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UI in the News

October, 2004

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NASA Official Criticizes Bush On Warming (Columbia Daily Tribune, Oct. 31)
The Bush administration is trying to stifle scientific evidence of the dangers of global warming in an effort to keep the public uninformed, a NASA scientist said Tuesday night. "In my more than three decades in government, I have never seen anything approaching the degree to which information flow from scientists to the public has been screened and controlled as it is now," James Hansen told a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA audience.  Hansen is director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York and has twice briefed a task force on global warming headed by Vice President Dick Cheney. The Tribune is based in Columbia, MO.
http://www.columbiatribune.com/2004/Oct/20041031News022.asp

IEM Seeks To Predict Election Outcomes (Boston Globe, Oct. 31)
Placing a presidential bet, though often illegal then as well, used to be as American as hanging red, white, and blue bunting at a political convention. From the 19th century to the mid-20th, odds on presidential races were greeted with much fanfare and regularly posted on the front pages of the nation's leading newspapers in the weeks preceding the election. For Americans looking for action on the presidential race, there are a couple of types of venues. The most popular are the online futures markets such as at www.intrade.com. Sites like these discourage using the term ''gambling" and prefer "trading." The business school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA runs a similar trading site called the Iowa Electronic Markets, open to the public. In fact, it's the only legal place to bet on the presidential race in the United States, since the university uses the website for research and educational purposes. (Unlike other sites, traders are limited to a maximum $500 investment.) This story also appeared on the websites of the LOS ANGELES TIMES, SEATTLE TIMES and the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2004/10/31/bettors_risking_millions_online_to_predict_election_outcome/

IEM Shows Election 'Agonizingly Close' (Capitol Hill Blue, Oct. 31)
If the up-and-down swings in the presidential polls have left you dizzy, maybe you should look at the political betting shops instead. They're volatile, too, but they tend to be more accurate than most polls. People answering pollsters' questions have no particular reason to be truthful, even if they do know their own minds, while people who have real money on the line have good reason to make thoughtful and informed decisions about what is likely to happen.  Since 1988, the Tippie College of Business at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has operated the Iowa Electronic Market, which among other issues tracks the presidential race. As of Friday, contracts for a Bush win were trading about 6 cents above contracts for a Kerry win. The spread was wider for a while in September, but has consistently favored Bush since the end of August. There's a separate contract for share of the popular vote, and it is saying that the vote is likely to be agonizingly close. But we knew that.
http://www.capitolhillblue.com/artman/publish/article_5617.shtml

Arndt Comments On Seniors, Drug Abuse (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct. 31)
By 2020, 4.4 million older adults nationwide are expected to need treatment for some sort of substance abuse, according to a recent estimate by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and North Carolina's Research Triangle Institute. We are on the crest of a wave coming up," said STEPHAN ARNDT, a University of Iowa psychiatry professor. "You've got two factors: the overall population is getting older, and then you've got all the baby boomers."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/5057115.html

UI Publishes Leading Walt Whitman Journal (Cherry Hill Courier Post, Oct. 31)
"I sing the body electric!" thundered Walt Whitman. It wasn't Walt who did the thundering last week at Rutgers University in Camden, but a convincing incarnation - Rocky Wilson, the inimitable poet, puppeteer and performer. The words - uplifting, earthy, passionate - were unmistakably those of the Good Gray Poet. And they marked the launch of a fresh and, shall we say, electric venue for Whitman's voluminous body of work, as well as for the ever-increasing body of scholarship about it.  A revamped version of The Mickle Street Review, an academic journal of Whitman and American studies, is now online. It takes its name from the thoroughfare (now Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard) where Whitman lived for two decades before his death in 1892. The pre-eminent journal, The Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, is published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It has a home page on the Web, but it lists only the contents of the current print issue, and not the texts. The Courier Post is based in Cherry Hill, NJ.
http://www.courierpostonline.com/news/southjersey/m103104m.htm

UI Student Adjusts from Life in National Guard (Bradenton Herald, Oct. 31)
From lectures in his Chinese history class about how emperors sold war to their people, to a local business' toy-soldier display representing Americans who have died in combat, Bradley Rehak, a senior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said he is constantly reminded of the war. "We can say that we got rid of a terrible dictator by going to war," said Rehak, 24, a medic with the Iowa National Guard. "The argument misses the far greater points that we haven't found that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction and we haven't found links between al-Qaida and Iraq." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, BILOXI SUN HERALD, MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS, MACON TELEGRAPH, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER ENQUIRER, GRAND FORKS HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, KANSAS CITY STAR, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/news/nation/10063104.htm

IEM Still Has Bush Out Front (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 31)
With trading set to close soon, shares of George W. Bush are selling for about 53 cents on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS; those of John F. Kerry are selling for about 47 cents. The market allows investors to bet on election outcomes instead of soybeans or pork bellies. Created as a teaching tool, the market was started during the 1988 presidential election by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS. So far this year, the university says about 3,100 traders have invested $356,000.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0410310497oct31,1,5460137.story

Dybek Debuts New Poetry Collection (Kalamazoo Gazette, Oct. 31)
It's been 25 years since Stuart Dybek's last book of poetry. You read that right: poetry. Although Dybek is a heavyweight among American short story and fiction writers, his first book was a collection of poems, and a new one is on the way. A Chicago native who moved to Kalamazoo in 1973 and is an alumnus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Dybek is an English professor at Western Michigan University. His latest book, the novel-in-stories "I Sailed With Magellan" (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), was named a New York Times notable Book of the Year and is now out in paperback. This year, Chicago Mayor Richard Daley chose Dybek's short-story collection "The Coast of Chicago" for the citywide "One Book, One Chicago" reading program.
http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/kzgazette/index.ssf?/base/features-1/1099223039296870.xml

UI Campus Abuzz With Election Talk (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 31)
A reporter visiting Iowa City describes the buzz over Tuesday's election. "...Even before the ballots have been counted ... there is a sense of something important going on in a country at war in Iraq, three years from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, four years from Bush vs. Gore," the reporter writes. "You can see it in a local shopping mall, half-abandoned, where college kids from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA bring life and energy to two stores that have been transformed into a local Kerry for president headquarters. You can see it on the University of Iowa campus, where 1,500 turned out recently for a Kerry for president rally headlined by Cedar Rapids native Ashton Kutcher, an actor, who said he voted for Bush in 2000 but admitted he got 'punk'd.'"
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0410310499oct31,1,6246571.story

Squire, Torosyan Discuss EU In American Elections (Euro-correspondent.com, Oct. 31)
The European Union has been all but ignored by the main protagonists and mainstream American media as the 2004 US Presidential election campaign enters its final days. In the recent series of three televised presidential debates, neither incumbent George W Bush nor challenger John Kerry let the words 'European Union' past their lips. When EU Member States - chiefly the UK - were discussed, it was primarily in terms of their role as allies of the US in the war on terror. This is no great surprise. "Europe is being ignored because no-one would benefit from talking about it," says GAYANE TOROSYAN, a broadcaster working for WSUI radio who is originally from Armenia. "There has been nothing that has dealt profoundly with Europe," she adds. "The American public by and large discusses the rest of the world through narrow perspectives, such as terrorism and Iraq."  Torosyan argues that Bush would have most to lose by raising the EU-US relationship as a campaign issue. The president's unilateral position over the last four years on questions from global warming to the International Criminal Court means he is vulnerable to accusations from the Democrats that he has alienated allies. But John Kerry has also limited his comments on Europe. "The Kerry people want to convey the notion that Kerry will do better to engage the international community," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa in the heart of the American Midwest. "But they don't want to spell it out in too much detail."
http://www.euro-correspondent.com/ed75_311104.htm

Patchett, Grealy Met At Writers' Workshop (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 31)
Ann Patchett, winner of the Heartland Prize for fiction, was in unfamiliar territory when she sat down to write "Truth & Beauty," an account of her friendship with fellow author Lucy Grealy. Best known for her fiction, including "The Magician's Assistant," "The Patron Saint of Liars" and 2001's PEN/Faulkner winner "Bel Canto," she encountered none of the usual struggles facing novelists: names, location, plotline. What Patchett did encounter, just a few weeks after Grealy's death in 2002, was staggering grief and an overwhelming need to write. The result is an unflinching, heartbreaking and hilarious history of a friendship, complete with petty jealousies, high-decibel arguments and profound love. Patchett and Grealy met as grad students in the WRITERS' WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, eventually rooming together.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/magazine/chi-0410310427oct31,1,3613624.story

Anderson Tour Started at UI (Denver Post. Oct. 30)
Laurie Anderson's latest creation in "The End of the Moon," a 90-minute solo work combining spoken word and electronic music. It emerged partly as a result of her ongoing tenure as the first artist-in-residence with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The national tour of the new offering, which began in September at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, will arrive Wednesday at the Boulder Theater and culminate in February during a two-week residency at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ca957fd9d40d899dc4b34f55f6516442&_docnum=61&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVA&_md5=2d17640b53142f783238088c4359142d

IEM Noted as Established Exchange (The Economist, Oct. 30)
Cyberspace betting on political events has flourished since the last American presidential election, in 2000. Websites such as www.betfair.com, based in Britain, and www.tradesports.com, based in Ireland, let gamblers back and lay odds on their favorite candidates for a host of American election contests with as much money as they want. An older exchange (and the only legal one based in America, where gambling over the wires is forbidden), the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM), sponsored by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has been letting selected experts bet modest amounts for years.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ca957fd9d40d899dc4b34f55f6516442&_docnum=72&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVA&_md5=682bd988926a5cd4c5f993e79f5041bd

Squire Discusses Nation's Split Over Candidates (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 30)
As President Bush and Sen. John F. Kerry flitted Saturday from one campaign rally to the next -- shadowed by the video specter of Osama bin Laden -- partisans began mustering their ground troops for Tuesday's big push, promising the greatest voter mobilization in U.S. history. In many ways, the election seems an extension of the knotted 2000 race, with many of the same states the most competitive. "We were split down the middle before, and nothing much has happened to move us off that," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political scientist. Gore carried that state four years ago by just more than 4,000 votes out of nearly 1.3 million cast. A version of the story also ran on the website of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/la-na-map31oct31,1,5028040.story

Gronbeck: Political Humor Also Informative for Some (Capitol Hill Blue, Oct. 30)
BRUCE GRONBECK
, professor of communication studies and director of the Center for Media and Political Culture at the University of Iowa, also sees the lampoons as more than comic relief. In 2002, Gronbeck said, he surveyed 1,600 people in four states and learned 30 percent used humor as a source of political information. "This is an amazing thing," he said.
http://www.capitolhillblue.com/artman/publish/article_5610.shtml

Squire: Bin Laden Tape's Influence Unknown (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 30)
Analysts were divided over the impact. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "We have become so divided in terms of partisanship that each side will read what they want into the statement. What Republicans are thinking is: 'This puts the focus back on terrorism.' And the people supporting Kerry say this shows Bin Laden is alive and well three years after we said we were going to get him." A version of this story also appeared on the Web site of the HARTFORD COURANT, MAIL AND GUARDIAN (South Africa), GUARDIAN UK, INDIAN EXPRESS, NEW VISION (Uganda).
http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/2004/la-na-map31oct31,0,3320448.story?coll=la-home-headlines

Lewis-Beck: Bad News May Sway Undecided Voters (New Zealand Herald, Oct. 30)
President Bush has been dogged by a spate of bad news in the final days of the presidential campaign but it is unclear whether that will sway enough voters to affect the election outcome. University of Iowa political scientist MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK said the bad news could sway the remaining undecided voters and that polls have shown it already had. "Things are so tight that any random ripple can make a difference. People are paying very close attention now and bad news travels far and fast," he said.

IEM Allows Investors To 'Bet' On President (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 29)
It's estimated that tens of millions of dollars have already been plunked down on the 2004 presidential election through online wagering and futures markets. But the size of the online pot spread out across a dozen or so Internet sites could possibly double as the campaign winds down, according to gambling experts. The business school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA runs a trading site called the Iowa Electronic Markets, open to the public. It's the only legal place to bet on the presidential race in the country since the university uses the website for research and educational purposes. (Unlike other sites, traders are limited to a maximum $500 investment.)
http://www.latimes.com/technology/la-et-bet29oct29,1,5046205.story?coll=la-headlines-technology

Gronbeck Comments On Political Humor (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Oct. 29)
There are hundreds of election-related jokes, cartoons, flash movies and doctored photographs that weary, obsessed Americans are circulating by e-mail in the run-up to President George Bush's showdown with Sen. John F. Kerry. In part, communication experts say, the proliferation reflects America's cynicism with politics and psychic need to poke fun at the famous. But they said the lampoon also has become a way for the everyman to digest complex political issues and explore the campaign with others. BRUCE GRONBECK, professor of communication studies and director of the Center for Media and Political Culture at the University of Iowa, also sees the lampoons as more than comic relief. In 2002, Gronbeck said, he surveyed 1,600 people in four states and learned 30 percent used humor as a source of political information. "This is an amazing thing," he said.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04303/403615.stm

Ciochon Comments on New Human Species Discovery (Science, Oct. 29)
Archaeologists have made the startling discovery of a lost world of small archaic humans, who hunted dwarf elephants and Komodo dragons on an Indonesian island as recently as 18,000 years ago. The researchers uncovered the skull and skeleton of an adult human female with a brain the size of a small chimpanzee. This diminutive new species lived on the tropical island of Flores at the same time that modern humans inhabited nearby islands and were circling the globe. The leading hypothesis for H. floresiensis's origins is that it was descended from H. erectus, says paleoanthropologist Peter Brown. He theorizes that during thousands of years of isolation on the islands, the lineage shrank in a dwarfing process that has been observed in other island mammals. Eventually, these isolated little people evolved into a new species of human. "This shows that humans are not special cases: The evolutionary processes that shape life on Earth operate in the same way on humans," says paleoanthropologist RUSSELL CIOCHON of the University of Iowa in Iowa City.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/306/5697/789

Berg: IEM Shows Election A 'Virtual Tossup' (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Oct. 29)
Market players once again are proving you can make or lose a buck on anything. Including presidential races. With just a few days to go, investors in futures contracts on the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) have narrowed the Bush-Kerry tilt from a several-point Bush lead to a virtual tossup, said JOYCE BERG, an accounting professor and director of the University of Iowa-based electronic market. The Iowa futures market has correctly predicted presidential popular-vote winners since its inception before the 1988 race. Traders in the school's futures market "are saying right now ... that the vote-share outcome is a coin flip," Berg said from Iowa City.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/5058002.html

Segura: Latino Recruitment May Become Contentious (Biloxi Sun Herald, Oct. 29)
A story about efforts by the Democrats and Republicans to sway Latinos this presidential election says that if a protest movement against the Iraq war and aggressive recruitment by the military of Latinos grows, this would not be the first time the military has served as a catalyst for social change. The Latino civil rights movement was quickened by the experience of veterans who came home from World War II only to find they were not entitled to all the benefits white veterans received. Latino protests also mobilized, although slowly, during the Vietnam War. As the dangers faced by America's all-volunteer army grow, says GARY SEGURA, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa, the recruiting issue is bound to become more contentious. "It's always the poor who go off and fight," he said, "and they go off and fight based on the decisions of others." The paper is based in Mississippi. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the Bradenton (Fla.) Herald, the ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH and many other media outlets.
http://www.sunherald.com/mld/sunherald/news/nation/10046562.htm

Segura: Most Hispanics Leaning Democrat (KING5-TV, Oct. 29)
The Hispanic vote could determine the election in swing states, such as Florida, where in 2000, the Cuban-American community largely favored Bush but that voting pattern might not be repeated. "There is some evidence that nationwide the total number of Latino voters this year will be about 1 million greater than four years ago, but I think that is optimistic," said GARY SEGURA, political science professor at the University of Iowa. "I expect about 500,000 new Latino voters at the polls from four years ago. "Most Hispanics are leaning Democrat and the only question is how strongly. Bush got about 35 percent of the Latino vote nationwide in 2000 but he won't do as well this time...My prediction would be that he will get about 32 percent of the Latino vote." The station is based in Seattle, Wash.
http://www.king5.com/topstories/stories/NW_102604WABethnicvotersEL.198d89da.html

Lehnertz Comments On Mall Space Consideration (Chronicle, Oct. 29)
A growing number of colleges and universities are buying or leasing retail stores - entire shopping centers, in some cases -- and converting them for academic use. Colleges that have made the leap say it makes economic and educational sense. Converting an existing building into a campus can be considerably less costly than putting up a new building. The University of Iowa at Iowa City, for example, increasingly squeezed for space, has for some time had its eye on the Old Capital Town Center mall that sits across the street. The once-prospering shopping mecca has been in decline since the late 1990's, when a new high-end mall was built in the suburbs of neighboring Coralville, Iowa. The university could easily put classrooms or office space in the mall, says RODNEY P. LEHNERTZ, director of campus and facilities planning. But town-gown considerations have impeded the university's acquisition of the property, he says. The university is Iowa City's biggest landowner and employer, and as such it must tread carefully to avoid creating the perception that its growth is too aggressive. In addition, the mall is one of the city's biggest taxpayers, paying $340,380 for the 2003-4 fiscal year.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i10/10a02801.htm

Berg: IEM Shows Election A Toss-Up (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct. 29)
Market players once again are proving you can make or lose a buck on anything. Including presidential races. With just a few days to go, investors in futures contracts on the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) have narrowed the Bush-Kerry tilt from a several-point Bush lead to a virtual tossup, said JOYCE BERG, an accounting professor and director of the University of Iowa-based electronic market. The Iowa futures market has correctly predicted presidential popular-vote winners since its inception before the 1988 race.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1069/5058002.html

