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UI in the News


April, 2005
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Music Instructors Met at UI (Aberdeen American News, April 29)
Northern State University music instructors Boyd and Jessica Perkins will present a recital Monday night at the Berggren Recital Hall in the Johnson Fine Arts Center. Married in July 2004, the Aberdeen couple has been performing together since they met at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Both were members of the Symphony Band and played in the same tuba/euphonium quartet. She is a native of Davenport, Iowa. The newspaper is based in South Dakota.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/11521396.htm

UI Operates Drug Manufacturing Plant (Indianapolis Star, April 29)
Purdue University will open a $6.5 million drug manufacturing plant next month in Purdue Research Park.will turn out capsules of a powerful antibiotic that will be sold by Indianapolis drugmaker Lilly. Owned by Purdue Research Foundation, the center becomes one of only five university-run pharmaceutical plants in the country, according to Purdue. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DIVISION OF PHARMACEUTICAL SERVICE also operates drug manufacturing plant. This facility, which occupies about 24,000 square feet on the ground floor of the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy building, typically serves over 65 client organizations per year. It was started in 1974. The newspaper is based in Indiana. http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050429/BUSINESS/50428022

UI Study Shows Lust Doesn't Last (Indianapolis Star, April 29)
It's true that opposites sometimes attract -- often resulting in lust at first sight, and marriage. But scientists have found that relationships of opposites are much more likely to be rockier and shorter than those among two people whose personalities are similar. A study of almost 300 couples, published in the latest edition of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, found that the happiest duos scored similarly on personality traits such as openness, agreeableness, conscientiousness and "disinhibition" -- a measure of irresponsible or reckless behavior. Researchers SHANHONG LUO and EVA KLOHNEN of the University of Iowa said sharing the most personality traits creates compatibility and reduces conflict. They studied 291 couples who'd been married less than a year when the research began and dated each other for an average of 3.5 years. "What is most intriguing is that when the researchers assessed marital quality and happiness, they found that personality similarity was related to marital satisfaction, but attitude similarity was not," they said in the peer-reviewed article. "People may be attracted to those who have similar attitudes, values and beliefs and even marry them, at least in part on the basis of this similarity, because attitudes are highly visible and salient characteristics, and they are fundamental to the way people lead their lives." The newspaper is based in Indiana. Version of the story appeared in the GLOBE AND MAIL in Canada, the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050429/LIVING/504290331/1007

Robinson Comments On Sleep Research (Pakistan News Service, April 28)
A new study suggests too little or too much sleep could lead to diabetes, at least in older people. The goal of the researchers was to see if they could find a link between sleep levels and impaired ability to process glucose, a hallmark of diabetes. They report their findings in this week's issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. Compared with those who slept seven to eight hours, those who slept fewer than five hours were 2.5 times more likely to have diabetes. The diabetes rate was slightly lower -- 1.7 times -- for those who slept six hours. The diabetes rates were also higher -- by 1.7 times -- for those who slept more than nine hours. Dr. JENNIFER G. ROBINSON, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Iowa, said the findings make sense because disruptions in sleep rhythms put high levels of stress on the body. "We certainly are understanding, really within the last decade, about the complexities of sleep and the prevalence of sleep disorders," she said. "It's quite high, and there's certainly a lot of potential for adverse health impacts." As for the link between sleep and diabetes, she added that depression could play a role because affected people sleep too much or too little. "We know that depression is related to inflammation, diabetes and heart disease," she said. The good news? "Because of all the research, we're finding that there are things we can do to help people sleep better," Robinson said.
http://paktribune.com/news/index.php?id=103329

UI Students Place at Web/Database Competition (Anchorage Daily News, April 28)
Students from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA won third in a national Web site and database design competition in Atlanta this month. The students were among 785 participating in the collegiate competition. A total of  62 colleges entered the contest, sponsored by the Association of Information Technology Professionals. Students from Virginia's James Madison University took first place, while students Charter College in Anchorage, Alaska won second place. The newspaper is based in Alaska.
http://www.adn.com/money/story/6428308p-6307433c.html

Aslan: Book a Result of UI Courses (Alternet, April 28)
REZA ASLAN
the author of "No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam" says in a question and answer interview that the book was actually a result of a series of courses that he taught at the University of Iowa. "I was a visiting assistant professor there, and taught the religion and politics of the Middle East. After Sept. 11, the course became so popular that it occurred to me that it's information that most Americans don't have. Most of the western world is fairly ignorant when it comes to the faith and practice, and history and political culture of Islam and of the Muslim world."
http://www.alternet.org/waroniraq/21891/

An excerpt from the book is published at http://www.alternet.org/story/21887/

Dorfman: Many Academics See Career As Calling (Chronicle, April 29)
Until 1994 colleges and universities required tenured faculty members to retire at age 70. While mandatory retirement for most of the nation's workers ended in 1986, Congress permitted colleges and universities to continue it through the end of 1993. The age limit was designed to keep the professorial ranks from growing ineffective and unremovable because of tenure, according to a report by a committee that studied mandatory retirement. So it's now up to the individual to decide when to retire, or up to the institution to give them a subtle, or not so subtle, push. Many colleges do have retirement-incentive programs in cases where they need to encourage turnover. "Because the academic life is a kind of calling -- like the ministry -- people see it as a life commitment," says LORRAINE T. DORFMAN, a professor of social work at the University of Iowa. "That's why many work longer and then continue after retirement." Dorfman's research has shown that people who retired by 70 tended to have more children, grandchildren, or other "competing interests." Those who stayed longer had fewer competing interests. "They may not have been more productive, but they kept working," she acknowledges.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i34/34b01801.htm

One sidebar that provides suggestions for approaching retirement planning again quotes Dorfman and cites her book, published in 1997 by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, "The Sun Still Shone: Professors Talk About Retirement." Dorfman says in this story that one danger of remaining on the campus in retirement is that you will outlive your usefulness. "You don't want to be a has-been and just hang around the department," Dorfman says. "You have to figure out how you can remain useful and not be marginalized."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i34/34b01601.htm

A second sidebar lists books about retirement and again cites Dorfman's "The Sun Still Shone: Professors Talk About Retirement, which focuses on the experiences of retired professors through personal interviews.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i34/34b02301.htm

Poet Wood Has Twice Won Iowa Poetry Prize (Chronicle, April 29)
A profile of John Wood, a professor of English at McNeese State University and a poet, says Wood has twice won the Iowa Poetry prize -- in 1994 for "In Primary Light" and in 1997 for "The Gates of the Elect Kingdom," both published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS -- and the University of Arkansas Press brought out his "Selected Poems, 1968-199"8 in 1999.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i34/34a04801.htm

Squire: Politicians Court Iowans Early (Boston Herald, April 28)
The committee giving money on Gov. Mitt Romney's behalf to Republicans in Iowa raised nearly $91,000 last year, the 11th-largest take among political action committees in the state that can make or break presidential hopefuls. The Commonwealth PAC, established last summer in Iowa, spent more than $76,000 in 2004, donating to local candidates and party organizations throughout the state. That made it the 22nd-biggest giver among the state's PACs. "It's a way of introducing yourself to people who you want to have on your side if you decide to run (for president)," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, political science professor at the University of Iowa.
http://news.bostonherald.com/politics/view.bg?articleid=80568

Robinson Comments On Sleep Research (China Daily, April 28)
A new study suggests too little or too much sleep could lead to diabetes, at least in older people. The goal of the researchers was to see if they could find a link between sleep levels and impaired ability to process glucose, a hallmark of diabetes. They report their findings in this week's issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. Compared with those who slept seven to eight hours, those who slept fewer than five hours were 2.5 times more likely to have diabetes. The diabetes rate was slightly lower -- 1.7 times -- for those who slept six hours. The diabetes rates were also higher -- by 1.7 times -- for those who slept more than nine hours. Dr. JENNIFER G. ROBINSON, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Iowa, said the findings make sense because disruptions in sleep rhythms put high levels of stress on the body. "We certainly are understanding, really within the last decade, about the complexities of sleep and the prevalence of sleep disorders," she said. "It's quite high, and there's certainly a lot of potential for adverse health impacts." As for the link between sleep and diabetes, she added that depression could play a role because affected people sleep too much or too little. "We know that depression is related to inflammation, diabetes and heart disease," she said. The good news? "Because of all the research, we're finding that there are things we can do to help people sleep better," Robinson said. A version of this story appeared April 28 on the Web sites of the ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, ABC NEWS, and HEALTH 24.com, based in South Africa.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-04/28/content_438241.htm

Robinson: Sleep Interruptions Stress Body (Forbes.com, April 27)
If your schedule robs you of slumber, you may be setting yourself up for diabetes. But don't press the snooze bar too many times, because oversleeping might bring the same result. Those are the surprising findings of a new study that suggests too little or too much sleep could lead to the blood sugar disease, at least in older people. "This is one additional piece of information bolstering the common recommendation for sleeping seven to eight hours a night," said study co-author Dr. Daniel Gottlieb, an associate professor of medicine at Boston University. Gottlieb and his colleagues examined statistics on the health of 1,486 participants in a 1995-1998 study that studied the cardiovascular effects of sleep disorders that affect breathing. According to previous studies, Americans have been sleeping less over the past several decades. The median sleep time for American adults aged 40-79 was eight hours per night in 1959; it dropped to seven hours in 2002, with more than one in three sleeping fewer than seven hours. Dr. JENNIFER G. ROBINSON, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Iowa, said the findings make sense because disruptions in sleep rhythms put high levels of stress on the body. "We certainly are understanding, really within the last decade, about the complexities of sleep and the prevalence of sleep disorders," she said. "It's quite high, and there's certainly a lot of potential for adverse health impacts." A version of the story also ran on the website DR.KOOP.COM.
http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/04/27/hscout525386.html

Lee Says Steering Wheel Controls Might Distract (Desert Sun, April 27)
Steering wheels aren't just for steering anymore. Or even honking. They're increasingly becoming the place to install more control buttons -- from switching radio stations to cranking up the air conditioning. But as steering wheels are loaded up with more and more buttons, there's worry a driver might accidentally hit the button that blasts the stereo when all he was trying to do was downshift into low. Pondering such possibilities, experts worry the button bonanza may go too far. "As you put more and more buttons on the steering wheel, it can be confusing," says JOHN D. LEE, a University of Iowa engineering professor who has written about driver distraction. "There's not a lot of research that looks at what happens when you get multiple systems in the car ... and what happens when people make mistakes," Lee says. The paper is based in Palm Springs, Calif.
http://www.thedesertsun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050427/BUSINESS/504270340/1003/business

Ex-UI Student Last Male Graduate Of St. Mary (Yankton Daily Press, April 27)
Roger Gunderson, who earns his degree next month from the College of St. Mary in Omaha, Neb., will be the school's last male graduate -- 11 years after the school decided to return to the tradition of accepting only women. Gunderson, 58, of Missouri Valley, enrolled in 1992, intending to take computer science courses. He had taken courses earlier at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Creighton University, but hadn't completed his degree. An adviser suggested the switch to business. His workload as a technician at the Council Bluffs BP terminal, where he fixes tanks, meters, lines and computers, limited his course load to one credit hour per semester, but he persevered. The paper is based in South Dakota.
http://www.yankton.net/stories/042705/news_20050427034.shtml

Gurnett Discusses 'Sounds of Space' (Sacramento Bee, April 26)
Music and physics might seem to be strange partners, but for the Kronos Quartet, Nevada City composer Terry Riley and plasma physicist DONALD A. GURNETT, they are a natural combination. "It was an intersection of two different worlds," said Gurnett, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Iowa. He was describing his collaboration with Riley to help the composer create "Sun Rings," a work that the San Francisco-based Kronos Quartet will perform Wednesday at the Mondavi Center at the University of California, Davis. Part of the experience will be the "music" from space that Gurnett first captured on the plasma wave detector-amplifier he invented in 1960-61 and that Riley interpreted three years ago in his unusual music composition, commissioned by Kronos. "Building this type of instrument for space was my invention, my idea," Gurnett said, "but I had already heard some recordings of generated 'whistlers' (created by common lightning). It was really intriguing, and I thought we should (record sounds) on a space trip." Gurnett's invention opened up the field of plasma wave research. Since then, the devices have been sent throughout our solar system. So far, 35 have been built at the University of Iowa, and currently three of Gurnett's wave detectors are recording sounds on the Cassini-Huygens space mission designed to study Saturn and its moons.
http://www.sacticket.com/arts/story/12790691p-13641441c.html

UI Study Shows Meth Treatment More Successful (USA Today, April 26)
The success rate for treatment of methamphetamine addiction is significantly higher than for other drugs, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study showed. The study tracked 832 patients admitted for substance abuse treatment. After six months, 65.5 percent of former meth addicts avoided drug use. The lowest abstinence rate was alcohol, at 43 percent while marijuana users came in at 53 percent.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=d63d8b888c98b00dd77bb92d009a8f2b&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVA&_md5=232aca0a04d481e3f568d1c7450f71ef

Lee Says Steering Wheel Controls Might Distract (USA Today, April 26)
Steering wheels aren't just for steering anymore. Or even honking. They're increasingly becoming the place to install more control buttons - from switching radio stations to cranking up the air conditioning. But as steering wheels are loaded up with more and more buttons, there's worry a driver might accidentally hit the button that blasts the stereo when all he was trying to do was downshift into low. Pondering such possibilities, experts worry the button bonanza may go too far. "As you put more and more buttons on the steering wheel, it can be confusing," says JOHN D. LEE, a University of Iowa engineering professor who has written about driver distraction. "There's not a lot of research that looks at what happens when you get multiple systems in the car ... and what happens when people make mistakes," Lee says.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/autos/2005-04-25-steer-usat_x.htm

Schelbert: Quantity Means Quality in Heart Valve Surgery (ABCNews.com, April 26)
The more heart valve replacement operations performed at a hospital, the more likely the surgeons there will insert the type of aortic valve deemed safest for most older patients, new research finds. So, where a patient receives the valve replacement is of utmost importance, said Dr. ERIK B. SCHELBERT, a fellow in the division of cardiovascular diseases at the University of Iowa and lead author of the study, which appears in the April 26 online issue of Circulation. For older patients in need of aortic valve replacement, the message is clear, he said: "Go to an experienced center. Those centers in our study performed most in accordance with the guidelines." The same article appeared on the Web sites of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, FORBES and HEALTHCENTRAL.COM.
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Healthology/story?id=703294

Conroy Remembered in Memorial Service (Baltimore Sun, April 26)
Some of the biggest names in American fiction celebrated the life and work of FRANK CONROY with much of what he loved - great writing, music and laughter. Conroy, the acclaimed writer and longtime director of the prestigious University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, died this month at age 69 after a battle with cancer.  At a memorial on campus, Conroy was remembered for his talent as a writer, his wry sense of humor, skill as a jazz pianist and his dedication to the writing program and the students he mentored for 18 years. "To enhance the stature of an institution that has already been legendary for decades is no small achievement," said Pulitzer Prize winner MARILYNNE ROBINSON, a workshop teacher who was hired by Conroy in 1989. The Friday program featured readings from noted workshop alumni such as John Irving and T.C. Boyle.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/lifestyle/bal-to.mailer26apr26,1,1615744.story?coll=bal-artslife-today

Bibas Comments on Rigas Settlement (Buffalo News, April 26)
The Rigas family has agreed to give up 95 percent of its assets - or more than $1.5 billion - to settle the government's case against John and Timothy Rigas and Adelphia Communications Corp., the cable company they managed and defrauded. Federal officials, who announced the agreement Monday, said it was the largest asset forfeiture in any corporate fraud case in history. "I can't remember a forfeiture one-tenth that size," said STEPHANOS BIBAS, an associate professor of law at the University of Iowa who previously served as a prosecutor in the U.S. attorney's office in New York that got the Rigases convicted. Under the deal, the Rigas family including members who did not face criminal charges will forfeit more than $1.5 billion in assets to the U.S. government.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20050426/1070708.asp

