroud of fog had lifted as Gina Nauman and Julia Klenk made their way across a blue-speckled field in Manassas National Battlefield Park. Every few steps, they'd stop to spray weedkiller on common bugloss, with its purple-blue flowers, and other non-native plants such as bull thistle, which have infested portions of the Prince William County historic site. Wearing ball caps, protective clothing, elbow-length rubber gloves and knee-high boots, Klenk and Nauman, both 22, toted portable plastic sprayers on their backs. They moved from plant to plant amid an undulating sea of grass, trying to coat as many of the weeds as possible in a field encompassing several acres adjacent to a visitor parking lot. Klenk, Nauman, two other women and their supervisor have been toiling in the park off Groveton Road for almost a month. It's part of a six-month Student Conservation Association project to give college students and recent graduates practical experience in the field, and the added satisfaction of community service. The group includes Klenk, a University of Texas graduate; Nauman of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; Jennifer Lasee of the University of Wisconsin; and Kimberly Gronas, a student at Miami University of Ohio. The newspaper is based in Virginia.
http://fredericksburg.com/News/FLS/2005/082005/08042005/119031

UI Graduate Student Enjoys Bank Perk (Clarion-Ledger, Aug. 4)
A story about a local bank that is encouraging customers to shop with their bank debit cards by offering cash back directly into customers' checking accounts, cites the example of Judith Coleman of Clinton. "If I had to turn in receipts or do something like that to qualify, I probably wouldn't, but cash will be automatically deposited in my account, and I think it's great," said Coleman, who this fall will enroll at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA where she plans to seek a doctorate in English literature. The newspaper is based in Mississippi.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050804/BIZ/508040352/1005

Crash After Visit To UI Changed Teacher's Path (Gainesville Times, Aug. 4)
Will Schofield had planned to leave teaching and pursue a law career and the prestige, money and other rewards that came with it. But, after a visit to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's law school in 1989, he was involved in a head-on car collision that broke his dreams like it did his back. Schofield spent the next six months suffering through the effects of spinal damage and wondering whether he'd walk again. Six months of enduring pins and rods in his back also involved a lot of soul-searching. He realized that he "needed to teach kids." Schofield, now 41, stuck to that vow and now is embarking on an administrative career with the Hall County School System. He began July 1 as deputy superintendent. As part of a leadership transition plan, he will ascend next July 1 to the superintendent's seat, taking over for a retiring Dennis Fordham. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/news/stories/20050804/localnews/2302.shtml

Accused Professor Is UI Alumnus (Kansas City Star, Aug. 4)
A Central Missouri State University music professor was charged Wednesday with premeditated first-degree murder in the April 2004 strangulation death of a Shawnee man. David Lee Stagg, 57, was charged in Johnson County District Court in the death of William J. Jennings, 51. Stagg is accused of strangling Jennings on April 24 or 25, 2004, inside Jennings' home in the 15900 block of West 75th Terrace, near Midland Drive and Interstate 435. Authorities described the case as a domestic violence homicide. Stagg joined the CMSU faculty in 1981. He is associate director of bands and a trombone instructor, according to the university's Web site. Before arriving in Warrensburg, Stagg taught at Central College in Pella, Iowa, and Westmar College in LeMars, Iowa. He holds degrees from Wichita State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/local/12298433.htm

New Teacher Holds UI MBA (Bradford County Telegraph, Aug. 4)
An article about new teachers at a local elementary school notes that Susan Hencin will be joining the faculty teaching third-graders this year. Hencin graduated from St. Petersburg High School then went on to the University of South Florida to earn her bachelor's degree. She also earned an MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=14968160&BRD=2150&PAG=461&dept_id=430589&rfi=6