IEM Allows Investors To 'Bet' On President (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 29)
It's estimated that tens of millions of dollars have already been plunked down on the 2004 presidential election through online wagering and futures markets. But the size of the online pot spread out across a dozen or so Internet sites could possibly double as the campaign winds down, according to gambling experts. The business school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA runs a trading site called the Iowa Electronic Markets, open to the public. It's the only legal place to bet on the presidential race in the country since the university uses the website for research and educational purposes. (Unlike other sites, traders are limited to a maximum $500 investment.)
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/la-et-bet29oct29,1,4630244.story

Grant To UI Funds Trauma-Care Research (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 28)
Eleven emergency medical services in Iowa soon will begin using new technology to save victims of heart attacks or trauma.  A $2.5 million federal grant from the National Institutes of Health will help University of Iowa scientists study the use of new devices and drugs to treat serious trauma and prevent out-of-hospital deaths from heart attacks. The money will establish at the university the Iowa Regional Resuscitation Center, one of 10 such centers to be created in the United States and Canada. Dr. RICHARD KERBER, center co-director and professor in the UI Carver College of Medicine, said studies involving the 11 emergency medical services in Iowa will assess new devices or drugs to treat serious trauma and prevent out-of-hospital sudden death from cardiac arrest.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1642&u_sid=1242881

Squire Comments on State Legislature Elections (Stateline.org, Oct. 28)
Nearly 80 percent of the nation's 7,382 state legislative seats are up for grabs Nov. 2, but candidates in more than a third of those races won't be pacing the room or wringing their hands as votes are tallied election night.  That's because they're running unopposed. "A lot of voters are going to go to the polling place and not have any choice," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa who has tracked legislative races across the country.  "It's just harder to get people to run for the state legislature than it was a decade ago. The time commitment is not always matched by the salary, and the fact is, running for office now is not a pleasant experience," Squire said. "You take a lot of abuse, and so it's just harder to get people to put the time in to run a campaign that they may end up losing."
http://www.stateline.org/stateline/?pa=story&sa=showStoryInfo&id=409065

Ciochon Comments on Hominid Discovery (London Guardian, Oct. 28)
Scientists have discovered a new species of human in remotest Indonesia. RUSSELL CIOCHON, a paleoanthropologist from the University of Iowa, says: "I suspect that creationists will act very negatively toward this discovery. "It shows that humans were not alone. There may be other dwarfed species lurking in the caves of other isolated islands. Each new discovery will subtract some essence from the uniqueness of humans. I wonder if this discovery might even be discussed in our current political campaign? It is no secret that Bush is anti-evolution. If he is smart, he will not touch this one."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/life/feature/story/0,,1337198,00.html        

Hovenkamp Comments On Broker (International Herald Tribune, Oct. 28)
Marsh & McLennan, the world's largest insurance broker, is promising to change the way it does business in an effort to satisfy regulators' concerns about potential conflicts of interest. But Marsh's extensive and lesser-known ties to the rest of the industry may prove much harder to untangle. Indeed, as scrutiny of the insurance industry intensifies, experts say, it is likely to spotlight the extensive web of relationships between insurers and Marsh, the company that can bring them more business than any other broker. These links are forged in significant investments in insurance companies made by Marsh. In some cases, former Marsh executives run the new companies and current Marsh executives sit on their boards and own personal stakes in them. "Bias in brokerage where people are purportedly acting as neutrals but steering customers toward suppliers with whom they have an ownership interest, those things are all regulatory problems," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa. "They are probably something that insurance regulators want to look into." Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, the TUSCALOOSA (Ala.) NEWS, OCALA (Fla.) STAR-BANNER, SPARTANBURG (S.C.) HERALD-JOURNAL, THE LEDGER in Florida and many other media outlets.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2004/10/27/business/insure.html

Ciochon Comments on New Human Species Discovery (The Age, Oct. 28)
When Indonesian and Australian archaeologists started to excavate a limestone cave on the Indonesian island of Flores, they weren't prepared for what they found, the skeleton of an entirely new species of human, Homo floresiensis, that lived as recently as 18,000 years ago. he discovery raises obvious questions about the diversity of the human family, such as whether undiscovered human-like species might survive today. Are we really the sole human custodians of our planet? Could the existence of Homo floresiensis rehabilitate persistent rumors of undiscovered human-like species elsewhere, notably the orang pendek of Malay folklore? The discovery may also have religious and political overtones. RUSSELL CIOCHON, a paleoanthropologist from the University of Iowa, says: "I suspect that creationists will act very negatively toward this discovery. It shows that humans were not alone. There may be other dwarfed species lurking in the caves of other isolated islands. Each new discovery will subtract some essence from the uniqueness of humans. I wonder if this discovery might even be discussed in our current political campaign? It is no secret that Bush is anti-evolution. If he is smart, he will not touch this one."
http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2004/10/28/1098667904973.html?oneclick=true

Lewis-Beck: Bad News May Sway Undecided Voters (Macon Telegraph, Oct. 28)
President Bush has been dogged by a spate of bad news in the final days of the presidential campaign but it is unclear whether that will sway enough voters to affect the election outcome. University of Iowa political scientist MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK said the bad news could sway the remaining undecided voters and that polls have shown it already had. "Things are so tight that any random ripple can make a difference. People are paying very close attention now and bad news travels far and fast," he said. The Telegraph is based in Macon, GA. The same story appeared on the Web site of CAPITOL HILL BLUE.
http://www.maconareaonline.com/news.asp?id=8948

ASA Scientist: Bush Administration Squelching Science (Common Dreams, Oct. 28)

The Bush administration is trying to stifle scientific evidence of the dangers of global warming in an effort to keep the public uninformed, a NASA scientist said Tuesday night. "In my more than three decades in government, I have never seen anything approaching the degree to which information flow from scientists to the public has been screened and controlled as it is now," James E.  Hansen told a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA audience. Hansen is director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York and has twice briefed a task force headed by Vice President Dick Cheney on global warming. Hansen said he was speaking as a private citizen, not as a government employee, and paid his own way for the Iowa appearance. He described himself as moderately conservative, but said he will vote for John Kerry in the presidential election. "He certainly is not in denial of the existence of climate change problems," Hansen said. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the CONTRA COSTA TIMES and the IRISH EXAMINER.
http://www.commondreams.org/headlines04/1027-06.htm

Segura Comments on Iraq War Impact on Latino Recruiting (San Jose Mercury News, Oct. 28)
In a story about splits in the Latino community over the war in Iraq, GARY SEGURA, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said that as the dangers faced by America's all-volunteer Army grow, the military recruiting issue is bound to become more contentious. ``It's always the poor who go off and fight,'' he said, ``and they go off and fight based on the decisions of others.''
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/world/10035425.htm

Bush Leads Tight IEM Race (Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Oct. 28)
ROBERT FORSYTH, professor of economics, is interviewed about the Iowa Electronic Market.
http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2004/s1229517.htm

Rietz Explains IEM, Updates Prices (MSNBC, Oct. 27)
Appearing on MSNBC's "Market Wrap," UI associate professor of finance TOM RIETZ, explained the Iowa Electronic Markets, noting that the IEM has about 3,200 traders and about $300,000 in investments. Since 1988, the IEM has had an average prediction error of 1.37 percent in predicting the outcomes of presidential elections. The IEM is showing a 60 percent probability that George Bush will win the election, compared to 40 percent for John Kerry.

NASA Scientist: Bush Administration Squelching Science (USA Today, Oct. 27)
The Bush administration is trying to stifle scientific evidence of the dangers of global warming in an effort to keep the public uninformed, a NASA scientist said Tuesday night. "In my more than three decades in government, I have never seen anything approaching the degree to which information flow from scientists to the public has been screened and controlled as it is now," James E. Hansen told a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA audience. Hansen is director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York and has twice briefed a task force headed by Vice President Dick Cheney on global warming. Hansen said he was speaking as a private citizen, not as a government employee, and paid his own way for the Iowa appearance. He described himself as moderately conservative, but said he will vote for John Kerry in the presidential election. "He certainly is not in denial of the existence of climate change problems," Hansen said. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, WALL STREET JOURNAL, SYDNEY (Australia) MORNING HERALD, YAHOO! NEWS, MIAMI HERALD, HINDUSTAN TIMES in India, MSNBC and many other media outlets.
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/resources/climate/2004-10-27-hansen_x.htm

Jones Comments On E-Voting Software Code Release (Washington Post, Oct. 27)
The nation's largest voting machine companies are submitting millions of lines of code to the National Software Reference Library to address sharp criticism from computer scientists about the secret software used in elections. But executives at the voting machine makers said Tuesday they would not submit their most valuable data -- their proprietary source code. And they might not provide the library with copies of software patches, updates and upgrades. Computer scientists said the conciliatory gesture wouldn't help ensure the integrity of next week's presidential election, when as many as 29 million Americans will cast electronic ballots. Some researchers worry that hackers, software bugs, ill-trained poll workers or power outages could intentionally or accidentally erase or alter voting data. "This is a step in the right direction," said DOUG JONES, associate professor at the University of Iowa's computer science department. "I just wish these steps had been taken earlier. I say hooray, but it's a long-term benefit with some pretty glaring caveats." Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, ORLANDO (Fla.) SENTINEL, HAMPTON ROADS (Va.) DAILY PRESS, NEOWIN in the Netherlands, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, WTOP in Washington, D.C., the PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORD, USA TODAY and many other media outlets.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A423-2004Oct26.html

Rietz Comments On IEM (Journal News, Oct. 27)
On the Iowa Elections Market at the University of Iowa, investors essentially bet on whether Bush or Kerry will win -- much the same way that traders gamble on futures and stocks on Wall Street. With a dizzying number of polls seemingly unable to tell who exactly is winning this race, some have turned to these markets to assess the current state of the campaign. Though political scientists dispute it, a number of economic experts now believe that these markets may be far more accurate than polls. At the Iowa Elections Market, which began with the 1988 presidential election, the average margin of error for the popular vote has been 1.4 percent, half of most major polls and news organizations, said finance professor TOM RIETZ, one of the project's directors. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.thejournalnews.com/newsroom/102704/d0127prezfutures.html

Reitz: Election a Toss-up (Wired News, Oct. 26)
Online traders wagering on the outcome of next week's presidential election are giving President Bush slightly better odds of victory than Sen. John Kerry. But trading-exchange operators caution against reading their data too strongly in Bush's favor, saying the race remains remarkably close. On two real-money wagering sites, TradeSports and the Iowa Electronic Markets, traders give Bush a 59 percent and 61 percent chance, respectively, of being re-elected, as of Monday. A third site, NewsFutures, where traders wager for prizes and bragging rights, has the race virtually deadlocked, giving Bush a 51 percent chance of victory. "It's not that much better than a coin flip," said THOMAS RIETZ, associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business and a co-director of the Iowa market.
http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0,1283,65448,00.html?tw=wn_tophead_1

IEM, Polls May Overestimate Bush Support (The Times of London, Oct. 26)
As things stand there is no way to reconcile objective polling evidence that shows a dead heat between John Kerry and George W. Bush with the very high probability attached to a Bush victory on Wall Street.  Even the 58-42 split in favor of Bush in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA electronic market, in which academic experts and investors back their judgment with real money bets, seems unrealistic. If anything, a dead heat in the opinion polls suggests two reasons why Kerry is likely to win. First, there are some well-established biases in the polls that tend to underestimate the role of young, poor and new voters and to overestimate support for incumbents. A second structural problem for the Bush campaign has been less widely recognised. For economic reasons the line-up of state voting looks less favorable for Bush than it was four years ago. U.S. elections tend to be won or lost in the Midwest and Great Lakes states - Ohio, Michigan, Illinois and so on - because of the electoral college system. But the Midwest also happens to be America's manufacturing heartland - and the manufacturing sector has fared much worse than the rest of the US economy in the past four years.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,630-1328446,00.html

UI Study Shows Extent of Alzheimer's Driving Difficulty (Miami Herald, Oct. 26)
In a recent study, researchers at the University of Iowa compared the driving of 32 people with mild Alzheimer's with 136 older people who did not have the disease. They were sent out on a 17-mile route in a car that monitored their speed, turning, braking, acceleration and driving errors. About 70 percent of those with Alzheimer's made at least two safety errors, such as erratic steering or driving into the bike lane, compared with about 20 percent of those who did not have Alzheimer's. They also made more wrong turns and got lost more often. ''There is an increased risk of crashes with Alzheimer's disease,'' said lead author ERGUN UC, an assistant professor of neurology. Uc said he does not think all people with Alzheimer's need to have driving privileges revoked. However, better methods are needed to determine who needs to have their driving restricted, he said.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/living/health/10008489.htm

Rietz Comments on IEM (ABCNews.com, Oct. 26)
Since 1988, the Iowa Electronic Markets' futures wagering lines have predicted presidential popular vote to within an average of 1.37 percentage points, says TOM RIETZ, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business, which runs the betting site. Proponents say it may gain accuracy because participants risk losing their money if they bet incorrectly. "We think that we're more accurate than polls," Rietz says. "We ask people to predict what will happen in November, not how they're feeling today. We ask how they think everyone's going to vote, not how they're going to vote."
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=193523&page=4

Mason: Bariatric Surgery Follow-up Insufficient (Tech Central Station, Oct. 26)
EDWARD EATON MASON
, professor emeritus of general surgery at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and inventor of gastric bypass, launched the International Bariatric Surgery Registry (IBSR) in an effort to promote reliable statistics on surgical treatments for obesity and improve outcomes for patients. Still after 20 years, recent research from surgeons, represented only a 52.9 percent follow-up rate of eligible patients, leading him to caution in 1998 "follow-up is insufficient for estimation of ... mortality rates." And again in 2003 he wrote: "We do not have the long-term follow-up information that is needed to fully inform patients of the consequences of their choice of operation."
http://www.techcentralstation.com/102604D.html

Ohsfeldt Research Cited (Reason, Oct. 26)
Advocates of a single-payer system often cite the lower medical costs of the completely nationalized health care systems in Canada and Britain, which spend less than 9.6 percent and 7.7 percent of their GDPs on health care, respectively. Despite the lower spending, the average life expectancy at birth is 79.8 years in Canada and 78.2 years in Britain, higher than America's 77.1. What explains the differential? As University of Iowa health economist ROBERT OHSFELDT notes in the fall 2003 issue of The Independent Review, if higher U.S. accident and homicide rates are taken into account, our life expectancy numbers match those of Britain. The difference is also partly due to a slightly higher infant mortality rate in the U.S.: 6.8 per 1,000 live births, compared to Canada's 4.9 and Britain's 5.3 rate per 1,000. (That seems largely related to racial disparities -- the white U.S. infant mortality rate in 2000 was 5.7 and the black infant mortality was 14.4.
http://www.reason.com/0411/fe.rb.mandatory.shtml

Dolezal Raves about Hospital Food Service (Forbes, Oct. 26)
It's not mealtime yet, but you've just awakened in your hospital bed, on the mend and starving. If you're lucky enough to be in the right hospital, you could satisfy that ice cream craving or sink your teeth into a roast beef sandwich a half-hour or so after you call room service. That's right, room service. The approach--called by such names as "At Your Request" or "A La Carte"--lets patients order food directly from the hospital food service department between regularly scheduled mealtimes, even if they just need a snack to tide them over. Better yet, the cost of these special orders is considered part of standard care, hospital officials say. "Satisfaction is phenomenal," agreed Joan Dolezal, director of food and nutrition services at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, where "A La Carte" room service was launched in January. "The food is very similar to what you would find in fine hotels," she says. Patients order through the room telephone from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week. A software program determines if their order violates any restriction laid down by their doctor. Food is delivered within 45 minutes," Dolezal says. "You can have an omelette in the evening; you can have pizza with the topping of your choice."
http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/2004/10/26/cx_1026health.html

IEM, Online Markets Bet on Sports, Politics (Concord Monitor, Oct. 26)
Think you've got a bead on who will win the World Series between the Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Cardinals? Prepared to put your money where your mouth is? Some fans would seek out their favorite bookmaker and take whatever odds are being offered. Others are taking the Wall Street approach and buying futures contracts on their teams of choice on TradeSports, an online exchange incorporated in Dublin, in part because of its favorable gambling laws. TradeSports and similar sites pattern themselves on traditional commodities exchanges. But instead of an agreement to buy or sell a commodity at a specified price in the future, contracts on TradeSports are worth $10 if the event the contract predicts occurs. In addition to sporting events, the site also trades futures contracts on political events, such as the U.S. presidential election, much like the popular Iowa Electronic Markets, run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Tippie College of Business. Traders can buy contracts on the candidate they think will win, as well as on the number of electoral votes they think each candidate will receive, among other variables. The Monitor is based in Concord, NH.
http://www.concordmonitor.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041024/REPOSITORY/410240418/1003/BUSINESS

UI Student Bets on Bush in IEM (Pittsburgh Post Gazette, Oct. 26)
For Jonathan Sargent, any talk about a presidential candidate's political stock rising or falling is no mere figure of speech. The 21-year-old University of Iowa senior has bet $75 that President Bush will win re-election, purchasing stock in the incumbent in an online stock market that lets investors invest their money in shares of the candidate they think will win.  Such online stock market schemes in which presidential futures trade like pork bellies do on the Chicago Board of Trade or shares of General Motors do on the New York Stock Exchange may be just for fun for people such as Bush-backer Sargent -- and a way to pick up a few bucks. If Bush wins, Sargent stands to double his investment. But to a cadre of academics and economists who believe markets are likely more telling than polls, the way people are betting with their money could be a tell-tale sign of who the likely winner will be come Nov. 2.  "We're about twice as accurate as polls," said GEORGE NEUMANN, director of the Iowa Electronic Markets, or IEM, where Sargent invested in Bush futures. Run by the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business, the IEM is regarded as the grandfather of political betting sites. Yesterday, it recorded a 4 p.m. EDT closing price of 61 cents per share for Bush's stock and a 39-cent close for Sen. John F. Kerry's in a "winner take all" contest in which traders will receive $1 for each of their holdings if their candidate prevails.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04300/401671.stm