Luo, Klohnen Study Shows Lust Doesn't Last (Lexington Herald Leader, April 26)
It's true that opposites sometimes attract -- often resulting in lust at first sight, and marriage. But scientists have found that relationships of opposites are much more likely to be rockier and shorter than those among two people whose personalities are similar. A study of almost 300 couples, published in the latest edition of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, found that the happiest duos scored similarly on personality traits such as openness, agreeableness, conscientiousness and "disinhibition" -- a measure of irresponsible or reckless behavior. Researchers SHANHONG LUO and EVA KLOHNEN of the University of Iowa said sharing the most personality traits creates compatibility and reduces conflict. They studied 291 couples who'd been married less than a year when the research began and dated each other for an average of 3.5 years. "What is most intriguing is that when the researchers assessed marital quality and happiness, they found that personality similarity was related to marital satisfaction, but attitude similarity was not," they said in the peer-reviewed article. "People may be attracted to those who have similar attitudes, values and beliefs and even marry them, at least in part on the basis of this similarity, because attitudes are highly visible and salient characteristics, and they are fundamental to the way people lead their lives." The Herald Leader is based in Kentucky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/living/health/11469041.htm

UI Study Shows Meth Successfully Treated at Higher Rate (KETV-TV, April 26)
A new study shows the success rate for treatment of methamphetamine addiction is significantly higher than for other drugs, including alcohol and marijuana. Marvin Van Haaften, Gov. Tom Vilsack's drug policy adviser, said in an interview Monday with The Associated Press that the study can help persuade people to get treatment. The study was conducted by the Iowa Consortium for Substance Abuse Research and Evaluation, based at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It studied 832 patients admitted for substance abuse treatment. Researchers did follow-up interviews and tests six months after treatment to determine if patents were continuing to avoid drug use. The study said former meth addicts have the highest abstinence rate, with just over 65 percent of patients avoiding drug use after treatment. KETV is based in Omaha. The same story appeared on the Web site of WQAD
http://www.theomahachannel.com/news/4414310/detail.html

Gallup Took First Poll at UI (Elkhart Truth, April 26)
A fascinating fact finds the first poll ever taken by George Gallup was a survey to find the prettiest girl on campus at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he was editor of the student newspaper in the early 1920s. He ended up marrying the winner.
http://www.etruth.com/News/Content.aspx?ID=346662&page=

UI Leads Big 10 in Athletic Disparity (WQAD-TV, April 26)
A new report says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA leads Big Ten schools with the greatest disparity between the number of men and women participating in athletics. The report issued yesterday says that "women are underrepresented in UI athletics, based on the proportion of women in the study body, and men are overrepresented in athletics." WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3259990

Luo, Klohnen Compatibility Study Cited (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, April 25)
Scientists have found that relationships of opposites are much more likely to be rockier and shorter than those among two people whose personalities are similar. A study of almost 300 couples, published in the latest edition of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, found that the happiest duos scored similarly on personality traits such as openness, agreeableness, conscientiousness and "disinhibition" -- a measure of irresponsible or reckless behavior. Researchers SHANHONG LUO and EVA KLOHNEN of the University of Iowa said sharing the most personality traits creates compatibility and reduces conflict. "What we found is, if two people are similar ... they probably will be attracted to each other at first sight," Luo said. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the SPRINGFIELD NEWS SUN, the HAMILTON JOURNAL NEWS and the MIDDLETOWN JOURNAL, all in Ohio.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/lifestyle/221287_tf125.html

New Complex Houses UI Hygienic Lab (WQAD-TV, April 25)
Iowa's new state medical examiner's office is in business. The $52 million complex is on the campus of Des Moines Area Community College in Ankeny. Officials hope it will make criminal investigations more efficient. For the first time in decades, state police technicians and their medical counterparts say they have the space they need to do their job. State medical examiner Doctor Julia Goodin, who used to perform autopsies in a room borrowed from Broadlawns Medical Center in Des Moines, says she can't say enough about the new lab. The unified lab concept will allow pathologists to conduct autopsies in one lab while crime technicians scrutinize evidence in another lab. Officials say that will make investigations more efficient and should save money. The five-building complex also has space for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB and the Department of Agriculture.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3253128

UI Hoarding Study Cited (Baltimore Sun, April 24)
We are busier and more distracted than ever. And, among other things, it's making a mess. In this season of spring-cleaning and renewal, many of us are having a hard time keeping our real and virtual possessions in their place. Our baskets, whether they hold laundry or e-mail, overfloweth. Technology, which was supposed to bring us a streamlined, paperless society, is partly to blame, say psychologists and professional organizers. Instead, the information overload it has produced is making our clutter problem worse. At the extreme end of the cluttering spectrum are compulsive hoarders, the less than 1 percent of the population who have trouble parting with anything -- items the rest of us would consider useless, like outdated coupons and hamburger wrappers. It can take outside intervention, such as an eviction, to force them to get rid of things. Researchers have concluded that hoarders suffer from a form of obsessive-compulsive disorder. A recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study linked the compulsion to certain types of brain damage from stroke, surgery or encephalitis.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/home/bal-hf.clutter24apr24,1,5721406.story

Squire Comments On Brownback Candidacy (Topeka Capital-Journal, April 24)
The U.S. senator Sam Brownback is tugging hard on the brim of his Stetson and putting rosin to glove leather in anticipation of a possible run for president of the United States. He hasn't announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination in 2008. Nobody serious about this wide-open race would use spurs at this juncture. For now, aspirants earn points for being coy instead of cavalier. That is the thought behind Brownback's "exploring the options" reply when asked about a bid for the White House. Only ambitious, play-to-win politicians -- count Brownback among them - devote time and money stirring the pot in New Hampshire and Iowa more than three years ahead of the primaries. This social conservative's courting of activists is designed to solidify alliances in advance of those bone-crushing presidential tests. "There is no real mystery here," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "He's trying to get a sense of how large a potential base he has in the Republican Party. He's trying to figure out how many he can corral." Brownback is well known for standing at the political forefront of the "culture of life" agenda. This segment of the voting public is key to Brownback's presidential fortune. Without these volunteers and contributors to breathe life into a political network, he will get flanked and forced to the sideline early. "There is a strong conservative religious presence in Iowa," said Squire. "They'll be the ones to help you create a campaign organization."
http://cjonline.com/stories/042405/loc_brownback.shtml

UI Study Demonstrates Hospitalists' Success (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, April 24)
A story about the growing number of "hospitalists" -- physicians who specialize in treating hospital patients - says that several studies in recent years have found that hospitalists provide care more efficiently than other physicians. For example, researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA concluded -- in a study published in August 2004 -- that hospitalists' patients had shorter, cheaper hospital stays. Their overall costs were about $900 lower per patient, primarily because the shorter stays allowed for lower nursing expenses. The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/news/11477558.htm

UI Study Inspired Patient Center (Barre Montpelier Times Argus, April 24)
A story about Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center's Center for Shared Decision Making, whose goal is to help patients make better, wiser and potentially less costly choices about their treatment by involving them more actively in their health-care decisions, says center director Dr. James Weinstein's interest in the approach was sparked a decade ago when he participated in a research project at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The orthopedic surgeon was surprised to see that some surgery rates fell by 30 percent when patients were given more information about their choices. "I didn't feel like they (patients) were getting the information they needed to make their decisions," he said. "They were talking to me, but maybe that wasn't good enough, because I was a surgeon and surgeons do what surgeons do. Maybe they weren't getting a fair shake." The paper is based in Vermont.
http://www.timesargus.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050424/NEWS/504240364/1002/NEWS01

Robinson Leads Quiet Life (Daytona Beach News-Journal, April 24)
Unlike most Americans, MARILYNNE ROBINSON never suffers the agonies of the modern traffic jam, rising gas prices or a dearth of downtown parking. Robinson, who won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week for her novel, "Gilead," a gentle, moving story about a small town preacher from Iowa, prefers the rhythms of a slower, simpler life. She doesn't own a car or drive, preferring instead to walk to class, church or anywhere else in this small, Midwestern college town. "I'm so happy not to have a car," says the writer, who also doesn't own a television set but concedes her traditional tendencies are limited by her cell phone. "I don't like cars. There is just something ridiculous about them. They are noisy ... clumsy, they choke towns. I just love walking." Robinson, who moved here in 1989 to teach at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa, is also unapologetic about the 24 years that passed between her highly acclaimed first novel, "Housekeeping," and her latest. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/Entertainment/Headlines/03SceneBOOK03042405.htm

Schoen: Reimburse All Eugenics Victims (Winston Salem-Journal, April 23)
A North Carolina state legislator is making the first attempt in the nation to put a dollar figure on the wrongs suffered by victims of eugenic sterilization. Rep. Larry Womble has filed legislation that will ask the state to make payments to surviving victims of the N.C. Eugenics program, which was active from 1929 to 1974. In recent months, state employees have made statistical estimates of the likely number of victims who are still alive, said JOHANNA SCHOEN, a professor of women's history at the University of Iowa and author of a recent book on the North Carolina eugenics program. They came up with a figure of 3,400, she said. "If payments are on the table, everybody should get payments," Schoen said, because she thinks that the existing records are, in most cases, too sketchy for anyone to determine whether anyone was sterilized without consent. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031782329994

UI Pharmacy Alumnus Flew Bombing Missions In WWII (Charlotte Observer, April 23)
A feature on a man who grew up in the small town of Hendersonville, N.C., says he was studying to become a pharmacist when he found himself traveling halfway around the world to drop bombs on enemy targets. Larry Feagin, 80, grew up in the Hyman Heights neighborhood of Hendersonville, the son of Eugene and Audella Knight Feagin. The 1941 graduate of Hendersonville High School had plans to follow in his father's footsteps and become a pharmacist. When the United States entered World War II, his plans changed. One year and a half after entering Auburn University, Feagin joined the Army Air Corps. After the war he met his future wife, whom he married June 1947, while attending school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Feagin completed his pharmacist degree in 1950 from the University of Iowa. The family moved to Hendersonville, where the couple raised six children and Feagin joined his brother and father at Jackson Pharmacy, across the street from the Hendersonville Post Office at the corner of Fourth Avenue West and Church Street. Today, the old post office is the Federal Building. The paper is based in North Carolina. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of WCNC-TV in North Carolina, the WINSTON-SALEM (N.C.) JOURNAL, the RALEIGH (N.C.) NEWS & OBSERVER, the WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, the MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN and WVEC-TV in Virginia, and other media outlets.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/11472064.htm

Chang To Head Writers' Workshop (Chronicle, April 22)
The University of Iowa Writers' Workshop will usher in a new director next year. LAN SAMANTHA CHANG, a fiction writer who attended and taught at the workshop and now teaches at Harvard University, will return to Iowa City to assume the directorship in January. Ms. Chang, 40, will succeed FRANK CONROY, who announced last summer his intention to step down as director this May, but died April 6. Mr. Conroy, who suffered from colon cancer, had led the program for 18 years. He first gained literary fame with his 1967 memoir Stop-Time, which chronicled his troubled childhood.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i33/33a00802.htm

UI Faculty Share Passover Food Favorites (Bankrate.com, April 22)
Traditionally high prices for kosher food get even higher when Passover restrictions are added to the mix. Even if all you plan to celebrate this year is a single Seder, expect to pay handsomely.  But for mere mortals, there are ways to make Passover cheaper. "I've found that the best way to save money is to go back to what I considered the original idea regarding Passover -- to have an opportunity to recall what our ancestors went through as they were fleeing Egypt," says Susan Assouline of Iowa City, a mother of two and associate director for the Belin-Blank International Center for Gifted Education. "So this is a time to make homemade treats."

Assouline has plenty of motivation to bake her own stuff. In Iowa, the selection is small and the prices often reflect that. Two UI professors also offered their Passover food hints. "Let's face it: Pesach is the festival of cholesterol," says DOUG JONES, a professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. "Matzah brei for breakfast and sometimes lunch. Scrambled eggs, too." "I am fortunate because I love matzah with cheese, any kind of cheese: cream cheese, soft cheese, hard cheese, cottage cheese with pepper and za'atar, whatever," says Steven Green, a biologist and professor in Iowa City. "On Pesach, I subsist on matzah and cheese, eggs, pickles and salads, and I enjoy it!"
http://www.bankrate.com/brm/news/advice/20050422a1.asp

Kutcher Attended UI (ABCNews.com, April 22)
Ashton Kutcher stars in a new movie "A Lot Like Love," his second romantic comedy this year. Kutcher's entire career has been a series of unlikely successes. Back in 1997, he was sweeping up Cheerios dust at a General Mills factory in his hometown of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, for $12 an hour. He had dropped out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he was studying biochemical engineering, to become a male model.
http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/story?id=692170&page=1

Top High School Student Considers UI (Onalaska Life, April 22)
Twenty Future Business Leaders of America members from Onalaska High School attended the FBLA state conference April 7-9 in Green Bay and senior Duncan Davis won the top honor at the state conference by winning the Future Business Leader event. After high school, Davis is interested in going into law or possibly business administration. He has been accepted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Wisconsin.
http://www.onalaskalife.com/articles/2005/04/22/news/02davis.txt

Kutcher Left UI for Modeling Career (Calgary Herald, April 22)
Actor Ashton Kutcher attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA where he studied biochemical engineering, but he dropped out to pursue a modelling career. The newspaper is based in Alberta, Canada.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b5f0a141e3e58615ba50cb14c8065d39&_docnum=52&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=203de1250026d6b1a7ec60fbde1e9e00

Candidate Earned UI Law Degree (Richmond Dispatch, April 21)
Viola O. Baskerville, D-Richmond, yesterday predicted that she will become the first woman elected as the state's lieutenant governor in November. But first she must win her party's nomination for the No. 2 statewide office against three other Democrats in the party's June 14 primary. Baskerville earned a J.D. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW in 1979. The newspaper is based in Virginia.
http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD/MGArticle/RTD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031782298418

Tiwari Comments On NYSE Floor Traders (Wall Street Journal, April 21)
In the "Trading Shots" column, it's noted that the New York Stock Exchange is doing away with its seats, and eventually will probably do away with its bodies, too. The NYSE swears there will be a place for floor traders, but Wall Street thinks the end is inevitable. At first glance, there are some benefits to losing floor traders. Though some "specialists" would probably be kept around to ride herd on trading, the bad apples among them might get fewer chances to dip into clients' wallets. Trading would be less costly and certainly will be quicker, for what that's worth. Eliminating floor traders, if not done right, could cause problems for investors. Last year, a study by finance professors PUNEET HANDA and ASHISH TIWARI of the University of Iowa and Robert Schwartz at Baruch College, City University of New York, found that floor trading at the American Stock Exchange was more efficient than the Amex's automated system. "Floor traders were waiting for the opportune time to execute trades to minimize the price impact," says Mr. Tiwari. "For certain kinds of investors -- institutional traders -- that could be valuable."
http://online.wsj.com/public/article/0,,SB111411087457213504,00.html?mod=todays_free_feature

UI Graduate Named Correspondent (WKYT-TV, April 21)
Ryan Lenz, a newsman in the Portland, Maine, bureau of The Associated Press, has been appointed correspondent in Evansville. Before working for the AP, he was research aide for the Agricultural Health Study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He is a native of Cherokee, Iowa, and a graduate of the University of Iowa. The TV station is based in Kentucky. The article also appeared in the LEXINGTON (Ky.) Leader.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/news/local/11454516.htm

