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UI in the News

November, 2004

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Colangelo Discusses Gifted Children (Charleston Post and Courier, Nov. 30)
Even before the workshop started, parents were talking about the decisions they made for their gifted children. One mother talked with another parent about moving her daughter from second to third grade. Even with the support she had, she said some people felt she was pushing her child. The other parent had his own concerns about his daughter losing her love for math because her math classes were too easy for her. What NICHOLAS COLANGELO Colangelo told parents at the workshop Monday night was that acceleration is not about hurrying a child but about giving kids what they are ready for and not denying them more fast-paced and complex material. Colangelo, a professor at the University of Iowa, is director of the Connie Belin & Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development. He spoke to about 50 parents as part of the three-day S.C. Consortium for Gifted Education conference that began Monday at Charleston Place Hotel. The "Think Gifted" conference drew more than 750 educators of the gifted and talented. The Post and Courier is based in Charleston, SC.
http://www.charleston.net/stories/113004/loc_30gift.shtml

Keel Defines New Eating Disorder (New York Times, Nov. 30)
Another candidate for a new eating disorder in the fifth edition of the manual can be thought of as the flip side of binge eating, a condition that has been labeled "purging disorder" by Dr. PAMELA KEEL, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Iowa. Just as binge eating disorder has many of the characteristics of bulimia, so does purging disorder. But neither meets the strict criteria for bulimia nervosa. People with purging disorder, Dr. Keel said, are of normal weight, and they purge after eating normal or even small amounts of food. Right now, purging disorder is relatively hidden, buried in the Eating Disorder Not Specified category. And until the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual panelists ask for more data, as they have for binge eating disorder, not much more will be known, Dr. Keel said. "Within widely used diagnostic interviews, if a person has never had a low weight and denies a history of binge eating, the interviewer skips all questions regarding the use of vomiting, laxatives or diuretics to control weight," Dr. Keel wrote in an e-mail message. "It's very difficult to learn more about a problem if you never ask any questions about it." This story also appeared on the Web site of the Spartanburg (NC) Herald Journal.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/30/health/psychology/30eat.html

Brokaw Attended UI (Alameda Times Star, Nov. 30)
This Wednesday, Tom Brokaw signs off for the last time as anchor of the "NBC Nightly News." It's noted that Brokaw was a radio DJ  and then newscaster in the late 1950s, and entered the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but was in and out of classes while majoring in "co-eds and beer."
http://www.timesstar.com/Stories/0,1413,125~1549~2566710,00.html

UI Meth Research Cited (about.com, Nov. 30)
People who use or abuse methamphetamine, or meth, do not necessarily need specialized treatment but do need more time in intensive outpatient or residential drug treatment than currently occurs. A multidisciplinary team of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers made the recommendation in a review article that appeared in the April 2003 issue of the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. The team also identified areas of research that could help improve treatment, including retention and new drug therapies.
http://alcoholism.about.com/cs/meth/a/bliowa030814.htm

Writer's Workshop is One Model for British Writing Programs (Christian Science Monitor, Nov. 30)
A story about the increase in the number of universities offering poetry classes in Britain points out that much of the current thinking about creative writing stems from the United States. For instance, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA offers a renowned writing program with a worldwide reputation. Many institutions in Britain are modeling their programs around what is found in America.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/1130/p13s01-legn.html

Alumnus Choreographs Chinese Ballet (The Guardian UK, Nov. 30)
Chinese cinema has come up with the perfect way to make violence look beautiful: by setting fights in a bamboo forest. Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon saw Chow Yun Fat and Zhang Ziyi show off their swordplay while balancing impossibly on stems of bamboo. Zhang Yimou's Hero, another wuxia (meaning "martial arts chivalry") epic, similarly set its combatants sailing over bamboo-tops, while his latest wuxia, House of Flying Daggers, released next month, promises another stunning bamboo forest fray. But it isn't just in the cinema that bamboo is an inspiration. It also forms the backdrop to the latest work by Taiwan's Cloud Gate Dance Theatre, Bamboo Dream. Cloud Gate's director, Lin Hwai-min, has a simple reason for choosing the plant as his theme: it grows in abundance outside his studio, on the outskirts of Taipei. Back in 1999, when Lin was asked to come up with a title for his next show, the answer was right before his eyes. At the helm is Lin, a former writer who, while studying at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the late 1960s, took dance classes with Martha Graham and Merce Cunningham, the pillars of modern dance. On returning to the Taiwan Political University he was invited to join its dance faculty, and his first students became the founding members of the company.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/features/story/0,11710,1362362,00.html

Fisher Tax Breaks Study Noted (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 29)
A 94-year-old auto factory, where the original Willys Jeep that took U.S. soldiers to war was produced, is at the center of a legal battle over the tax breaks used by dozens of states to attract employers. Back in 1998, DaimlerChrysler AG was considering shutting the Toledo, Ohio, factory. To keep the plant open, the city and state offered the auto maker a $280 million tax break in exchange for a $1.2 billion plan to expand the complex. Then a group spearheaded by consumer advocate Ralph Nader filed a lawsuit attacking the package as illegal "corporate welfare." State and local governments have long used tax breaks to draw factories from other places in order to create jobs. Critics of the breaks cite studies showing that tax incentives don't figure as prominently in business-location decisions as geography or the availability of labor. A two-year study tracking such decisions by PETER FISHER, a University of  Iowa  professor of urban and regional planning, found that in many instances tax breaks provided incentives "to a firm that would have relocated there anyway."
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB110168708121085220-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

Campus Minister Comments on Debt (Times Record, Nov. 28)
Studies show that the average American family charges about $1,200 on their credit cards during the holidays, which takes up to six months to pay off. During this time of increased materialism and growing debt, many spiritual leaders say that guidance on finances may be found among religious teachings. "There are more actual references to money in the Bible than to anything else," said Kevin Kummer, a campus minister at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. According to Kummer, many laws regarding taxes, bankruptcy and finances are taken from spiritual teachings found in Christian, Jewish and Muslim texts. The newspaper is based in Ft. Smith, Ark.
http://www.swtimes.com/archive/2004/November/28/features/beware_of_debt.html

Author Studied at UI (RedNova.com, Nov. 28)
 "The Middle Mind: Why Americans Don't Think For Themselves" by Curtis White is reviewed in this essay. Working under Merle Brown at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the 1970s, White was trained in the close reading of texts, and came to appreciate the importance of reflecting long and deeply on a poem or any work of literature or art in order for it to reveal its "power and suggestiveness."
http://www.rednova.com/news/display/?id=106634

Brokaw to Retire (Seattle Times, Nov. 28)
This Wednesday, Tom Brokaw signs off for the last time as anchor of the "NBC Nightly News." It's noted that Brokaw was a radio DJ and then newscaster in the late 1950s, and entered the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but was in and out of classes.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2002103460_brokaw29.html

Weston Speaks at Human Rights Conference (WABC-TV, Nov. 28)
Actress Vanessa Redgrave, her brother and the father of a Guantanamo detainee on Saturday launched a new political party in England devoted to human rights. The Peace and Progress Party says it will field candidates and endorse politicians with strong human rights records in the next general election. Organizers discussed the party's platform and strategies at a conference in London that drew several hundred people. Other speakers at Saturday's conference included BURNS WESTON, president of the University of Iowa Center for Human Rights, and prominent Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya, a vocal critic of Russia's military campaign against separatist rebels in Chechnya. The television station is based in New York City. The story also appeared in the WASHINGTON POST, NEW YORK NEWSDAY, THE GUARDIAN (U.K) PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORD, PHILADEPHIA INQUIRER, KANSAS CITY STAR, MIAMI HERALD, SEATLLE POST-INTELLEGENCER, DOW JONES NEWSWIRES, and several other publications.
http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/features/entertainment/wabc_entertainmentstory_112804redgrave.html

Pascarella Studies College Selectivity (Nashua Telegraph, Nov. 28)
The most advanced effort so far to identify schools by what they do for students, rather than how many applicants they reject, is the National Survey of Student Engagement. The NSSE has surveyed more than 620,000 undergraduates at more than 850 colleges and universities on an assortment of issues. George Kuh, the Indiana University professor who heads NSSE, and ERNEST PASCARELLA, professor of higher education at the University of Iowa, reported in the September/October issue of Change magazine that high selectivity - rejecting 70 percent to 90 percent of applicants as the Ivies do - doesn't correlate with high ratings on the NSSE surveys. "In one instance - instructor feedback to students - selectivity did explain 20 percent of the institution-level variance," Kuh and Pascarella said, "but the effect of selectivity was negative, meaning that the more selective the college, the less frequently students got feedback from their teachers." The newspaper is based in New Hampshire. The article originally appeared in the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041128/YOUTH/111280039

Couple Tries to Overcome Infertilty (Chicago Daily Herald, Nov. 28)
Tracy and Gary Heilers have gone though a seven-year ordeal of trying to have a baby, in which they tried a variety of methods, both traditional and otherwise. The ordeal of trying to get pregnant was frustrating and often lonely for St. Charles resident Tracy Heilers. That included the time she couldn't quite gather the courage to give herself an injection of fertility drugs. The Heilers are Iowa natives active in sports - Tracy was a Division I gymnast at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, while Gary was a runner at Loras College in Dubuque.
http://www.dailyherald.com/special/odysseyoflove/index.html

Basketball Player Recovers Vision (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 28)
Tyler McKinney wondered 10 months ago if he would ever see out of his right eye again, let alone play basketball at Creighton University. The Creighton senior was in excruciating pain from an infection that had invaded his eye and required two cornea transplants. Now, sooner than anyone but perhaps McKinney thought, he is back with the Bluejays and starting at point guard.