Top NASA Global Warming Expert to Criticize Bush in UI Lecture (New York Times, Oct. 26)
A top NASA climate expert who twice briefed Vice President Dick Cheney on global warming plans to criticize the administration's approach to the issue in a lecture at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA tonight and say that a senior administration official told him last year not to discuss dangerous consequences of rising temperatures. The expert, Dr. James E. Hansen, director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in Manhattan, expects to say that the Bush administration has ignored growing evidence that sea levels could rise significantly unless prompt action is taken to reduce heat-trapping emissions from smokestacks and tailpipes. The same story also appeared on the Web sites of the LEDGER (Lakeland, Fla.), SARASOTA HERALD TRIBUNE, SPARTANBURG (NC) HERALD JOURNAL and MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/26/science/26climate.html

Harris: More Students Seek Counseling (New York Times, Oct. 26)
The college campus can be a stressful place. Surveys show that the number of college students with mental health problems of all types is steadily increasing. And some students find themselves emotionally at sea, struggling with problems from homesickness and relationship breakups to drug or alcohol abuse, severe depression or even thoughts of suicide.  Experts say that, given the prevalence of emotional difficulties on campus, it pays to find out, before choosing a college, what mental health services are available. Most college mental health counselors, surveys show, also have noticed a sharp rise in the number of students with severe crises, like major depression, bipolar disorder and eating disorders and drug and alcohol problems severe enough to require hospitalization. Dr. MARK HARRIS, assistant director of counseling services at the University of Iowa, said his service saw 20 percent more students last month than in September 2003. And his colleagues at other universities are reporting similar increases. "What I'm picking up on the national list serve is that this has been the worst fall for emergencies in two decades," Dr. Harris said. "We're seeing a lot more anxiety disorders and panic attacks. With the global war on terrorism and terror alert codes, the world has become a pervasively more frightening place to live in." Less severe problems, like homesickness or roommate squabbles, can also be troubling enough to need treatment.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/26/health/psychology/26cons.html?oref=login&pagewanted=2

UI To Track Use Of New Devices, Drugs By First Responders (WQAD-TV, Oct. 25)
Eleven emergency medical services in Iowa will soon begin using new technology to save victims of heart attack or trauma. A federal grant for more than $2 million will help UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists study the use of new devices and drugs to treat serious trauma and prevent out-of-hospital deaths from heart attacks. Some ambulances will carry new devices to improve ventilation in patients during heart attacks while others may involve alternative fluids to replace blood loss for accident victims. The UI will establish one of 10 regional resuscitation centers in the nation to conduct the research. Nationwide, more than $300,000 people die each year from out-of-hospital sudden death because of heart attacks or traumatic injury. In Iowa, trauma is the major cause of death for people under 44. Emergency medical services participating in the program include Cedar Falls, Cedar Rapids, Davenport, Des Moines, Dubuque and Iowa City. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2474028&nav=1sW7SLlN

Lewis-Beck Election Forecase Model Cited (National Review Online, Oct. 25)
The latest copy of PS: Political Science and Policy - a quarterly journal published by the American Political Science Association - includes a symposium on election forecasting, highlighting seven different statistical models prepared by a venerable group of political scientists who - taken together - predict that President George Bush will get around 53.8 percent of the vote. Among the authors and co-authors of the seven models is MICHAEL S. LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa and Charles Tien of Hunter College. Lewis-Beck and Tien give Bush a 49.9 percent chance of winning.
http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/andres200410250759.asp

UI Involved In Study Of Hands-Free Cell Phones, Drivers (Detroit News, Oct. 25)
A growing body of research suggests that using a cell phone while driving is a serious safety problem -- even if a driver's hands are on the steering wheel. A few states require headsets or other hands-free technology for cell phone users. Automakers and phone companies have embraced that compromise. But the latest research shows people talking on cell phones are distracted even if their hands remain on the steering wheel. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is conducting in-depth research at its National Advanced Driving Simulator, run jointly with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Preliminary research indicates that even though their hands remained on the wheel, study subjects using voice-activated systems take longer to dial -- a potentially dangerous distraction. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the DESERT SUN in Palm Springs, Calif.; and THE NEWS JOURNAL in New Hampshire.
http://www.thedesertsun.com/news/stories2004/business/20041024235144.shtml

IEM's Presidential Futures Market Predicts Bush Win (Newsday, Oct. 25)
A summary of various indicators about who might win the U.S. presidential elections includes the Iowa Presidential Futures market run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BUSINESS SCHOOL. The market has been within 1.4 percent of the presidential victory margin in the past three elections. The victory margin today is Bush by 18 percentage points.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/longisland/politics/ny-webref4018797oct25,0,5393730.story?coll=ny-lipolitics-print

UI Studies Vehicle Stability Control System (Montgomery Advertiser, Oct. 25)
Electronic stability control systems, while slower to catch on domestically than overseas, are gaining traction in the United States. This monitoring system helps keep vehicles in control by braking or slowing engine speed to avoid skidding or rolling over.In August, Continental Teves, which supplies Ford with its AdvanceTrac system, cited recent studies by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that illustrated how such technology increases driver control by 34 percent and cuts the number of crashes by up to 35 percent. The paper is based in Alabama.
http://www.nwanews.com/story.php?paper=adg&section=Business&storyid=96681

Iowa Actor Cast as Superman (Montgomery Advertiser, Oct. 25)
A little-known actor has been cast as Superman in a big-budget film slated for 2006, according to Variety magazine. Brandon Routh, 25, of Norwalk, Iowa, has appeared in the soap opera "One Life to Live" and just finished his first feature film, "Deadly." He attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and has had guest appearances on the television shows "Cold Case," "Gilmore Girls" and "Will and Grace." The paper is based in Alabama. Versions of the story have run in many other media outlets as well.
http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/NEWSV5/storyV5xsuperman25.htm

Rosazza Comments On News Catalyst Center (Lawrence Journal-World, Oct. 25)
It's been slightly more than a year since the University of Kansas announced it would receive a $17 million grant to establish the Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysts to study catalysts, which speed chemical reactions that help make a variety of products. Coupled with industry and university support, the project is worth about $30 million over five years. The center grant includes researchers at KU, the University of Iowa and Washington University in St. Louis. Center leaders have created a structure for researchers to suggest projects and for various groups to collaborate from their institutions. "These are huge programs," said JACK ROSAZZA, director of the Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing at the University of Iowa. "They're extremely complex. There are a lot of components, with research, education, interfacing with NSF, industrial outreach and diversity. Each of those required quite a bit of effort." The paper is based in Kansas.
http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/emailto/185584

Weiner Comments On Antibody Drugs (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Oct. 24)
For a small biopharmaceutical company that has yet to get a drug on the market, Medarex Inc. has been keeping some impressive company. Top pharmaceutical and biotech companies, from Johnson & Johnson to Amgen Inc., are lining up to pay Medarex to use its genetically engineered mice as they seek to develop new, better drugs. The doctored mice have the rare ability to produce human antibodies, which can help fight disease in people for months at a time just like natural antibodies. Last month, the world's biggest drug company, Pfizer Inc., signed Medarex to a decade-long development deal that could bring up to $500 million and a stream of future royalties. Pfizer, which has been unable to get any antibody drugs approved, will try to develop up to 50 using Medarex technology. Since 1986, 17 antibody drugs have been approved in this country, mostly in the last six years. They include Erbitux for colorectal cancer - the drug involved in the Martha Stewart stock scandal - six other cancer drugs, Remicade and Humira for rheumatoid arthritis, three drugs for preventing organ transplant rejection and Xolair for asthma. Dr. GEORGE WEINER, director of the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa, said antibody drugs also have promise against infections, heart and blood vessel diseases, and various immune system disorders. The paper is based in Indiana. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of TALLAHASSEE.COM in Florida, the BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, the MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, KENTUCKY.COM, the MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, KANSAS.COM, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, PHILADELPHIA (Penn.) INQUIRER, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, and many other outlets.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/business/10004813.htm

Champion Of Hebrew Poetry Attended IWP (Jerusalem Post, Oct. 24)
Israeli poet Amir Or, considered one of the best-known champions of Hebrew poetry, mentions in a Q&A interview that her wrote the Hebrew version of "Poems" in 1994, after he returned from a stay at the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1098591994045&p=1006953079969

UI Press-Published Author Writes About Prairies (New York Times, Oct. 24)
Suzanne Winckler, author of "Prairie: A North American Guide" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS), wrote an article for the newspaper about remnant prairies in the United States.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/24/travel/24prairie.html?oref=login

Jones: Long Voting Lines In Florida A 'Serious Concern' (Miami Herald, Oct. 24)
If voters on Election Day spend the same amount of time casting ballots as some early voters have, South Florida polling places could be overwhelmed Nov. 2 with long lines that drag into the night, frustrated voters and delays in reporting election returns. The Herald spent two days in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties observing more than 400 voters at several early-voting sites. On Election Day in Miami-Dade, at least 516,000 voters are expected at the polls to vote on 6,466 machines. That means each machine, on average, must accommodate 80 voters throughout the day. Yet, when The Herald monitored 14 machines during a consistently busy two-hour period of early voting, the process moved more slowly. At the pace observed, nearly six voters an hour, only 71 people per machine would vote by the normal closing time on Election Day. The extra minutes and seconds may seem small, but compounded by more than a million voters expected in Miami-Dade and Broward on Election Day, voter advocates fear that they leave dangerously slim margins. ''If the lines are long, some people just give up. So it's a serious concern,'' said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa and a consultant to the Miami-Dade Elections Department. "And if the lines are long just in Dade County and short in the rest of the state, you have a discrimination case in the making.''
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/state/10000065.htm

Alumnus Questions Civil Servant Test History Component (Taipei Times, Oct. 23)
The issue of national examinations rarely grabs the headlines but the newly appointed head of the entry-level national examination committee for civil servants, Examination Yuan member Lin Yu-ti, managed to do just that this week. On Oct. 16 Lin started a controversy by saying he would only allow questions about Taiwan's history and geography to appear in the national history and geography test in January's entry-level national civil service examinations. At present, only 5 percent of the questions in those tests in the entry-level exams for civil servants are about Taiwan. As a solution to the issue raised by Lin, the Ministry of Examination has proposed two plans to the Examination Yuan for its consideration. One is to abolish the history and geography tests in the entry-level examination altogether. The other is to change the name of the test from "national history and geography" to "history and geography" and increase the percentage of questions that deal with Taiwan, as opposed to China. Born in 1939 in Tainan County, the National Taiwan Normal University-educated Lin obtained his PhD in philosophy from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Taiwan.
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2004/10/24/2003208188

Rietz Notes IEM Accuracy (MSNBC.com, Oct. 22)
The notion that an open market can accurately predict the outcome of an election was pioneered by academics at the University of Iowa where the now oft-quoted Iowa Electronic Futures Market, a real-money market that allows punters to buy futures contracts based on the outcome of economic and political events, was established in 1988. Run by the university's business school and regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the Iowa market has spawned similar futures markets at Intrade.com and Tradesports.com, and they have been remarkably prophetic. Compared with 596 national polls in four presidential election cycles between 1988 and 2000, the Iowa market was closest to the actual election result 76 percent of the time notes THOMAS RIETZ, a finance professor at the University of Iowa and director of the Iowa futures market.Indeed, early on in the 2000 White House race, the polls put George W. Bush as the clear winner, but the Iowa futures market predicted a dead heat as early as May that year, Rietz said.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6281086/

Iowa Actor Cast as Superman (USA Today, Oct. 22)
A little-known actor has been cast as Superman in a big-budget film slated for 2006, according to Variety magazine. Brandon Routh, 25, of Norwalk, Iowa, has appeared in the soap opera "One Life to Live" and just finished his first feature film, "Deadly." He attended the University of Iowa and has had guest appearances on the television shows "Cold Case," "Gilmore Girls" and "Will and Grace." The Associated Press article appeared in THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE; NEW YORK TIMES; NEW YORK NEWSDAY; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS and DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota; KANSAS CITY STAR; SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD, and NORTH COUNTY TIMES in California, SEATTLE POST-INTELLEGENCER, MIAMI HERALD, and numerous others.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2004-10-22-routh-superman_x.htm

UI Hospitals and Clinics Offer Room-Service Option (Forbes.com, Oct. 22)
About 25 percent of U.S. hospitals offer some form of room service option, according to Joyce Hagen-Flint, president of American Society for Healthcare Food Service Administrators, basing the estimate on several surveys. In surveys measuring health-care satisfaction, hospitals that offer the room-service approach get better ratings when compared with hospitals that don't offer it. "The satisfaction is phenomenal," agreed JOAN DOLEZAL, director of food and nutrition services at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, where "A La Carte" room service was launched in January. "The food is very similar to what you would find in fine hotels," she said. Patients order through the room telephone from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week. A software program determines if their order violates any restriction laid down by their doctor. "Food is delivered within 45 minutes," Dolezal said. "You can have an omelette in the evening, you can have pizza with the topping of your choice."
http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2004/10/22/hscout521685.html

IEM Noted in Derivative Market Article (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 22)
Financial and economic titans from Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan to famed money manager Warren Buffett have pondered aloud about the risks of derivatives. Now a new online market, HedgeStreet, wants to bring derivatives to the masses, albeit in small doses and not in the speculative form that critics contend can pose financial ruin. HedgeStreet has other precedents in academia. The University of Iowa, for instance, has operated the modest and experimental IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, where students and outsiders make bets on developments in elections and various economic indicators, among other things.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109838600867752205-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%27university+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29\

Edwards Stresses Voter Turnout at UI (Washington Post, Oct. 22)
The sun had gone down and a brisk breeze kicked up by the time Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.) climbed onto an outdoor stage Thursday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.  Edwards nevertheless chucked his blazer over a decorative bale of hay topped with pumpkins and corn before rolling up his sleeves and launching into his fiery stump speech. Speaking on a college campus in one of Iowa's most Democratic pockets, Edwards had an easy sell. But the appearance, his last in a swing through southeastern Iowa Thursday, wasn't so much about changing minds. It was part of an effort to drive up the turnout of Democrats, and Democratic students in particular. To underscore his point, Edwards pulled University of Iowa freshman Jessica Mangler onto stage and announced that she had already taken 47 of her friends to vote early. If other students there were to do just half that, Edwards proclaimed, "this election is over in Iowa."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A53846-2004Oct22.html?sub=AR

IEM Origin Explained (Chicago Sun-Times, Oct. 22)
Run by the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business, the Iowa Electronic Market has correctly picked the winner of three out of the past four presidential elections. Three professors, GEORGE NEUMANN, ROBERT FORSYTHE AND FORREST NELSON, came up with the idea for a presidential futures market in March 1988 after polls failed to predict Jesse Jackson winning the Michigan democratic primary. They were in a bar across the street from the business school having beers and watching TV. ''Dukakis was widely seen as the leader; it was a shock to see Jesse Jackson win it,'' said Neumann. ''I went home and wrote up a proposal saying we want to run an electronic market and see if the market could do a better job than the polls.''
http://www.suntimes.com/output/casual/cst-fin-casual22.html

Lewis-Beck Quoted on Economic Model (Montreal Gazette, Oct. 22)
The economy is the most important factor in any presidential election result, including this one. That's why University of Iowa professor MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a former editor of the American Journal of Political Science, is forecasting a narrow victory for Democrat John Kerry on Nov. 2. "Jobs, or their relative lack, play a decisive role that has hitherto been neglected," he says in a recent paper. "Once the job market is considered, a rather precise forecast of the 2004 race becomes possible." Over 20 years of forecasting election results, Lewis-Beck has looked at two key factors - presidential popularity and economic growth. Since 1948, the first factor has an 82-per-cent correlation with the popular vote, the second a 66-per-cent correlation.
http://www.canada.com/montreal/montrealgazette/news/business/story.html?id=7f9517e7-aab2-4156-bec2-255274b5dcf5\

Bush Leading in IEM (CBS Marketwatch, Oct. 22)
In the late 1980s, the University of Iowa created a real-money futures exchange that allowed investors to bet on which presidential candidate would win the general election. Several other electronic futures markets have since been created as well, most prominently the Dublin-based Intrade. These markets are now fairly strongly predicting that George Bush will win re-election. As of Thursday night, for example, the Bush futures contract at the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS was trading at a price that reflects a 59 percent probability of Bush winning. The probability implicit in the similar contract at Intrade is 61 percent. The article also appeared in INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY.
http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?guid=%7BB465B04D-305A-4C64-AB5D-F4947B19F992%7D&siteid=google&dist=google

Artist Studied at UI (Washington Post, Oct. 22)
One of the purposes of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden's "Ana Mendieta: Earth Body, Sculpture and Performance 1972-1985" is, according to show organizer Olga Viso, to make the late artist's work "visible." This, of course, implies a certain invisibility -- or at least ephemerality -- to begin with. Much of the art Mendieta made during her brief lifetime (1948-85) can't really be experienced at all today, at least not directly. Grounded largely in conceptual and performance art -- which the Cuban-born artist began to explore while still a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S INTERMEDIA PROGRAM AND THE CENTER FOR NEW PERFORMING ARTS.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A51338-2004Oct21.html

UI Little-Known Facts Noted (York Daily Record, Oct. 22)
A list of little known facts about the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA includes: Seventy-five Herky Hawk mascot statues have been placed around Iowa City in honor of Kinnick Stadium's 75th anniversary; famous alumni include Tennessee Williams, Gene Wilder and Al Jarreau; "Gary," a character in the new puppet movie "Team America: World Police" is described in the film as the perfect weapon - an actor who double majored in theater and world languages at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://ydr.com/story/psu/46163/

Edwards Speaks at UI (Winston-Salem Journal, Oct. 21)
Concluding a campaign swing through Iowa, Democratic running mate John Edwards appeared at a noisy voter-turnout rally at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "You look great from up here," Edwards told a cheering crowd of about 10,000, largely students. Kerry's campaign put a special focus on working to turn out college students who traditionally vote only sporadically. Canvassers have been registering students for weeks on the state's campuses and there's some sign of success. State Sen. Bob Dvorsky of Coralville noted that 92 percent of the 18-to 24-year-olds in Johnson County are registered. The newspaper is based in North Carolina. The Associated Press article also appeared on the websites of the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, WILMINGTON DAILY STAR, and WCNC-TV in North Carolina; WVEC-TV in Virginia; the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER; WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas; SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS in California; MIAMI HERALD; DOW JONES NEWSWIRES; and several others.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031778675870&path=!localnews&s=1037645509099