UI Participates In Newborn Obesity Study (NBC4-TV, April 21)
Babies set their metabolism patterns during their first week of life, and those who gain weight rapidly during this time are more likely to be overweight as young adults, a study suggests. Researchers from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studied 653 adults, ages 20 to 32, whose weight had been carefully recorded as newborns while participating in an infant-formula study. The study was published today in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association. The newspaper is based in Alabama. The TV station serves the Los Angeles, Calif. area. A version of this story appeared on the websites of WCVB-TV in Boston, Mass., WGAL-TV in Pennsylvania, NBC17-TV and WXCin North Carolina, KMGH-TV in Denver, WNBC-TV in New York and several other TV station websites.
http://www.nbc4.tv/health/4402871/detail.html

Board Helps Child Recovering from Surgery  (Macomb Journal, April 21)
The McDonough County Board members made personal contributions toward an upcoming April 30 benefit for two-year old Mallory Hoyt of Macomb. The child is recovering from recent brain surgery at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. "Her mother is a county employee, so let's do all we can," Board Chairman Bob Harwick urged the board. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.macombjournal.com/articles/2005/04/21/news/news3.txt

Film By UI Student Opens (Rosemount Sun Current, April 21)
Tommy Haines, JT Haines, Tony Deutsch and Nick Deutsch, co-founders of Yuppie Dirtball Productions (YDP), will premier their third feature film, "Generation Mason," at the Uptown Theatre in Rosemount, Minn. this Saturday, April 23.  "Generation Mason" examines the life and pressures faced by a 20-something bachelor named Mason. To collect other actors for "Generation Mason," the group posted on the Minnesota Film Board as well as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where Tommy attends film school. The newspaper is based in Minnesota. The article also appeared in the APPLE VALLEY (Minn.) SUN CURRENT.
http://www.mnsun.com/story.asp?city=Rosemount&story=155980

Kutcher Attempted UI Degree (iFMagazine.com, April 21)
In his next film, Ashton Kucher plays a reluctant boyfriend to Amanda Peet in "A Lot Like Love." In this profile of the actor, it's noted that Kutcher attempted a degree of Biochemical Engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a stint as a cereal sweeper in a factory, Kutcher was discovered and made the journey from the farm to the big apple.
http://www.ifmagazine.com/feature.asp?article=1243

Man Sentenced in Death of UI Student (WQAD-TV, April 21)
A man accused of running over and killing a woman in downtown Iowa City after he smoke marijuana has been sentenced to five years in prison.

Twenty-two-year-old Thomas Eldridge of West Des Moines pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter in the death of 20-year-old Amanda Skolnick in 2003. He was sentenced yesterday in Johnson County District Court in Iowa City. Skolnick, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from Woodstock, Illinois, was walking to work when she was hit by Eldridge's sports utility vehicle. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3240659

Alumnus Leads Dance/Health Session (Green Bay News Chronicle, April 21)
Local cancer survivors will have the chance to become more comfortable with their bodies through physical movement at A Day of Rejuvenation on April 30. The event, held at St. Norbert Abbey, is sponsored by the Brown County Women's Cancer Coalition. Movement education specialist Marc Kotz will lead a 45-minute session emphasizing awareness of breath and the use of imagery as a source of movement at the fifth annual gathering. The session will resemble the activities of the class he teaches weekly at the Bay Area Yoga Center called "Minding and Mending the Body." Kotz has a history as a professional dancer. He earned a master of fine arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and danced with the Hartford Ballet and the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company. The newspaper is based in Wisconsin.
http://www.gogreenbay.com/page.html?article=131048

UI Researchers Study Personality Differences (Cox News Service, April 20)
Scientists have found that relationships of opposites are much more likely to be rockier and shorter than those among two people whose personalities are similar. A study of almost 300 couples, published in the latest edition of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, found that the happiest duos scored similarly on personality traits such as openness, agreeableness, conscientiousness and "disinhibition"- a measure of irresponsible or reckless behavior. Researchers SHANHONG LUO and EVA KLOHNEN of the University of Iowa said sharing the most personality traits creates compatibility and reduces conflict. They studied 291 couples who'd been married less than a year when the research began and dated each other for an average of 3.5 years. "What is most intriguing is that when the researchers assessed marital quality and happiness, they found that personality similarity was related to marital satisfaction, but attitude similarity was not," they said in the peer-reviewed article.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b5f0a141e3e58615ba50cb14c8065d39&_docnum=65&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=fe67690aa083ba508757e9e449c11872

Pierce Attorneys Seek Extension (Sports Illustrated.com, April 20)
Attorneys for former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball player Pierre Pierce have asked a judge for more time to prepare for trial and an extension of deadlines to file motions in the case. Pierce, 21, is scheduled to go on trial May 10 on four criminal charges stemming from an incident in which he allegedly threatened and assaulted his former girlfriend at her West Des Moines apartment in January. In documents filed in Dallas County District Court Wednesday, defense attorney Alfredo Parrish said more time is needed to interview witnesses, review police records and prepare for trial.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/basketball/ncaa/04/20/bc.bkc.piercetrial.ap/index.html

Illinois Chancellor Was UI Finalist (Chicago Sun-Times, April 20)
Richard H. Herman accepted the nomination to be permanent chancellor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Tuesday with a pledge to teach students to give back to society. Herman, 63, emerged as the choice of the university's board of trustees after a closed meeting Saturday during which three finalists were interviewed. His nomination was announced Tuesday by UI President B. Joseph White. Before becoming interim chancellor, Herman was UIUC's provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs from 1998 to 2004. During that time, he was a finalist for the presidency at the University of Florida and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but he said becoming chancellor at Illinois is a privilege. A version of the story also ran on the website of the CHICAGO DAILY SOUTHTOWN.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/education/19uofi.html

UI Alumna To Perform Slam Poetry (Joliet Herald News, April 20)
Lewis University's Department of English and the Writing Program will sponsor two events in celebration of April's National Poetry Month. A guest performance by slam poet Mary Fons will be at 2 p.m. Thursday in the Big Red Room of the student union in conjunction with a Student Poetry Open Mic session. A Chicago resident, Fons received her bachelor's degree in theater from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 2001. Using the name "Tennessee Mary," she has performed her original works of poetry slam across the country. The paper is based in Illinois.
http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/heraldnews/ourtown/j20lewis2.htm

UI Partner In Study On Infant Weight-Gain (Birmingham Post-Herald, April 20)
A recent study published in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation, says that babies who gain weight rapidly during the first eight days of life are more likely to become obese as young adults. Dr. Nicolas Stettler, a pediatric nutrition specialist at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and lead author of the study, says, "It suggests that there may be a critical period in that first week during which the body's physiology may be programmed to develop chronic disease throughout life." The study conducted by researchers from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, tracked 653 adults, ranging in age from 20 to 32. These people had been measured as newborns when they were formula-fed. It was found that the subjects who had shown rapid weight gain as newly-borns were at significant risk of becoming overweight in adult life. The paper is based in Alabama. A version of the article also ran on the website EARTHTIMES.ORG.
http://www.postherald.com/nw041905.shtml

UI Participates In Newborn Obesity Study (Birmingham Post-Herald, April 19)
Babies set their metabolism patterns during their first week of life, and those who gain weight rapidly during this time are more likely to be overweight as young adults, a study suggests. Researchers from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studied 653 adults, ages 20 to 32, whose weight had been carefully recorded as newborns while participating in an infant-formula study. The study was published today in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association. The newspaper is based in Alabama. A version of this story appeared April 19 on the Web site of the ST. PETERSBURG (Fla.) TIMES.
http://www.postherald.com/nw041905.shtml

Academic Couple's Career Includes Stop At UI (Courier Mail, April 19)
Professor Julie Campbell, 58, is a Senior Principal Research Fellow of the National Health and Medical Research Council, director of the Centre for Research in Vascular Biology at the University of Queensland and director of the Wesley Research Institute at the Wesley Hospital, where her main focus is developing the "grow your own artery" process to help heart patients. The Wesley Research Institute currently funds the artificial artery work. Her husband, Professor Gordon Campbell, 61, who has held the Chair of Anatomy at UQ since 1991, is co-director of the university's Centre for Research in Vascular Biology. As well as researching, he is a full-time teaching academic. The couple met over a microscope at the University of Melbourne more than 30 years ago when they were researching their PhDs. They have reared five children (including two from Gordon's previous marriage) and worked together around the world at various institutions, including University College London, the University of Washington in Seattle, USA and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Queensland, Australia.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5d82d155cf75cf4c5ddfaa96183b16c9&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVb&_md5=5ad454c70ac1ec16c6bd9600be6a1f05

Artman On Panel Examining Heart Drug Natrecor (Forbes, April 19)
Johnson & Johnson's fast-growing biotech drug, a treatment for patients with dangerously weak hearts, may increase the risk of death by 80 percent, according to a study. The results, published in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association, are not new but a re-analysis of the data that was used to get the medicine, Natrecor, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. J&J has previously said that some of the doses in the new study are higher than the ones doctors actually use. J&J has enlisted Harvard's Eugene Braunwald, perhaps the world's most respected cardiologist, to head a panel to look into Natrecor's risks and benefits. Natrecor was approved in 2001 after an FDA panel voted 9-to-0, with one abstention, that the drug had a place on the market. Today, the vote might be closer, and the drug would probably wind up with a tougher label. Four of the 10 panelists say Natrecor needs to have significant labeling added to describe its risk: Packer, who chaired the panel; Steven Nissen, of the Cleveland Clinic; MICHAEL ARTMAN, of the University of Iowa; and Jeffrey Borer, of Cornell's New York Presbyterian Hospital. Panelist Ileana Pina, of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, pointed out that many doctors think the drug helps their patients but did not feel comfortable commenting on the new results. "I think a stronger label is worthwhile," says Artman. "People should be made aware of this."
http://www.forbes.com/home/healthcare/2005/04/19/cx_mh_0419jnj.html

Blumberg, Karlsson Study Sleep In Rats (National Geographic, April 19)
Adults spend nearly a third of their lives asleep. Infants sleep twice that much or even more -- yet scientists don't completely understand the processes of sleep and why the state is so essential. But new research on rats has added a piece to this puzzle by revealing that infant and adult sleep are strikingly similar. MARK BLUMBERG, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Iowa, and colleagues have reported that the neural (nerve) mechanisms in the active sleep of week-old rats are similar to the sleep mechanisms of adult rats. The results suggest that the basic components of sleep are present soon after birth and develop in more or less a straight line throughout life. Led by fellow University of Iowa researcher KARL KARLSSON, Blumberg and colleagues published their findings this week in the journal PLoS Biology.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/04/0419_050419_sleep.html

UI Teams Up With Caterpillar In $1.75 Million Deal (WQAD-TV, April 19)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's engineering department is teaming up with Caterpillar Incorporated to create new technologies for the school's virtual soldier program. The five-year deal is estimated at $1.75 million dollars. University officials say this will help researchers develop modeling and simulation technology to improve the department's human modeling program, known as "Santos." Santos is designed to save time and money. It will reduce the need to build physical prototypes to test and evaluate products such as equipment, vehicles, clothing, body movement, fatigue and other human behavior before money is spent on manufacturing. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3231363

Billett, Xue Comment On Stock Buyback Trend (The Economist, April 19)
Companies are reeling in their shares hand over fist these days. First-quarter corporate results have brought a new batch of buyback programs -- and much food for thought. In the past week alone, BASF, a German chemicals group, has announced a new 1.5 billion Eurodollar share buyback, on top of the 1 billion Eurodollar program it has just completed. Citigroup and Merrill Lynch, two giants of American finance, have unveiled repurchase plans worth $15 billion and $4 billion respectively. Kerr-McGee, an American oil company, said it would buy back up to $4 billion-worth of its shares. BP, a British oil giant, Franco-Belgian bank Dexia and Germany's Deutsche Börse are also buying back shares. One benefit for companies that buy back shares is that they are likely to be able to raise equity finance later more cheaply, say MATTHEW BILLETT and HUI XUE from the University of Iowa. This is so not only because repurchasing shares is likely to raise their price; their shares also resist better the normal downdraft that accompanies a new share issue.
http://www.economist.com/agenda/displayStory.cfm?story_id=3884235

Bezanson Critical of Blackmun Article (New York Law Journal, April 19)
The late Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun ceded so much of his authority to his law clerks during his 24-year tenure that it amounts to "a scandalous abdication of judicial responsibility," Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David Garrow asserts in a magazine article out today. The article in Legal Affairs, based on research done by Garrow in Blackmun's papers released last year at the Library of Congress, recounts numerous cases in which memoranda from clerks and other documents show an outsized influence and assertive tone by clerks that Garrow says is unmatched by other justices whose papers are available. However, RANDALL BEZANSON, one of the Roe-era clerks cited by Garrow, was sharply critical of Garrow's article, which he saw late last week. "The conclusions he draws about assertiveness and forcefulness are a wrong and unfortunate misinterpretation," says Bezanson, now a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law. "Justice Blackmun treated his clerks as people in whom he had confidence and from whom he wanted their views stated in a clear way. The justice was clearly in charge." Bezanson, like others interviewed, said Garrow's interpretation might have been different if he had sought the perspectives of the clerks whose memos he cited.
http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1113555914558

Van Voorhis: Symptoms of Aging, Menopause Similar (Asbury Park Press, April 19)
A conference last month at the National Institutes of Health raised more questions than it answered about treating menopause symptoms. Sorting menopause symptoms from aging symptoms is tricky. For example, incontinence is more common in older women, said University of Iowa endocrinologist BRADLEY VAN VOORHIS. But the Women's Health Initiative conference found that bladder control worsened in women on hormones, compared with those on a placebo, suggesting the problem is unrelated to menopause, he said. The Press is based in New Jersey.
http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050419/LIFE/504190358/1006/NEWS01

IEM Exploits Collective Wisdom (BBC, Apri 19)
Worldwide electronic markets work so well because there is a collective wisdom among the tens of thousands of people all over the world who trade on them. The point about these markets, and there are many of them, is that they are very good at predicting what will happen. When the punditocracy were opining that Senator John Kerry might well win the election against President Bush, the people investing their real money in the electronic futures market were having none of it. The markets got it right, down to the share of the vote of each candidate.  In presidential elections since 1988, for example, the Iowa Electronic Market organized by the College of Business at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has out-performed the polls consistently.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4457715.stm

UI Research Shows Sleep Development Patterns (KeralaNext, April 19)
U.S. researchers said infant sleep patterns are so important for central nervous system development that it can govern adult sleep patterns. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studied the brains and sleep patterns of neo-natal rats and found they bore a striking resemblance to adults. More important, the neural mechanisms of the infant brain that underlie the sleep state also seem to contain the primary components of adult sleep. KeralaNext is based in India. The same story appeared on the Web site of the WASHINGTON TIMES.
http://www.keralanext.com/news/indexread.asp?id=183439

UI Participates in Newborn Obesity Study (Daily Southtown, April 19)
Babies set their metabolism patterns during their first week of life, and those who gain weight rapidly during this time are more likely to be overweight as young adults, a new study suggests. Researchers from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studied 653 adults, ages 20 to 32, whose weight had been carefully recorded as newborns while participating in an infant-formula study in Iowa. The Daily Southtown is based in Chicago. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, BBC NEWS, WEBINDIA123.com, KERALANEXT (India), FOOD CONSUMER, HEALTH TALK CANADA, MEDICAL NEWS TODAY and DAILY MAIL (UK).
http://www.dailysouthtown.com/southtown/dsnews/199nd5.htm