Jones Comments On Latest Diebold E-Voting Woes (Oakland Tribune, Aug. 3)
Diebold's latest electronic voting machine, desired by dozens of counties nationwide, fared worse in the nation's first mass testing than previously disclosed, with almost 20 percent of the touch-screen machines crashing. Those software failures are likely to send Diebold programmers back to work and perhaps force the firm into weeks of independent laboratory testing. With 17 California counties -- including Alameda, Marin and San Joaquin -- as well as dozens of counties in Ohio, Utah and Mississippi considering purchase of the Diebold AccuVote TSx, the delay could put at risk tens of millions of dollars in sales and throw open the door to Diebold competitors. Diebold officials say they plan to fix the problems and bring the machines back for a new mass test late this month. DOUGLAS JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa and an expert on computerized voting systems, isn't surprised. Diebold's touch-screen machines run software written by Microsoft, Diebold and at least three other companies that make parts such as printers, memory cards and the touch-sensitive screen itself. The paper is based in California.
http://www.insidebayarea.com/oaklandtribune/localnews/ci_2909696

Carrageenan Comment Cites Tobacman Study (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Aug. 3)
A Q&A health column responds to a question about the food additive carrageenan, which the inquirer suggests causes stomach ailments. Cinda Williams Chima with the University of Akron responds that food-grade carrageenan is a purified extract from tropical and cold-water red seaweeds. It is used as a thickener and stabilizer in a wide range of food products including frozen yogurt and reduced-fat ice cream, processed meats, puddings and salad dressings. It is also used in nonfood products such as shoe polish, toothpaste and air freshener gels. Carrageenan is classified as GRAS (generally recognized as safe) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Unfavorable health effects (ulcerations and cancers of the GI tract) have been linked to poligeenan, a low molecular-weight, chemically degraded carrageenan derivative sometimes used in nonfood products. An article questioning the safety of carrageenan was published in 2001 by JOANNE TOBACMAN, [formerly] an internal medicine physician at the University of Iowa. She reviewed several studies in rats and human tissue samples and suggested that carrageenan may cause cancer and intestinal ulcers. The paper is based in Ohio.
http://www.cleveland.com/living/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/living/1123061819160111.xml&coll=2

Kurth, Gurnett Record Spooky Saturn Sounds (San Diego Union-Tribune, Aug. 3)
It's not exactly a message from outer space, an alien communique, but researchers at the University of Iowa are busily trying to pin down the exact cause and origin of eerie radio transmissions emanating from Saturn. The howling transmissions, which resemble a Halloween soundtrack, are called kilometric radiation and coincide with the appearance on Saturn of atmospheric auroras - those wavy, glowing sheets of polar luminescence that on Earth are sometimes called the northern (or southern) lights. Using the Cassini space probe, Iowa scientists recorded Saturn's transmissions and shifted their frequencies down into audio range. Writing in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, BILL KURTH and DON GURNETT say they believe the sounds are related to "tiny radio sources moving up and down along Saturn's magnetic field lines." Beyond that, however, the sounds remain a mystery. But not a unique one. In 1979, Gurnett discovered that the Earth produces similarly spooky transmissions that, no doubt, are right now scaring anybody out there listening. The paper is based in California.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/features/20050803-9999-lz1c03eureka.html

Student Picked For Africa Trip Plans To Attend UI (Island Packet, Aug. 3)
For Adrienne Brown, spending four weeks in Cape Town, South Africa was the trip of a lifetime. The Ridgeland, S.C. resident fell in love with the mountainous coastal region, the people and the open-air markets during her time as an International Human Rights Exchange Student last month. Besides taking in the picture-perfect scenery, though, Brown learned about the darker side of life on the sunny coast of Africa -- the prevalence of women infected with HIV and AIDS. "I cried a lot," the Spellman College graduate said of seeing how common the disease is in the region. "Because it's just amazing how we (as Americans) are blaming the government for this but the people aren't taking the proper precautions (to keep from spreading the disease)." The 22-year-old was one of 75 college students from around the world chosen to take part in the international exchange program that focused on the research of human rights topics. Students earned college credit for the course. Brown, who graduated from Spellman with a computer science degree earlier this summer, chose to study South African women with HIV and AIDS. The young graduate has ambitions of traveling the world, working with countries to develop and advance their biomedical information systems. But first Brown will attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to work on a doctorate in biomedical engineering. The paper is based in South Carolina.
http://www.jasperedition.com/jasper/story/5071412p-4622186c.html