Youth Voter Registration Noted (CBS News, Oct. 21)
The New Voters Project has registered 347,000 youth voters in swing states, including Colorado, Oregon, Iowa, New Mexico, Nevada and Wisconsin. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the group is registering 500 students a day.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/10/21/politics/main650736.shtml

Spotlight Back on Iowa Voters (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 21)
With the presidential race nip and tuck in its final stretch, Iowans are among those squarely in the political spotlight.  Polls show John Kerry and President Bush are statistically tied in the state, leaving it on the short list of battlegrounds and targeted for lavish attention from both campaigns. Both candidates stumped in the state Tuesday in their quest for its seven electoral votes. In Iowa, Democrats hope to pile up votes in Des Moines, Sioux City, Cedar Rapids and Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The article also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.latimes.com/news/yahoo/la-na-iowa21oct21,1,2651266.story

Berg Comments On IEM Accuracy (National Post, Oct. 21)
As if the U.S. presidential contest wasn't enough like a horse race, web users all over the world can now bet on the outcome through online futures exchanges that treat politics like corn, cocoa or other commodities. At web sites like the IOWA ELECTRONICS MARKETS (http://www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem/) and Dublin-based Intrade (http://www.intrade.com), members can buy contracts predicting that President Bush will win re-election on Nov. 2 -- or sell them off if they think Sen. John Kerry will unseat him. Savvy traders can make money along the way as prices fluctuate with the candidates' fortunes. On the Iowa exchange, traders on Wednesday gave the Republican Bush a 59.8 percent chance of winning. The Iowa markets have predicted the winner in all but one election since they were started as a teaching tool in 1988, said JOYCE BERG, a University of Iowa accounting professor. The National Post is a Canadian newspaper.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=6cbc83b460e1241942f6a88c443371cf&_docnum=52&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVb&_md5=3be170ba53204f303a748f8149a72b29

Berg Comments On IEM Accuracy (Reuters, Oct. 21)
As if the U.S. presidential contest wasn't enough like a horse race, web users all over the world can now bet on the outcome through online futures exchanges that treat politics like corn, cocoa or other commodities. At web sites like the IOWA ELECTRONICS MARKETS (http://www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem/) and Dublin-based Intrade (http://www.intrade.com), members can buy contracts predicting that President Bush will win re-election on Nov. 2 -- or sell them off if they think Sen. John Kerry will unseat him. Savvy traders can make money along the way as prices fluctuate with the candidates' fortunes. On the Iowa exchange, traders on Wednesday gave the Republican Bush a 59.8 percent chance of winning. The Iowa markets have predicted the winner in all but one election since they were started as a teaching tool in 1988, said JOYCE BERG, a University of Iowa accounting professor. A version of this article appeared Oct. 21 on the web sites of the HOUSTON CHRONICLE and the INDIAN EXPRESS.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=ourWorldNews&storyID=6569429

Attorney Elected To UI Law Foundation Board (Arizona Republic, Oct. 21)
Heidi Staudenmaier, a partner with Snell & Willmer, has been elected to a six-year term on the Iowa Law School Foundation board of directors. The foundation solicits gifts for the COLLEGE OF LAW at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.azcentral.com/abgnews/articles/1021lawrail21.html

D'Alessandro Recommends Info Prescriptions (Only Punjab.com, Oct. 21)
Having trouble finding quality health information on the web? You might ask your doctor to write you an "information prescription." A University of Iowa study shows that the nearly no-cost, quick effort is an effective way to put people in touch with quality health information on the Internet. The finding, based on a study of pediatricians and families at one hospital, appears in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. In addition to helping families, sharing Internet sources for health care information also helps health care providers, said DONNA D'ALESSANDRO, M.D., the study's principal investigator and UI associate professor of pediatrics in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and a pediatrician with Children's Hospital of Iowa at UI Hospitals and Clinics. "We hear from patients and families that they're having trouble finding good health care information on the Internet, and we hear from health care providers that they think the families they treat are using some questionable information," she said. "Using Internet prescriptions to guide families to good information will help solve these problems for both groups."
http://www.onlypunjab.com/real/fullstory-newsID-8755.html

Man Finds Music By Father, A UI Alumnus (Charlotte Observer, Oct. 21)
Clearing out a stack of boxes, Richard Snyder stumbled onto a dusty cardboard box that had belonged to his father, Lester. The box, crammed with sheet music, contained a band arrangement Lester Snyder had written nearly 80 years ago. "I didn't know he had composed or written music," said Richard Snyder, 77. "I never knew him as a professional musician." Nearly eight decades later, Snyder, his daughter and two grandsons are rehearsing the arrangement, titled "A Southern Hunting Scene," with the Piedmont Prime Time Community Band. Lester Snyder was born in 1893 in Panora, Iowa, a small town near Des Moines. He paid his way through college at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA by playing in orchestras and small dance bands.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/states/north_carolina/counties/cabarrus/9973431.htm?1c

Jones Discusses Voting Systems (NBC's Today Show, Oct. 20)
DOUGLAS JONES
, associate professor of computer science at the UI, discussed various kinds of voting machines on the Today Show, including computer touch screen systems. "Thirty percent of America this coming election is going to be voting on touch screen voting machines, not that different from these. People will be toughing and making things happen on the screen. They will be voting for candidates by touching...the votes are recorded in a computer inside the machine. And there have been questions raised about the integrity of the computing systems in these machines. It's not worthy that all of the machines in this exhibit here are machines that have what's called a voter verified paper ballot. The result of your vote is also printed on paper, or behind glass," Jones said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=272cdb2bcfaa31236ec951969a9fd32e&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVb&_md5=6990990f09b1d671a8cd60f135edb44a

Squire Quoted In Story On Karl Rove (Globe & Mail, Oct. 20)
With less than two weeks until election day and opinion polls showing the race too close to call, it's crunch time for the likes of Karl Rove. The brains behind President George W. Bush's re-election bid has been running Republican campaigns since he was a college student 30 years ago and has a reputation for doing whatever it takes to win. In the meantime, PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, says it is hard to gauge what's actually going on in the campaign because opinion polls are so close, and pollsters are having difficulty figuring out how likely respondents are to actually vote. "I think everybody is not putting as much faith in the surveys as we might have in the past," he said. The paper is based in Canada.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20041020.wxcarlrove20a/BNStory/Front/

Squire: Flu Shot Shortage Could Decide Election (Bloomberg, Oct. 20)
In a presidential campaign where the candidates have been stressing the same topics for months -- terrorism, Iraq, jobs -- an issue few anticipated has pushed its way into the dialogue: flu vaccines. John Kerry, the Democratic nominee, is using the shortage of influenza shots to try to persuade elderly voters and mothers of infants that President George W. Bush isn't able to protect the public's health. Bush this week dispatched Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson to the battleground state of Florida, with its large population of senior citizens, to reassure voters that those who need flu shots will get them. In Florida, 18 percent of the population is age 65 or older, the largest percentage in the U.S., according to Census Data. Pennsylvania ranks second at 15.6 percent and Iowa is fourth with 14.9 percent. If the election is "close enough in a couple of states, a minor issue could seemingly swing enough votes to change the outcome," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=a__mME9mytBs&refer=us

UI Ponders Push For More Friday Classes (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 20)
A University of Iowa subcommittee would like to make Friday classes a regular routine. Many professors and students at the U of I prefer classes that meet twice a week for longer periods, said LOLA LOPES, associate provost. But that sort of schedule leaves many students with light course loads on Fridays. "We'd like to retrieve that fifth day of the week," Lopes said. She is leading the subcommittee that will draft the undergraduate portion of Iowa's new strategic plan for 2005 through 2010, which is scheduled to be presented in March to the Iowa Board of Regents.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1235394

Lewis-Beck Model Predicts Slim Kerry Win (Washington Times, Oct. 20)
While most data-driven "vote models" predict George Bush will win the 2004 presidential election, one combined forecast made in late August by MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa and Charles Tien of Hunter College predicts a "paper-thin defeat for Bush," predicting the president will get 49.9 percent of the two party-vote and 241 Electoral College votes. Their conclusions were based on "economic voting and the institutional features of incumbency" along with "a variable that has been hitherto unstudied in the election forecasting world - jobs."
http://washingtontimes.com/national/20041019-103119-7584r.htm

Workshop Cited In Arts Support Story (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Oct. 20)
The Americans for the Arts Action Fund on Tuesday released a "report card" on the recent arts-related voting records of Minnesota's eight U.S. House members, along with those of their counterparts across the nation. The arts-advocacy group gave each of the 435 members of the 2003-2004 House points based on 11 factors, with a primary thrust being four votes concerning an increase in funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The upshot: Minnesota ranked 19th with a B grade overall. Vermont ranked first and Wyoming last. Iowa was 23rd, Wisconsin 26th, New York 10th and California 17th. The Midwest ranked third among six U.S. regions, with New England first and the South last. Some of the study's results can be misleading at face value, one critic said. Jim Leach, who represents southeastern Iowa and was one of three Republicans to get an A+ rating, has a history of moderate voting and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's nationally renowned WRITERS' WORKSHOP is in his district.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/5041453.html

NADS Used In Research On Cell Phones, Drivers (USA Today, Oct. 19)
A growing body of research suggests that using a cell phone while driving is a serious safety problem - even if a driver's hands are on the steering wheel. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is conducting in-depth research at its NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR, run jointly with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Preliminary research indicates that even though their hands remained on the wheel, study subjects using voice-activated systems take longer to dial - a potentially dangerous distraction.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2004-10-19-handsfree-driving_x.htm

Squire: Nader Has Iowa Democrats on Edge (Toronto Star, Oct. 19)
Some analysts suggest independent presidential candidate Ralph Nader could hand George W. Bush victory in any of six states. Others put the number as high as nine. In Iowa, where an American Research Group poll shows Bush and Kerry knotted at 47 per cent, a hardcore of Nader supporters have Democrats on edge, said University of Iowa political scientist PEVERILL SQUIRE. "They are not persuaded by Kerry and will turn to Nader, even if it gives Iowa to Bush," he said. Gore won Iowa's seven electoral votes in 2000, outpolling Bush by a mere 4,144 votes.
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1098136210135&call_pageid=968332188854&col=968350060724

UI Report on Accelerated Leaning Cited (Washington Times, Oct. 19)
A newly released UNIVERSITY OF IOWA report, "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students," details how simply accelerating students through school - allowing them to complete their education at younger ages - can keep intelligent students from losing their drive to learn.
http://washingtontimes.com/culture/20041018-103749-5568r.htm

IEM Uses Markets to Predict Presidential Election (New Zealand Business Review, Oct. 19)
Who won the last presidential debate? Who's going to win the US election? According to the betting and political futures trading communities, it was -- and will be -- George W Bush. t since the election of 1988, one source, the electronic market run as a test lab by the business school at the University of Iowa, has accurately predicted presidential outcomes based on futures contracts. "The central premise is that markets can reveal information about future events," FORREST NELSON, an economics professor at the university and board member of the Iowa Electronic Markets, told Wired Magazine two years ago.
http://www.nbr.co.nz/home/column_article.asp?id=10484&cid=15&cname=Politics

Miller: Snafus Still Possible in 2004 Election (Economic Times of India, Oct. 19)
Among potential complications in the 2004 election are faulty voting technology. While states have poured money into voting technology, some are suspicious of the new systems which lack a track record. Lawyers have descended on swing states like Florida to scour procedures and be on hand should grounds for dispute arise. "We're clearly not rid of the potential for snafus happening and something similar to what occurred in '00 happened again," said political scientist ARTHUR MILLER of the University of Iowa. In addition to concerns about equipment like touch-screen machines, there is wrangling over voter-registration procedures and fears some groups will be systematically disenfranchised.
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/890286.cms

Surgeons Leave UI Organ Transplant Program (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 19)
Two of the three highly regarded surgeons at the organ transplant program at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Hospitals and Clinics have moved on to new jobs elsewhere, leaving patients with questions about the future of the program.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=1234457

NADS Cell Phone Driving Research Cited (Washington Times, Oct. 19)
Recent studies indicate hands-free cell phones are just as unsafe as driving while using a hand-held cell phone. A study by the American Automobile Association found driving and cell-phone talking was the seventh most distracting activity for drivers whether hands on or hands off. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is conducting in-depth research at its National Advanced Driving Simulator, run jointly with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://washingtontimes.com/upi-breaking/20041018-105457-8203r.htm

Alumnus Levine's Poetry Collection Reviewed (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 19)
Philip Levine may be our pre-eminent memory poet, and, in his subtle, elegiac new collection, "Breath," he has a lot to remember. He was born in Detroit in 1928, the son of Jewish immigrants. Encouraged by his mother to pursue an interest in poetry, he still spent years punching out Chryslers in the factories of his hometown. At 26, he finally decamped for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, fearful he might be squandering whatever gift he had. There, under the instruction of Robert Lowell and especially John Berryman, Levine discovered that nearly the exact opposite was true. In his memories of manual labor and the men he'd shared it with, he found a great subject, and one he had pretty much all to himself.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/10/19/DDGTF9BGLA1.DTL

Lewis-Beck, IEM Cited In Election Story (Barron's, Oct. 18)
An article that says some reliable economic predictors of election outcomes are saying that Bush will lose a close race on Nov. 2. The real disposable income of individuals, historically a leading indicator of electoral success, is growing well below the level that usually ensures an incumbent keeps the White House. And in the trading pits of the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, where investors can put cash on the election outcome, Bush futures are barely priced higher than Kerry futures, which is bad news for an incumbent. In any event, disposable income isn't the only economic predictor. MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, who chairs the University of Iowa's political-science department, uses a model that considers not only leading economic indicators but a president's job-approval ratings, too. His verdict: Kerry will win. He's one of the few social scientists sticking his neck out and making a call without qualifications.
http://online.barrons.com/article/SB109788336601047076.html

IEM Finds Competition In For-Profit Wagering Systems (Bloomberg, Oct. 18)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's market for U.S. presidential futures, founded 16 years ago, has been overtaken by a Dublin-based exchange that is now 25 times larger. Investors betting on the race between President George W. Bush and Democratic challenger John Kerry have purchased contracts worth more than $4 million on Intrade, better known by its TradeSports.com Web address. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a not-for-profit wagering system, has a potential payout of $162,000. The Iowa Electronics Market, run by Iowa's Tippie College of Business, has correctly picked the winner of three out of the past four presidential elections. Professors GEORGE NEUMANN, ROBERT FORSYTHE and FORREST NELSON hatched the idea for a presidential futures market after polls failed to predict Jesse Jackson winning the Michigan democratic primary in March 1988.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000085&sid=aMvUTY3v9hr0&refer=europe

Forsythe Explains IEM (Fox News, Oct. 18)
ROBERT FORSYTHE, senior associate dean of Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, explained how some investors are putting their money on their presidential pick in the Iowa Electronic Markets. He discussed the IEM's vote share and winner-take-all markets, what the markets were indicating, and how the markets worked, and their high rate of accuracy in predicting the outcome of presidential elections.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,95063,00.html

Miller: 2004 Election Could Have Snafus (New York Times, Oct. 18)
Strange twists may lie ahead in an already suspenseful presidential race: a disputed ballot count, an inconclusive vote ultimately resolved by lawmakers or even a sentiment-shifting capture of Osama bin Laden are just a few possibilities and bizarre twists. Political pundits are taking these scenarios seriously, even though few making outright predictions of them. "We're clearly not rid of the potential for snafus happening and something similar to what occurred in 2000 happened again this," said political scientist ARTHUR MILLER of the University of Iowa. A version of the story also ran on KERALANEXT in India and on MACON AREA ONLINE.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/politics/politics-campaign-surprises.html

Squire Comments On Gubernatorial Races (Keralanext, Oct. 18)
Voters in 11 states will elect governors on Nov. 2 in contests that test both the drawing power of the presidential candidates dominating the ticket and the down-home strength of the two major parties. Based on polls and early estimates it appears that Republicans, who control 28 governorships, have a shot at capturing two states in Democratic hands, while Democrats, who hold 22, could end GOP runs in two states. That is based on races too close to call or considered tight in Missouri, Indiana, Montana and New Hampshire. None of the 10 most populous states is at stake and six of the contests are in states that are among the 15 least populated. That is in sharp contrast to two years ago when 36 states elected governors. It reflects decisions states have made over the years to place governors' contests in mid-term elections where they can play out on their own stage without the distraction of a White House race, according to PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. He also believes that a common thread in all 11 elections this year is the economy, more specifically "its impact on state budgets, taxes and what future state budgets are going to look like." The publication is based in India.
http://www.keralanext.com/news/?id=56564

Squire Comments On Politicians' Children (Raleigh News & Observer, Oct. 18)
Last week, Jack Edwards had another big week on TV -- even though he spends most of his days in preschool. His dad, Sen. John Edwards, repeated a story Tuesday on "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" that he had told at least twice on national television -- about Jack's line on stage after the vice presidential debate ("Which one's Cheney?" in a gruff voice). During the summer, the Edwards children -- Jack, who's 4, and Emma Claire, 6 -- were regulars on the campaign stage, on TV and in Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry's speeches. The country hasn't seen a national major-party candidate with children this young since the Kennedys in the 1960s. Their prominence keeps Edwards' image as a youthful father fresh. But there's a risk. With their children around, in person or in cute stories, the Edwardses walk a line between campaigning as a family and having the children perceived as window dressing, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "Candidates run that risk any time they use their family members as prominent parts of the campaign," he said. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://newsobserver.com/news/story/1743485p-8016285c.html