Oral Explains Iowa Meth Policies (Poplar Bluff Daily American, April 19)
Authorities have dismantled more than 50,000 clandestine meth labs since 2001, including some 4,000 in Iowa. Roughly 30 percent are "mom and pop" labs in homes where children live. Thousands of children across the country have been taken away from their meth-abusing parents in recent years, placed with relatives or shifted into already overloaded foster care systems. Scores have been injured, a dozen or more killed; thousands have been born with traces of meth in their bodies. Under Iowa's current policies, which mirror those elsewhere, the Department of Human Services has some discretion as to removing meth-exposed children from home or giving addicted parents a chance to kick the habit. "If we detect meth in a newborn, we're required to notify DHS," said Dr. RESMIYE ORAL, pediatrician at the University of Iowa hospital. "The baby gets medical follow-up and the mother goes to treatment. If she doesn't go along with the plan, the baby is removed." The Daily American is based in Arkansas.
http://www.darnews.com/articles/2005/04/18/news/news13.txt

UI Grad Student Union Rejected at UM (Inside Higher Ed, April 19)
By a substantial margin, graduate students at the University of Minnesota have voted down a plan to create a union of teaching and research assistants. The would-be union was called GradTRAC - for Graduate Teaching and Research Assistants Coalition. It affiliated with the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers, a union that represents graduate students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web site of the ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, GRAND FORKS HERALD, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, FARGO FORUM, TWIN CITIES BUSINESS JOURNAL and MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2005/04/19/minn

Weinstock Study Verifies Safety of Worm Treatment (Boston Globe, April 19)
Ingesting the eggs of Trichuris suis, an intestinal worm, appears to be a safe and effective treatment for active ulcerative colitis, new research shows. Ulcerative colitis is a common inflammatory disease of the colon that causes bloody diarrhea and heightens the risk of colon cancer. Treatment with parasitic worms or ''helminths" seems to work by altering the body's immune system, according to the report in the April issue of the journal Gastroenterology. Dr. JOEL V. WEINSTOCK of the University of Iowa and colleagues assessed the outcomes of 54 patients with active ulcerative colitis who were randomly selected to receive Trichuris suis eggs or inactive ''placebo" every two weeks for 12 weeks. Forty-three percent of patients in the worm-egg group experienced a moderate or major improvement in their disease compared with just 17 percent of patients in the placebo group.
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/health_science/articles/2005/04/19/treatment_with_intestinal_worm_appears_to_help_a_common_inflammatory_disease/

Robinson Leads Quiet Life (Akron Beacon Journal, April 19)
Unlike most Americans, MARILYNNE ROBINSON never suffers the agonies of the modern traffic jam, rising gas prices or a dearth of downtown parking. Robinson, who won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week for her novel, "Gilead," a gentle, moving story about a small town preacher from Iowa, prefers the rhythms of a slower, simpler life. She doesn't own a car or drive, preferring instead to walk to class, church or anywhere else in this small, Midwestern college town. "I'm so happy not to have a car," says the writer, who also doesn't own a television set but concedes her traditional tendencies are limited by her cell phone. "I don't like cars. There is just something ridiculous about them. They are noisy ... clumsy, they choke towns. I just love walking." Robinson, who moved here in 1989 to teach at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa, is also unapologetic about the 24 years that passed between her highly acclaimed first novel, "Housekeeping," and her latest.
http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/entertainment/books/11411147.htm

Weisman to Teach at Michigan Institute (Ann Arbor News, April 19)
The Life Sciences Institute at the University of Michigan has announced the hiring of six new faculty.  The hires bring the staff total to 17 since the institute opened in 2003. U-M says the institute will eventually have 25-30 faculty researchers. LOIS WEISMAN, will become a research professor at LSI this summer. She is currently on the faculty at the University of Iowa. She works with bakers' yeast and studies a cellular process involved in cell division and embryonic development. This process plays a role in disease, such as cancer and diabetes.
http://www.mlive.com/news/aanews/index.ssf?/base/news-12/111383520520590.xml

Robinson, McPherson Discuss Chang Selection (New York Times, April 18)
The novelist MARILYNNE ROBINSON was a member of the seven-member search committee that selected LAN SAMANTHA CHANG as the new director of the University of Iowa Writer's Workshop. Of those the considered for the position, she said "We felt we couldn't go wrong choosing any of the candidates." The others were Jim Shepard, Ben Marcus and Richard Bausch. But she noted of Ms. Chang that "her career is on the upswing, which makes her a valuable presence as an active writer," and added: "She's very devoted to the program," where she studied in the early 1990's, and where she has been a visiting faculty member. JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON, acting director of the workshop and another member of the search committee, said he expected no major changes in the program. "They have comparable sensibilities," he said of Mr. Conroy and Ms. Chang. Like Mr. Conroy, he said, Ms. Chang is comfortable with people from varying backgrounds. In Mr. Conroy's time, the workshop produced writers with as varied an aesthetic as T. C. Boyle, Jane Smiley and Allan Gurganus, all in the same class at Iowa in the 1970's, all taught by John Cheever, a writer with his own singular style. Mr. McPherson added: "She will be closer to the experience of young writers than I was or Frank was."
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/18/books/18chan.html

Conroy Mentored Young Writers (Time, April 18)
Frank Conroy, 69, died of colon cancer in Iowa City. Conroy, who laid the groundwork for modern confessional memoirs with his acclaimed 1967 debut "Stop-Time," an unsentimental chronicle of his painfully nomadic, picaresque childhood. The sometime jazz pianist mentored scores of young writers, many of whom became successful novelists, during 18 years as head of the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, the country's most prestigious creative-writing program.
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1047476,00.html

Wilder Attended UI (Patriot Ledger, April 18)
A story about actor Gene Wilder's new autobiography, ''Kiss Me Like a Stranger: My Search for Love and Art'' says the book touches on his rise into the professional ranks from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, his first, fateful meeting with Mel Brooks - he met him on the set of a Jerome Robbins version of Brecht's ''Mother Courage and Her Children,'' with Wilder in a small part and Brooks' girlfriend Anne Bancroft in the lead role - and learning about an all-too-Brooksian script called ''Springtime for Hitler,'' which would later become, of course, ''The Producers.'' Had he not met Brooks, Wilder mused, he ''would probably be making wallets at some neuropsychiatric institute somewhere.'' The paper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.patriotledger.com/articles/2005/04/18/life/life01.txt

Chang Named Director Of Writers' Workshop (Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, April 18)
American literature has expanded beyond traditional themes and now so has one of the nation's most prestigious writing programs. "Our literary world is larger than it used to be. The fact that I'm the new director is an illustration of that," said LAN SAMANTHA CHANG, a first-generation Chinese-American who's taking over as director of the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop. Chang, 40, whose writing focuses on the lives of Chinese-Americans, is the first female and first Asian American to lead the famed workshop. She succeeds FRANK CONROY, the longtime director who retired, and died of cancer this month at 69. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/living/11423869.htm

UI Law School Ranking Cited (WQAD-TV, April 18)
Iowa Drake University Law School is ranked in the bottom tier of law schools by a national magazine. The fourth-tier ranking in this month's U-S News and World Report is a tier below what the school has been ranked for the past five years. Rankings are based on 12 factors in four different categories. They include assessments by judges and lawyers around the country, test scores and bar exam passage rate. School officials say the drop is rating is due to a one-year dip in the bar passage rate and a lack of information when reporting job placement. THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's law school was the only other state school to appear on the list. It was ranked in the top tier, number 22 in the country. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3223053

Maia Quartet Picks Park For First Violinist (Playbillarts.com, April 18)
The Maia Quartet has chosen Tricia Park to fill its vacant first violinist position, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA announced. The quartet, which was formed in 1990 at the Cleveland Institute of Music, is in residence at the UI School of Music. Park replaces founding first violinist Amy Appold, who left the group last fall to teach at the University of Missouri. Park was selected through an unusually public search process, in which two finalists visited the university to teach, rehearse, and perform. Trained at the Juilliard School, Park won the Avery Fisher Career Grant. She has performed as a soloist with the Baltimore Symphony, Seattle Symphony, Montreal Symphony, and other groups. The other members of the Maia Quartet are founding violist Elizabeth Oakes, cellist Hannah Holman, and violinist Margaret Soper Gutierrez.
http://www.playbillarts.com/news/article/1847.html

Robinson: Next Book Will Be Nonfiction (WQAD-TV, April 18)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON
, who won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week, is unapologetic about the years that passed between her highly acclaimed first book and her latest. The 61-year-old Robinson won the Pulitzer for fiction for her novel "Gilead," a story about a small town preacher from Iowa. She wrote it 24 years after her first novel, "Housekeeping." Robinson, who grew up in Sandpoint, Idaho, moved to Iowa City in 1989 to teach at the University of Iowa's celebrated Writers' Workshop. Sandpoint is the model for the fictional town for her 1980 novel, "Housekeeping. Robinson won a PEN/Faulkner Award and was nominated for Pulitzer. With little pressure to appease her publisher and nothing simmering at the time to write another novel just for the sake of it, Robinson took her time working on "Gilead." And another long wait may be in store for fans eager for her next novel. She says her next project will be a nonfiction book. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3221581

Robinson Leads Quiet Life (Register-Guard, April 17)
Unlike most Americans, MARILYNNE ROBINSON never suffers the agonies of the modern traffic jam, rising gas prices or a dearth of downtown parking. Robinson, who won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week for her novel, "Gilead," a gentle, moving story about a small town preacher from Iowa, prefers the rhythms of a slower, simpler life. She doesn't own a car or drive, preferring instead to walk to class, church or anywhere else in this small, Midwestern college town. "I'm so happy not to have a car," says the writer, who also doesn't own a television set but concedes her traditional tendencies are limited by her cell phone. "I don't like cars. There is just something ridiculous about them. They are noisy ... clumsy, they choke towns. I just love walking." Robinson, who moved here in 1989 to teach at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa, is also unapologetic about the 24 years that passed between her highly acclaimed first novel, "Housekeeping," and her latest. The newspaper is based in Washington state. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the LANSING (Mich.) STATE JOURNAL and BARRE MONTPELIER TIMES ARGUS in Vermont.
http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&q=%22University+of+Iowa%22&ie=UTF-8&scoring=d&sa=N&start=40

Weinstock Study On Helminthic Treatment Cited (Zeenews.com, April 17)
Ingesting the eggs of Trichuris suis, an intestinal worm, appears to be a safe and effective treatment for active ulcerative colitis, new research shows. Ulcerative colitis is a common inflammatory disease of the colon that causes bloody diarrhea and heightens the risk of colon cancer. Treatment with parasitic worms or "helminths" seems to work by altering the body`s immune system, according to the report in the journal Gastroenterology. Animal studies have shown helminth therapy to have a beneficial effect on colon inflammation. In an earlier study, Dr. JOEL V. WEINSTOCK, from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and colleagues described the development of a helminth that cannot multiply within the human body and has no harmful effects. A suspension of the worm`s eggs was given to six patients with bowel disease, and it produced a temporary remission from their disease in all but one. A version of the story also ran on the website of KERALANEXT in India. Zeenews.com is based in India.
http://www.zeenews.com/links/articles.asp?ssid=28&aid=212487&newsid=ENV

Author Of Islam Book Attended Workshop (Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, April 17)
America's painful recent encounters with the Muslim world have spurred a spate of books, including several that cover Islam as a whole. Reza Aslan's "No God But God" is one of the most readable, reflecting his unusual background as both a student of religion and a graduate of the University of Iowa's WRITERS' WORKSHOP. But his attention to good storytelling occasionally interferes with accuracy. Mostly reliable and usually entertaining, the book also has some problems. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/news/editorial/11418430.htm

Chang Named Workshop Director (Cincinnati Enquirer, April 17)
American literature has expanded beyond traditional themes, and now so has one of the nation's most prestigious writing programs. "Our literary world is larger than it used to be. The fact that I'm the new director is an illustration of that," said LAN SAMANTHA CHANG, a first-generation Chinese-American who's taking over as director of the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop. Chang, 40, whose writing focuses on the lives of Chinese-Americans, is the first female and first Asian-American to lead the famed workshop. She succeeds FRANK CONROY, the longtime director who retired, and who died of cancer this month at 69. "She's bringing a new youthful perspective," said LINDA MAXSON, dean of Iowa's College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. "She has a passionate dedication to the program, and what it means for the world of writers." That Chang is female and Asian-American is "a bonus," Maxson said.
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050417/ENT07/504170323/1032/Life

Squire Comments On Possible Brownback Candidacy (Kansas City Star, April 17)
U.S. Sen. Sam Brownback, the Republican senior senator from Kansas, was in Manchester, N.H. Saturday giving a speech to a conservative activist group and is said to be considering a bid for president. His trip comes after visits to Iowa and South Carolina, two other states where presidential dreams can soar or sour. Iowa is as close to a home field as Brownback will get, and it's the state where he has spent the most time so far, with four trips there since last summer and another being planned. As a former Kansas secretary of agriculture, he should be comfortable talking about the farm issues that will be a big part of the Iowa race. Plus, conservative Christians will make up about one-fourth to one-third of Iowa Republican caucus-goers, estimated PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "If you can get one-third of the vote in a five- or six-person field, you're in good shape," Squire said. "He has a chance to do reasonably well in Iowa. Of all the candidates on the Republican side, he may be the most advantaged by Iowa being first."
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascitystar/news/politics/11413955.htm

Fisher Comments On Subsidizing Companies (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, April 17)
With considerable fanfare, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty in 2003 touted a plan to offer state tax breaks and credits to budding bioscience companies in Minnesota. Fifteen months after the program started, just three takers, producing fewer than two dozen jobs, have been approved for $170,000 in state aid. Nevertheless, proponents say the nature of the industry makes it difficult to compare the biosciences program with other, more lavishly financed state programs such as the Job Opportunity Building Zones (JOBZ) program. Biotech start-up firms fail more often than they succeed, making the state's modest subsidies in this arena look like risk management. Meanwhile, some biotech firms may be wary of taking the money for fear of signing promises to create jobs. Others see no appeal in corporate income tax breaks when their companies, as yet, have no income. Skeptics of public subsidies for private enterprises say balancing costs and benefits is a vexing problem. PETER FISHER, a University of Iowa economist, put it this way: Offer large subsidies and the cost per job may be enormous; pay a little and the subsidies may make no difference. "Can you sort out the firms where it really could make a difference? How much do you need to give to make a difference?" he said. "Of course, the companies know what that amount is and the state doesn't."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/5350781.html

Weinstock Worm Treatment Cited (New Scientist, April 16)
Many scientists are now convinced that better treatments for immune-related diseases lie just around the corner. In London, one group has already developed a vaccine from dead M. vaccae for treating eczema and asthma. The vaccine is now showing encouraging results in clinical trials. Other researchers are studying the effects of using live lactobacilli to treat children with eczema, allergic rhinitis, food allergies and inflammatory bowel diseases. There is even growing interest in using the eggs of worms such as the pig whipworm Trichuris suis -- which cannot survive in humans as adult worms -- to treat patients with colitis, type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. In January, JOEL WEINSTOCK and his team at the University of Iowa in Iowa City reported that drinking a sports drink containing 2500 T. suis eggs once every three weeks for 24 weeks resulted in the disappearance of symptoms in 21 of 29 patients with Crohn's disease.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=d44c06930df74cffdc161e4a2f35a8ec&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVb&_md5=0fa457ab4435d3f2b933f6b4a409a9c0

Loening-Baucke: Constipation Common Among Children (Pak Tribune, April 16)
Constipation is common among children up to 2 years old, according to the results of a recent study. However, dietary changes and laxatives usually resolve the problem. Dr. VERA LOENING-BAUCKE, of the University of Iowa, Iowa City, measured the rate of constipation in 4157 children 2 years of age or younger. In addition, she documented the effects of dietary changes, corn syrup, or laxatives. The results are published in the Journal of Pediatrics. Loening-Baucke identified 185 children with constipation. Up to 1 year of age, 2.9 percent of the children had constipation, but this increased to 10.1 percent in the second year. Boys and girls were affected equally. The paper is based in Pakistan. A version of the story also ran on the website of KERALANEXT in India.
http://paktribune.com/news/index.php?id=101888