McKinney laid in a darkened hospital room in Iowa City for a week in January, receiving eyedrops every 20 minutes, day and night. He showed no improvement and underwent his first cornea transplant March 4. But not all of the amoeba was out of the eye, and a second transplant was done April 1.

"It's remarkable he can play this year," said DR. JOHN SUTPHIN, a University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics surgeon who performed the transplants. "Ordinarily, we have people sit out a year after surgery before we let them go back to the court. I'm surprised he's able to play, and I'm glad for him."  Sutphin, who treats patients from Iowa and surrounding states, said he sees 15 to 20 patients a year with amoeba infections, but only four or five require surgery. The article also appeared in the ALLENTOWN (Pa.) MORNING CALL, CASPER (Wyo.) STAR TRIBUNE, BILLINGS (Mont.) GAZETTE, FREMONT (Neb.) TRIBUNE, MIAMI HERALD, LOS ANGELES TIMES, and several other newspapers.
http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/college/mensbasketball/cs-041

Ghoneim Comments on Anesthesia (New York Newsday, Nov. 28)
Every year about 20,000 to 40,000 of the 21 million patients who receive general anesthesia wake during surgery because they are under-anesthetized, usually by mistake or because doctors fear too high a dose could be dangerous. Many anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists consider their clinical judgment of vital signs to be the best way of gauging whether a patient is awake. MOHAMED GHONEIM, an anesthesiology professor at the University of Iowa, however, said he uses a specialized EEG machine that monitors brain waves, lauding it as the best way to detect whether a patient is sufficiently anesthetized. He said he routinely uses a bispectral index monitor, which was found to reduce the risk of anesthesia awareness by about 80 percent, according to two prospective studies this year involving more than 7,000 patients. The article also appeared in the CANTON (Ohio) REPOSITORY.
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/ny-hsawak294058303nov28,0,7553824.story?coll=ny-health-headlines

Iowa Test of Basic Skills Created at UI (Myrtle Beach Sun News, Nov. 28)
In an opinion piece about standardized testing, it's noted that St. Andrew and St. Michael Catholic schools use the Iowa Test of Basic Skills, a nationally recognized test given to students across the United States and Internationally. The ITBS has been in existence for 70 years and was developed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in South Carolina. http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/sunnews/news/opinion/10287906.htm

UI Tuition Noted (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Nov. 28)
In a commentary about taxes in Minnesota, the writer notes that tuition at the University of Minnesota today is 1,040 percent what she paid to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/sports/outdoors/10266293.htm

UI Society to Judge Essay Contest (Reno Gazette-Journal, Nov. 27)
First- through 12th-graders in Reno, Nev. are invited to take part in a national writing contest, answering the question "What do you like most about living in the United States and why?" The 50 to 250 word entries must be postmarked by Friday. The QUILL AND SCROLL SOCIETY OF THE COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS at the University of Iowa will judge the essay contest. The newspaper is based in Reno, Nev.
http://www.rgj.com/news/stories/html/2004/11/27/86274.php?sps=rgj.com&sch=LocalNews&sp1=rgj&sp2=News&sp3=Local+News&sp5=RGJ.com&sp6=news&sp7=local_news

Mall Santa Graduated from UI (St. Petersburg Times, Nov. 27)
Jack McElhinney has been a professional Santa for 14 years, 11 of them at WestShore Plaza. Kids have grown up on his knee. So every morning for 32 days this holiday season, the 71-year-old Land O'Lakes man will dutifully slip on the white-trimmed, red velour pants that his wife, Pam, has ironed and laid out for him. McElhinney is retired, a former traveling salesman and real estate agent, with 14 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. He majored in commerce at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.sptimes.com/2004/11/27/Tampabay/Living_up_to_the_lege.shtml

Iowans Rank High In 'Playboy' Readership (KETV, Nov. 26)
According to a New York Times map published last Sunday, Iowa has the highest per capita readership of the men's magazine in the country. The Audit Bureau of Circulation figures show that nearly 17 out of 1,000 Iowans read Playboy. The figures also show that Iowa ranked third in per capita readership for Ladies Home Journal, which is published by Des Moines-based Meredith Corporation. A University of Iowa journalism professor, STEPHEN BLOOM, said the statistics show the great divides within the state's population. He said Iowa has both very conservative and very liberal constituencies, as is evident by Iowa's two U.S. senators -- Republican Charles Grassley and Democrat Tom Harkin. KETV is based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/entertainment/3951212/detail.html

Researcher Studied at UI (News and Observer, Nov. 26)
 In April, David A. Schwartz becomes director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. He tracks environmental hazards that hurt people, whether grain dust that's poisoning farmhands or chemicals that harm some asthma patients more than others. His studies while on the faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA explored the risks from an endotoxin reaching people from grain dust. The newspaper is based in Raleigh, N.C.
http://newsobserver.com/news/story/1867244p-8200326c.html

UI Pollution Study Cited (Joplin Independent, Nov. 24)
The Senate and House are likely to consider a rider to the Omnibus appropriations bill that would exempt polluting factory farms from requirements to report their toxic chemical releases to local, state and federal agencies. Scientific evidence has shown that these factory farms pose a threat to people's health. According to a landmark 2002 study conducted by Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, "Hydrogen sulfide and ammonia are recognized degradation products of animal manure and urine. Both of these gases have been measured in the general vicinity of livestock operations at concentrations of potential health concern for ruralresidents, under prolonged exposure."The publication is based in Joplin, Mo.
http://www.joplinindependent.com/display_article.php/dwillett1101346866

Bill Extends Funding For UI Project (WQAD-TV, Nov. 24)
The Iowa Army Ammunition Plant in Middletown in southeast Iowa is included in a just-passed federal spending bill. The bill contains $300,000 for the University of Iowa to continue filing medical claims for former workers. The plant produced nuclear weapons during the Cold War, and officials think hundreds of former workers haven't been screened for illnesses related to making weapons. The university's lead investigator, LAURENCE FUORTES, says he hopes to reach those workers and help others who may be having difficulty filing the appropriate paperwork for government compensation.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2609234&nav=1sW7TUUd

Memories Of Japan Relived In Memoir (Contra Costa Times, Nov. 24)
Marilyn Abildskov, an English professor at St. Mary's College, worked for years as a features writer for a small town newspaper. Later, she jumped at the chance to teach English to junior high school students in Japan. Ten years after she left Japan, her first book, "The Men In My Country," publishes this month. Abildskov wrote about her experiences while she was studying for her master's of fine arts with the University of Iowa's non-fiction program. "'The Men In My Country' is a thoughtful, humorous look at love and the inevitable contradictions of desire," said PATRICIA FOSTER, associate professor, University of Iowa. "Early in the book, Abildskov tells us that she has been teaching English in Matsumoto, Japan for three years and has fallen in love with a Japanese lawyer, a man who -- like the country -- can never be fully known, can never be fully hers. And yet the intensity of desire compels her onward. What, we wonder, will happen to the narrator in such a quest? It's the knitting together and the unraveling that make this book such a delight." The newspaper is based northern California.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/local/states/california/counties/contra_costa_county/cities_neighborhoods/10261509.htm

UI Lab Attack Referenced (Daily Breeze, Nov. 24)
Following the vandalism of a McDonald's Restaurant in the Los Angles area, police said the weekend action appeared to be the latest committed by the Animal Liberation Front. The ALF took responsibility Monday for a Nov. 14 attack at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA building. Activists freed hundreds of lab animals and destroyed years of research. A videotape sent to television stations showed people in black masks emptying dozens of cages. The newspaper is based in Southern California.
http://www.dailybreeze.com/news/articles/1216196.html

Patient Undergoing Chemotherapy (Quincy Herald-Whig, Nov. 24)
Dave and his wife, Susan, not their real names, live in a small town with their four children -- a daughter and three boys ages, all 17 or under. He worked a job at another factory through a temporary employment agency. The family is noted in The Herald-Whig's Good News of Christmas campaign. Dave was diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease in April. He had surgery in May and is now undergoing chemotherapy treatments at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. The treatments are expected to last six to eight months. Doctors have said Dave is unable to work because of his serious medical condition. The newspaper serves Quincy, Ill.
http://www.whig.com/284801023159026.php

Hovenkamp Comments On Doctor Boycott (Washington Times, Nov. 24)
Maryland doctors who take part in group boycotts or work slowdowns to protest the state's high medical-malpractice insurance rates run the risk of violating antitrust law, state officials say. At issue is whether independent doctors in Maryland decided as a group to withhold services to change their economic circumstances. If so, they might be crossing a line from political protest to price fixing and collusion, antitrust lawyers warned. "It sounds pretty dangerous to me," said HERB HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa who specializes in antitrust law. "There is a labor exemption that permits employees to do this, but independent doctors don't qualify for labor immunity." Mr. Hovenkamp said doctors could be penalized for participating in work slowdowns or group boycotts. They could be forced to reimburse monetary losses that result from the slowdown. "If the hospital takes a big hit in revenue, the damages could get quite large," he said.
http://washingtontimes.com/metro/20041123-102031-5266r.htm