UI Involved In Study Of Drivers Using Cell Phones (Detroit News, Oct. 18)
A growing body of research suggests that using a cell phone while driving is a serious safety problem - even if a driver's hands are on the steering wheel. The latest research shows that people talking on cell phones are distracted even if their hands remain on the steering wheel. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is currently conducting in-depth research at its National Advanced Driving Simulator, run jointly with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Preliminary research released last month indicates clear trade-offs with hands-free technology. Even though their hands remained on the wheel, study subjects using voice-activated systems take longer to dial - a potentially dangerous distraction.
http://www.detnews.com/2004/autosinsider/0410/18/a01-307032.htm

UI Press's 'A Cappella' Cited (Indianapolis Star, Oct. 17)
Among Indiana poets who have recently released books is Ann Hostetler, "A Cappella: Mennonite Voices in Poetry" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, $39.95 hardcover, $19.95 softcover). This anthology reveals the diversity of thought among Mennonites, which belies whatever stereotypes people have of the religious group. Hostetler is the anthology's editor, and she teaches creative writing at Goshen College. She includes five of her poems as well as four by Carmel poet Shari Wagner and five by Elkhart County native Todd Davis.
http://www.indystar.com/articles/4/187138-9604-021.html

Squire: Visiting Politicians May Have 2008 Aspirations (Deseret News, Oct. 17)
Gov. Mitt Romney came to Iowa Saturday with a message from Massachusetts to the GOP faithful of this important swing state: Don't let his state's senator reach the White House. Sen. John F. Kerry lacks the resolve to be an effective president, Romney told a group of Republican activists at a fund-raiser Friday night. Only President Bush has the steadfastness to lead the nation in a time of uncertainty, he said, echoing sentiments he conveyed to a national audience at this summer's Republican National Convention. While his speech was officially on behalf of the Bush-Cheney ticket, the buzz surrounding Romney's visit to Iowa's capital city was attached to the Massachusetts governor himself and whether he is contemplating a run for president in 2008. "The people who come in here to speak are not a random sample of politicians. These are people who are at least contemplating their futures," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "If you are going to run in the Iowa caucuses, these are the people to start with." The paper is based in Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,595098816,00.html

UI Alumnus Let Universities Produce Flu Vaccines (Durham Herald Sun, Oct. 16)
David Work, executive director of the N.C. Board of Pharmacy, said this year's flu vaccine fiasco points to a need for major changes. "I think this is a good time for our policy-makers in Washington to seriously consider setting up a public agency to manufacture vaccine," he said, "because the pharmaceutical manufacturers figure they can't make as much profit off vaccines as off other products." Work suggested the federal government contract out flu vaccine manufacturing to universities to ensure plenty of supplies every year. Work, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said his alma mater was licensed to make drugs. "Plenty of universities with medical schools, pharmacy schools, engineering schools are able to produce vaccines of all kinds," he said. "Of course, the pharmaceutical manufacturers would go into a high snit if some other groups went into the drug manufacturing business. But there's a need. We've learned that the hard way this year." The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.herald-sun.com/durham/4-533636.html

UI, Workshop Mentioned In Travel Article (Providence Journal, Oct. 16)
A travel piece about visiting Iowa describes a stop in Iowa City, mentioning the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, where Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Philip Roth and John Cheever have taught and whose graduates include Wallace Stegner and Flannery O'Connor. The paper is based in Rhode Island.
http://www.projo.com/travel/content/projo_20041017_iowa.18f193.html

Squire: Per Diem Boosts Lawmakers' Income (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Oct. 16
In Wisconsin's last legislative session, taxpayers spent more than $2.7 million to cover the on-the-job expenses of state lawmakers. The money is in addition to their regular salary, some of it is tax free, and much of it is handed out on the honor system, something almost incomprehensible in the private sector. A Journal Sentinel examination of legislator expenses in the 18 months, between January 2003 and June 2004, also revealed stark differences in the amount of time lawmakers are working in Madison, the degree to which they travel their district on what they say is constituent business, and the extent to which they bill taxpayers for everything from mileage to meals. The biggest source of extra income, however, is not in-district travel. It's the per diems. Intended to cover the cost of being at work in the Capitol, it might be put toward meals or a hotel room - no receipts required. All a legislator has to do is stroll into the Capitol for five minutes and check e-mail to be eligible for a full day's per diem. Also, per diems for legislators are tax free, meaning they actually serve as a back-door income booster, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa who studies state legislatures.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/state/oct04/267426.asp

Squire: Iowa, Wisconsin Split Politically (Orlando Sentinel, Oct. 16)
With the election less than three weeks away, the nation's political geography has shrunk markedly, with polls showing the presidential contest likely to be decided by a handful of crucial tossup states, with Florida being the largest. Wisconsin and Iowa were won by Democrat Al Gore four years ago. But there's no clear leader now. "These states are really split down the middle politically," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "The populations don't change much, and essentially what we're seeing is a replay of the 2000 election." Versions of the story ran on the websites of many other news organizations, including the PHILLY.COM, THE (Columbia, S.C.) STATE, the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS and KANSAS.COM
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/elections/orl-asecpresident16101604oct16,0,723354.story?coll=orl-home-headlines

Jones Comments On E-Voting Problems (New Scientist, Oct. 16)
Four independent studies in the past 18 months have identified problems with voting machines that could lead to vote tallies being mistakenly altered or deliberately tampered with during the Nov. 2 general election. The flaws affect both the hardware and software of machines made by two companies: Diebold Election Systems of McKinney, Texas, and Sequoia Voting Systems of Oakland, California. Concerns have also been raised about machines made by other manufacturers. "When the margins in an election are wide, these problems are inconsequential, but when the margins are narrow, as in Florida in 2000, these problems dominate the news," says DOUGLAS JONES, a computer scientist at the University of Iowa who has written numerous reports on the security of e-voting systems.
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996523

Columnist Cites UI Health Care Website For Ear Wax Facts (St. Paul Pioneer-Press, Oct. 16)
A reader asks a health columnist whether something his physical education teacher taught him as a young student were true: that ear wax has natural bug-repellent properties and serves its purpose by keeping insects from flying into your ears. The columnist said a Google search for "ear wax insects" found, high up on the long list of matches, information from UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE (www.uihealthcare.com/topics/earnosethroat/earn4453.html): "Ear wax is made by glands in the outer part of the ear canal and helps maintain a healthy ear. This sticky substance helps prevent insects and other foreign objects from entering the ear canal...."
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/columnists/9931057.htm (free registration required)

Fry Article Suggests UI 'Cradle of Coaches' (MSNBC, Oct. 16)
A story about former Hawkeye Football Coach Hayden Fry's retirement in Nevada suggests that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is the new cradle of coaches. It says that seven of his former assistants or players at Iowa, where he coached for 20 years, are head coaches at Division I-A schools. Six others who worked or played under Fry for the Hawkeyes are offensive or defensive coordinators at I-A programs. Miami of Ohio has long claimed to be the "cradle of coaches," producing the likes of Woody Hayes, Ara Parseghian, Bo Schembechler, Paul Brown and Jim Tressel. But with Fry's ever expanding coaching tree, Iowa at least deserves a spot in the nursery.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6249333/

Colleges Hold Suicide Prevention Programs (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 15)
With the school year in full swing, colleges are keenly aware of the heightened risks of suicide on their campuses. Many are adding mental-health staff and holding more workshops for students. A few are also adopting elements of an unusual suicide-prevention program that has been in place at the University of Illinois for 20 years, but that has received little attention. One reason for this burst of interest is that suicide-prevention programs are coming under greater legal and parental scrutiny. Several universities, including Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, have been sued in the past few years by parents of kids who killed themselves. The crux of the allegations is that the schools knew the students were at risk for suicide and didn't do enough to intervene. The University of Iowa case was eventually dismissed, but the MIT suit, which has attracted national attention, appears headed for a messy court battle.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109778123802145667-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

 Movie References UI (NBC4-TV, Oct.15)
"Team America: World Police," an all-puppet extravaganza about a globe-trotting team of overly energetic peacekeepers" opens this weekend in theatres; it's created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, creators of the TV show "South Park." In a review of the film, it's said that one of the characters, Gary, "is 'the perfect weapon' since he's an actor who double majored in theater and world languages at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA." NBC4 is based in Washington, D.C. The Associated Press review also appeared on the websites of CNN, KSBW-TV and KTVU-TV in California, WDIV-TV in Michigan, KIRO-TV in Washington, and many others.
http://www.nbc4.com/entertainment/3823762/detail.html

Semken (Fort Wayne News Sentinel, Oct. 15)
Saber-toothed cats, woolly mammoths and giant ground sloths roamed across North America until 10,000 years ago, when nearly every large mammal on the continent disappeared. For decades, scientists have been trying to uncover why. The scientific community has been ripped in two over this issue and tensions run high between those who would blame humans' arrival, thought to be just a thousand years or so before the extinctions, and those who point to climatic upheaval at the end of the last ice age. Still, others think humans merely swept into North America for the coup de grâce, speeding the inevitable end of a process brought on by climate change. "Without environmental change, people weren't able to bring them down elsewhere like Africa and Europe," said paleontologist HOLMES SEMKEN of the University of Iowa. "So there's got to be more than just people involved." The newspaper is based in Fort Wayne, Ind.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/news/editorial/9926564.htm

Political Markets Put Bush in Lead Over Kerry (San Jose Mercury News, Oct. 15)
The stock of President Bush literally went down during Wednesday night's debate, but the market still shows him with a substantial lead over John Kerry in the minds of investors -- a larger lead than reflected in voter polls. Online futures markets allow investors to bet on the presidential contest by buying futures contracts, somewhat akin to the way hog bellies and corn futures are sold. Two popular political markets are IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, run by the University of Iowa, and Intrade, run by a Dublin, Ireland-based company. Sam Savage, a management and science professor at Stanford University, follows the political markets closely and believes they're just as accurate as polls. He watched the TV debate Wednesday while following the trading on his computer. ``There was a significant run-up on Bush just entering the debate, and a significant drop just after the beginning of the debate,'' he said Thursday. Apparently, Bush wasn't doing as well as some traders expected. The newspaper serves San Jose, Calif.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/9925235.htm?1c

UI Student Arrested Over Paternity Test (KTVO, Oct. 15)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student who police say took a paternity test for a friend has been arrested. David Salazar, of La Grange, Ill., is charged with conspiracy and tampering with records. The 23-year-old Salazar took the paternity test in place of a friend who had been ordered by a judge to provide genetic specimen samples on Feb. 10. KTVO-TV is based in Kirksville, Mo. The story also appeared on the websites of NBC5 and WQAD in Illinois, and KETV in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/Global/story.asp?S=2431469&nav=1LFsS0Te

Student Arrested in Paternity Case (USA Today, Oct. 14)
David Salazar, 23, was arrested on charges of conspiracy and tampering with records for allegedly taking a paternity test for a friend, officials said. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student allegedly stood in for a friend who had been ordered by a judge to provide genetic specimen samples.
http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/news/20041015/a_states15.art.htm

Bush's Online-Futures Lead Narrows After Debate (Bloomberg, Oct. 14)
President George W. Bush's lead over Democratic challenger John Kerry narrowed in Internet futures trading following the third and final presidential debate. On the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a non-profit betting system run by the University of Iowa, Bush's lead initially narrowed, then rebounded today. Bush had a 9.3 percentage-point advantage over Kerry on the Iowa market, up from 9.1 points on Oct. 12. At midday, Bush's lead was down to 8.1 percentage points. Bush contracts were priced at 54.3 and Kerry at 45. Two days ago, Bush futures were at 54.7 and Kerry at 45.6.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000087&sid=aLrVLnG9imVk&refer=top_world_news

UI Graduate Named County Administrator (Napa Valley Register, Oct. 14)
Britt Ferguson was named as assistant CEO Napa County, Calif. He holds a bachelor of arts degree in religious studies from Cal State Northridge and a masters degree in public affairs from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Napa, Calif.
http://www.napanews.com/templates/index.cfm?template=story_full&id=80B9A89C-A0EF-4FBA-8D99-382A65C390E2

Flattery Better in Job Interviews (United Press International, Oct. 14)
Sucking up or apple polishing work better in a job interview than bragging about one's accomplishments, University of Florida researchers have found. The researchers studied 116 undergraduate students majoring in business or liberal arts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who were interviewed for jobs they sought through the college placement service. The applicants completed surveys asking them to rate, on a seven-point scale, their use of various flattering or self-promoting tactics. Flattery included agreeing outwardly with the recruiter's opinion while disagreeing inwardly, and complimenting the interviewer's appearance. Self-promotion tactics included playing up one's accomplishments or experience levels and overstating one's qualifications. The findings show there is a large social component to the workplace, despite business schools spending a great deal of time and effort training people to master technical skills, the researchers said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=434334f1165198e71c1587ca4b280e0a&_docnum=21&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVb&_md5=1ea641cc0d93c66550c271591ea4526f

Movie References UI (Monterrey Herald, Oct. 14)
"Team America: World Police," an all-puppet extravaganza about a globe-trotting team of overly energetic peacekeepers" opens this weekend in theatres; it's created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, creators of the TV show "South Park." A plot synopsis in a film review notes that one of the characters, Gary, is recruited by Spottswoode, the group's silver-haired mentor, to use his acting skills and go undercover as a terrorist to find out when and where the next big attack is planned. (Spottswoode believes Gary is "the perfect weapon" since he's an actor who double majored in theater and world languages at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.)
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/entertainment/9916571.htm

UI Alumnus Seeks Elective Office (Seattle Times, Oct. 14)
An article about local candidates for statewide office notes that one of the candidates, James Whitfield, earned a bachelor's degree in communications from the http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/eastsidenews/2002062653_48thdistrict07e.html.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/eastsidenews/2002062653_48thdistrict07e.html

Berg Comments On IEM Trader Blip (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 13)
Even gamblers on the presidential election can be hammered by late trading. Last Thursday, a person or persons unknown placed a bet with the online IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS suggesting that Democrat John Kerry would win a 70 percent share of the vote "market" against President Bush. Iowa sponsors futures trading related to political events, including presidential elections. The market has a good record for predictions. The Kerry spike, recorded on the University of Iowa Business School's Web site, www.biz.uiowa.edu, apparently indicated a trade near midnight last Thursday, said JOYCE BERG, an accounting professor at the school and a director of the Iowa Electronic Markets. "I don't know what was in the trader's mind," she said. The spike did not last long. "By 2 a.m. [Friday], prices were back to 48," indicating the nearly 50-50 race currently under way, Berg said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/printedition/chi-0410130125oct13,1,3970162.column

IEM Congressional Markets Noted (Business Week Online, Oct. 13)
With Election Day less than a month away, where do the major parties stand in their battle to control the White House and both houses of Congress? One way of tracking the potential outcomes: The Iowa Electronic Markets, real-money futures markets maintained by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Tippie College of Business, which provide probability estimates for events such as elections.The current Iowa futures are consistent with our forecasts for the outcome of the congressional contest. The futures contracts suggest around a 73 percent chance of the GOP maintaining control of both houses. Indeed, the market is priced for either a GOP pickup in House seats or for no change in composition. The odds for the Senate aren't quite as strong, with around a 53 percent chance of a Republican pickup, and the chance of the GOP either holding or losing seats each at 20 percent to 27 percent In the Presidential contest, the chances of a Bush win have narrowed since the first debate.
http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/bw/20041013/bs_bw/nf200410136431db038

Berg Compares Polls, IEM (KOBTV, Oct. 13)
Polling organizations handicap the election by asking people how they're going to vote. Is this the most accurate source of predicting election outcomes? Maybe not. The fact is that people who put their money where their mouth is, in other words, bettors, may in fact be more accurate in predicting the outcome of elections. "If you look at polls run during the election and we've looked at about 600 polls," says JOYCE BERG, a professor at the University of Iowa, "what we found is 75 percent of the cases, the Iowa market prices predict the actual vote share of the election better than polls." Berg is talking about a low-stakes trading market that the university's business college has sponsored for years. Participants can wager from $5 to $500 in winner-take-all futures markets in everything from political races to box office receipts. Primary purpose? Giving students the ultimate incentive to learn. "I poured all of my money into Kerry and as sort of a hedge to my bet I poured some into John Edwards as well and it ended up that Kerry and Edwards went one-two in the Iowa caucus. So, I started with about $20 and went up to $120 after that," says Iowa student Jonathan Sargent. The television news station is based in New Mexico.
http://kobtv.com/index.cfm?viewer=storyviewer&id=14293&cat=CONSUMER

NCAA's Brand Speaks At UI (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 13)
NCAA President Myles Brand needed less than 18 months in the job to push through major academic reforms for college athletics. Getting a handle on the spiraling costs of athletics will be much more difficult, Brand said Tuesday. Brand also told a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA audience that he supports subsidizing the athletic department with money from a school's general fund - provided the department is subject to the same governance and oversight as other areas in the university.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=1229372

Nelson Bemoans Herky Destruction (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 13)
The University of Iowa Alumni Association is offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of vandals who damaged two "Herky on Parade" statues this month. Assailants tore the Herky statue on the Pentacrest from its base early Saturday. Covered in mirrored tiles, the statue called "Reflections of U" had been a favorite of the Herky public art project. The "Dance Marathon Herky" near the Iowa Memorial Union also was damaged. "We believe that such aggressive and selfish actions should not be tolerated," said VINCE NELSON, president of the UI Alumni Association. "It's a blow to all those artists and volunteers who toiled for weeks to create the statues, the people who gained such enormous pleasure from the Herkys and everyone who simply takes pride in the University of Iowa."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1229166

Movie References UI (Modesto Bee, Oct. 13)
"Team America: World Police," an all-puppet extravaganza about a globe-trotting team of overly energetic peacekeepers" opens this weekend in theatres; it's created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, creators of the TV show "South Park." In a review of the film, it's said that one of the characters, Gary, "is 'the perfect weapon' since he's an actor who double majored in theater and world languages at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA." The newspaper is based in Modesto, Calif. The article also appeared in the TACOMA (Wash.) NEWS-TRIBUNE and on MSNBC.
http://www.modbee.com/24hour/entertainment/movies/reviews/story/1731347p-9554632c.html