New University of Maine President Worked At UI (WCSH-TV6, April 16)
University of Maine System Chancellor Joseph W. Westphal today named Robert A. Kennedy as the 18th president of the University of Maine. Kennedy, who has been serving as interim president since August, has been with UMaine since 2000, when he was hired to serve as provost and vice president of academic affairs. He later was named executive vice president and provost, a joint position he held until taking over the presidency following the resignation of Peter S. Hoff. A plant biochemist, Kennedy grew up in Minnesota and graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1968. After service in the U.S. Army, he entered graduate school, earning a Ph. D. in Botany from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1974. Kennedy's academic career has included faculty and administrative posts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Washington State University, The Ohio State University, the University of Maryland and Texas A&M University. A version of the story also ran on the website of the PORTSMOUTH HERALD NEWS in New Hampshire. WCSH is based in Maine.
http://www.wcsh6.com/home/article.asp?id=21838

UI Methadone Study Cited (Laconia Citizen, April 16)
Myron E. Gile, a.k.a. Munk, of Halls Brook Road was arraigned at Grafton County Superior Court in North Haverhill on Wednesday. According to court records, Gile was arrested on Dec. 18 on two counts of unlawful possession of a narcotic substance. One count was for methadone, a Class B felony, and the other count was for marijuana, a Class A misdemeanor. The court set bail at $800 personal recognizance. According to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MEDICAL SCHOOL, methadone is a synthetic opiate used to aid heroin addicts trying to kick the addiction. It is an addictive drug in its own right, and the "high" it produces lasts roughly 20 to 24 hours. The paper is based in New Hampshire.
http://www4.citizen.com/april_2005/04.16.05/news/groton_041605a.asp

UI's $1 Billion Fundraising Goal Cited (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, April 16)
Tommy Boyer remembers what Fayetteville looked like when he graduated from the University of Arkansas in 1964. The campus had about 5,000 students. The town had one stoplight. "It was a sleepy little town," he said. Not anymore. Fayetteville is now a place where its university on a hill stands at the edge of raising $1 billion in private gifts and pledges in seven years. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is listed among other colleges and universities in the United States currently engaged in efforts to raise $1 billion or more. http://www.nwanews.com/story.php?paper=adg&section=News&storyid=113597

IEM Gave Bush Clear Edge In Election (Egypt Election Daily News, April 16)
A number of Internet gambling sites are taking bets on who will come out of the upcoming cardinals' conclave as the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church. Some bricks-and-mortar bookmakers in Britain, Ireland and Europe are also in on the game, though Las Vegas and Atlantic City have shied away from the Vatican action. The official papal selection process begins in Vatican City on Monday and is expected to choose a successor to John Paul within a few days. Betting markets have outdone pundits, polls and the press in predicting other elections. During the past four U.S. presidential campaigns, economists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have operated an Internet-based futures market where anybody who wants to can bet on one of the two major-party candidates. In the extremely tight 2004 election, for example, virtually every authoritative source considered the race too close to call right up to election night. But the Iowa market gave George W. Bush a clear edge from the end of the Republican convention in early September.
http://egyptelection.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=467

UI Futures Market Noted (Charlotte News and Observer, April 15)
A number of Internet gambling sites are taking bets on who will come out of the upcoming cardinals' conclave as the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church. Economists have been surprised at how well the aggregated guesses of bettors align with the real likelihoods of different outcomes in all sorts of events. In economic terms, bettors are essentially traders in an efficient market, where prices are very close to the actual values of whatever is being bought and sold.  Betting markets have outdone pundits, polls and the press in predicting other elections. During the past four U.S. presidential campaigns, economists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have operated an Internet-based futures market where anybody who wants to can bet on one of the two major-party candidates. In the extremely tight 2004 election, for example, virtually every authoritative source considered the race too close to call right up to election night. But the Iowa market gave George W. Bush a clear edge from the end of the Republican convention in early September. The newspaper is based in North Carolina. The story also appeared on the websites of KATC-TV in Louisiana, CBS4-TV in Denver; 570 NEWS, MACLEANS and CANADA EAST in Canada; NEW YORK TIMES; SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, CONTRA COSTA TIMES, SAN LUIS OBISPO TRIBUNE, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE AND MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD in California; KANSAS CITY STAR, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, NEW YORK NEWSDAY; THE GUARDIAN in the United Kingdom; WIRED NEWS; DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE and ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS in Minnesota, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, and several other media outlets.
http://newsobserver.com/24hour/technology/story/2312805p-10521906c.html

Rushton to Speak In New York (Troy Record, April 15)
The University At Albany School of Public Health is sponsoring presentations on Geographic Information Systems and Public Health April 19 at the School of Public Health, 1 University Place, Rensselaer. The Keynote address will be given by GERARD RUSHTON, University of Iowa: "The Promise and the Challenges of Applying Geographic Information Systems in Public Health." The newspaper is based in New York.
http://www.troyrecord.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1170&dept_id=7010&newsid=14352929&PAG=461&rfi=9

Diekema Concerned About Staph Infection Increase (WQAD-TV, April 15)
Researchers at the University of Iowa say there is reason for concern about a growing number of infections across the state involving drug-resistant staphylococcus bacteria. A recent survey of the hard-to-treat cases parallels two national studies showing drug resistant infections are becoming more prevalent in the community, outside hospitals and nursing homes. DR. DAN DIEKEMA, an epidemiologist at the University of Iowa, says one of the reasons it's considered to be a public health problem is that it is one of the most common causes of severe infections in humans. And it is now becoming increasingly difficult to treat with antibiotics. University researchers tested 193 samples of staph infections gathered from 1998-2001 in 15 communities across the state, from as far west as Sioux City to Des Moines and eastern cities of Clinton and Burlington. The television station is in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3212714

Engineering Alumnus Promoted (Arlington Heights Journal, April 14)
James Massarelli has been named the director of engineering in Arlington Heights Village, Ill.  A graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a bachelor's degree in civil engineering, Massarelli worked for five years as a project engineer for a private firm in Hinsdale, Ill. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.journal-topics.com/ah/05/ah050414.2.html

Robinson Leads Quiet Life (Longview Daily News, April 14)
Unlike most Americans, MARILYNNE ROBINSON never suffers the agonies of the modern traffic jam, rising gas prices or a dearth of downtown parking. Robinson, who won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week for her novel, "Gilead," a gentle, moving story about a small town preacher from Iowa, prefers the rhythms of a slower, simpler life. She doesn't own a car or drive, preferring instead to walk to class, church or anywhere else in this small, Midwestern college town. "I'm so happy not to have a car," says the writer, who also doesn't own a television set but concedes her traditional tendencies are limited by her cell phone. "I don't like cars. There is just something ridiculous about them. They are noisy ... clumsy, they choke towns. I just love walking." Robinson, who moved here in 1989 to teach at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa, is also unapologetic about the 24 years that passed between her highly acclaimed first novel, "Housekeeping," and her latest. The newspaper is based in Washington state.
http://www.tdn.com/articles/2005/04/14/this_day/news02.txt

Columnist Writes About Workshop Graduate (Woburn Advocate, April 14)
A columnist writes about a goofy idea for a book concocted by his friend Mark, an "amazing writer" who no doubt will soon be gracing the pages of the New Yorker, Harpers, and the Atlantic Monthly. He recently got his MFA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which has one of the most respected creative writing programs in the country. "Pulitzers, Nobel Prizes - you name it, it's gone to an Iowa graduate, and I guess I'm just hoping to have won my Razzie before Mark takes home any of the more prestigious hardware."
http://www2.townonline.com/woburn/opinion/view.bg?articleid=223486

Graduate's Research Shows Excess Chloroform (Medical News Today, April 14)
Researchers at Virginia Tech have discovered that the use of antimicrobial soaps and other products may unnecessarily be directly exposing consumers to significant quantities of chloroform. Peter Vikesland, assistant professor in civil and environmental engineering, has shown in his research that when the chemical triclosan, present in many antimicrobial soaps, reacts with chlorine in tap water, chloroform is produced. Chloroform is classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a probable human carcinogen. Vikesland's work was reported in last week's on-line edition of Environmental Science & Technology's science news section. Vikesland is an NSF CAREER Awardee for 2004-2009. He received his bachelor's degree in chemistry from Grinnell College in 1993. He received his master's and Ph.D. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in civil and environmental engineering in 1995 and 1998, respectively. His research areas of interest include environmental nanotechnology, subsurface contaminant remediation, and drinking water treatment.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=22782

Chang Selected To Head Workshop (Boston Globe, April 13)
Harvard's LAN SAMANTHA CHANG is the new director of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP, which is widely considered the nation's most prestigious graduate writing program. How prestigious? Each year the workshop gets 750 applications for 25 openings. Chang, 40, a workshop graduate, is the author of "Hunger: A Novella and Stories" and the novel "Inheritance." She succeeds Frank Conroy, a longtime Nantucket resident who stepped down in February and died last week.
http://www.boston.com/ae/celebrity/articles/2005/04/13/dawson_draws_cheers_afflecks_a_material_guy/

Chang Succeeds Conroy As Workshop Director (Seattle Times, April 13)
LAN SAMANTHA CHANG
, a Harvard University professor and award-winning fiction author who specializes in stories of Chinese-Americans, has been named director of the nation's most prestigious writing program, the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop. A student at Iowa in the 1990s and later a teacher there, Chang succeeds FRANK CONROY, the longtime director who announced last summer that he was retiring and died of cancer last week, at age 69. Chang, a Briggs-Copeland lecturer in creative writing at Harvard, will begin at Iowa next January. University of Iowa president DAVID SKORTON said Monday in a statement that he wanted Chang to consider her new job "as a homecoming" This story also appeared on the Web site of the GLOBE AND MAIL in Canada.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/books/2002239309_iowadirector13.html

UI Graduate to Speak (Charlotte Observer, April 13)
Robin Behn, a Guggenheim Fellow and Pushcart Prize-winning poet, will read from her work at 1 p.m. April 27 in the Catawba Valley Community College auditorium in North Carolina, An acclaimed poet and English professor at the University of Alabama College of Arts and Sciences, Behn earned a master of fine arts degree in English from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/states/north_carolina/counties/catawba/11379878.htm

Flu Vaccine Evaluated (Washington Times, April 13)
A flu vaccine designed specifically for the elderly is being tested at the University of Maryland and four other sites nationwide in an effort to increase the effectiveness of the inoculations. The current vaccine is effective in 30 percent to 70 percent of older persons, said Dr. Robert Edelman, the study's principal investigator. "That's not too good," Dr. Edelman said. "In young adults, it's 70 to 90 percent, so there's a very big difference there." In addition to the University of Maryland, the study is being conducted at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, St. Louis University Health Sciences Center and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The story also appeared on the websites of WJZ-TV in Maryland, the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://washingtontimes.com/metro/20050412-103027-6646r.htm

Bechera Makes Presentation At Conference (Wall Street Journal, April 12)
After evolving for thousands of years in conditions where the next meal was often hard to come by, humans may be hard-wired to like high-calorie foods. So how can they resist French fries and sugar-sweetened soft drinks now that they are ubiquitous, inexpensive and often outsized? In an effort to look for solutions beyond futile diet fads and the usual exhortations to exercise more, McGill University's medical and business schools last week brought together an unusually broad cross-section of scientists, health and marketing experts in Montreal to brainstorm about ways to nudge consumers toward healthier eating. Discussions ranged from cutting-edge neuroscience to simple concepts such as the New American Plate, the idea that vegetables, fruits and grains should cover two-thirds of a plate, with fish and meat covering the remainder. The challenge, as laid out by McGill marketing professor Laurette Dube, was to examine whether it is possible to "promote everyday, pleasurable healthy eating as a way to fight obesity." ANTOINE BECHARA, a neurology professor at the University of Iowa, presented research into brain functions indicating that the willpower to override impulses -- such as the desire for high-calorie foods -- is influenced by what children are taught as they grow up. This suggests that if adults make eating healthful food a "rewarding experience," children will grow into adulthood with a better ability to control their food impulses, he argued.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB111325870307403991,00.html

Turner Discusses History of Islam (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, April 12)
Historian RICHARD TURNER has the same reaction every time he sees a new book that attacks Islam as it relates to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. He ignores it. "I don't read these books," Turner said Monday in an address at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. Turner is an associate professor of African-American world studies and religious studies at the University of Iowa and author of Islam in the African-American Experience. While his research places Islam in a historical context, Turner doesn't see that happening in what he said is a current genre of nonfiction that attacks the religion."There's no solid research," he said. "They take advantage of hysteria."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=6dcce52789b8d129a765f184822c4266&_docnum=20&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=eb3e1a82b15c11ed1a86fe494f27bd63

UI Student Finalist in Miss USA Pageant (NBC5, April 12)
Miss North Carolina, Chelsea Cooley, was crowned Miss USA at the 54th annual pageant. Miss California, Brittany Hogan, 20, was first runner-up. Rounding out the top five were Miss Kentucky, Miss Illinois, Jill Gulseth, and Miss Florida. Gulseth, 21, is from the Chicago suburb of Geneva. She is a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. NBC5 is an Illinois television station. The story also appeared on the website of WFIE-TV in Evansville, Ind.
http://www.nbc5.com/entertainment/4371041/detail.html?z=dp&dpswid=2265994&dppid=65192

Chang Succeeds Conroy As Workshop Director (New York Times, April 12)
LAN SAMANTHA CHANG
, a Harvard University professor and award-winning fiction author who specializes in stories of Chinese-Americans, has been named director of the nation's most prestigious writing program, the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop. A student at Iowa in the 1990s and later a teacher there, Chang succeeds FRANK CONROY, the longtime director who announced last summer that he was retiring and died of cancer last week, at age 69. Chang, a Briggs-Copeland lecturer in creative writing at Harvard, will begin at Iowa next January. University of Iowa president DAVID SKORTON said Monday in a statement that he wanted Chang to consider her new job "as a homecoming" and said the school was "fortunate to have someone of Samantha's stature and promise." This story also appeared on the Web sites of the WASHINGTON POST, LOS ANGELES TIMES, KANSAS CITY STAR, INDIANAPOLIS STAR, BOSTON GLOBE, USA TODAY, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, MIAMI HERALD, NEWSDAY, GUARDIAN (UK), BARRE MONTPELIER (VT) TIMES ARGUS, NEW ALBANY (IN) TRIBUNE, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, RAPID CITY JOURNAL, NORTH COUNTY (Calif.) TIMES, TALEQUAH (OK) DAILY PRESS and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/arts/AP-Iowa-Workshop-Director.html?