Videotape Of Break-In Released (WTLV-TV, Nov. 24)
The FBI believes it knows who's responsible for breaking into a psychology lab at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Members of the Animal Liberation Front sent a videotape to a TV station in Iowa City. They claim the video shows them releasing more than 400 rats, mice and pigeons, and destroying some 40 computers and other equipment. The group claims it raided the laboratory to liberate the animals being used for research. The television station is based in Jacksonville, Fla.
http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/usworld/news-article.aspx?storyid=28247

Brokaw Attended UI (Aberdeen American News, Nov. 24)
"NBC Nightly News" anchor Tom Brokaw credits a South Dakota work ethic for helping him through a journalism career that has spanned more than 40 years. Brokaw departs the "Nightly News" set after his Dec. 1 newscast. He has been anchor and managing editor for 21 years. He attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for a year and returned to take classes at the University of South Dakota. The newspaper is based in South Dakota.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/10255622.htm

FBI Investigates Vandalism Tape (WKMG-TV, Nov. 23)
The FBI is investigating a videotape mailed to media outlets near Iowa City that shows masked men vandalizing an animal research lab at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The tape, which appears to be edited, was mailed from a group claiming to be the Animal Liberation Front, according to the report. It shows at least four people wearing masks and gloves entering campus buildings. The footage shows rats and mice being dumped into at least nine plastic containers. The intruders are also seen spray-painting "ALF," "Science Not Sadism" and "Free the Animals" on building walls. It does not show chemicals being dumped in the basement of Spence Labs, which closed that building indefinitely. The television station serves central Florida.
http://www.local6.com/news/3943452/detail.html

Videotape Of UI Lab Vandalism Noted (MSNBC, Nov. 23)
On "Countdown" program, host Keith Olbermann noted the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where an animal rights group has released a videotape showing masked men destroying a psychology lab there. The Animal Liberation Front released the tape. The group smashed 40 computers and claims to have released hundreds of lab rats, mice, and pigeons.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=0de21cafa63446048cf44a1fff399400&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=2c357ca048c0d65c28d0c6f55eed407f

Ghoneim Uses Brain Wave Device (Washington Post, Nov. 23)
The leading device that measures brain waves to detect whether a patient is adequately anesthetized is easy to use, costs about $9,000 and has been shown to reduce the risk of waking up in surgery by about 80 percent. Although BIS monitors have been installed in the operating rooms of 34 percent of the nation's hospitals -- and 78 percent of teaching hospitals -- they are used in only about 10 percent of operations, according to manufacturer Aspect Medical Systems of Newton, Mass. The monitor calculates the depth of sedation from 0 to 100, using data from an electrode attached to a patient's forehead. A reading of zero signifies no brain activity, while 100 is wide awake; the recommended range for general anesthesia is between 40 and 60. Anesthesiologist MOHAMED M. GHONEIM, an expert on anesthesia awareness who is a professor at the University of Iowa, said he uses a BIS monitor in all his cases. In Ghoneim's view, apathy is the reason many anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists do not use the devices.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A4205-2004Nov22.html

Peters Questions Economic Development Subsidies (KVUE-TV, Nov. 23)
In a story about state subsidies for economic development in Texas, some question whether the money is truly developing the economy. "What you are doing is subsidizing the loss of jobs" from elsewhere, said ALAN PETERS, chairman of the graduate program in urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa. KVUE is based in Austin. This story also appeared in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, DENTON (TX) RECORD CHRONICLE and WFAA-TV.
http://www.kvue.com/news/state/stories/112204cccakvuetexfund.83361a67.html

"A Nation Deceived" Report Cited (Arizona Republic, Nov. 23)
The decision whether to skip a grade starts with parents questioning whether their child is being challenged appropriately. It's important that the children are able to fit in with their peers if they skip a grade. Many parents believe that if their child, who is in second grade, were just in third grade they would receive more instruction or learn better. However, a child might excel in reading and writing but may not be advanced in math. Grade skipping is gaining attention nationwide. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA report, "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students," compiles the findings of 50 years of research about grade skipping. The two-volume report concludes that students who are moved ahead tend to be more ambitious, and they earn graduate degrees at higher rates than other students.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/1123edskip23.html

Alumnus Manages Soup Kitchen Volunteers (Summit Daily News, Nov. 23)
Patti Bowers chokes up when she thinks about the people her volunteers help at The House with the Red Door. The volunteer coordinator began work there three years ago, serving soup to people who had just come into town, who were down on their luck or just wanted a safe place to mingle with others. And she's recently handed over the job to Lindsay Breece, who stopped by "The House" seeking help with her resume and became involved in helping. "You volunteer, you think you're giving," Bowers said. "You are giving, but you're getting so much more back." Bowers has a marketing degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Daily News is based in Breckinridge, Col.
http://www.summitdaily.com/article/20041122/NEWS/111220001

UI Students Help Repair Florida Church (West Palm Beach Post, Nov. 23)
In the back of the New Creation Missionary Baptist Church in West Palm Beach, Fla., sat eight college students from Iowa City. They showed up Friday night, intent on repairing the church's roof, still leaking from Hurricane Frances. They're also planning to fix the crumbling ceiling tile and lay new carpet. Eight UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students from a group called 24-7 and the Parkview Evangelical Free Church drove to Palm Beach to help.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/localnews/content/local_news/epaper/2004/11/22/s1b_CHURCH_1122.html

Debate Student Chosen for U.S. Team (Corvalis Gazette-Times, Nov. 22)
 Bridget Burns, an Oregon State University graduate student from Livingston, Mont., has been chosen to fill one of the two positions on the U.S. National Debate Team. Burns is the first OSU student to receive this selective honor in the 80 years of the program. Burns will be teamed with Orion Jones, a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, for an upcoming tour to Great Britain and Portugal.
http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2004/11/22/news/community/monloc03.txt

Jones Comments on Touch Screen Voting (Miami Herald, Nov. 22)
A review of election results in a dozen Florida counties showed that the millions of dollars spent on new voting equipment since 2000 drastically reduced formerly scandalous rates of spoiled ballots. Osceola and Duval counties, both of which switched from punch cards to optical scanners, had discard rates around a quarter percent, compared to rates around a half percent for the touch-screen counties checked. That's likely because touch-screen systems, while greatly improved since their introduction, still need refinement in ''human factors'' such as screen layouts that can sometimes confuse voters, said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa who has served as a consultant to the Dade Elections Department.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/10242607.htm?1c

Florida President Attended UI (Sun Sentinel, Nov. 21)
It's been more than a year since Bernie Machen, 60, was named UF president and just three months since he was officially sworn in. He's quickly making his mark, though, and as the school's search for a new football coach heats up this week, the unlikely president is dealing with unlikely celebrity. He earned his master's degree in pediatric dentistry and a doctorate in educational psychology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/college/gators/orl-sptbernie21112104nov21,0,442848.story?coll=tf-gators

Advertising Writer/Producer Attended UI (Kansas City Star, Nov. 21)
A profile of Michael Mackie, who is a television producer and copywriter at PlattForm Advertising on Olathe, Kan., notes that he earned his bachelor's degree in communications, with minors in French and acting, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City.

Gifted Children Report Noted (New York Times, Nov. 21)
The "Incredibles" is not just an animated adventure for children, at least not to the parents and teachers who have been passionately deconstructing the story of a family of superheroes trapped in suburbia. The movie has reignited one of the oldest debates about child-rearing and society: competition versus coddling, excellence versus egalitarianism. "The Incredibles" might take comfort from a recent report, "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students," by the John Templeton Foundation. It summarizes research showing that gifted children thrive with more advanced material and describes their current frustration in prose that sounds like Dash: "When they want to fly, they are told to stay in their seats. Stay in your grade. Know your place. It's a national scandal." But if they do fly, what happens to the children left on the ground? One of the report's authors, NICHOLAS COLANGELO, a professor at the University of Iowa who is an expert in gifted education, pointed to research indicating the left-behind do not suffer academically or emotionally.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/21/weekinreview/21tier.html?oref=login

Robinson Book Reveiwed (San Francisco Chronicle, Nov. 21)
It's been 23 years since Marilynne Robinson published her first novel, "Housekeeping," so to say the publication of her second novel is long-awaited is a bit of an understatement. Readers will be delighted to know that Robinson has lost none of her edge when it comes to poetic prose, for "Gilead" is chock full of rich, complex language, as well as plunges into intricate philosophical and spiritual introspections. It's not surprising, really, that Robinson, who teaches at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, is often asked to preach to her local congregation. One might label this a religious book, but that would be overreaching. Rather, it's a meditation on the sacredness and inscrutability of belief, forgiveness and faith in human connections.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/chronicle/a/2004/11/21/RVG7T9PUO31.DTL

Fundrasier Benefits UI Center (WQAD-TV, Nov. 19)
A fundraiser called "Jam for Hope" at the Col Ballroom in Davenport was held Saturday. Proceeds from the event will go toward the University of Iowa's CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE, the primary source in the region for the care of Huntington's patients and their families, and a premier spot for research for the nation's 300,000 Huntington's patients. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2592277&nav=1sW7TLwG

Writing Program Director Attended UI (Newport News Times, Nov. 19)
Carla Perry will hand over the reigns of the Nye Beach Writers' Series, along with direction of Writers On The Edge, to Michelle Bonzcek and Tom Holmes. For the past seven and a half years, Perry has been bringing authors from throughout the country to the Oregon coast as featured guests of the Nye Beach Writers' Series, a program of Writers On The Edge. Through her stewardship, the nonprofit organization has featured 254 writers at 98 events - largely made possible through volunteer efforts and community support. In 1970, Perry received a degree in poetry from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, the only place that offered bachelor's and master's degrees in writing at the time. She also received a degree in Mandarin Chinese. The newspaper is based in Oregon.
http://www.newportnewstimes.com/articles/2004/11/19/arts/arts01.txt