Skorton, Davisson Write On Asian Meetings (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 2)
UI President DAVID SKORTON and associate professor ROBIN DAVISSON say in an opinion article that the United States has made it increasingly difficult for American colleges and universities to work overseas and recruit international students. They recently traveled to Asia and met with university and education officials there. (A Wall Street Journal subscription is required to access this article)
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112293539283901970,00.html

Kohatsu Questions Long Terms Affects Of Atkins (Financial Times, Aug. 1)
Atkins shot to global prominence about three years ago after its diets, which included eating steak and eggs, caught the imagination of a U.S. population battling rising waistlines and obesity. Atkins suffered as doubts grew about the effectiveness of the low-carb diet and as nutritionists started to advocate cutting only certain carbohydrates. NEAL KOHATSU, president of the American College of Preventive Medicine and a professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa, said: "It [the Atkins diet] did result in weight loss but there were potential long term safety issues, which is why it was not embraced by mainstream people in nutrition."
http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/provider/providerarticle.asp?feed=FT&Date=20050801&ID=5009035

UI Student Quoted On Cisco Security Dispute Story (New York Times, Aug. 1)
Attendees at the Defcon security event denounced the way Cisco Systems and Internet Security Systems dealt with Michael Lynn after he showed that it is possible to hack Cisco routers. Lynn stirred the Black Hat security conference Wednesday by quitting his job at ISS, a move taken so that he could demonstrate that he could gain control of a Cisco router by exploiting a security flaw. He did so in defiance of Cisco and ISS, which had agreed to cancel the talk. Cisco and ISS subsequently sued Lynn and the Black Hat organizers, charging public disclosure of illegally obtained proprietary information. While corporate America may frown at Lynn's actions, he is a hero at Defcon, the more informal gathering of security professionals and enthusiasts that follows Black Hat. T-shirts with anti-Cisco prints have been selling well, and hackers have set up a PayPal account to collect money for a legal defense fund. On Saturday, network security specialist Raven Alder gave a presentation on the vulnerability of the Net's infrastructure. She did not repeat Lynn's demonstration, but Alder said Lynn's disclosure was important to the security of the Net. Alder disputed Cisco's argument that the flaw can be exploited only from the local network, saying it is indeed a remote vulnerability. Others in the audience agreed. "It is possible to escalate an attack and get close enough to the router to attack it," said Robert Hansen a computer security graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nytimes.com/cnet/CNET_2100-1002_3-5812044.html

Column On Autism In Literature Cites UI Study (New York Times, Aug. 1)
A column about novels that feature characters with autism says the writer once came across a 30-year-old paper by William P. Sullivan, originally published in The Bulletin of the West Virginia Association of College English Teachers, that describes Melville's Bartleby as "a high-functioning autistic adult." She says, "The notion struck me as far-fetched, but it certainly has had legs. A recent search using the words 'Bartleby' and 'autism' turned up, among other results, a 2004 Modern Language Association essay on the pale scrivener's 'autistic presence' and a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study guide that asks if Melville might have 'observed some of these attributes in himself.'"
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/31/books/31MORRICE.html?