Van Allen Favors Unmanned Space Exploration (USA Today, April 12)
Not everyone is enamored of President Bush's vision of remaking NASA into an agency focused on the exploration of the moon and Mars. Some scientists, such as the University of Iowa's JAMES VAN ALLEN, discoverer of the radiation belts that protect Earth from solar particles, have long argued that scientific returns from unmanned missions such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the international Cassini-Huygens mission far exceed anything garnered by manned efforts like space shuttles.
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2005-04-11-space-alternate-visions_x.htm

ISU Has Big Plans for Former UI Herbarium (AgriNews, April 12)
Iowa State University is making big plans for a collection of dried plants that was once housed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Iowa's herbarium was sent to Iowa State a year ago in a move that sparked a lawsuit over which university should keep it. A trial is set for June 13 in Johnson County District Court. In the meantime, ISU's herbarium director has big plans. AgriNews is published in Rochester, Minn.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/283061899613768.bsp

Conroy: Robinson Book 'Gilead' Doesn't Proselytize (Chicago Tribune, April 12)
Unlike most Americans, MARILYNNE ROBINSON never suffers the agonies of the modern traffic jam, rising gas prices or a dearth of downtown parking. Robinson, who won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week for her novel, "Gilead," a moving story about a small town preacher from Iowa, prefers the rhythms of a slower, simpler life. She doesn't own a car or drive, preferring instead to walk to class, church or anywhere else in this small, Midwestern college town. "I'm so happy not to have a car," said the writer, who also doesn't own a television but concedes her traditional tendencies are limited by her cell phone. "I don't like cars. There is just something ridiculous about them. They are noisy ... clumsy, they choke towns. I just love walking." Robinson moved here in 1989 to teach at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa. While religion is a focal point in "Gilead," Robinson cleverly avoids any hint of preachiness, a trait in keeping with her own nature and character, according to FRANK CONROY. "The book is religious only in the broadest sense, in that it offers a quiet illuminocity," said Conroy, who stepped down last year after 16 years as director of the famed Iowa Writers' Workshop. He passed away last Wednesday. "It's not proselytizing at all, and neither is Marilynne. If I ever saw her proselytizing a student, I wouldn't believe my eyes. It would be like seeing her show up for class belly dancing," he said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/chi-0504120052apr12,1,212377.story

Conroy was Tough, Respected Writer and Teacher (Inside Higher Ed, April 12)
Ask any American writer today for a list of his or her literary idols, and FRANK CONROY'S name always rises to the top. The author of one of the best books of our age, "Stop-Time," published in 1967, as well as the director of the greatest incubator of literary talent ever assembled, the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Conroy was as close to legend as any living writer gets. Not to mention a Grammy winner--for best liner notes. Despite a rough beginning, he made the most of a life that ended Wednesday when he died at age 69 of colon cancer. He arrived as director at the Iowa Writers' Workshop in 1987 and quickly developed a reputation as a no-nonsense teacher who lived and breathed writing. This column was written by STEPHEN BLOOM, professor of journalism at the University of Iowa.
http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2005/04/12/bloom2

UI Foundation Asked to Release Salaries (WQAD-TV, April 12)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is sorting out whether its private fund-raising arm will disclose staff salaries. The University of Iowa Foundation says that, as a private institution, it's not subject to Iowa's open records law. However, the Iowa Supreme Court ruled differently earlier this year in a case concerning Iowa State University's fund-raising entity. It says if a public agency outsources one of its responsibilities to a private third party, work records that otherwise would be public remain public. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3194366

Kutcher Contemplated Suicide at UI (Hollywood.com, April 12)
Actor Ashton Kutcher once contemplated suicide when he was told that his twin brother had just a few hours to live. Kutcher was just 13 when he visited his brother at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS and learned that, after Michael's heart stopped temporarily, he probably had only hours to live. Ashton considered jumping from a hotel balcony so his healthy heart could go to his brother. "I'm standing on the balcony, thinking about jumping off, and my dad comes out and says, 'What are you thinking about?' I tell him. He comes over and says, 'You can't do that'," the actor was quoted as saying by the website. "And right then the doctors come rushing out, (saying), 'We have to prepare the OR. A woman died in Florida in a car accident, and there's a heart on the way." The same story appeared on the Web sites of NEW KERALA.com (India) and WEBINDIA123.com.
http://www.hollywood.com/news/detail/article/2439108

UI Public Health Faculty Oppose Riverside Casino (Las Vegas Sun, April 11)
Faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Public Health say they're opposed to a casino proposal in nearby Riverside. "In our professional judgment, this location so near Iowa City will be detrimental to University of Iowa students since students are at a heightened risk for developing pathological or problem gambling behavior," public health faculty currently said in a statement. Faculty members who study addictions said the combination of youthful inexperience, plus students' exposure to other addictive behaviors including binge drinking, pose a particular risk. The same story appeared on the Web site of the CASINO CITY TIMES, based in Massachusetts.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/gaming/2005/apr/11/518582875.html

Robinson Publisher Known for Fiction Excellence (Oakland Tribune, April 11)
The reception area of Farrar, Straus & Giroux is no larger than the average Manhattan kitchen and its pale blue-green paint evokes feelings not of publishing glory, but of high school labs and hospital waiting rooms. Visitors, however, can't be blamed for wanting to remain there a good long time, just to take in all those plaques on the walls. Founded in 1946 by Roger Straus and John Farrar, FSG has long distinguished itself as an intimate and long-term home to such literary greats as T.S. Eliot, Flannery O'Connor and Bernard Malamud. "Many people have accused me of being an elitist," Straus, a Guggenheim heir who died last year, once said. "I'm guilty. I am an elitist. I like good books." The founders are gone, but FSG, under president and publisher Jonathan Galassi, has well carried on, releasing acclaimed poetry, children's books and criticism, and making fiction prizes practically an annual tradition. Since 1997, it has published seven novels that have won four National Book Awards and three Pulitzer Prizes, most recently for MARILYNNE ROBINSON's "Gilead." Robinson's novel has appealed to fans of her first novel, "Housekeeping," and to fans of Robinson herself. In Iowa City, where she teaches at the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, Prairie Lights Books has sold nearly 1,000 copies of "Gilead." "It's been an event here. Everyone in town seems to have a copy," Prairie Lights buyer Paul Ingram says. Same story appeared in the CONCORD (NH) MONITOR
http://insidebayarea.com/bayarealiving/ci_2649589

Squire: Legislator's Behavior May Breed Cynicism (Las Vegas Sun, April 11)
Some political observers have charged that Iowa Rep. Scott Raecker, head of the House Ethics Committee, may have gotten himself into an ethics pinch last year by directing a nonprofit organization that sought a grant from a casino while at the same time floor managing a gambling expansion bill. The Prairie Meadows Racetrack and Casino board awarded a $625,000 grant to the Character Counts program about three weeks after Gov. Tom Vilsack signed a bill last year that allows for expanded casino gambling in Iowa. Character Counts is operated in Iowa by the Institute for Character Development in Des Moines. Raecker is the institute's $75,000-per-year executive director. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said the legislator may have stepped into a gray area of political ethics.  "It sounds like this is bumping up against some potential problems," Squire said. "This is the kind of behavior that leads to more cynicism about the public process."
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/gaming/2005/apr/11/518582902.html

UI Honors Program Cited (WCCO-TV, April 11)
The University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus, once content to admit any moderately qualified high school graduate, is hurling itself into the competition to attract the very best students it can. Especially attractive are Minnesota students who in the past might have left the state for college or enrolled in prestigious private schools. The big carrot is an honors college, one of the main ideas for reshaping the campus. Gifted students would have a provocative curriculum, the chance to do research with faculty members and guaranteed admission to professional programs such as law or medicine if they do well. They might even live together. An honors college would put the "U" in the company of other Big Ten schools with populist traditions, including Pennsylvania State University, Michigan State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, that already use universitywide honors programs to woo talented students. WCCO is based in Minneapolis. The same story appeared on the Web sites of KARE-TV (Minneapolis), DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, FARGO FORUM and GRAND FORKS HERALD.
http://wcco.com/topstories/local_story_101120218.html

Ault: Cervical Cancer Drug Shows Promise (Drug Researcher, April 11)
The prospect of a simple vaccination to prevent cervical cancer took a major step with the publication of positive Phase II trial results on a candidate from Merck, called Gardasil, in the April edition of the medical journal The Lancet Oncology. Gardasil, is designed to protect women against four strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV) and will go head-to-head against GlaxoSmithKline's (GSK) rival product Cervarix, which targets just the two strains responsible for cervical cancer, a disease that kills a quarter of a million women each year. Both treatments are now in final-stage clinical studies and are tipped by industry analysts to be multibillion-dollar sellers. Phase III clinical trials to evaluate Gardasil are already underway with over 25,000 participants enrolled worldwide, with results expected to be available later this year, and if successful Gardasil could be on the market in two years. "Although the study was not originally designed or powered to assess vaccine efficacy on the disease endpoints separately, efficacy of the investigational vaccine against cervical pre-cancers caused by the HPV types 16 18, 6 and 11 was 100 per cent," said KEVIN AULT, department of obstetrics and gynaecology at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.
http://www.drugresearcher.com/news/news-ng.asp?n=59299-merck-s-hpv

UI Honors Program Cited (Minneapolis Star Tribune, April 11)
The University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus, once content to admit any moderately qualified high school graduate, is hurling itself into the competition to attract the very best students it can. Especially attractive are Minnesota students who in the past might have left the state for college or enrolled in prestigious private schools. The big carrot is an honors college, one of the main ideas for reshaping the campus. Gifted students would have a provocative curriculum, the chance to do research with faculty members and guaranteed admission to professional programs such as law or medicine if they do well. They might even live together. An honors college would put the "U" in the company of other Big Ten schools with populist traditions, including Pennsylvania State University, Michigan State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, that already use universitywide honors programs to woo talented students.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/5340412.html

Polgreen: IEM Helps Provide Surveillance (Orlando Sentinel, April 11)
At the University of Iowa, you can bet -- real money -- on who will win the 2008 presidential race or, if you're a health-care practitioner, where and when the flu virus will strike the state. "We like to think of this as a new way to do surveillance for infectious diseases," Dr. PHILLIP POLGREEN, an associate professor of internal medicine at the university, told The Des Moines Register in November. The university's business faculty launched the futures market (the Iowa Electronic Market) in 1988, allowing students and others to invest up to $500 in the success of various political candidates. Your profits, if any, are determined largely by whether your candidate wins or how much of the popular vote he or she gets. It may sound one step above a poker game, but the school insists the futures market is an excellent forecasting tool, and it has proved remarkably accurate. At midnight on Nov. 1, 2004, the night before the election, it had President Bush earning 50.45 percent of the popular vote. He wound up with 51.54 percent. Registration is required to access this site.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/lifestyle/orl-livwannabet041105apr11,1,7352913.story?coll=orl-living-headlines

Law Alumnus Rowley to Speak in Iowa City (WQAD-TV, April 11)
A former FBI agent who accused her bosses in Washington of blowing a chance to prevent Nine-Eleven will speak in Iowa City. Rowley will speak April 30th at the Iowa Civil Liberties Union Foundation's annual dinner. Rowley was raised in Iowa and graduated from Wartburg College in Waverly and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3192487

Wilder Studied Drama at UI (CBS Sunday Morning, April 10)
Gene Wilder, whose real name is Jerry Silberman, studied drama at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as well as in London, did time in the military and in 1961 was accepted at the prestigious Actors Studio in New York.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a940ca5964bbe3deaa36f4a77667de90&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=6942ffe0c9ce35ae7177c08ed55eaa0a

Conroy was Tough, Respected Writer and Teacher (Chicago Tribune, April 10)
Ask any American writer today for a list of his or her literary idols, and FRANK CONROY'S name always rises to the top. The author of one of the best books of our age, "Stop-Time," published in 1967, as well as the director of the greatest incubator of literary talent ever assembled, the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Conroy was as close to legend as any living writer gets. Not to mention a Grammy winner--for best liner notes. Despite a rough beginning, he made the most of a life that ended Wednesday when he died at age 69 of colon cancer. He arrived as director at the Iowa Writers' Workshop in 1987 and quickly developed a reputation as a no-nonsense teacher who lived and breathed writing. This column was written by STEPHEN BLOOM, professor of journalism at the University of Iowa.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/perspective/chi-0504100201apr10,1,5884437.story

Robinson Publisher Known for Fiction Excellence (New York Times, April 10)
The reception area of Farrar, Straus & Giroux is no larger than the average Manhattan kitchen and its pale blue-green paint evokes feelings not of publishing glory, but of high school labs and hospital waiting rooms. Visitors, however, can't be blamed for wanting to remain there a good long time, just to take in all those plaques on the walls. Founded in 1946 by Roger Straus and John Farrar, FSG has long distinguished itself as an intimate and long-term home to such literary greats as T.S. Eliot, Flannery O'Connor and Bernard Malamud. "Many people have accused me of being an elitist," Straus, a Guggenheim heir who died last year, once said. "I'm guilty. I am an elitist. I like good books." The founders are gone, but FSG, under president and publisher Jonathan Galassi, has well carried on, releasing acclaimed poetry, children's books and criticism, and making fiction prizes practically an annual tradition. Since 1997, it has published seven novels that have won four National Book Awards and three Pulitzer Prizes, most recently for MARILYNNE ROBINSON's "Gilead." Robinson's novel has appealed to fans of her first novel, "Housekeeping," and to fans of Robinson herself. In Iowa City, where she teaches at the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, Prairie Lights Books has sold nearly 1,000 copies of "Gilead." "It's been an event here. Everyone in town seems to have a copy," Prairie Lights buyer Paul Ingram says. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the MIAMI HERALD, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, NEWSDAY, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, KANSAS CITY STAR, BALTIMORE SUN, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE and other news organizations.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/arts/AP-Prize-Winning-Publisher.html?

Kutcher Studied Biochemical Engineering at UI (USA Weekend, April 10)
As a child, Ashton Kuthcer's focus turned to drama, sports and, of all things, science. Fascinated by ribonucleic and deoxyribonucleic acids (RNA and DNA), Kutcher went on to study biochemical engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He worked sweeping up Cheerios dust at a General Mills plant, donated his blood for cash to help pay tuition -- and planned to be a geneticist. Even today, he says, "I get so excited when Rumer or Scout [two of Moore's children] has homework that involves Punnett squares [a graphic way of predicting the likelihood of inheriting a particular trait] or something. That's when I'm loving it." In 1997, Kutcher's life took a 180 when a talent scout spotted him in a bar and urged him to enter a modeling contest. He won, and soon chose modeling over molecules.
http://www.usaweekend.com/05_issues/050410/050410ashton_kutcher.html

UI Meth Study Cited (Great Falls Tribune, April 10)
Montana could finally be on the way to slowing the insidious surge of methamphetamine production in the state. Lawmakers are working hard at both the federal and state levels to staunch the easy flow of meth ingredients needed to "cook" the addictive drug. Unfortunately, state representatives late last week approved an amendment that effectively gutted one of the anti-meth measures. At the federal level, meanwhile, Republican U.S. Rep. Denny Rehberg is pushing federal officials to expedite federal testing of a new compound that could be added to anhydrous ammonia, which is one of the ingredients of meth. Anhydrous ammonia also is a farm fertilizer commonly used in rural Montana. According to researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the additive doesn't harm the fertilizer but prevents the chemical reactions that allow the manufacture of meth. The Tribune is based in Great Falls, Mont.
http://www.greatfallstribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050410/OPINION01/504100305/1014/NEWS01

Peters: Enterprise Zones a Bust (Contra Costa Times, April 10)
In economic circles, they are zones of contention. Touted as an economic elixir for high rates of poverty and unemployment, enterprise zones offer special tax breaks to businesses in an effort to bring money and jobs to 39 struggling communities in California. But economists and planning experts disagree sharply on the healing power of the two-decade-old program. Bottom line: Economists lack conclusive evidence that enterprise zones work. The root causes of economic growth are too complex and difficult to isolate. And the state does not collect the kind of hard data that economists need to analyze if tax breaks spark new economic activity. Consequently, studies nationwide and in California have yielded conflicting results. ALAN PETERS, a University of Iowa professor who co-authored a book on enterprise zones, says these corporate tax incentives that target communities for economic boom have been a bust. "These programs deliver tax breaks to businesses. That's what they do," he said. "Surely, it would be better to fundamentally alter the state tax codes rather than have special areas where you give special stuff away. Why not bring down business taxes in general rather than give out incentives in politically designated zones?" The Times is based in Contra Costa, Calif.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/11359520.htm