Skorton Responds to Animal Rights Group (WQAD-TV, Nov. 19)
The president of the University of Iowa says the school will not be "bullied" by the tactics of an animal rights group claiming responsibility for damage at a research lab last weekend. An e-mail sent to the media claims to be from the Animal Liberation Front. It prompted an angry response from university President DAVID SKORTON and raised concerns about researcher safety. The e-mail describes in detail how, it claims, vandals destroyed equipment and research papers in Seashore Hall and Spence Laboratories. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2588422&nav=1sW7TK2c

Brigham Young to Merge Sports Programs (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 19)
At the end of September, Brigham Young announced it was merging its men's and women's sports programs, which had been separate entities dating back to their founding at the turn of the last century. "At Brigham Young, we have one of the largest, if not the largest, percentages of students participating in intramural sports," says Barbara Day Lockhart, a professor of exercise science. "And competitive athletics is an outgrowth of that." Ms. Lockhart, an Olympic speed skater in 1960 and 1964 who went on to work as an athletics administrator at Temple University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before coming to Brigham Young, worries that women, both athletes and administrators, will get lost in the shuffle as departments are brought together.
http://chronicle.com/temp/email.php?id=7qvl3rlc7tozq6hb6e44x30n405iyemh

Donham Investigates Rural Air Conditions (Canadian Occupational Safety Magazine, Nov. 18)
Open fields and clear-blue skies surrounding pastoral farms invoke archetypal images of health for Canadians. Farmers and livestock producers are seen as sturdy exemplars of healthy living, breathing in clean outdoor air while working the sun-dappled land - not like the majority of Canadians who are trapped on smog-choked highways struggling to get to work, who are then locked in hermetically sealed office buildings with recycled air, or those workers straining in dusty or smoke-filled factories or warehouses. But look a little more closely at the farmer, and one just may just find him or her wheezing, struggling to get a breath of air. Farmers' lung conditions were something certainly on the mind of Dr. KELLEY DONHAM, professor of occupational and environmental medicine with the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa. As a young man, Donham had worked on farms where pigs, chickens and other animals were housed, and grain was stored in large silos. He soon began to notice that he had trouble breathing. "Having worked in livestock facilities at the time the industry began moving towards more indoor- and intensive-type (animal) housing, I noticed I was having respiratory problems whenever I worked in them," Donham says. "So if I was having problems, I began to suspect that others were having problems as well."
http://www.industrialsourcebook.com/cgi-bin/archivef.pl?id=776

Robinson Publishes New Book (The Atlantic, Nov. 18)
A review of "Gilead," the new book by MARILYNNE ROBINSON, who teaches in the UI Writers' Workshop. The online review is accessible to The Atlantic subscribers only.
http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/prem/200411u/int2004-11-17

Bibas: Apologies Are New Trend in Law (Bradenton Herald, Nov. 18)
Apologies are tricky things, though, and not everyone can dance the mea culpa. In a culture better at blame than contrition, sorry is, as Sir Elton John informs us, the hardest word. In criminal cases, the trend is for prosecutors and defense attorneys to seek so-called restorative justice, in which perpetrators apologize to their victims, says STEPHANOS BIBAS, a University of Iowa scholar of apology in criminal law. The Herald is based in Bradenton, FL. This story also appeared on the Web sits of the KANSAS CITY STAR, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, AKRON BEACO JOURNAL, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, MIAMI HERALD, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, WILKES-BARRE (PA) TIMES LEADER and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/10205534.htm

Workshop Alumnus Book Reviewed (Columbus This Week Newspapers, Nov. 18)
Janet Desaulniers' debut short story collection, What You've Been Missing, is peopled with characters who are learning the limits of intimacy. In many of the stories, the spaces between people within the closest relationships -- married couples, siblings, parents and children -- can be as significant as the relationships themselves. Desaulniers is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop and her book was published by UI Press. It was awarded the John Simmons Short Fiction Award by the Workshop. Columbus This Week Newspapers are based in Columbus, Ohio.
http://www.thisweeknews.com/thisweek.php?edition=common&story=thisweeknews/111804/common/News/111804-News-484850.html

UI Student Competes for Miss Illinois Title (Arlington Heights Daily Herald, Nov. 18)
When Jill Gulseth was a little girl, she watched the Miss USA pageant on television and thought it would be fun to be a contestant. So, when she received a flier in the mail last year asking her to participate in Miss Illinois USA - the preliminary to Miss USA - Gulseth of Geneva sent in the paperwork and was chosen to be a contestant out of more than 1,300 women. "I thought it was now or never so I decided to do it now," said the 20-year-old. "You're only young once." She ended up placing in the top 15 with no previous pageant exper iience. This weekend, Gulseth is heading back to Chicago's McCormick Place, with 125 other women, for a second try at the Miss Illinois USA crown. She said this year she feels more prepared. Gulseth is is a junior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.dailyherald.com/kane/main_story.asp?intID=3830968

Whitman Book Reviewed (Minneapolis City Pages, Nov. 17)
A book from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, "Walt Whitman, The Correspondence, Volume VII" edited by Ted Genoways, is reviewed in this article. "Publish or perish goes the old saw of academic life, but publish and perish seems to be the fate that befell Edwin Haviland Miller and his plans to publish Walt Whitman's collected writings. The series launched with a bang in 1961, but progress has been increasingly tangled and feeble since then. During the '60s, through New York University, Miller shepherded into print several volumes of correspondence, two books of prose, and a "comprehensive reader's edition" of "Leaves of Grass." In the '70s, another academic, William White, put out a three-volume edition of daybooks and notebooks, and Miller added a supplementary volume of letters to the pile, which included newly discovered material. In the '80s, yet another academic jumped into the fray and published "Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts." Fast-forward to the year 2004. The entire advisory board of the Miller project, including Miller himself, is now deceased, and there does not seem to be an end in sight. So Whitman watchers can be forgiven a spell of confusion at this fall's news that the University of Iowa Press has brought out Volume VII of Whitman's writings, under a new publisher and a new editor."
http://www.citypages.com/databank/25/1250/article12680.asp

UI Students Take Longer to Graduate (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 17)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ranks near the bottom among Big Ten schools for the time it takes students to graduate, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. The center, a research arm of the U.S. Department of Education, said 64.5 percent of University of Iowa students graduated in the six years from 1997 to 2003.That puts the university in ninth place. The best graduation rate was at Northwestern University, which graduated 93.1 percent of its students in six years. At the other end was Minnesota, graduating 54.4 percent.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1260720

National Book Award Nominee Attended Writers' Workshop (Wisconsin State Journal, Nov. 17)
Sarah Shun-Lien Bynum is nominated for a National Book Award in fiction. Her book, "Madeleine Is Sleeping." Life, not inspiration, proved the greatest obstacle to completing the book. Time was limited for a few years while Bynum taught creative writing at a secondary school in Brooklyn. Accepted in 1998 to the prestigious WRITERS' WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she again found that her teaching getting in the way. "I was still so full of experiences as a teacher that most of my work for the Iowa classes were short stories about those experiences," she says. "So I worked on the book a little, on the side. It was kind of like having a secret affair, when I would sneak off and write this. I sort of had this clandestine relationship with the book."
http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/features/index.php?ntid=18313&ntpid=1

Jones Comments on Electronic Voting (Interpress News Service Agency, Nov. 16)
For its boosters -- technology vendors and the election officials who spent millions on their wares -- electronic voting (e-voting) passed the test of Nov. 2 with flying colours, withstanding unprecedented scrutiny and making life easier for millions of disabled and non-English-speaking U.S. voters.  To detractors -- mostly computer security experts and voter protection groups -- it is only a matter of time before paperless elections invite wide-scale fraud. DOUG JONES, a computer scientist at the University of Iowa and member of the National Committee for Voting Integrity, said he was concerned about reports that some observers, including those sent by the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) had trouble gaining access to polling places. And independent monitors who did watch the count may not have been trained in how the e-voting software works. "There are some counties where there are reports that nobody was allowed to observe the vote tabulation -- one in Ohio -- and even if you can observe the tabulation, in many counties using computer systems, all you see is the backs of technicians hunched over computer displays," said Jones.  "What can you tell about what is really going on when you can't see the screen itself and you have no idea what the commands to the system mean?" he asked.
http://www.ipsnews.net/interna.asp?idnews=26299

Radioactive Material Released in Sewer Leak (WQAD-TV, Nov. 16)
Clean up is under way at the University of Iowa Oakdale Research Park after a fluid containing low-level radioactive material was released when an underground sewer pipe broke. It happened yesterday afternoon at the research park. The material bubbled to the surface. It was linked to the Oakdale Waste Storage Facility. JIM WALKER of the university's Health Protection Office says the chemical is a surfactant, and that's what you use to wash your dishes -- it's a soap. Walker says no one was injured in the sewer break, and no state environmental laws were violated in the spill. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2572225&nav=1sW7TBK1