UI Has Advanced Driving Simulator (Rocky Mountain News, Aug. 1)
Pilots log hours in cockpit simulators before taking the controls of an airliner, practicing emergency procedures and learning the layout of a plane's instrument panel. Automakers also rely on simulators, though their intent is to study drivers, not train them. Perhaps the most sophisticated such center in the world, the National Advanced Driving Simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, belongs to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. One recent experiment there tested portable telephones controlled by voice commands, and another is studying teenage drivers to learn why they have so many accidents.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/technology/article/0,1299,DRMN_49_3968293,00.html

Damasio Remarks On Emotion, Consumer Products (Los Angeles Times, July 31)
Across the consumer electronics industry, traditionally geeky manufacturers are embracing their sensitive side to develop products that evoke feelings, including joy, desire, comfort and nostalgia. Neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO believes that tapping into emotions is more than just a nice touch. In many cases, he said, emotions help drive decisions. In his studies of patients whose brain injuries impaired their ability to express emotions, Damasio found that many had difficulty making decisions, even though they were able to clearly articulate the pros and cons of various options. "Some people think it's best to reason with a cool head," said Damasio, professor of neurology at the University of Iowa. "Others think they should always follow their feelings. The truth is that emotion is part of the mechanism of reasoning. The lack of it is very detrimental to decision making."
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-emotional31jul31,0,3528651.story?coll=la-home-business

Author Of Book On Baseball Great Taught At UI (The State, July 31)
A story about author William Price Fox's new book, "Satchel Paige's America," says that Fox has written for numerous national magazines, been a scriptwriter in Hollywood and taught at the WRITERS' WORKSHOP OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A native of Illinois, he is a longtime resident of South Carolina and is married to author Sarah Gilbert. The paper is based in Columbia, S.C.
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/living/12257518.htm

UI: Investors Lacking Emotions May Fare Better (Seattle Times, July 31)
People with certain kinds of brain damage may make better investment decisions. That is the conclusion of a new study offering some compelling evidence that mixing emotion with investing can lead to bad outcomes. By linking brain science to investment behavior, researchers concluded that people with an impaired ability to experience emotions could actually make better financial decisions than other people under certain circumstances. The research is part of a fast-growing interdisciplinary field called "neuroeconomics" that explores the role biology plays in economic decision making, by combining insights from cognitive neuroscience, psychology and economics. The study was published last month in the journal Psychological Science, and was conducted by a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2002412278_pfinvesting31.html

UI Journalism Alumnus Offers Freshmen Tips (Dallas Morning News, July 31)
Lauren Smiley, 22, identified as a 2005 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is one of several students currently interning on The Dallas Morning News staff asked to provide incoming college freshmen advice on surviving college.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/fea/texasliving/stories/0801dnlivcollegeadvice.3941f50.html

UI To Study Road Taxes (WOWT-TV, July 31)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will be looking for ways states can help shore up revenues as more fuel-efficient vehicles roll across the nation's roads. The hybrid vehicles are dramatically improving mileage for consumers but that means lost tax revenues at the gas pump. A $16 million grant will be used to bankroll the study. That money was appropriated as part of the federal transportation bill approved by Congress last week. The station is based in Omaha.
http://www.wowt.com/news/headlines/1755817.html

UI Business, CLAS Students Studied (Charlotte Sun-Herald, July 31)
Sucking up or apple polishing are more likely to work in a job interview than boasting of one's accomplishments, a new University of Florida study finds. Timothy Judge, a UF management professor who did the research, said the study shows there is a large social component to the workplace, despite business schools spending a great deal of time and effort training people to master technical skills. The study, whose findings appear in the August Journal of Applied Psychology, examined 116 undergraduate students majoring in business or liberal arts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who were interviewed for jobs they sought through the college placement service. The applicants completed surveys asking them to rate on a seven-point scale their use of various ingratiatory and self-promotion tactics. In turn, the recruiters were asked to assess the applicants, including stating how strongly they agreed or disagreed with statements such as, "This applicant is a good match or fit with my organization and its current employees" and "This applicant's values reflect the values of my organization." While the results showed a strong relationship between the use of ingratiating behaviors and favorable attitudes on the part of recruiters, self-promotion techniques had no effect, Judge said. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.sun-herald.com/NewsArchive2/073105/bz1.htm?date=073105&story=bz1.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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