Weight Loss Surgery Developed at UI (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 13)
The weight-loss techniques, collectively called bariatric surgery, were first developed in the 1950s and have undergone continuous refinement. Initially, they involved invasive surgery in which the chest was opened and a large segment of the intestines bypassed, thereby reducing absorption of food. The procedure required several days' hospitalization, had many complications and was never very popular. In the 1980s, Dr. EDWARD E. MASON of the University of Iowa developed what is now known as the Roux-en-Y procedure, in which the upper portion of the stomach is stapled to reduce the amount of food it can hold and a new outlet is formed in the stomach wall and connected to the lower intestine, bypassing much of the gastrointestinal tract. This is now the "gold standard" for bariatric surgery and was found to be the most effective in a Minnesota study. The article also appeared in the CONTRA COSTA TIMES in California, the SUN-HERALD in Mississippi and the AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN in Texas.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2004/10/13/MNG4O98R7D1.DTL

NCAA's Brand Discusses Economics (Seattle Times, Oct. 13)
NCAA president Myles Brand needed less than 18 months on the job to push through major academic reforms. Getting a handle on spiraling costs will be much more difficult, he said. Brand told an audience at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that he supports subsidizing athletic departments with money from a school's general fund - provided the department is subject to the same governance and oversight as other areas in the university. "Subsidy need not be a dirty word," Brand said. A version of the article also appeared in the DETROIT NEWS, KOTV in Oklahoma, and CBS SPORTSLINE.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/sports/2002061291_digs13.html

UI Nerve Damage Research Noted (Press and Dakotan, Oct. 13)
A Yankton quadriplegic and a Vermillion researcher said the death of actor-activist Christopher Reeve will leave a large void in winning visibility for spinal-cord research. However, Leo Hallan and Dr. Robert Morecraft -- who both serve on a state advisory committee dealing with spinal-cord and traumatic brain injuries -- say they remain confident the momentum will continue from Reeve's actions. Reeve's clout cannot be overstated in the world of research, with its intense competition for attention and funding, Morecraft said. As an example, he noted the importance of a five-year, $1.7 million federal grant for collaborative research between USD and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on repairing nerve damage. "We are researching the motor recovery process," he said. "We are targeting parts of the brain that were not injured and trying to convince them, scientifically or behaviorally, to take over the functions of the damaged areas." The newspaper is based in Yankton, S.D.
http://www.yankton.net/stories/101304/com_20041013022.shtml

Former UI Researcher Named To Post (Milwaukee Business Journal, Oct. 13)
After a three-year search for a top-level researcher to lead the college's biochemistry department and to serve as the Joseph F. Heil Jr. Professor of Molecular Oncogenesis, the Medical College of Wisconsin has recruited ROBERT DESCHENES, college officials have announced. Michael Dunn, dean and executive vice president of the Medical College described Deschenes as one of the country's leading researchers in the genetic and biochemical mechanisms of cell growth regulation in yeast, an important field in the development of drug therapies used to treat disease. Deschenes came from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, where he was professor and vice chair of biochemistry and director of the graduate program in genetics. Deschenes maintains an adjunct professor position at the UI.
http://milwaukee.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/stories/2004/10/11/story3.html

Bibas Comments on Sentencing Decision (The New Standard, Oct. 12)
The United States Supreme Court heard arguments last week in two cases legal analysts say could profoundly impact the criminal justice system. At issue is the legality of federal sentencing guidelines, which have come under fire for allegedly violating the constitutional right to a jury trial. If overturned, the sentences of thousands of people currently serving time could be called into question. During its last session, the Supreme Court voided sentencing guidelines used in Washington State on the grounds that they were unconstitutional. Lawyers successfully argued in Blakely v. Washington that during the sentencing phase, allowing judges to consider evidence not introduced during a trial, other than information about prior criminal history, was a constitutional violation. University of Iowa College of Law professor STEPHANOS BIBAS wrote in an online debate with Douglas Berman, Ohio State University law professor and managing editor of the Federal Sentencing Reporter, published in Legal Affairs in September: "My fear is that the [United States Sentencing] Commission is still wedded to its old model. Many state sentencing commissions have done a much better job by soliciting and incorporating comments from a wide variety of people, but I don't see how the feds will get there from here." Bibas, a former assistant US attorney from the Southern District of New York, told The New Standard his main concern is that the Court will apply Blakely to the federal system in a limited form and leave the guidelines largely intact. Such a situation, he says, would create more problems than it solves. "If they're going to apply Blakely to the federal system, it would be better to knock it [the guidelines] all down," he said.
http://newstandardnews.net/content/?action=show_item&itemid=1105

Murray Study Identifies Cleft Gene Variation (Springfield News-Leader, Oct. 12)
A variation in a single gene plays a significant role in the development of a cleft lip or cleft palate, says a major international study involving almost 2,000 families. The discovery - the first of its kind - should improve genetic counseling for families at increased risk for these types of birth defects. It could also speed research into preventing cleft deformities before they start. "Because we now know that this gene is involved in clefting, it gives us some insights into the other kinds of genes or environmental factors that we might want to look at," said lead researcher Dr. JEFFREY C. MURRAY, of the University of Iowa. His team's findings appeared in an issue of the New England Journal of Medicine this summer.
http://springfield.news-leader.com/health/thisweek/1012-Cleftlip,p-198887.html

UI Studies Research Patents (Durham Herald Sun, Oct. 12)
These days, big research universities use their formidable powers for far more than teaching and scholarly inquiry. They invest in top scientists, create big labs, team up with companies and spawn commercial spinoffs. They and their scientists lure grants from foundations and federal agencies. The National Institutes of Health alone funded $20 billion of research at U.S. campuses last year. And big universities generate patents themselves. In 2002, they collected nearly $1.3 billion in royalties, according to the Association of University Technology Managers. Universities are fighting hard for exemption from outsiders' intellectual-property claims, at a time when many universities are also aggressively seeking and defending their own patents. In one prominent case, the University of Rochester sued drug maker G.D. Searle & Co., now owned by Pfizer Inc., arguing that the university's patents for blocking certain enzymes covered big-selling drugs including Celebrex. (Rochester's patents were declared invalid earlier this year by a U.S. appeals court.) Recent court rulings are already reverberating, as universities fear that patent holders will come out of the woodwork, demanding royalties and impeding research. Johns Hopkins says it has received at least eight letters since the verdict, from streaming-media outfits to biotech firms, claiming it infringes on patents. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, as a test, tried to track the possible patent infringement of one lab that has just a handful of scientists, who study rare ocular disease. Iowa had to contact 71 different people. It spent $24,000 just to do background checks and send letters to patent owners, none of whom asked for money.
http://www.herald-sun.com/durham/4-531840.html

Frisbie: Standardized Test Industry Growing Rapidly (USA Today, Oct. 12)
In the new test-driven world of education, the field of the moment is psychometrics.  Trained in psychology and statistics, psychometricians work for school districts and testing companies; while the jobs require a Ph.D., new psychometricians can often command $100,000 salaries, more than twice as much as in most other academic disciplines and far more than most teachers or principals. Many psychometricians juggle competing offers from testing firms before they've even completed their course work. To meet the growing demand, the industry is expanding rapidly - some say too rapidly. "Certainly the need (for tests) has increased, in good part because of No Child Left Behind," says University of Iowa professor DAVID FRISBIE, who oversees the Iowa Test of Basic Skills, one of the nation's oldest standardized skills tests. "I don't think we're coming close to filling that need." (see sidebar)
http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2004-10-12-tests-usat_x.htm

Brown Named Chair at U-Texas Cancer Center (Houston Business Journal, Oct. 12)
Dr. DAVID BROWN has been named the Edward Rotan Distinguished Professor and chair of anesthesiology and pain medicine at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Brown, who will also serve as medical director of the operating rooms, joined the M.D. Anderson faculty from the University of Iowa College of Medicine, where he served as professor and chair of the anesthesiology department since 1997.
http://houston.bizjournals.com/houston/stories/2004/10/11/daily3.html

Neumann Comments On IEM Election Reading (CNNFN, Oct. 11)
GEORGE NEUMANN, UI economics professor and Iowa Electronic Markets co-director, commented on the IEM's record of accurately predicting election results, and gave a current reading of the market for the 2004 election. "Right now we're showing it's a tight race and (have) been showing that since March. (The markets) have Bush ahead by two points, 51.49 in the vote share market. We also run a market that assesses the probability of winning the majority share of the two-party vote. And that had Bush ahead -- or with a probability of winning the majority share of the popular vote -- by around 60 percent as recent as a week ago. But that's narrowed to about 54 to 46 percent."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=1431c5373261c6cde1e079f9af40296f&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=a73662b796fc3cebc682345d487e08b7

Molecular Clock Tied to Fossil Record (Nature.com, Oct. 11)
A way to date prehistoric events using molecules from living creatures is finally becoming precise enough to be useful. A team of scientists has improved on a 'molecular clock' system that can fix a rough date for the last common ancestor of two separate species. DEBASHISH BHATTACHARYA, who works on comparative genomics at the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, has also produced a 'relaxed molecular clock', as have several others, although Douzery's tree is the most exhaustive so far. Bhattacharya is skeptical about Douzery's dates for one mysterious red alga - the tree says that it appeared after the fossil - but pleased with the work overall. "The real strength of the analysis is they have a large data set," he says. Bhattacharya believes that molecular clocks will soon be a useful tool for researchers. "The work is all going in the same direction. I do think it is going to crystallize in a couple more papers," he says.
http://www.nature.com/news/2004/041011/full/041011-2.html

Semken Comments on Ancient Mammal Extinction (Contra Costa Times, Oct. 11)
Saber-toothed cats, woolly mammoths and giant ground sloths roamed across North America until 10,000 years ago, when nearly every large mammal on the continent disappeared. For decades, scientists have been trying to uncover why. The scientific community has been ripped in two over this issue and tensions run high between those who would blame humans' arrival, thought to be just a thousand years or so before the extinctions, and those who point to climatic upheaval at the end of the last ice age. Still, others think humans merely swept into North America for the coup de grâce, speeding the inevitable end of a process brought on by climate change. "Without environmental change, people weren't able to bring them down elsewhere like Africa and Europe," said paleontologist HOLMES SEMKEN of the University of Iowa. "So there's got to be more than just people involved." (Registration required)
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/9890119.htm

Forkenbrock Developing New Road Tax System (St. Louis Post Dispatch, Oct. 11)
One day we might never have to pay a nickel in fuel tax, but don't start your gas-guzzling highway party just yet. We'll still have to pay to drive. We'll pay by the mile. Researchers are developing a system that will replace the fuel tax with a fee based on the number of miles motorists drive. Missouri is one of 15 states along with the Federal Highway Administration that funded this study. DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the University of Iowa Public Policy Center, is working on the system. "We have relied on the motor fuel tax for well over a half-century," Forkenbrock said. "It contributes about $60 billion a year, but the problem is that the motor fuel tax won't perform well in the future." Vehicles are becoming too efficient, and alternative fuels such as hydrogen cells soon will become commonplace, the professor said. A fuel tax soon won't be able to bring in enough money. "It's not a question of whether it will happen but how soon," he said.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/columnists.nsf/alongfortheride/story/023FBC13C6E4C24186256F2A0038A478?OpenDocument&Headline=Fuel+tax+may+someday+give+way+to+fee+system

UI Studies Research Patents (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 11)
These days, big research universities use their formidable powers for far more than teaching and scholarly inquiry. They invest in top scientists, create big labs, team up with companies and spawn commercial spinoffs. They and their scientists lure grants from foundations and federal agencies. The National Institutes of Health alone funded $20 billion of research at U.S. campuses last year. And big universities generate patents themselves. In 2002, they collected nearly $1.3 billion in royalties, according to the Association of University Technology Managers. Universities are fighting hard for exemption from outsiders' intellectual-property claims, at a time when many universities are also aggressively seeking and defending their own patents. In one prominent case, the University of Rochester sued drug maker G.D. Searle & Co., now owned by Pfizer Inc., arguing that the university's patents for blocking certain enzymes covered big-selling drugs including Celebrex. (Rochester's patents were declared invalid earlier this year by a U.S. appeals court.) Recent court rulings are already reverberating, as universities fear that patent holders will come out of the woodwork, demanding royalties and impeding research. Johns Hopkins says it has received at least eight letters since the verdict, from streaming-media outfits to biotech firms, claiming it infringes on patents. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, as a test, tried to track the possible patent infringement of one lab that has just a handful of scientists, who study rare ocular disease. Iowa had to contact 71 different people. It spent $24,000 just to do background checks and send letters to patent owners, none of whom asked for money.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2004/10/11/financial0934EDT0031.DTL

UI Enrollment Steady, While Private Colleges Increase (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 11)
Enrollment at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA held steady this year, while enrollments at Iowa's many private colleges increased significantly.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1227318

Physicians Magazine Scrapped by UIHC to Save Money (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 11)
There will be no more editions of the award-winning University Hospitals magazine that caters to physicians in Iowa and surrounding communities. The magazine, "Currents," which was published quarterly, has been canceled to cut costs at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA hospital, officials said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=1227199

Gronbeck: Few Politicians Have Coattails (Anchorage Daily News, Oct. 11)
It's been 40 years since Alaskans voted for a Democratic president, hopping on the landslide that kept Lyndon Johnson in the White House. Tony Knowles remembers the 1964 election well. It was the last time he voted for a Republican for president. Knowles again finds himself on the wrong side of the trend. As he seeks to be the first Democrat sent to Congress by Alaska in nearly 25 years, he's not getting any help from the top of the ticket. Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry may be a liability for Knowles, with the state likely to go strongly for President Bush. Certainly Knowles' Republican opponent, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, seems to think so, as she regularly reminds voters in advertisements and talks that Knowles shares the ticket with Kerry. She also frequently links Knowles to other prominent Democrats who are unpopular with Alaska conservatives, such as Sens. Ted Kennedy and Tom Daschle. But BRUCE GRONBECK, director of the University of Iowa's Center for Media Studies and Political Culture, said Knowles will benefit from a national trend away from both "coattails and spikes," in which state candidates get much less benefit or harm from the national ticket than in years past. "In most parts of the country, it seems that people are pretty able to run independent of others in the race," Gronbeck said. "The whole coattails notion disappeared after Reagan in 1980," he said. "The national trend is one of disconnect."
http://www.adn.com/front/story/5658627p-5590269c.html

UI Press Book Reviewed (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 10)
A review of "What You've Been Missing," published by UI Press, says that the painful situations described in these 10 stories lurk throughout life. Thoughtful people will find the reading profound; lesser minds will flee to romance novels. In the context of a culture whose constant advertising and TV bombardment offers fairy-tale idealizations of love and family life, this book is a refreshing elixir.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/10/10/RVGIJ7O93R1.DTL

UI Helps Set Hospitalist Trend in Health Care (New London Day, Oct. 10)
Admitted with a lung infection to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's hospital recently, Katie Kauffman never saw her regular physician, but was instead cared for by a new breed of doctor she hadn't heard of before: a hospitalist. Most patients won't learn about hospitalists until they end up in the care of one. But these specialists - whose sole responsibility is the care of hospitalized patients, from admission through discharge - constitute the fastest-growing field in medicine. Hospitalists coordinate care by all staffers from nurses to specialists, order up tests, make treatment decisions in consultation with primary care doctors, and are trained to recognize and respond quickly to changes in a patient's condition. Unlike attending physicians who train residents and often have their own medical practices, hospitalists spend all their time on care or administrative duties, and don't see outside patients or follow inpatients once they leave the hospital. The field's growth reflects efforts by hospitals to cut costs, reduce the alarming number of medical errors, and improve the general quality of care. Studies show patients cared for by hospitalists have a better chance of going home alive, with fewer complications that require readmission. At a number of large academic hospitals, hospitalists have reduced lengths of stay by more than 30 percent, and cut costs by 20 percent. At the University of Iowa's hospital, the hospitalist program saved more than $370,000 during its first year, ended June 2001, and had 450 fewer days of care compared with non-hospitalists, according to PETER KABOLI, assistant professor of general internal medicine. The Day is based in New London, Conn.
http://www.theday.com/eng/web/news/re.aspx?re=4AB142C2-1F81-4226-81CB-FA238F78E2D2

Watson: Opposites Don't Attract (Indianapolis Star, Oct. 9)
Few couples' differences are illustrated as overtly as Jeff and Mandy Sequin's. They've drawn a line -- quite literally. Down the middle of a game room. Jeff is a diehard Notre Dame fan; Mandy cheers for her alma mater, Ohio State. Overcoming a sports rivalry may be a fairly innocuous task in a marriage. Some differences are harder to deal with. Chuck Chamness and his wife, Briget Polichene Chamness, are members of opposing political parties. They're both active in politics, and at one point worked across the aisle from one another on Capitol Hill. Chuck, a Republican, is resigned to the fact that he'll never have a Republican wife. Briget doesn't see their political differences as a problem. "It can be more fun to talk with him about the presidential debates than (with) a room full of Democrats," she said. "Who wants to hear nothing but opinions of people who agree with you?"  Few, perhaps. But all that stuff about how opposites attract is nonsense, according to a study published in the Journal of Personality. Researchers studied 291 newlywed couples and found that most had similar personalities, intelligence, values and political and religious attitudes. "About the only issue where we found opposites were complementary was in the trait of introverting and extroverting," said DAVID WATSON, professor of psychology at the University of Iowa. "It's hard to have two people talking at the same time. Someone has to be quietly listening while the other one is gabbing."
http://www.indystar.com/articles/6/184799-5806-047.html