FBI Takes Charge of Vandalism Investigation (WQAD-TV, Nov. 16)
The FBI has taken charge of the investigation into a vandalized research lab at the University of Iowa. Extensive damage was done over the weekend at Spence Labs and Seashore Hall, which are connected. The FBI is involved because the lab uses federal grants for some of its research. Vandals broke into the buildings Saturday night or Sunday morning. They freed rats, mice and pigeons, dumped chemicals and damaged about 40 computers. The lab was sealed yesterday. University spokesman STEVE PARROTT says officials must determine what was spilled before they can start the investigation and clean up.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2571716

Oden Says Vandalism is Setback to Research (Salt Lake City Tribune, Nov. 16)
Vandals dumped chemicals, damaged computers and freed research animals at the University of Iowa, officials said. The FBI was called in to investigate the vandalism discovered Sunday at Seashore Hall and Spence Laboratories. Seashore Hall houses the university's psychology, journalism and sociology departments. "This will be a major setback in terms of research," said GREGG ODEN, chairman of the psychology department. "We don't know how much damage has been done." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the WASHINGTON POST, NEWSDAY, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT, RALEIGH NEWS OBSERVER, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS, WORCESTER (MA) TELEGRAM, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, CHARLESTON (WV) GAZETTE MAIL, WQAD-TV, GUARDIAN (UK), NORTHWEST ALABAMA TIMES DAILY, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.sltrib.com/nationworld/ci_2454116

Hornbuckle: Household Chemicals Linger in Environment (Newsday, Nov. 16)
The chemicals go down the drain, but in the environment they remain. Researchers have found that a complex brew of everyday compounds - from products as ubiquitous as shampoo, bug spray and even that morning cup of coffee - lingers in Minnesota waters even after they're showered off or dumped down the sink. Those persistent chemicals include caffeine, synthetic musk used in personal-care products, a flame retardant, a herbicide, insect repellent and several medications, according to the most extensive study ever conducted of the state's waters. KERI HORNBUCKLE, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa, said at least a million pounds of these chemicals are used in the United States each year. "You'd be hard-put to find someone who doesn't use these chemicals in some personal care product," Hornbuckle said. "It's amazing that we're releasing such large quantities of them every day, yet we have almost no information about their potential costs to the environment." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the L.A. TIMES, TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, WILMINGTON (NC) MORNING NEWS, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, WORCESTER (MA) TELEGRAM, MONTEREY (CA) COUNTY HERALD, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, ONLYPUNJAB.COM, and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.newsday.com/news/science/wire/sns-ap-lingering-chemicals,0,1503186.story?coll=sns-ap-science-headlines

UI Study Shows Even Bacteria Diversify (News-Medical.net, Nov. 16)
Diversification helps reduce overall risk by putting your eggs in more than one basket and is a strategy that strengthens groups of all kinds -- from forests challenged with environmental stress to stock market portfolios in uncertain times. Findings from UNIVERSITY OF IOWA show that even bacteria have learned this important lesson. When disease-causing bacteria assemble into communities known as biofilms, the individual bacteria rapidly diversify. This diversity increases the capabilities of the group and provides a form of "biological insurance," which protects the organisms from adverse conditions. The findings will appear the week of November 15 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=6312

UI Study Shows Health Benefits of Maggots (Team India, Nov. 16)
Blood sucking leeches, flesh eating maggots and venomous lizards - they are not a part of any horror movie plot but "offbeat treatment" which is slowing finding its way back into alternative medical practice. The FDA has given clearance to a French company for commercial marketing of leeches as a medical device in the U.S. A new research has found that wounds treated with presurgical maggot therapy developed no infections after surgery. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine have found that certain worm eggs can relieve the abdominal distress caused by Inflammatory Bowel disease.
http://www.teamindia.net/news/index.php?action=fullnews&id=36252

Alumnus Nominated for National Book Award (Daytona Beach News Journal, Nov. 16)
Life, not inspiration, proved the greatest obstacle Sarah Shun-Lien Bynum encountered to completing her book, "Madeline is Sleeping," which has been nominated for a National Book Award in the fiction category. Time was limited for a few years while Bynum taught creative writing at a secondary school in Brooklyn. Accepted in 1998 to the prestigious writers' workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she again found that her teaching getting in the way. "I was still so full of experiences as a teacher that most of my work for the Iowa classes were short stories about those experiences," she says. "So I worked on the book a little, on the side. It was kind of like having a secret affair, when I would sneak off and write this. I sort of had this clandestine relationship with the book." The National Book Awards will be presented Wednesday. The same story appeared on the Web site of CNN.COM and CNNINTERNATIONAL.COM
http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/Entertainment/Books/03SceneBOOK01111604.htm

Robinson Finally Writes Second Novel (Time, Nov. 15)
This month, MARILYNNE ROBINSON will publish "Gilead," her second novel, 23 years after publishing her first. That book, "Housekeeping," was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and won the PEN/Hemingway Award. It is a mainstay of book clubs and lists of the best novels of the 20th century. The anticipation of Robinson's follow-up has been urgent, loud and public. The interval had nothing to do with indolence and everything to do with rigor, and Robinson, 60, says she feels little need to apologize for it. "I have always been doing things that felt very necessary from the point of view of the integrity of my work," she says, with only the slightest hint of irritation. "So other people will just have to look out for themselves." Those "necessary" things were prompted by the dishonesty and vacuity she sensed in virtually every level of public discourse. "I actually became struck by the fact that people very routinely talk about major writers, historical figures, episodes in history on the basis of what are very, very banal cliches," says Robinson, who lives in Iowa City and has taught at the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop since 1991. "My impatience with that became so marked that I felt as if I couldn't say anything true until I had essentially re-educated myself." Which she did by reviewing virtually the entire Western canon.
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1101041122-782119,00.html

Skorton Speaks at Media Dinner (East Valley Tribune, Nov. 15)
Ten presidents of colleges and universities and a score of reporters gathered for the Media Dinner, a yearly production by Virgil Renzulli, Arizona State University's vice president of public affairs.  The event held ast week at the Penn Club in New York Cityalso drew the presidents of Syracuse University, University of Iowa, University of Florida, Northeastern University, Barnard College, Skidmore College, State University at Binghamton and University of Maryland-Baltimore County.

One question directed at the university presidents was what the second Bush administration meant for campuses. DAVID SKORTON, president of the University of Iowa, said there will be continuing friction between the government's desire for national security and universities' desire for international students. He said universities could improve the situation by putting restrictions on graduate programs lengths, which are virtually unregulated now and lead to longer visa approval times. The newspaper is based in Mesa, Ariz.
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/index.php?sty=31584

IEM Showed Bush Lead (Reason Online, Nov. 15)
All year long, month after month, opinion polls averaged to give George W. Bush a lead in the low-to-mid-single digits, depending on when the poll was taken and who took it. Only toward the end, after the debates, did the gap narrow to that now proverbial "statistical dead heat." Even then, the statistically insignificant margin generally favored Bush. Another indicator was the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S electronic election market, which lets traders bet on election outcomes; it consistently showed Bush winning with a percentage in the low 50s. Rarely has an election been so unsurprising.
http://www.reason.com/rauch/111504.shtml

Jones Comments on Lost Votes (Charlotte News Observer, Nov. 15)
A state study commission will convene as early as this week to decide how to overhaul North Carolina's hodgepodge of voting machines -- including the one that lost about 4,500 votes in Carteret County. University of Iowa computer science professor DOUGLAS JONES, a voting-machine expert, said the number of votes lost in Carteret County may be a new record. The paper is based in North Carolina. The story also appeared on the websites of WCNC-TV, the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, WILMINGTON MORNING STAR, and the WINSTON-SALEM JOURNAL in North Carolina.
http://newsobserver.com/news/story/1831015p-8145140c.html

Baldus Death Penalty Study Noted (Herald Mail, Nov. 15)
A Supreme Court ruling in the 1987 case McCleskey vs. Kemp over a similar study on race and the death penalty in Georgia found that discrepancies in sentencing "are an inevitable part of our criminal justice system." That has significantly dulled the effect of appeals based on broad, statistical analyses of capital punishment, according to University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS, who authored the Georgia study. Defense attorneys must prove that the decision to seek the death penalty was driven by racial prejudice in a specific prosecutor's office or with a particular prosecutor, he said. Broad-brush studies rarely go that deep. "The court says statistical evidence is irrelevant," he said. "You've got to come up with an admission by a prosecutor or jury that they took race into account. That's impossible to do." The newspaper is based in Maryland. The story also appeared on the website of WTOP radio in Maryland.
http://www.herald-mail.com/?module=displaystory&story_id=95807&format=html

UI Press Author Comments on Festivals (International Herald Tribune, Nov. 15)
Coarsegold, a tiny village in the Sierra Nevada foothills of California, hosts the Tarantula Awareness Festival each year. In its deeply abiding wackiness, the tarantula festival, like other offbeat festivals around the United States - say, the annual Middle of Nowhere Carnival Days in Ainsworth, Nebraska - speaks to the American ability to turn a liability into an asset, wedding the time-honored tradition of the publicity stunt with an enduring pride of place, "the idea that every place is important and essential to who we are," said Drake Hokanson, an assistant professor at Winona State University in Minnesota and author of "The Lincoln Highway: Main Street Across America" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 1999). The article originally appeard in the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2004/11/14/travel/trspider.html

Hornnbuckle Comments on Water Study (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Nov.  14)
According to the most extensive study of Minnesota waters ever conducted, caffeine, synthetic musk used in personal-care products, a flame retardant, an herbicide, the popular insect repellent DEET and other pharmaceuticals, products and chemicals are part of a complex brew being found in waters around the state. A pair of synthetic musks detected frequently in the study are used to mask scents or add fragrance to shampoos, perfumes and household cleaners.  KERI HORNBUCKLE, associate professor in civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa, said that at least a million pounds of the chemicals are used in the United States each year. They degrade slowly to give products long shelf lives, she said.