Lasansky Works on Exhibit in Michigan (Grand Rapids Press, April 10)
This year marks the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps in World War II, and observances have been held nationwide since January. Locally, the Shoah Remembrance Committee of Muskegon has organized a citywide series, "The Holocaust and the Arts," that includes the first-ever Holocaust exhibit at the Muskegon Museum of Art. "Always Remember: The Holocaust 60 Years Later" opens Friday and features "Kaddish," a series of eight etching and aquatint prints created by renowned printmaker Mauricio Lasansky as a memorial to victims. Lasansky chose pairs of direly opposed images to remember victims of the Holocaust in his print series "Kaddish" produced between 1974 and 1978. The Kaddish prayers talk about world peace and a recurring image on the top half of each print is a dove in different poses. The bottom half offers tormented images of the people who lost lives in the Holocaust. A string of numbers that recall camp inmate tattoos separates the two images. An Argentinian immigrant to the United States, Lasansky made a name for himself in the 1940s and '50s as an art professor at the UNIVERISTY OF IOWA, where his work helped gain recognition for printmaking as a legitimate art form. The same story appeared on the Web sites of numerous Michigan newspapers.
http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/grpress/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/1113128213225670.xml

Sidel: Indian-Americans Growing in Influence Back Home (Arizona Republic, April 10)
The Indian-American community reflects the growing clout of many expatriate groups in the United States. From Mexican-Americans to immigrants from the Muslim world, they are becoming more aware of their influence back home and are trying to capitalize on it. Irish-Americans have influenced events in their homeland for decades. But the Indian-American community has gained new visibility in recent years as its political and financial clout has grown. As America's wealthiest ethnic group, it is particularly divided over allegations that some charities are funneling money to sectarian violence like that in Gujarat. "We are seeing increased attention by Indian-Americans to how their donations are used, particularly in the wake of September 11 and the Gujarat events," said MARK SIDEL, an expert on Indian diaspora at the University of Iowa.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0410INDIA-expat10.html

Conroy: Robinson Book Gilead Doesn't Proselytize (Centre Daily Times, April 10)
Unlike most Americans, MARILYNNE ROBINSON never suffers the agonies of the modern traffic jam, rising gas prices or a dearth of downtown parking. Robinson, who won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week for her novel, "Gilead," a moving story about a small town preacher from Iowa, prefers the rhythms of a slower, simpler life. She doesn't own a car or drive, preferring instead to walk to class, church or anywhere else in this small, Midwestern college town. "I'm so happy not to have a car," said the writer, who also doesn't own a television but concedes her traditional tendencies are limited by her cell phone. "I don't like cars. There is just something ridiculous about them. They are noisy ... clumsy, they choke towns. I just love walking." Robinson moved here in 1989 to teach at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa. While religion is a focal point in "Gilead," Robinson cleverly avoids any hint of preachiness, a trait in keeping with her own nature and character, according to FRANK CONROY. "The book is religious only in the broadest sense, in that it offers a quiet illuminocity," said Conroy, who stepped down last year after 16 years as director of the famed Iowa Writers' Workshop. He passed away last Wednesday. "It's not proselytizing at all, and neither is Marilynne. If I ever saw her proselytizing a student, I wouldn't believe my eyes. It would be like seeing her show up for class belly dancing," he said. The Daily Times is based in Pennsylvania. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the MONTREAL GAZETTE, CJAD radio, OTTAWA CITIZEN, VANCOUVER PROVINCE, and the NATIONAL POST of Canada.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/living/11350838.htm

International Writers Alumnus Writes Novel Set in Iowa (Financial Express, April 9)
In many ways, Mole reminds the reader of Anurag Mathur's The Inscrutable Americans. The events narrated in this novel, a translation of the Tamil novel Otran by Ashokamitran, take place within a period of seven months in America's midwest city Iowa. The Inscrutable Americans became a rage especially with youngsters because it described an Indian student's passage to America. Mole on the other hand, is a mature novel. The narrative which is part fictional, part autobiographical had its origins in the time Ashokamitran spent at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM between 1973-74. He was the first Tamil writer to participate in this programme and it came at a time when it was still not common for Indian writers, especially language writers,to travel to the West. The Financial Express is based in India.
http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=87515

Conroy Compared Teaching to Jazz (International Herald Tribune, April 8)
FRANK CONROY
, 69, a celebrated author who for the last 18 years headed the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa, where he taught and influenced generations of young writers, died of colon cancer on Wednesday at his home in Iowa City. In 1987 Conroy was hand-picked by James Freedman, then the president of the University of Iowa, to succeed Jack Leggett as director of the workshop. Conroy, whose novel, "Body and Soul" (1993), is about a poor boy who grows up to be a famous pianist and composer, compared teaching to playing jazz. "You have to be fast, able to think on your feet and able to trust yourself to improvise well within certain strictures," he said. Halberstam said: "I think what made him a great teacher was that he was so wounded himself, he had a very good sense for the wounds in other people. He knew what a frail business this being a writer is." The obituary originally appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/04/07/news/obits.html

Conroy Remembered in 1993 Interview (National Public Radio, April 7)
FRANK CONROY
died Wednesday at the age of 69 of colon cancer. For 18 years he directed the Writers Workshop at the University of Iowa, where he helped shape the early work of some now-important writers. He also wrote a 1967 memoir called "Stop-Time" that is now considered a classic. On the Fresh Air program, host Terry Gross played portions of a 1993 interview with Conroy, talking about his novel "Body & Soul," the story of a young music prodigy who lives in poverty but finds a wonderful, dedicated teacher and goes on to become a great musician. Conroy also talked about how writers often "live in our heads so much." "I've noticed this about a lot of artists: that, really, they have a very peculiar relationship to their body, as you know, as if it's just some old suitcase you have to lug around with you--some old, battered up suitcase," he said.
Transcript at http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=1d745564a5da47983f8890a759f6b123&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=a6b7786d20127a991bd4d26ee034e766

Audio at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4580769

Cram Says Specialty Hospitals' Outcomes Are Inflated (ABCNews.com, April 7)
Specialty hospitals, often partly owned by physicians who refer their own patients to them, are no better at cardiac procedures than ordinary community hospitals, a new study claims. The study, published in the April 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, acknowledges that specialty hospitals have produced findings that would indicate better care -- such as lower death rates and shorter hospital stays. But those numbers are deceptive, said Dr. PETER CRAM, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Iowa, who led this latest study of more than 42,000 Medicare patients undergoing cardiac procedures. "There are three main findings," Cram said. "First, specialty hospitals are admitting patients who are healthier and wealthier. Second, these hospitals do many more bypass surgeries per year than local general hospital competitors. Third, after accounting for [these] differences in patient characteristics and volume, there are no statistically significant differences in outcome."
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Healthology/story?id=647870

Conroy Memoir "A Model For Countless Young Writers" (New York Times, April 7)
FRANK CONROY
, the author of the classic memoir "Stop-Time" and an influence on generations of young writers, died yesterday at his home in Iowa City. He was 69. The cause was colon cancer, said his wife, Margaret. Mr. Conroy, who headed the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa for 18 years, published just five books, a relatively small number for a writer of his reputation. But one of them was the lucid and evocative 1967 memoir that has been a model for countless young writers -- the sort of book that is passed along like a trade secret. Versions of this article appeared April 7 on the Web site of the ORANGE COUNTY (Calif.) REGISTER and THE DAY (in Connecticut).
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/07/books/07conroy.html

Conroy Made A Great Program 'Extraordinary' (Washington Post, April 7)
FRANK CONROY
, the memoirist and longtime director of the celebrated University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, died Wednesday. He was 69. Conroy died at his home in Iowa City of colon cancer, said JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON, acting co-director of the workshop. "Frank took a great program and made it an extraordinary one," McPherson said. Versions of this Associated Press article appeared April 6 and 7 on the web sites of ABC NEWS, CNN, BOSTON GLOBE, NEW YORK TIMES, NEWSDAY, USA TODAY, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, CHICAGO DAILY SOUTHTOWN, BALTIMORE SUN, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, MIAMI HERALD, SEATTLE TIMES, PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORDER, WIRED NEWS, CLEVELAND (Ohio) PLAIN DEALER, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, TALLASSEE (Fla.) DEMOCRAT, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, LEXINGTON (Ky.) HERALD LEADER, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, TIMES PICAYUNE in Louisiana, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, THE OREGONIAN, KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, MLIVE.com in Michigan, WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, THE LEDGER in Florida, THE GUARDIAN (U.K.), WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, WILKES-BARRE (Pa.) TIMES LEADER, TUSCALOOSA (Ala.) NEWS, INDIANAPOLIS STAR, NEW ALBANY (Ind.) TRIBUNE, EVANSVILLE (Ind.) COURIER & PRESS, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER, NORTH COUNTY (Calif.) TIMES, MUNSTER (Ind.) TIMES, RAPID CITY (S.D.) JOURNAL, TAHLEQUAH (Okla.) DAILY PRESS, CANOE.ca in Canada, CJAD in Canada, MACLEANS in Canada, SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, ORLANDO SENTINEL, MSNBC, WJLA in Washington, D.C., and OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A32463-2005Apr6.html

Islam Book By UI Alumnus Stands Out (Washington Post, April 7)
A book review calls Reza Aslan's "No god but God" one of the most readable of a spate of books spurred by America's painful recent encounters with the Muslim world, reflecting his unusual background as both a student of religion and a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A32729-2005Apr6.html

Alumnus Started Business At UI (USA Today, April 7)
A story about declining numbers of working teens includes a list of CEOs who entered the workforce as teenagers, including David Levin, CEO of Casual Male Retail Group. When he was 19 and a sophomore at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Levin and a fraternity brother each pitched in $500 to start a business selling military-type clothing, which was popular on campuses during the Vietnam War. The store, which later spread to two other college campuses, was making $2 million by the time he graduated. Levin says the experience made him a gutsier businessman. "It made me more well-rounded, just better understanding of what customers want and how to deal with them," he says.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/economy/employment/2005-04-06-teen-work-usat_x.htm

Arizona Chief Justice Is UI Alumna (Arizona Business Gazette, April 7)
Incoming Arizona Chief Justice Ruth V. McGregor takes office June 12, a Sunday. She will have a weekend to savor her position after the June 10 passing-of-the-gavel ceremony officially passes on to her responsibilities of the state's top judicial officer. Some of McGregor's new tasks also will include administrative matters, such as oversight of budgetary matters and technological improvements. And, of course, McGregor will write some legal rulings for cases the court reviews. The state Supreme Court is in session continually, and the justices select about 40 cases a year to consider from a volume of about 1,200 petitions from the Court of Appeals. McGregor says she expects to write opinions on 10 to 13 cases this year. Some of her writing skills developed during her days as an undergraduate and a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she earned a bachelor's degree in what now is known as that university's communications arts department and a master's degree in communications research.
http://www.azcentral.com/abgnews/articles/0407mcgregor07.html

McLeod Comments On iTunes, Napster To Go (Argus Leader, April 7)
Pepsi vs. Coke. Ford vs. Chevy. Nike vs. Reebok. Football vs. soccer. Crest vs. Colgate. Our society is full of consumer choices presented as struggles for supremacy and identity. Add the fight for digital music to the mix as Napster's cool cat mascot has just begun a battle with Apple's ultra-popular iTunes service. iTunes sells songs for 99 cents a shot. Comparatively, Napster is selling its To Go service with the promise of unlimited downloads for $14.95 a month. If NTG's subscription service sounds too good to be true, it's because it kind of is. Sure, the monthly fee grants users unlimited access to more songs than most people would ever want to hear, but Napster users aren't "buying" the songs. They're basically renting them. They're only available if you're paying Napster's monthly fee. If you skip a payment or discontinue the service, all the songs are "wiped" off your computer and portable MP3 player. For possessive listeners, the revelation of Napster's rental service probably is enough to convince them of iTune's supremacy. Yet, KEMBREW MCLEOD warns that iTunes is just "renting" the music as well. "iTunes just gives you more rental options," says McLeod, a communications professor at the University of Iowa who just wrote "Freedom of Expression," a book examining copyright issues. "Once you click on that licensing agreement, and you agree to it by just buying the song ... you're giving away all your fair use rights." The newspaper is based in South Dakota.
http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050407/ENT/504070321/1005

Concert Features UI Professor's Rare Instruments (Argus Leader, April 7)
The Summit Chamber Players will perform at 7:30 in the B.J. Haan Auditorium, using unusual string instruments made by Alfred Stelzner (1852-1906), a German math and physics professor and musician. The group will play Stelzner's redesigned violin, viola and cello, and two instruments he invented: the violotta, played like a violin but tuned one octave lower; and the cellone, played like a cello but tuned two octaves below a violin. Stelzner's violotta bridges the sound-range gap between the viola and the cello, while the cellone sound is between the cello and the bass. The instruments are on loan from collector JIM CHRISTENSEN, a retired professor of internal medicine from the University of Iowa and a cello player. The newspaper is based in South Dakota.
http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050407/ENT01/504070306/1005/ENT

Offutt Remembers Friend Conroy (All Things Considered, NPR, April 6)
FRANK CONROY
, the author of books including the 1967 memoir "Stop Time" and a longtime director of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, has died of colon cancer at his home in Iowa City, Iowa. He was 69. Melissa Block talks with CHRIS OFFUTT, a colleague and friend of Conroy.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4579695

Merrill Discusses Life, Work Of Saul Bellow (The World, April 6)
Host Lisa Mullins and international literature critic, CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, director of the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa, talk about the work of Saul Bellow and his influence on writers around the world. The Nobel prize-winning novelist died yesterday at aged 89. The World is a program of Public Radio International.
http://www.theworld.org/latesteditions/04/20050406.shtml

Cram Says Specialty Hospitals' Outcomes Are Inflated (DrKoop.com, April 6)
Specialty hospitals, often partly owned by physicians who refer their own patients to them, are no better at cardiac procedures than ordinary community hospitals, a new study claims. The study, published in the April 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, acknowledges that specialty hospitals have produced findings that would indicate better care -- such as lower death rates and shorter hospital stays. But those numbers are deceptive, said Dr. PETER CRAM, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Iowa, who led this latest study of more than 42,000 Medicare patients undergoing cardiac procedures. "There are three main findings," Cram said. "First, specialty hospitals are admitting patients who are healthier and wealthier. Second, these hospitals do many more bypass surgeries per year than local general hospital competitors. Third, after accounting for [these] differences in patient characteristics and volume, there are no statistically significant differences in outcome." A version of this article appeared April 6 on the web site of FORBES.
http://drkoop.com/newsdetail/93/524977.html

Sale Comments On Bond Investigation (Reuters, April 6)
MBIA Inc.'s bet on its own credit quality in 2002 has come back to haunt the company, opening it up to investigations by regulators. MBIA, the largest municipal bond insurer in the United States, was under heavy pressure in late 2002 as investors questioned its financial strength and bet against it in the stock and bond markets. Those trades could have raised the company's borrowing costs. At the same time, MBIA took the opposite bet, using credit derivatives without disclosing its trades until afterward. Those positions may have made the credit markets' assessment of the company look rosier than it would have appeared otherwise and may have lowered the company's borrowing costs. It is not clear from reviewing the relevant publicly available documents whether the company did anything wrong. But lawyers who have reviewed information regarding the trades say they should at least raise a red flag for investigators. "It sounds like there is a good argument that MBIA may have failed to disclose information that could have been material for bond purchasers," said HILLARY SALE, a professor of securities law at the University of Iowa College of Law in Iowa City.
http://www.reuters.com/financeNewsArticle.jhtml?type=bondsNews&storyID=8106901