Arndt: Drug Rehab Services Needed for Elderly (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Oct. 9)
With rehabilitation efforts generally aimed at younger addicts, experts say most older users of cocaine, heroin, marijuana and other narcotics do not get the help they need, even though their health is more frail. Instead, they say, treatment services dismiss older addicts as beyond hope and unworthy of care. At the same time, family and friends frequently are in denial about their usage, regarding it as dementia, depression or simply a slip-up. Experts say most older addicts have used drugs for decades, though some turn to drugs late in life to ward off the boredom of retirement or cope with the deaths of spouses, friends and relatives. By 2020, 4.4 million older adults are expected to need treatment for substance abuse, according to a recent estimate by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and North Carolina's Research Triangle Institute. "We are on the crest of a wave coming up," said STEPHAN ARNDT, a University of Iowa psychiatry professor. "You've got two factors: The overall population is getting older, and then you've got all the baby boomers."
http://www.cleveland.com/living/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/living/1097321469121370.xml

Alumnus Started Blog While UI Law Student (The Ledger, Oct. 9)
Equal parts soapbox, confessional and church social, the blogs of religious folk are not easily categorized. On Monday, someone may post a lengthy exegesis of a favorite Bible passage, on Tuesday a political screed and on Wednesday, a picture of his cat. Blogs, or "Web logs," resemble personal Internet pages. But advances in computer technology are making such blogs public trading posts in the marketplace of ideas. Bloggers post comments on their pages instantaneously, provide links to articles and other Web sites, and hold running conversations between people on multiple continents. Like incense in a mammoth cathedral, religion permeates the blogosphere. Because this is an election year, it's only natural that many faith-based bloggers have gotten political. Take, for example, Jason Steffens, a 26-year-old lawyer in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He started his blog, june24.net, which he calls "Antioch Road," in December 2001, while a law student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. As a student, Steffens said, he devoted five to 20 hours a week to his blog. But with a newborn and a new job, his blogging time has been greatly reduced. The Ledger is based in Lakeland, Fla. This story also appeared on the Web site of the FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/living/religion/9867415.htm

Cohen to Consult with Tennessee Officials for Pharmacy College (The Tennessean, Oct. 9)
The Tennessee Higher Education Commission has hired a consultant to help decide if Tennessee needs two pharmacy schools or a single larger program with satellite offices. Dr. JORDAN COHEN, dean of the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy, will provide an outside perspective on whether East Tennessee State University in Johnson City should open a college of pharmacy, or the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis should add local satellite colleges. The Tennessean is based in Nashville. The same story also appeared on the Web site of the KNOXVILLE NEWS SENTINEL.
http://www.tennessean.com/education/archives/04/09/59337175.shtml?Element_ID=59337175

UI Studying St. Helen's Ash (Seattle Post Intelligencer, Oct. 9)
Bursts of ash and venting steam get all the glory, but truly, it's a not-ready-for-prime-time bulge that now holds much of scientists' attention. As Mount St. Helens yesterday continued to grumble and vent, portending possible eruption, scientists provided a glimpse into two working theories they think may be behind a dramatic rise, or bulge, in the restless volcano's lava dome. And it's mostly what's happening beneath the surface, they say, not in the limelight above, that's helping them to determine whether a potential eruption in the offing will be devious or more delicate. Or, in geoscience geek-speak terms: "explosive" or "extrusive." "Both things are possible," John Pallister, a U.S. Geological Survey volcanologist, said yesterday. The two hypothetical models scientists are studying both involve the rising of magma -- molten rock within St. Helens' plumbing they believe is making its way toward the crater's surface. "We know that it's down there," USGS volcanologist Jake Lowenstern said. "We just don't know how much or where it is." It's rising magma, scientists say, that's the likely culprit behind the ever-bulging dome and the mountain's recent restlessness. Since St. Helens reawakened Sept. 23, part of the roughly 1,000-foot lava dome -- which was built up over six years after the infamous eruption of 1980 -- has bulged at least 250 feet upward, scientists say. To help determine what's causing the new activity, ash samples have been sent to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for study.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/194481_sthelens09.html

Jones: Close Election Magnfies Possible Controversy (Baltimore Sun, Oct. 9)
Four years ago, the talk after the presidential election was about hanging chads. This November, it might be about bad code.  That would be computer code. With more and more Americans - including voters in Maryland - depending on computer programs to tally their votes, it would not be surprising if somewhere along the line the same type of glitch that occasionally keeps your home computer from booting up pops up in the polling process. And if it does, it is highly unlikely to be a little-noticed local problem. Next month's vote is shaping up to be the most scrutinized election in the country's history. In every one of the dozen or so battleground states, the election process will be subject to constant surveillance by both parties and a variety of other interest groups. Teams of lawyers are on standby, ready to jump in. When it's a close election, that magnifies all kinds of problems that are normally unnoticed," said DOUGLAS W. JONES, a computer scientist who specializes in election technology at the University of Iowa. "Because of that, we could have, at the same time, one of the most controversial and one of the best-run elections in our history."
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bal-pe.vote10oct10,1,2339972.story

IEM Accuracy Noted (National Review Online, Oct. 8)
In this article about the predictive nature of markets on the presidential election, it's noted that most election betting markets have George W. Bush as the favorite to win re-election.  Political futures contracts, traded in smaller size on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a website operated by the business school of the University of Iowa, have correctly predicted every presidential popular-vote winner since 1988.
http://www.nationalreview.com/nrof_luskin/luskin200410080821.asp

Ferguson To Appear At Arthritis Camp (Mobile Register, Oct. 8)
Camp M*A*S*H (Make Arthritis Stop Hurting), a free day camp for children with arthritis and their families, will be held from Oct. 23 at Hickory Grove Lodge in Mobile. The camp, sponsored by the Arthritis Foundation, Alabama Chapter and the Infirmary Foundation, will feature canoes, kayaks, horseback riding, ropes course, skeet shooting, the Mobile Ballet, arts and crafts with the VSA of Alabama and more. Camp M*A*S*H will also feature educational sessions with experts in the field of juvenile arthritis and nutrition, including DR. POLLY FERGUSON, pediatric rheumatologist, and assistant professor of pediatrics, University of Iowa, as well as other specialists and motivational speakers. The newspaper serves Mobile, Ala.
http://www.al.com/news/mobileregister/index.ssf?/base/news/1097226973123690.xml

Alumnus Opens Orthodontics Office (Springfield News Leader, Oct. 8)
Dr. Kevin Austin, who recently opened an orthodontic office in Nixa, Mo., completed his two-year residency at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, earning a certificate in orthodontics and a master's degree.
http://springfield.news-leader.com/business/today/1008-Nixaorthod-196492.html

Alumna Promoted (Dover Community News, Oct. 8)
Dr. Lisa R. Ehrlich has been promoted to the position of assistant vice president at Measured Progress, an educational assessment company. Ehrlich is leading the team providing management support and oversight for the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS), a large-scale assessment contract awarded this spring to the company. Ehrlich earned master of arts and doctorate degrees in instructional design, with a minor in educational measurement, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper serves Dover, Del.
http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/dover/d10_8biz.htm

Palestinian Author Attended UI (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 8)
Palestinian novelist Sahar Khalifeh's seventh book has just been translated into German from Arabic and published by Zurich-based Unionsverlag as "Die Verheissung" ("The Promise"; an English translation is in the works). Along with the works of numerous other Arab authors, it is one of the publisher's featured books at this year's Frankfurt Book Fair, which, instead of its usual focus on a single country, is showcasing the vastly diverse literature and culture of the Arab world. She has a doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109717990361839527-search,00.html?collection=autowire%2F30day&vql_string=%27university+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

UI Study Examined Alzheimer's Patients (Hamilton Spectator Oct. 8)
Even after Alzheimer's disease is diagnosed, experts say, many older people with the condition continue to drive. But a study released last month suggests that their driving ability should be carefully scrutinized. Writing in the journal Neurology, the researchers said they found that even people in the early stages of the disease were much more liable to make navigation and safety errors while driving. The researchers, led by DR. MATTHEW RIZZO of the University of Iowa, compared the performances of 32 drivers with mild Alzheimer's, all of whom were regularly on the road, with those of 136 older adults with no known neurological problems. Physically, the Alzheimer's patients were as capable of driving as were the other drivers. The problems arose when the drivers with Alzheimer's were told to follow an assigned route. More than 70 per cent of them made at least one wrong turn. That was more than three times the rate for the other group of drivers, the study said. About the same percentage also made driving mistakes such as veering out of their lane. The newspaper is based in Ontario, Canada.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=1bd73ccc11959bde3c16f25f3467149d&_docnum=28&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVA&_md5=9bc9ced8be367e0c9bf85ce49608ff47

Alumna To Serve On ABA Executive Council (Arizona Business Gazette, Oct. 7)
Heidi McNeil Staudenmaier, a partner at Snell & Wilmer, was elected to a four-year term on the executive council of the American Bar Association's business law section, of which she will be chairwoman of the strategic planning committee. She has a B.A. in journalism and broadcasting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and she received a J.D. from the University of Iowa in 1985.
http://www.azcentral.com/abgnews/articles/1007lawrail07.html

Alumnus Named Planning Director (Kansas City Star, Oct. 7)
After serving as interim Johnson County planning director for 22 months, Dean Palos received the permanent job Wednesday of guiding growth in the unincorporated region of the county. Palos has taught planning and urban design courses at the University of Kansas and the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He received his bachelor's degree in sociology in 1970 and a master's degree in urban and regional planning in 1972 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He earned a master's degree in urban design in 1986 from KU. A similar story appeared Oct. 7 in the KANSAS CITY BUSINESS JOURNAL.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/local/9854648.htm

Columnist Questions NADS Grant (MetroWest Daily News, Oct. 7)
A columnist wonders why the government puts a higher priority on research than action when it comes to curbing the number of drunken drivers on the road. Since 1998 in Massachusetts, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the number of deaths in alcohol-related accidents has increased. In 2002, a record 221 people died. These numbers, again, do not count those who receive serious injuries or account for the families left behind. In the midst of this carnage -- in the midst of our federal, state, and local inability, apparently, to deal well and effectively with the issue, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (ironically, the department that is keeping the mortality numbers) recently awarded the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA $2.9 million for their Advanced Driving Simulator, as part of a three-year project that will eventually cost $5.1 million, according to MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving.) According to MADD, the government will fund research on the influence of alcohol on driver performance and behavior. Perhaps instead the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration should be forced by victims of drunk driving accidents to merely look at, and truly understand, their own statistics. Perhaps they should interview the victims of drunk driving accidents. Perhaps they should talk to the broken families left behind. They could, instead, listen to the stories to find out all they need to know about a drunk driver's performance and behavior. The newspaper is based in the metro Boston area.
http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/columnists/view.bg?articleid=79890

UI Hospitalist Program Highlighted (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 6)
Admitted with a lung infection to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's hospital recently, Katie Kauffman never saw her regular physician, but was instead cared for by a new breed of doctor she hadn't heard of before: a hospitalist. Most patients won't learn about hospitalists until they end up in the care of one. But these specialists -- whose sole responsibility is the care of hospitalized patients, from admission through discharge -- constitute the fastest-growing field in medicine. Studies show patients cared for by hospitalists have a better chance of going home alive, with fewer complications that require readmission. At a number of large academic hospitals, hospitalists have reduced lengths of stay by more than 30%, and cut costs by 20%. Managed-care companies, including Aetna Inc. and Cigna Corp. have also endorsed the use of hospitalists. At the University of Iowa's hospital, the hospitalist program saved more than $370,000 during its first year, ended June 2001, and had 450 fewer days of care compared with non-hospitalists, according to PETER KABOLI, assistant professor of general internal medicine. A version of this article also appeared Oct. 6 in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109700758634336919,00.html

Berg Comments On IEM Accuracy (CNBC, Oct. 6)
Following the vice presidential debate on Tuesday, the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) were mostly unchanged, but George W. Bush's lead in the IEM had narrowed against John Kerry since the first presidential debate. JOYCE BERG, IEM co-director and associate professor of accounting in the UI's Tippie College of Business, said that since 1988, the IEM has been 75 percent more accurate in predicting the outcome of the presidential election compared to opinion polls. The average margin of error in the IEM is about 1.4 percent she added. CNBC has been tracking IEM prices regularly during the presidential campaign. (No Link Available)

UI Capital Campaign Cited (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 6)
The 23 American universities that are seeking to raise at least $1-billion collected a total of $548.3-million in gifts and pledges during the last month for which they had data available. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has raised $760.2-million as of September 15 (increase of $9.3-million in the last month); the goal is $1-billion by 2005.
http://chronicle.com/prm/daily/2004/10/2004100607n.htm

Lutz Comments on Crying at Work (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 6)
In an article about women crying at work, TOM LUTZ, an English professor at the University of Iowa and author of "Crying: A Natural and Cultural History of Tears" (W.W. Norton & Co.), says if women cry more than men, it is due mostly to social conditioning. "I think the cultural forces at work are much more powerful than the biological ones," Lutz says. Social rules govern which group can cry for what reason, he says, so that in the U.S., "men are expected to cry more often from pride, for instance, than women are, but men are never supposed to cry from frustration, while women can. "Tears are often are a "sign of submission," Lutz notes. "Since women are conditioned to be more subservient than men, they are `allowed' to cry more often." As females become less subservient, Lutz believes, the frequency of female crying changes. To stop unwanted tears, Lutz says women should "refuse to accept the social role that makes crying appropriate." The article also appeared in the SUN-SENTINEL based in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/women/chi-0410060042oct06,1,5701503.story?coll=chi-leisurewomannews-hed

UI Study Examines Boot Camp Virus (Seattle Times, Oct. 6)
The Defense Department is speeding up development of a vaccine to thwart a virus striking 1 in 10 recruits, Dr. William Winkenwerder Jr., assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, said yesterday. Winkenwerder said he is unaware of any widespread problems within the eight largest basic-training centers where outbreaks have been centered. He said doctors have established the nation's most comprehensive adenovirus-virus tracking system, but efforts are limited to the military. He said he thinks the virus also thrives outside the military, such as in college dormitories, and said a study launched this year through the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA could show the virus is the culprit behind civilian deaths attributed to other causes.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2002055317_virus06m.html

Testing Hours Cut (WQAD-TV, Oct. 6)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA program that allows students with disabilities to take exams at arranged times is cutting its hours. Program officials say the university's Alternative Exam Services made the changes because of a university-wide budget crunch. The program's director says about fourteen hundred arranged tests are given each year. Roughly 600 students with physical and mental disabilities who are registered with Student Disability Services take the tests. Testing is no longer available on Thursday. Hours testing is offered other weekdays also has been cut. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2391867

Cochran Comments on Depression (News 8, Oct. 6)
About 6 million men in the United States are diagnosed with depression each year. While women are twice as likely as men to be diagnosed with the illness, some researchers say many men suffer in silence because of society's stigmas and stereotypes. Medications and talk therapy are the two of the most common treatments for depression. Some ways to help men seek these successful treatments include confrontation and spousal intervention. SAM COCHRAN, Ph.D., from the University of Iowa, says the best way to convince a man to get help is to simply confront him. "Hit it head-on, you know, say, 'I am worried about how you are feeling or how you are. You have been under a lot of emotional stress lately,'" he said.
News 8 is based in Austin, Texas.
http://www.news8austin.com/content/headlines/?ArID=121278&SecID=2

Judge Denies Dismissing Charges in Fatal Crash (WQAD-TV, Oct. 6)
A judge in Iowa has refused to dismiss charges against a man accused in an accident that killed a northern Illinois woman last year.Twenty-one-year-old Thomas Eldridge of West Des Moines is charged with vehicular homicide. He's accused of hitting and killing 20-year Amanda Skolnick of Woodstock, Ill. Skolnick died in September of 2003. She was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Police say Eldridge had been smoking marijuana before the accident. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2390571

Lewis-Beck Explains Election Forecast (Liberation, Oct. 5)
MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK writes about forecasting the November 2004 U.S. Presidential election. He notes that at a recent meeting, six out of seven political scientists presented election forecasts predicting a Bush victory. The "odd man out" was the Lewis-Beck and Tien (LBT) forecast, which predicted a Kerry win, with 50.1 percent. The article discusses why the LBT forecast differs from the others, and whether it might be right. Liberation is a daily newspaper in France. This article is written in French.
http://www.liberation.fr/page.php?Article=243502

Sidel Comments on Shatner Riverside Hoax (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 5)
In an op-ed article, MARK SIDEL, UI professor of law, compares William Shatner's hoax in Riverside to the laudable and philanthropic actions of other favorite sons and daughters who have returned to their Midwestern hometowns, such as Johnny Carson and Bill Kurtis.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/oped/chi-0410050212oct05,1,949620.story?coll=chi-newsopinioncommentary-hed

Schulz-Stubner Uses Hypnosis For Patient Pain Relief (News 14, Oct. 5)
Hypnosis often brings up thoughts of people clucking like a chicken. In the health area, it's often used to help people quit smoking. Now an anesthesiologist is using it to help his patients who struggle through numerous drugs and therapies without getting relief. University of Iowa anesthesiologist SEBASTIAN SCHULZ-STUBNER uses hypnosis to ease chronic pain. "Hypnosis is effective probably in the range of 65 to 70 percent." News 14 is based in Raleigh, N.C.
http://rdu.news14.com/content/headlines/?ArID=56284&SecID=2

Watson: Hands-Free Cellphones Aren't Safer (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 5)
Recent studies have shown that driving while talking on a hands-free cellphone may not significantly improve safety. GINGER WATSON, coauthor of one of the studies at the University of Iowa, said the results suggest that using hands-free devices may not be safer.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-wheel5oct05,1,3306665.story?coll=la-headlines-california