"You'd be hard-put to find someone who doesn't use these chemicals in some personal care product," said Hornbuckle, whose own research found the fragrance in Lake Michigan. "It's amazing that we're releasing such large quantities of them every day, yet we have almost no information about their potential costs to the environment." The Associated Press article also appeared in the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS and on WCCO in Minnesota, FORUM  in Fargo/Grand Forks, N.D., the GRAND FORKS HERALD (N.D.)
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/5083855.html

Lukas Gives Advices on Holiday Eating (RedNova.com, Nov. 14)
If you are tempted by festive parties and treats lurking around the office cooler this season, a University of Iowa, Iowa City, heart care specialist has suggestions that can help you cut down on calories or balance them with exercise during the holidays. There are several strategies for making your way around the buffet table at the office party or family gathering, maintains AMY LUKAS, a dietitian with the Cardiovascular Health, Assessment, Management and Prevention Service. You can better resist holiday fare with a little preparation. For one, do not skip meals. "Have your lower-calorie meal earlier in the day, but don't starve yourself because then you're bound to overdo it at the party," Lukas advises. Also, consider the connection between what you wear and what you eat. "You can wear clothes that are close-fitting so that when you eat enough you feel it-and stop."
http://www.rednova.com/news/display/?id=102875

Rietz Comments on IEM Accuracy (USA Today, Nov. 14)
Many models that mix economic and political data forecast George W. Bush would be re-elected. They were off on the margin of victory. At least one indicator was more accurate this time. The Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) let participants invest $5 to $500 in Web-based futures contracts that predict the vote share each candidate will receive. The vote share market was off 1.1 percent election eve, better than the 1.33 percent average prediction error in previous cycles. "While the error was small, this race was just so close" that a small shift in contracts would have spelled a different result, says THOMAS RIETZ, IEM co-director and associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa. As of midnight Nov. 1, the IEM showed Bush with 50.45 percent  of the popular vote, vs. 49.55 percent for Kerry. The actual result as of Nov. 4 showed 51.54 percent for Bush and 48.55 percent for Kerry.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/economy/2004-11-15-election-econ_x.htm

Robinson Interviewed About New Book (Boston Globe, Nov. 14)
Working on her own internal clock, Marilynne Robinson let 23 years lapse between the publication of her celebrated novel, ''Housekeeping," in 1981 and this fall's arrival of ''Gilead."  For this article, Robinson spoke from her home in Iowa City, where she teaches at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The  narrator of "Gillead," John Ames, is a 77-year-old Congregational minister living in small-town Iowa. Having lost his first wife and child as a young man, he has remarried late in life, and the book takes the form of a letter he is writing for his 6-year-old son.
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/11/14/finding_balm_in_the_spiritual/

UI Study Notes Prescriptions Given in Schools (Herald Mail , Nov. 14)
About 5.6 percent of K-12 students receive medications on a typical school day in the United States, according to a 2000 study by ANN MARIE MCCARTHY, an associate professor at the University of Iowa. The most common medication is for attention-deficit (hyperactivity) disorder, followed by over-the-counter medications, analgesics, asthma and anti-seizure medications. McCarthy's survey of 649 school nurses is one of the few national studies that looked at dispensing medications in schools. She found that errors were three times more likely to occur when unlicensed personnel, including school secretaries, health aides, teachers and parents, administered medications to students. The newspaper is based in Maryland. The article also appeared in the CHARLESTON (W.V) GAZETTE.
http://www.herald-mail.com/?module=displaystory&story_id=95728&format=html

Memoir Author Attended UI (Daytona Beach  News Journal, Nov. 14)
Maura Conlon-McIvor's new memoir, "FBI Girl: How I Learned to Crack My Father's Code." The book provides a rare glimpse inside the family life of an FBI agent, at a time when the inner workings of the agency, and its perceived failings, are being questioned. Conlon-McIvor's path to her memoir was an unlikely one. She majored in communications at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, then decamped for New York City, where she spent a brief period working at The New Yorker and at travel magazines.
http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/Entertainment/Books/03SceneBOOK04111404.htm

Muralist Studied Art at UI (Courier-Post, Nov. 14)
A new mural titled "Cascade," because of the colorful paint that drips over red, white and yellow circles, is on a building in Haddon Township in New Jersey. Artst Antonio Puri went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to study art. The newspaper serves Cherry Hill, N.J.
http://www.courierpostonline.com/news/southjersey/m111404f.htm

Fisher Comments on Tax Breaks (Detroit News, Nov. 14)
During its decade in existence, Michigan's main state-sponsored development program has signed deals with 223 businesses that promise to create 56,285 jobs in exchange for tax breaks of up to $1.6 billion. The Michigan Economic Growth Authority, renewed by the Legislature in 2003, awards tax abatements designed to keep job-producing firms here or lure them from elsewhere. MEGA is involved in a high-stakes competitive game among the states that, the others concede, Michigan plays like a real pro. Some less-than-enthused observers say, however, that the billions in tax breaks produce undramatic results while helping favored companies gain a leg-up on existing Michigan firms with whom they compete. PAUL FISHER, a University of Iowa professor who has written extensively on economic development programs by states, last year characterized tax write-offs as "an expensive way for a state to bring about a modest increase in job creation."
http://www.detnews.com/2004/specialreport/0411/14/A14-4211.htm

Writer Remembers Bijou Movies (New York Times, Nov, 14)
Writing about "Bollywood" and his love of Indian films, Suketu Mutha says: "It was not until graduate school that I became cynical about Bollywood movies. I too began to think that the plots were weak, melodramatic. At the University of Iowa's student-run movie theater, the BIJOU, I could see two movies for five dollars, most of them European. I was introduced to Renoir, Fellini, Fassbinder, De Sica. I became, for many years after that, something of a cinephile."
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/14/movies/14BOLL

Segura Comments on Political Shifts (Houston Chronicle, Nov. 13)
The effect of Prop 187 -- and the equally draconian Prop 209 two years later -- has seen California tilt strongly to the Democrats, with the exception of last year's special gubernatorial election victory by moderate Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger, himself an immigrant, albeit from Austria. Such a partisan shift in Texas would be "a long time coming," said GARY SEGURA, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, but a similar move to Democrats in the less populous (but fast growing) states of Arizona and Nevada "could happen much more quickly."
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/editorial/outlook/2899874

River Counties Showed Kerry Vote (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Nov. 13)
Across America, in county after county, President Bush won the majority of votes in rural and small-town areas that are predominantly white. A notable exception was the area along the northern Mississippi, particularly western Wisconsin and eastern Iowa. From the southern border of Wisconsin all the way up to Pierce County, west of Eau Claire, all eight counties along the river went for Sen. John Kerry, as did eight of 10 counties edging the river in Iowa. The vast majority of Iowa's colleges are in its eastern half.

The biggest one, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, in Iowa City, considered the state's most liberal area, is just west of the Mississippi.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/metro/nov04/274919.asp

Benchmarking  System Explained (East Valley Tribune, Nov. 13)
Bill Bonnstetter of Target Training International invented the TriMetrix System, an assessment program that lets employers set a benchmark for specific talents needed for superior performance in a job, then evaluate candidates against the benchmarks.  Bonnstetter, the company's president and chief executive officer, has taught management courses at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and community colleges around the United States. Eight years ago, he reached into his area of expertise and came up with what he thinks is a different way to find a job fit. He said that while other firms have development programs, his is the only one that sets a benchmark for a job by studying the job carefully.  "It came to me that we had to listen to the job," Bonnstetter said. "If the job could talk, it would clearly define the intelligence, the behavior needed to carry out the duties. The newspaper is based in Mesa, Ariz.
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/index.php?sty=31503

Wassink Notes Possible Autism Causes (Science News, Nov. 13)
Geneticist Thomas Wassink of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City says that most researchers studying the genetics of autism now assume that the disorder is caused by interplay between genes and factors from outside the body. He speculates that environmental factors trigger the disorder in children in whom 5 to 15 genes have created an underlying susceptibility. Gene hunters are homing in on several autism-related genes, he says.
 http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20041113/bob8.asp

Ropeadope Records To Appear At UI (Chicago Sun Times, Nov. 12)
Ropeadope records has solidified its standing among premier small labels while maintaining a dedication of high-quality diversity. The label releases have included work from artists such as the Spanish Harlem Orchestra, Robert Randolph, Charlie Hunter and DJ Logic. "Everyone is listening to everything these days. It's an iPod nation where your device is on shuffle. Music is flooding in from every source imaginable," says the label's founder, Andy Blackman Hurwitz. Now the label is taking its philosophy on the road -- and it's bringing along 25 artists and two buses. Hoping to take advantage of the national tour, Hurwitz has set up three stops to speak with students. The tour will stop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Colorado and Reed College in Portland, Ore.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/music/wkp-news-hiphop12.html