Robinson: Pulitzer For Gilead 'Doesn't Seem Real' (Argus Leader, April 6)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON has no idea when -- or even if -- the significance of winning the Pulitzer Prize for fiction will sink in. "It still doesn't seem real to me," Robinson, relaxing on a glider on the porch of her Iowa City home, told The Associated Press on Monday. "And when I do absorb it, I'm not sure what I'll make of it. What I do know is the book is something I'm pleased by," she said. Robinson, 61, was awarded the 2005 Pulitzer for fiction for her novel "Gilead," a moving story about an Iowa preacher who spends his last days writing a letter about his life and his family heritage to his young son. Robinson, who teaches at the famed Iowa Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa, says she is gratified by the reaction from readers and critics to a book like "Gilead," "a quiet book" compared to today's often sensational literature. The paper is based in Sioux Falls, S.D.
http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050406/LIFE/504060330/1004

Frank Partner In Study Of Auroras (PhysOrg.com, April 6)
According to scientists, the main cause behind the differences in location appears to be what occurs between the solar wind and Earth's magnetic field. The Earth's magnetic field, like that of the sun and some of the other planets, is generated by electrical currents flowing inside them. The sun's magnetic field, like that of Earth, has a north and south pole linked by lines of magnetic force. Looking at the auroras from space, they look like almost circular bands of light around the North and South Poles. At the North Pole, it's called aurora borealis, or northern lights, and at the South Pole it's called the aurora australis, or southern lights. "This is the first analysis to use simultaneous observations of the whole aurora in both the northern and southern hemispheres to track their locations," said lead author Timothy J. Stubbs of the Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (LEP/GSFC), Greenbelt, Md. Stubbs and his colleagues, Richard R. Vondrak, and John B. Sigwarth, both of LEP/GSFC, Nikolai Østgaard at the University of Bergen, Norway and LOUIS A. FRANK at the University of Iowa, used data from NASA's Polar and IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration) spacecraft to study the auroras.
http://www.physorg.com/news3609.html

Robinson Wins Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (New Orleans Times Picayune, April 5)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON
, a professor at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for her novel, Gilead. The same story also appeared on the Web sites of THE GUARDIAN (UK), NEW YORK TIMES, USA TODAY, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER, RAPID CITY (SD) JOURNAL, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, PORTLAND OREGONIAN, NEWSDAY, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, BELOIT DAILY NEWS, SALON, MSNBC, ABC NEWS, MUNSTER (IN) TIMES, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, WYOMING NEWS, WORCESTER TELEGRAM, NORTH COUNTY TIMES, McCURTAIN (OK) DAILY GAZETTE and numerous other news organizations. 
http://www.nola.com/newsflash/topstories/index.ssf?/base/national-41/1112642566121710.xml&storylist=topstories

Robinson: Gilead is a Quiet Book (Washington Post, April 5)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON
, who won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, said her novel, "Gilead," isn't outrageous, shocking or eccentric. "This is a quiet book," she said Monday from the porch of her home. "A lot of young writers think they have to write something sensationalistic to get noticed. I'm very pleased that this book, which is very theological in many ways, seems to be interesting to a lot of people." In 1989, Robinson accepted a position teaching at the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, which is the nation's oldest and most influential creative writing program. Its alumni have included John Irving, T.C. Boyle and Flannery O'Connor. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, NEW YORK TIMES, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, PHILADLPHIA INQUIRER, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, NEWSDAY, MIAMI HERALD and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A26428-2005Apr4.html

Robinson Says Gilead's Acceptance is a Treat (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 5)
Academy Award-winning screenplay writer John Patrick Shanley and the nation's poet laureate, Ted Kooser, were among the winners Monday of Pulitzer Prizes in the arts. MARILYNNE ROBINSON received the fiction award for "Gilead," her first novel in more than 20 years. "It's such a private thing to write a book and when I'm writing I can't think about whether it will appeal to other people," said Robinson, a teacher at the celebrated Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa, speaking breathlessly on her cell phone as she walked across campus. "But it's such a profound treat that people do find it meaningful." Robinson, who debuted in 1981 with the acclaimed "Housekeeping," already had won the National Book Critics Circle prize for "Gilead," a contemporary epistle of a dying Iowa preacher looking back on his life and the lives of his ancestors.
http://www.jsonline.com/onwisconsin/arts/apr05/315385.asp

UI Researchers Improve Huntington's Symptoms in Mice (Innovations Report, April 5)
Researchers at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine have taken another step toward a potential treatment for Huntington's disease (HD). Using an approach called RNA interference (RNAi), the scientists reduced levels of the disease-causing HD protein in mice and significantly improved the movement and neurological abnormalities normally associated with the disease. HD is a devastating, inherited, neurodegenerative disease that is progressive and always fatal. The disease-causing gene produces a protein that is toxic to certain brain cells, and the subsequent neuronal damage leads to the movement disorders, psychiatric disturbances and cognitive decline that characterize this disease. "Many of the current approaches aimed at treating HD are indirect and target the symptoms of the disease. RNA interference gives us the first opportunity to attack the fundamental problem and reduce protein expression from the disease gene," said BEVERLY DAVIDSON, Ph.D., the Roy J. Carver Chair in Internal Medicine and UI professor of internal medicine, physiology and biophysics, and neurology. "Our study is the first demonstration that a therapy designed to inhibit protein production has a beneficial effect." Innovations Report is based in Germany. The same story also appeared on the Web site of RxPGNews.com,
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/biowissenschaften_chemie/bericht-42554.html

UIHC Included in Bill (WQAD-TV, April 5)
Iowa House Republicans are expected to unveil a Medicaid reform bill Tuesday that could extend health coverage to 20,000 uninsured Iowans, while also ordering studies of limiting services and making recipients pay for some of their own care. Under the bill, the new recipients must receive care at Broadlawns Medical Center in Des Moines or the Iowa City-based UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. In addition, the services provided would be limited for the new recipients. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3165515

Alumnus Photo Exhibit Opens (Cincinnati Post, April 5)
An Appalachian photographer is dedicated to shooting his people amid all their stark poverty. But he has weathered criticism on the methods he uses to take his pictures. An exhibition on Shelby Lee Adams at the Carl Solway Gallery, up through April 23, combines recent portraits the Hazard, Ky., native took in Eastern Kentucky along with people of Northern Scotland. Adams' interest in Scottish people, also bruised by their Highlands climate but perhaps economically better off, is the result of the Scots' connection with Appalachia. Adams has a Master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050405/LIFE/504050331/1005

UI Resarchers Participate in Study (Medical News Today, April 5)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are among those participating in a study to determine the metabolic effects on the body of antipsychotic drugs.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=22315

UI Enrollment Cited (Bismarck Tribune, April 5)
A story about a proposal to create a second university system in North Dakota points out that the state has about the same number of students scattered through its 11 university campuses as attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's single campus in Iowa City.
http://www.bismarcktribune.com/articles/2005/04/05/news/editorials/edt01.txt

Robinson Wins Pulitzer For 'Gilead' (Dow Jones Newswire, April 4)
The Pulitzer for fiction went to MARILYNNE ROBINSON for "Gilead," her poetic, modern-day tale of a dying Iowa preacher. "It's such a private thing to write a book, and when I'm writing, I can't think about whether it will appeal to other people," said Robinson, a teacher at the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop. "But it's such a profound treat that people do find it meaningful."
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,BT_CO_20050404_006015,00.html

Workshop Alumnus To Perform In 'Medea' (Theatreport.com, April 4)
A performance of Euripides' "Medea" later this month in Houston says that one of the actors, from Infernal Bridegroom Productions, Charlie Scott earned his MFA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRTERS' WORKSHOP. The online news portal is based in Houston.
http://www.theatreport.com/modules/news/article.php?storyid=383

Van Voorhis Speaks On Menopause Symptoms (Shreveport Times, April 4)
Sorting menopause symptoms from aging symptoms is tricky. For example, incontinence is more common in older women, said University of Iowa endocrinologist BRADLEY VAN VOORHIS. But the NIH-sponsored Women's Health Initiative found in 2002 that bladder control worsened in women on hormones, compared with those on a placebo, suggesting the problem is unrelated to menopause, he said. After listening to Van Voorhis and other speakers, an independent panel convened by the NIH concluded that only hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, painful intercourse and, probably, sleep disturbances were linked to declining estrogen. The paper is based in Louisiana.
http://www.shreveporttimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050404/LIVING/504020329/1004

Poetry Contest Critics Target UI (Financial Express, April 4)
A columnist addresses the criticisms leveled by contributors to Foetry.com against a number of poetry contests, including one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in India.
http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=86914

Law Alumnus Invents 'Alcohawk' Breathalyzer (Chicago Tribune, April 3)
This year's NCAA tournament already has wrenched even the most seasoned beer guts into over-imbibing at sports bars, and we haven't even gotten to Monday's championship yet. All of the dangerous crossroads between bars and cars are why Brian Eddy, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA law-school grad who once interned for a DUI attorney, created the Alcohawk personal alcohol screeners with a buddy. They're not just for detection but also for prevention of drunken driving. "Everyone's got a friend who says, `Oh, I've only had three or four.' And really they've had eight or nine," said Eddy, now 30 and an attorney in Minneapolis.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/q/chi-0504020313apr03,1,5814301.story?coll=chi-leisureq-hed&ctrack=2&cset=true

UI Piano Professor To Lead Master Class (Northwest Arkansas Times, April 3)
Seven years ago, Billie Starr stepped in to help a friend. Carolyn Hickson, a University of Arkansas piano professor, founded the Starr Young Artist Piano Competition in 1987 but was having a hard time keeping it going all by herself, Starr said. Starr pitched in to help with promoting the event and raising monetary prizes. Together Starr and Hickson have ushered the competition into its 18th year, which is already being declared a banner year with 85 students from eight states scheduled to compete. Events begin with a master class led by competition judge KSENIA NOSIKOVA, an associate professor of piano at the University of Iowa, from 10:30 a.m. to noon Friday in the McBride Studio at the Walton Arts Center. The paper is based in Fayetteville, Ark.
http://nwanews.com/story.php?paper=nwat&section=Living&storyid=26776

UI Cited In Story On Writing Workshop Proliferation (Denver Post, April 3)
People love to take shots at creative-writing programs. Some claim, for example, that half the cab drivers in New York have master of fine arts degrees from the famed UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. And Nelson Algren used to say he got more money for talking about writing at universities than he did for his books. There is criticism of the so-called "workshop" story or poem for having an elaborately polished surface but little passion. And Robert Stone, among others, has cautioned students about writing for the workshop's approval rather than the greater literary world. Still, writing programs continue to thrive, as evidenced by the more than 4,000 writers in attendance at the Associated Writing Programs convention being held this weekend in Vancouver, B.C.
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~31109~2792255,00.html

Kuhl Outlines Mileage Tax System Prototype (Philadelphia Inquirer, April 2)
Hybrid and electric cars -- even vehicles powered by hydrogen fuel cells -- are no longer the wifty dreams of environmentalists. Toyota dealers around the country report waiting periods of several months to get a hybrid Prius, and within a few years, auto manufacturers plan to have more than a dozen hybrid models on the roads. The faster gas prices rise, the more quickly drivers will flock to these alternatives -- not to mention more efficient gas models. The result is a world we've been striving toward for years. We'll be gobbling up fewer natural resources and causing less pollution. But all that progress comes at an ironic price: Eventually, transportation experts warn, people won't be pumping enough gas to pay for the roads they use. JON KUHL, a professor of engineering at the University of Iowa and coauthor of a 2002 study that detailed a prototype mileage tax system, said privacy was a "paramount issue" in the designing stage. Kuhl and his fellow researchers say the system needed to support a mileage tax would not be nearly as intrusive as, for example, OnStar, the security and safety system used to locate lost or broken-down vehicles, which will be standard in GM vehicles by 2007.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/11295714.htm

Lenth Comments on Powerball Drawing (Minneapolis Star Tribune, April 1)
While one lucky winner snagged a $25.5 million jackpot in Wednesday's Powerball drawing, a record 110 players won $500,000 and $100,000 prizes. RUSSELL LENTH, a statistician at the University of Iowa, said he was surprised at the results. He said his own calculations show that the odds of there being so many winners show such "incredibly small numbers they don't even have any meaning.'' "I believe that the drawing of the numbers itself is random ... but the numbers that people choose are not random, so certain combinations of numbers will have more winners than others if they occur,'' he said. Lenth said the numbers could have special significance such as ages or dates, or simply serve as favorite numbers. "It must be something about those particular numbers,'' he said. The Associated Press story also appeared in the APPELTON (Wisc.) POST-CRESCENT,  MORNING SENTINEL in Maine, the KNOXVILLE NEWS SENTINEL in Kentucky, the UNION-LEADER in New Hampshire, the FORUM and GRAND FORKS HERALD in North Dakota, WTLX-TV in South Carolina, the KANSAS CITY STAR, and serval other media outlets.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/5324388.html

North Dakota Projects Address Methamphetamine (Grand Forks Herald, April 1)
Two pilot projects aimed at producers and users of methamphetamine in northeastern North Dakota earned support from North Dakota legislators Thursday. The House of Representatives approved a program that would treat first-time convicted drug users. Meanwhile, an initiative to lock tanks holding anhydrous ammonia, a crucial ingredient in the vast majority of the meth brewed in the state, found its way into a bill before the Senate Appropriations Committee. Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem said he's also excited at the possible development of an additive that would retain anhydrous ammonia's value as a farm fertilizer but render it useless as an ingredient to meth. The additive is being tested by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, he said. The newspaper is based in North Dakota.
http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/11282379.htm

Barkan Discusses Democracy in Africa (National Public Radio, March 31)

In a report on the "Talk of the Nation" program, JOEL BARKAN, professor of political science at University of Iowa and author of a forthcoming book on emerging legislatures in emerging African democracies, discussed the state of democracy in Africa. "What's going right in these countries is the following. The key basis of democratization is the building of democratic institutions on the one hand and the strong society and free press on the other. By political institutions, I mean, a strong and independent legislature that can oversee the executive. You have that in South Africa. You certainly now have that in Ghana. You have it in Kenya, beginning to emerge in a number of other places. An independent judiciary-- certainly true with South Africa, Ghana, Uganda. Kenya's a bit questionable, but it's coming along," Barkan said.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4569413

A transcript is at:
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=1294514063bdac825b84b574a02713aa&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=dbef4af6f013d67379ed939bfeee3439

Sener Teaches Dance in China (China Daily, March 29)
ALAN SENER
, an associate professor and chair of the dance department at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, the United States, was a guest artist at the Beijing Dance Academy. One day, his objective was to teach he students contact improvisation, a form of dance and theatrical training that allows performing artists to act on impulse and to physically and naturally interact. Contact improvisation is a wonderful thing to indulge in, as well as a great way to work. "I use it as a means to an end for choreography as well,"said Sener in an interview following the class. Despite not having an interpreter for the start of the class, the eager students had no reservations, and were totally focused on Sener's every gesture and movement. In a University of Iowa T-shirt and tattered New York Yankees baseball cap, Sener, with his long white hair fastened in a ponytail, moved around the studio scrutinizing the dancers and encouraging them to lose themselves in the almost primal movement.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-03/29/content_428932.htm

Poet Relates Meeting Robert Frost at UI (Philippine Daily Inquirer, March 28)
In a story about poet Edith Tiempo, it's noted that she got her master's degree in Creative Writing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where one of the visiting writers she had the privilege to hear was Robert Frost. After the lecture, she was invited to join a number of selected students to spend an after-dinner gathering with Frost. "We were really sitting at the master's feet then," she recalled.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7817f74be788b4bf81ba48cd48b79fad&_docnum=9&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=6d9f709724a020f1652ba59521e30f21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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