McCrory Explains IEM (Boston Herald, Oct. 5)
Opinion polls are a dime a dozen. If you really want to know who's ahead in the presidential race, look instead at the presidential election futures market. These are operating in Iowa City, Iowa, Dublin and London, and they all say one thing: President Bush remains ahead. But his lead has collapsed since the debate. The markets give him a 58 percent chance of winning the popular vote. A week ago, when Kerry looked dead in the water, that was 74 percent. How do the markets work? A trader buys and sells contracts that pay out $1 if his guy wins. How much the trader is prepared to pay reflects estimates of the probability. "Studies show we're more accurate than the polls 75 percent of the time," says GEORGE MCCRORY, spokesman for the University of Iowa's Electronics Market. "If you have money in a market you're going to be making more informed decisions than if you're just randomly called in a poll," he says. McCrory is misidentified as George McCurry in the article.
http://business.bostonherald.com/businessNews/view.bg?articleid=47454

Reitz: Bush Following Gore IEM Pattern From 2000 (Bloomberg News, Oct. 5)
President George W. Bush's lead over John Kerry in futures markets shrank by almost two-thirds after their debate last week. Bush led by 12.5 percentage points on the Iowa Electronic Markets, a non-profit political betting system. The Republican incumbent was 34 points ahead of Kerry, his Democratic challenger, the day before the Sept. 30 presidential debate. In 2000, then-Vice President Al Gore lost a 38-point lead over Bush in futures trading on the Iowa market after the first debate. The day of the November 2000 election, Bush held a 66- point advantage over Gore. "The pattern is the same as 2000," said THOMAS RIETZ, a professor at the University of Iowa who helps run the futures market. "2000 says it's not unprecedented" that a candidate would lose a lead in a few weeks, he said.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=aXyqGBf.h4_0&refer=us

UI Freshman Comments On Deceased Classmate (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 5)
Neuqua Valley High School on Monday mourned the sudden death of a popular student-athlete whose passion for basketball was exceeded only by his Christian faith. Roosevelt Jones, 17, collapsed and died Sunday evening while playing a five-on-five pickup game in the Neuqua Valley gymnasium. Brian Andonian, 18, co-captain of the varsity basketball team last year, recalled that Jones led the team in a short prayer before games. "It was really hard not to be touched by the things Rosie said and did," said Andonian, a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I'm sure he is resting quite well in heaven."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/nearwest/chi-0410050341oct05,1,5314146.story?coll=chi-newslocalnearwest-hed

Forkenbrock Studies Fees for Miles Driving Tax (Houston Chronicle, Oct. 4)
Paying your road taxes in the future might depend more on how much you drive than how much gasoline you pump. Texas is among a group of states researching how to replace the fuel tax with a fee based on the number of miles traveled - making every road a virtual tollway. Transportation officials from across the world discussed the concept here at last month's annual meetings of the trade groups representing the highway and tollway industries. Fees for miles traveled would be measured by Global Positioning System receivers embedded in vehicles. The system would track which roads a motorist uses so the virtual tolls could be distributed to the appropriate agency. Each jurisdiction could set its own per-mile fee. Data would be downloaded from vehicles monthly for billing, or could be transmitted at service stations in lieu of the gas tax. DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the University of Iowa Public Policy Center, has been working on a model for four years. His research is funded by 15 states, including Texas, and the Federal Highway Administration. As more hybrid and alternative-power vehicles are built, Forkenbrock said, gas-tax collections will suffer. "A tax at the point of purchase is inferior to user charges at the exact point of travel," he said, explaining the growth of toll roads in recent years.
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/metropolitan/2828417

Ault: Doctors Must Communicate HPV Results Better (American Medical News, Oct. 4)
Human papillomavirustesting has become more commonplace, but women's health experts are beginning to recognize that the increase in the test's frequency has outpaced many physicians' ability to communicate what it means. The September/October CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians featured a review article and accompanying editorial exploring these communication challenges. The authors highlighted the need for better patient education, preferably before a physician orders the test, and the development of shared decision-making tools to address patients' lack of knowledge. "It's a very difficult concept to get across to patients, and it's even a very fuzzy concept to physicians involved," said KEVIN AULT, associate professor of obstetrics-gynecology and epidemiology at the University of Iowa.
http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2004/10/11/hlsc1011.htm

IEM is Oldest Election Futures Market (Washington Times, Oct. 4)
There are several sites on the Web where real money can be bet on the election. The oldest is the Iowa Electronic Market at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It was originally set up to teach students about futures markets, but it is now used by political professionals to see what markets say about their candidates. Lately, they have shown Mr. Bush with a 2-to-1 lead over Mr. Kerry.
http://washingtontimes.com/commentary/20041003-113914-4176r.htm

IEM Successful Thanks to Collective Intelligence (Sydney Morning Herald, Oct. 4)
If you want to know who's likely to win next Saturday's federal election, don't consult the polls or ask an expert - ask a bookie. Of all the ways of predicting election results, the odds bookies quote on election eve are the most accurate. It may sound like superstition or just casual observation but there's actually a fair bit of science behind it, as research by economists and psychologists is demonstrating.What it's saying is that there's such a thing as "collective intelligence" whereby the average guess of the group is more reliable than the opinion of some great expert. The practical exploitation of the idea that punters' betting carried valuable information was pioneered by academics at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's business school. Their now well-known (but still small) Iowa Electronic Markets are online, real-money futures markets allowing you to make the equivalent of a bet on various future events, including elections. The IEM, too, has a most impressive forecasting record, though it erred in predicting that George Dubya would win the popular vote as well as the presidency in 2000. The market outperformed the polls in nine out of 15 cases.
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/10/03/1096741897547.html?oneclick=true

Alumnae Named to UW-GB Professorship (Green Bay Press Gazette, Oct. 4)
Professor Cheryl Grosso, a long-time member of the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, has been named to the Frankenthal Professorship. She will officially assume the title on Jan. 1. Grosso earned a doctorate in musical arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.gogreenbay.com/page.html?article=127887

UI Award Winning Book Shows Deft Writing (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 3)
In "Here Beneath Low-Flying Planes," a collection of short stories by Merrill Feitell, what catches your attention happens just under the surface. A deft writer of emotion, Feitell painstakingly renders moments of tension and transition in the lives of her characters. The book received the prestigious Iowa Short Fiction award from the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, and it is easy to see why other writers such as Michael Chabon and Charles Baxter like Feitell's stories. Readers will like them, too, but they might find themselves doing a little work to get there. The book is published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/10/03/RVGIJ7O8TE1.DTL

Alumnae Publishes Short Stories with UI Press (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 3)
When Janet Desaulniers was 25, her writing professor approached her after reading some of her work and encouraged her to send it to The New Yorker, then considered the Holy Grail of new fiction. "I was terrified of sending it, but told my professor I had," she says. "Then he kept asking me what the editors had said, and I kept lying until finally I just sent the story in. And they published it." All these years later, Desaulniers can't hold back a triumphant chuckle as she recalls that early triumph. "It was literally a dream come true," she says. "I just imagine all the magazine editors standing around the speaker phone when they called me, waiting to hear the 'clunk' when I fell on the floor in shock." It was the start of a marathon writing career, with high points (a master of fine arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, literary fellowships from the James A. Michener/Copernicus Society and the National Endowment for the Arts, a Pushcart Prize) and low moments (she walked away from a contract with longtime champion Knopf after finding she didn't have it in her to finish a book).  Today, "What You've Been Missing" has found a new publisher (the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS) and Desaulniers has found a new fulfillment in her writing. "This is a much better book than if I'd put it out earlier," she says.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/booksmags/chi-0410020085oct03,1,6758236.story

IEM Favors Bush (Las Vegas Review Journal, Oct. 3)
The betting public is laying odds President Bush, a leading opponent of casinos, will be re-elected in a landslide. Futures players using the Iowa Electronic Market are betting 3-to-1 Bush will slam Sen. John Kerry on Nov. 2. So far, 2,800 traders have bought $290,000 in futures contracts, or wagered legally, on the IWeb site operated by faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, about in line with past betting on presidential politics, a spokesman said. Post-debate bets on the offshore Olympic sports book, however, showed a significant erosion in the odds favoring Bush.
http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2004/Oct-03-Sun-2004/business/24889007.html

FBI Book's Author Attended UI (Nashua Telegraph, Oct. 3)
A few years after her father's death, author Maura Conlon-McIvor began navigating the bureaucracy necessary to extricate his personnel files from his old employer, the FBI. Her search for the man who came home every day to her family's Southern California home in his black FBI car, golden cartridge cases still strewn across the trunk, is at the core of Conlon-McIvor's new memoir, "FBI Girl: How I Learned to Crack My Father's Code." Conlon-McIvor's path to her memoir was an unlikely one. She majored in communications at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, then decamped for New York City, where she spent a brief period working at The New Yorker and at travel magazines. The Telegraph is based in Nashua, NH. This story also appeared in the OCALA (FL) STAR BANNER.
http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041003/BOOKS/210030363

Iowa City, UI Revel in Writing (Indianapolis Star, Oct. 3)
A travel writer says that Iowa City is an excellent base for exploring east-central Iowa. The city's population is only 62,000, but that increases by 29,000 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students during the school year. The college -- home of the Hawkeyes -- sits astride the Iowa River, and the gold-domed building that once was the territorial capitol dominates the old campus. The university is home to the famed Iowa Writers' Workshop, where Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Philip Roth and John Cheever have taught and whose graduates have included Wallace Stegner and Flannery O'Connor. Small wonder that the city takes pride in its literary heritage. Look down while strolling Iowa Avenue between Clinton and Gilbert streets just off campus and you'll see that you're on Literary Walk. Embedded in the pavement are quotes from 49 well-known writers with Iowa ties, including W.P. Kinsella, who wrote "Shoeless Joe," which became "Field of Dreams."
http://www.indystar.com/articles/4/183594-3454-051.html

Gray Heads Adenovirus Research Program (Duluth News Tribune, Oct. 2)
More than three decades ago, the Pentagon created two pills to ward off a lethal virus infecting boot-camp recruits. But defense officials abandoned the program in 1996 as too expensive. Now recruits are dying, thousands are falling ill, and the military is desperately racing to bring back a vaccine it once owned. A top Pentagon official called it "a major screw-up," hobbling U.S. efforts to rapidly deploy troops abroad. The respiratory virus now infects up to 2,500 service members monthly - a staggering 1 in 10 recruits - in the nation's eight basic-training centers, an analysis of military health-care records shows. Since the oral vaccinations stopped, the flu-like germ, adenovirus, is associated with the deaths of at least six recruits, four within the past year, according to military records and internal reports. GREGORY GRAY, who had set up the boot-camp tracking system for the germ, now is spearheading the nation's most ambitious civilian studies of adenovirus, at the University of Iowa. He has a $2.8.million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to collect adenovirus samples over three years. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the SEATTLE TIMES, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, KANSAS CITY STAR, CENTRE DAILY TIMES (PA), BILOXI SUN HERALD, BRADENTON HERALD, MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS, MACON TELEGRAPH, MONTEREY COUNTY (CA) HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO (CA) TRIBUNE, and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/news/nation/9820795.htm

Law Alumnus Publishes Christian Blog (Charlotte Observer, Oct. 2)
Since this is an election year, many faith-based bloggers have gotten political. Take, for example, Jason Steffens, a 26-year-old lawyer in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He started his blog, june24.net, which he calls "Antioch Road," in December 2001, while a law student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. As a student, Steffens devoted five to 20 hours per week to his blog. But with a newborn and a new job, he says his blogging time has been reduced. Steffens said in an e-mail that he is one of the few "Christian bloggers who does not mind being called a `fundamentalist.' "
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/living/religion/9816562.htm?1c

Bush's Futures-Market Lead Similar to Gore's in 2000 (Bloomberg, Oct. 1)
George Bush's lead over John Kerry in futures markets before this year's first presidential debate was similar to the advantage that Al Gore commanded four years ago.  Bush, the Republican incumbent, was ahead by 34 percentage points on the Iowa Electronic Markets in advance of his initial encounter with Kerry, his Democratic challenger. In 2000, Bush trailed then-Vice President Gore by 38 points after the first debate. Bush futures then began to rise. On the day of the November election, the contracts were priced at 83 while Gore futures traded at 17. ``Things happen over the course of the election that change people's opinions and produce a swing that reverses the prices,'' said THOMAS REITZ, a professor of finance at the University of Iowa's business school who helps run the market.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=aqyPvzxMfyTo&refer=us

Interest in IEM Increasing (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 1)
Investors' intense focus on the election is reflected in the burgeoning interest in markets run by the University of Iowa and by TradeSports, of Dublin, Ireland, which offer futures based on President George Bush's and Sen. John Kerry's chances of winning. University of Iowa Prof. THOMAS RIETZ says interest in the Iowa political markets has "cranked up this election," with volume this September more than five times what it was in September 2000.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109658693373433192-search,00.html?collection=autowire%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

Hornbuckle Comments on Teflon Chemical (Seattle Times, Oct. 1)
Industry, university and government scientists are hard at work trying to solve a mystery: How do PFOA (a chemical used to make Teflon) and other perfluorochemicals get into people to begin with?  Could it be from the water? The air? Dust from vacuuming stain-resistant carpets? Suddenly, it's a hot research topic. In the past three years, journals publishing papers on perfluorochemicals have grown tenfold, to nearly 50, according to the journal Environmental Science & Technology. "Scientists are way behind," said KERI HORNBUCKLE, a University of Iowa engineering professor. "We're scurrying to figure out all the chemical pathways that these chemicals go through."
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2002050937_teflon01.html

Gronbeck Comments on Kerry (Boston Globe, Oct. 1)
For 90 minutes last night, Senator John F. Kerry tried to make political gains by reviving a strategy that helped him in the 2004 Democratic debates and primaries: castigating the president on Bush's signature issue, national security, while pledging to be a stronger commander in chief, the essence of Kerry's "bring it on" mantra challenging Bush. “Kerry won the nomination because he convinced voters in Iowa, then New Hampshire, then the rest of the country that he was best suited to be president, and that he was best suited to take on Bush at a time of war," said BRUCE GRONBECK, director of the University of Iowa Center for Media Studies and Political Culture. "Kerry didn't land any knockout punches at the primary debates. He wasn't especially hard-hitting. He just convinced people that in a field of nine or 10, he was the best."
http://www.boston.com/news/politics/debates/articles/2004/10/01/kerry_stays_focused_projects_strength/

IEM Trading Heavy (Reuters, Sept. 30)
Online futures traders betting that President Bush will win reelection have trimmed their wagers heading into his first debate between Bush and challenger Sen. John Kerry Thursday evening, though the markets are still leaning heavily toward the incumbent. The Iowa Electronic Markets winner-takes-all contract for a Bush victory in the presidential contest traded on Thursday to show a 68.4 percent probability of Bush prevailing, while the Kerry contract showed a 34.5 percent probability. The Bush contract had traded as high as 74.2 cents on Monday, well above the lead most polls have given the president heading into the final month of the election. Altogether, the volume in the Iowa winner-takes-all futures during September has been three times what it was in the 2000 election, said TOM RIETZ, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, which runs the exchange. On Wednesday more than 20,000 Bush and Kerry contracts traded.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=reutersEdge&storyID=6382483

FBI Book’s Author Attended UI (CNN.com, Sept. 30)
A few years after her father's death, author Maura Conlon-McIvor began navigating the bureaucracy necessary to extricate his personnel files from his old employer, the FBI. Her search for the man who came home every day to her family's Southern California home in his black FBI car, golden cartridge cases still strewn across the trunk, is at the core of Conlon-McIvor's new memoir, "FBI Girl: How I Learned to Crack My Father's Code." Conlon-McIvor's path to her memoir was an unlikely one. She majored in communications at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, then decamped for New York City, where she spent a brief period working at The New Yorker and at travel magazines.
http://www.cnn.com/2004/SHOWBIZ/books/09/30/books.fbigirl.ap/

Colangelo: Bright Students Often Left Behind (Education Week, Sept. 29)
A report by a group of experts on gifted education makes an impassioned plea for schools to allow exceptionally bright children to skip grades, start school early, or take other steps to push ahead their learning. "Those of us who do research in this field have been very aware of the fact that, despite the research on the positive effects of acceleration, it's just not translating to practice," said NICHOLAS COLANGELO, a co-author of the report, "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students." The two-volume study, released on Sept. 20, includes a layman's version and a more detailed research report that corrals evidence for the group's assertions. Mr. Colangelo and his two co-authors identify 18 different strategies schools can use to help speed up the usual learning progression for academically gifted learners. They range from relatively rare practices, such as grade skipping, to more popular strategies such as Advanced Placement courses for high school students. Yet, for the most part, the report maintains, general educators often resist making adaptations for their smartest students, even though research suggests that doing so is effective. Mr. Colangelo said some of educators' reluctance to allow bright students to accelerate their learning beyond that of their peers comes from their philosophical beliefs about equity. And he said that is the case even when teachers are familiar with research findings that support acceleration. "It's one of those issues where attitude trumps evidence," said Mr. Colangelo, who is also an education professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City.
http://www.edweek.org/ew/ewstory.cfm?slug=05Gifted.h24

Colangelo, Assouline Co-Author Report (Rocky Mountain News, Sept. 25)
The Templeton Foundation has published a valuable introduction to a much neglected subject, the educational acceleration of gifted students. The authors of "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students" are NICHOLAS COLANGELO and SUSAN G. ASSOULINE of the University of Iowa and Miraca U.M. Gross of the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. The title, the authors admit, is provocative, but they stand behind it. "Deceiving our brightest students is no longer defensible," they say.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/cda/article_print/0,1983,DRMN_86_3208250_ARTICLE-DETAIL-PRINT,00.html

Colangelo: Give Bright Students More Challenges (Fox News, Sept. 24)
Accelerating the best students helps them intellectually and socially, says "A Nation Deceived", a new report from the University of Iowa. The Des Moines Register reports that a new University of Iowa report seeks to debunk myths that accelerated learning for gifted students is unfair, expensive for schools and causes students to be social outcasts, gifted-education experts said Monday. "If the work is not challenging for these high-ability kids, they will become invisible," says the lead author of the report, Iowa education professor NICHOLAS COLANGELO. "We will lose them. We already are." A version of the story also ran on the website of the JEWISH WORLD REVIEW.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,133519,00.html

 

 

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