Jones Comments On Florida Voting (Palm Beach Post, Nov. 12)
Internet sites and chat rooms are awash with reports and so-called statistical analyses claiming to prove that four years after they unscrupulously handed the presidency to Bush, the dastardly Republicans have done it again -- especially in overwhelmingly Democratic Florida counties. What the conspiracy theorists ignore, say those who have reviewed purported proof that the state's voting system again went horribly awry, is the most obvious of facts: residents of such counties have a long and rich history of registering Democrat and sending Republicans to the White House. DOUG JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa who is an expert on optical-scan systems, said if someone wanted to throw an election, it would be easier to do so in large counties where tens of thousands of votes could be snared. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/politics/content/news/epaper/2004/11/12/m1a_Conspiracy_1112.html

Apicella Coauthors Study On Toxic Molecule (Medical News This Week, Nov. 12)
In a tiny Pacific Ocean squid, a toxic molecule that causes whooping cough and gonorrhea in humans has been found to be a critical catalyst for organ development. The toxin, produced by different types of bacteria in different hosts, is known as tracheal cytotoxin. And the astonishing discovery that it can be either good or bad -- depending on its biological context -- promises to rattle long-held perceptions of microbes and their role as pathogens. The new work, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was reported this week (Nov. 12) in the journal Science. Among the study's coauthors is MICHAEL A. APICELLA of the University of Iowa. The website is based in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=16263

Berg Comments On IEM Presidential Market Success (Science Magazine, Nov. 12)
In a year when pre-election polls fluctuated, election markets managed to send a relatively consistent message. From the end of the Republican convention on September 2 through Election Day, the odds on President Bush's eventual victory never dropped below 50 percent on the commercial Tradesports.com web site. On election eve, a $1 contract for Bush to win closed at 53 cents on the dollar, meaning he was believed to have a 53 percent chance of winning. On the Iowa Electronic Market, run by the University of Iowa, Bush consistently led in the betting. A late Kerry surge brought the Democrat up to only 49.5 percent in the "vote share" market -- a 1.5 percent overestimate (as calculated for a two-way race), which was nevertheless within the market's historical error rate. And there was no need to sweat all night over swing states Florida and Ohio: Election followers had only to log on to Tradesports.com to see that they were pegged in the GOP camp. According to Iowa accounting professor JOYCE BERG, the Iowa market stayed steadier and closer to the final results throughout the year than polls, which underestimated Bush's final vote share before the Republican convention, then overestimated it until the first debate. Even after the last debate, "the polls were all over the map" compared with the markets, says Berg.
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/vol306/issue5699/r-samples.shtml

Author Of UI Press Book 'Lincoln Highway' Quoted (New York Times, Nov. 12)
Many communities mark this notoriously folksy time of year with apple picking, homecoming floats, homemade pies and twig and leaf wreaths by the front door. In Coarsegold, a tiny village in the Sierra Nevada foothills, it's tarantulas. "They're darling," said Joanne Schwertfeger, 74, who was attending the town's seventh annual Tarantula Awareness Festival with her husband, Harry, on Halloween weekend. "You see them heading into the flower beds, just as cute as can be." In its deeply abiding wackiness, the tarantula festival, like other offbeat festivals around the country -- say, the annual Middle of Nowhere Carnival Days in Ainsworth, Neb. -- speaks to the American ability to turn a liability into an asset, wedding the time-honored tradition of the publicity stunt with an enduring pride of place, "the idea that every place is important and essential to who we are," said Drake Hokanson, an assistant professor at Winona State University in Minnesota and author of "The Lincoln Highway: Main Street Across America" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 1999).
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/12/travel/escapes/12TARA.html

Vandals Hit UI, UMD Science Buildings (Duluth News Tribune, Nov. 11)
Vandals caused more than $1 million in damage to a soon-to-be-opened science building at the University of Minnesota-Duluth this weekend. The UMD building was not the only Midwestern university science building damaged by vandals over the weekend. Seashore Hall and Spence Laboratories at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will be closed for some time because of vandalism on Sunday to research laboratories and offices. Hazardous chemicals were dumped, more than 30 computers damaged, and an undetermined number of mice and rats released, a University of Iowa news release said. Stories on the same topic appeared on the Web sites of the ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS and MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/10193598.htm

UI HRT Study Cited (Ft. Lauderdale Sun Sentinel, Nov. 11)
In 2002, the National Institutes of Health stopped a large hormone replacement therapy clinical trial due to evidence of increased risks of breast cancer for women taking the drugs.  Since then, additional studies have come along linking an increased risk of other forms of cancer, such as ovarian cancer and non-Hodgkins lymphoma, to the use of the drugs. One of the studies, by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Minnesota determined that a combination of hormone replacement therapy was associated with certain types of non-Hodgkins lymphoma.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/palmbeach/sfl-pbogen11nov11,0,524619.story?coll=sfla-news-palm

Murray to Leave UI for Harvard (Chronicle, Nov. 11)
One of the great things about working at the University of Iowa, says JEFFREY C. MURRAY, a professor of pediatrics, is that in addition to having a wonderful medical school, "it was a terrific place to raise our children." But now that his last child has left Iowa City for college in Boston, Dr. Murray and his wife are also leaving the nest. After two decades in Iowa, he'll head east next spring, where he will be a professor of pediatrics and chief of genetics at Children's Hospital Boston, a teaching hospital for Harvard University.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i12/12a00801.htm

Alumnus Named Carpet Designer (OnlyPunjab.com, Nov. 11)
Suzanne Tick, Inc., headed by nationally recognized artist and designer, Suzanne Tick, has been selected to direct the design for Monterey Carpets, a Tandus company and award-winning manufacturer of commercial carpets. Suzanne Tick, Inc. will be responsible for developing Monterey's overall product strategy by working with a team of talented design professionals to create new floor covering products for all market sectors. Tick is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA school of art and art history.
http://www.onlypunjab.com/fullstory1004-insight-Suzanne+Tick+Inc+Named+Director-status-25-newsID-21052.html

Man Introduced to Printmaking at UI (San Diego Union Tribune, Nov. 11)
For more than 30 years, artist Jack Ragland's large printmaking press languished in crates and storage sheds, first in Iowa and later in his Fallbrook home. Not anymore. Scoured, oiled and reassembled in its new quarters at the Art Studios of Fallbrook, it has become the focal point of a new center for North County Printmakers. Ragland acquired the press more than 30 years ago after using a similar one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's art department.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/northcounty/20041111-9999-m1m11fallbrk.html

Doctor Joins Wisconsin Teaching Staff (Times Plus, Nov. 9)
Dr. Anthony Rogerson, a board-certified otorhinolaryngologist, has been reappointed to the teaching staff of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Rogerson, who practices at The Monroe Clinic and also at the Clinic's Freeport branch, has been teaching in Madison for four years. Rogerson joined The Monroe Clinic in 1994 after receiving his medical degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and completing his residency in otorhinolaryngology at the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City. The newspaper serves Monroe, Wisc.
http://www.themonroetimes.com/b1108pro.htm

Grinnell President Tops Salary List (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 9)
The highest paid college president in Iowa was Grinnell College President Russell Osgood, according to a salary survey by the Des Moines Register. Osgood earned $397,497 in the 2002-2003 academic year, making him one of the highest paid leaders of liberal arts colleges in the country. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University this year pay their presidents $293,250. The University of Northern Iowa president gets $231,050.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1253386

Albright: New NCAA Rule Doesn't Diminish Injuries (Wichita Eagle, Nov. 9)
In 1998 the NCAA legislated a decrease in the number of scrimmages and full-contact practices in spring football because the rate of injury in the spring was three times the rate of fall practice. A new study conducted by the Big Ten Sports Medicine Committee shows that the rule didn't have the desired effect of reducing the number of injuries. "Our hypothesis was that the rule changes would not reduce the injury rate back down to the level seen in the fall," said JOHN ALBRIGHT, University of Iowa professor in the Sports Medicine Center. "We found that the injury rate for spring practices after the rule changes was three times that of fall practices," Albright said. "We also discovered some interesting characteristics about the injury rates." The same story appeared on the Web sites of the KANSAS CITY STAR, ONLYPUNJAB.COM and MEDICAL NEWS TODAY.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/sports/colleges/kansas_state_university/10132312.htm

Jones: E-voting Went Well for the First Time (Computerworld, Nov. 9)
Electronic voting systems avoided the virtual meltdown that some people had predicted during last Tuesday's election. But critics said the technology still has significant shortcomings that raise questions about the validity of the results tabulated by the machines. Officials in various states said they encountered relatively minor glitches, such as a North Carolina county's inability to account for about 4,500 ballots cast on touch-screen systems. Nonetheless, the apparently largely successful use of the 175,000 or so e-voting systems deployed throughout much of the U.S. led proponents to call the election a validation of the technology. DOUG JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, said voting "went remarkably smoothly, considering that we had record turnout and considering that it was scrutinized with more intensity then I can remember." But he said little is known about what can go wrong when people use e-voting systems. "All we can do is compare the number of ballots with the number of votes recorded and wonder, 'Why did people come to the polling place to cast a blank ballot?' " Jones said.
http://www.computerworld.com/governmenttopics/government/story/0,10801,97303,00.html

UI Student Adjusts from Life in National Guard (Providence Journal Bulletin, Nov. 9 Oct. 31)
From lectures in his Chinese history class about how emperors sold war to their people, to a local business' toy-soldier display representing Americans who have died in combat, Bradley Rehak, a senior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said he is constantly reminded of the war. "We can say that we got rid of a terrible dictator by going to war," said Rehak, 24, a medic with the Iowa National Guard. "The argument misses the far greater points that we haven't found that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction and we haven't found links between al-Qaida and Iraq." (registration required)
http://www.projo.com/yourlife/content/projo_20041109_ctback.27abc3.html

UI Worm Study Cited (Hindustan Times, Nov. 9)
Blood sucking leeches, flesh eating maggots and venomous lizards - they are not a part of any horror movie plot but "offbeat treatment" which is slowing finding its way back into alternative medical practice. The FDA has given clearance to a French company for commercial marketing of leeches as a medical device in the US. A new research has found that wounds treated with presurgical maggot therapy developed no infections after surgery. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine have found that certain worm eggs can relieve the abdominal distress caused by Inflammatory Bowel disease.
http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_1097615,0050.htm

Alumnus Wins Literature Award (Shreveport Times, Nov. 8)
Centenary College is awarding its annual Corrington Award for Literary Excellence to poet and artist Debora Greger and poet and literary critic William Logan on Tuesday at Centenary College's Kilpatrick Auditorium. Greger, who became an English professor at the University of Florida in 1988, earned her bachelor of arts from the University of Washington in 1971 and a master of fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1974. Her seven books of poetry are Movable Islands (1980), And (1985), The 1002nd Night (1990) Off-Season at the Edge of the World (1994), Desert Fathers, Uranium Daughters (1996) and most recently Western Art in October. The newspaper is based in Louisiana.
http://www.shreveporttimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041108/NEWS01/411080321/1002/NEWS

Lohman Comments on SAT Test (New York Times, Nov. 7)
In a story about the validity of the SAT test, a 2001 speech by Richard C. Atkinson, then the president of the University of California,  is cited. He declared that for admissions purposes the University of California would henceforth require only ''standardized tests that assess mastery of specific subject areas rather than undefined notions of 'aptitude.' '' There is some evidence that minority students actually did better on the analogy part of the test than on, say, the reading comprehension. DAVID LOHMAN, a University of Iowa psychology professor writing in ''Rethinking the SAT,'' a collection of papers in response to the Atkinson speech, says that in general, the gap between minority and white students is smaller on tests that measure verbal and mathematical reasoning ability than those that measure actual high school achievement, which suggests that the real problem with the SAT may be that it's not enough of an aptitude test and that it hasn't sufficiently weeded out the kinds of questions that the classroom teaches you to answer.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/07/education/edlife/117CHI.html?pagewanted=2&oref=login

Women in Professional Schools Bring Change (New York Times, Nov. 7)
Change is taking many forms these days at the nation's professional schools. Business students network at potluck dinners. Medical schools incorporate more materials on women's health. At law schools, the Socratic method has come under attack, its dominance diluted by approaches thought to be more woman-friendly. The changes reflect the schools' responses to increased numbers of female students.  Much of the change has taken place in medical school curriculums, with many more women's health issues now being taught, the Association of American Medical Colleges says. Often, female students and professors led the campaigns for their introduction. Consider the different issues confronting Dr. Diane Magrane, an associate vice president of the Association of American Medical Colleges, who attended medical school in the late 1970's, and Joni Rabiner, who is in her third year of medical school at N.Y.U. ''The women were fighting an obvious form of sexism then,'' Dr. Magrane says. ''We frequently got questions like 'What are you doing here?' and 'Why are you taking a man's place?' '' When she studied medicine, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, only 20 percent of the students were women; it was not unusual for them to be addressed as ''sweetie.''
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/07/education/edlife/117GEN.html?pagewanted=1

Weiner Comments On Antibody Drugs (Asbury Park Press, Nov. 7)
About 20 experimental drugs using Medarex antibodies are in various stages of testing. Since 1986, 17 antibody drugs have been approved in this country, mostly in the last six years. They include seven cancer drugs, among them, Erbitux for colorectal cancer; Remicade and Humira for rheumatoid arthritis; three drugs for preventing organ transplant rejection and Xolair for asthma. Dr. GEORGE WEINER, director of the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa, said antibody drugs also have promise against infections, heart and blood vessel diseases, and various immune system disorders. The paper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.app.com/app/story/0,21625,1103365,00.html

UI Study on Negative Campaign Ads Noted (Herald-News, Nov. 7)
Negative campaign ads work because they get voters' attention, according to Douglas Bruce, who teaches political campaign communication at John Carroll University. And they're important because surveys show that voters get the majority of their information about candidates from advertising, Bruce said. According to Bruce, a study conducted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showed independent voters are more likely to be swayed by negative ads, Bruce said. The newspaper serves northeast Ohio
http://www.news-herald.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=13311844&BRD=1698&PAG=461&dept_id=21849&rfi=6

Olshansky Seeks Ways to Prevent Heart Surgery (News 8, Nov. 6)
Doctors perform cardiac surgery as a last resort for serious heart problems. However, 250,000 people die each year from the operation or from drug interactions. There's a hefty price tag too; bypass surgery costs $30,000. DR. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, a cardiac electrophysiologist at the University of Iowa, says people too often consider this risky and costly surgery, as their "way out." He wants to prevent patients from getting to that point. He says taking control of your health could be your best heart-saver. A healthy diet, regular exercise, and even meditation are ways Olshansky said you can improve your health and heart. He's studying a group of people who have heart disease. These participants practice alternative therapies, including transcendental meditation, yoga, breathing exercises, herbal preparations, and a mostly vegetarian diet. Olshansky determines patients' results by evaluating their blood pressure levels, cholesterol levels, weight, and mood. The results of the study aren't out yet, but Olshansky is hopeful. He said a larger study will follow if the results are positive. News 8 is based in Austin, Texas. The story also appeared on NEWS 9 in San Antonio, Texas.
http://www.news8austin.com/content/living/health_beat/?ArID=124062&SecID=16 9

Colangelo Comments On TM (Longview Daily News, Nov. 6)
Transcendental Meditation -- the practice of invoking a state of deep relaxation by mentally repeating a word, or mantra, is being implemented in some schools. Advocates say TM can spread success at other schools, and groups promoting it recently have appeared at public schools in New York, California, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Kentucky and other places. But critics, and there are plenty, say Transcendental Meditation in public schools straddles the line between church and state, and that other forms of meditation would be just as effective for students. University of Iowa education professor NICK COLANGELO also notes that studies indicating benefits of TM have yet to break into some of the main education journals and, until that happens, "I think everybody's going to be a skeptic on it." The paper is based in Washington. The article also appeared in the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.tdn.com/articles/2004/11/06/this_day/news01.txt

Sculptor Studied at UI (Washington Times, Nov. 6)
One of the least known members of this "Me Generation" of avant garde artists of the '70s and '80s is Cuban-born "earth body" sculptor Ana Mendieta (1948-1985), whose work is just now receiving its first survey at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Mendieta earned two master's degrees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa City, the first in painting and, later, a second in the new Intermedia Program.

IEM Election Day Trading Noted (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Nov. 6)
Right up through election day, Carleton College political science professor Stephen Schier tracked the performance of the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS. This is an on-line teaching tool developed by faculty members at the University of Iowa's Henry Tippie College of Business to show how markets work.Registrants could play the futures market by buying or selling vote-share contracts for John Kerry or President Bush. The market calculated the overall demand for one candidate over the other. If one of them got 32.4 percent of the votes in the market, his contract would be worth 32.4 cents. Since June, Bush almost always led. His contract leaped to around 75 cents just before the first debate, but by the eve of the election it had fallen to about 52 cents. On Tuesday afternoon, Bush's contract crashed, plunging to below 30 cents as John Kerry's contract shot above 70. Traders were acting on early exit polls, which pointed to a win for Kerry.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/business/columnists/dave_beal/10112198.htm

Berg Explains IEM Trading (National Public Radio, Nov. 5)
University of Iowa professor JOYCE BERG explained the Iowa Electronic Market on the Motley Fool Radio Show, saying that the IEM trades futures contacts on political candidates, and prices aggregate the beliefs of its traders in a vote share or a winner-takes-all market. As a forecasting too, Berg said the IEM's average prediction error is about 1.3 percent. The IEM is also running a market on the incidence of flu cases in Iowa.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4156072

Jones: Investigate Alleged Voting Machine Manipulation (Oakland Tribune, Nov. 5)
Not surprisingly, an undercurrent of lefty suspicion is running on the Internet: Was the president re-elected by "moral values" voters or by faith-based electronic voting machines? Armchair analysts are sifting the exit polls and finding -- astonishingly enough -- a multipoint gap between how paperless touch-screen voters in Ohio and Florida said they voted and the actual outcome. The facts underlying the analyses are wobbly at best but the two campaigns should take a look anyway, says University of Iowa computer scientist DOUGLAS JONES, a former state voting-machine examiner and touch-screen skeptic. "If any election fraud on that magnitude ever came to light in the United States, it could lead to impeachments and Teapot Dome-scale scandals. To overlook them would be irresponsible," Jones said. "But my bet is there is nothing there."
http://www.oaklandtribune.com/Stories/0,1413,82~1865~2515704,00.html#

Squire: Upper Midwest Likely to Remain Political Battleground (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Nov. 5)
Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin proved to be three of the hottest battlegrounds during the election, with both campaigns spending considerable amounts of time and money here. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, also believes the legions of political warriors will be back in 2008 and beyond. "All three states are pretty evenly divided, and both parties seem to be reasonably happy" with what they were able to accomplish here, he said.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/5069862.html

IEM Predicted Bush Victory (BBC, Nov. 5)
The polls were off-beam, the pundits were caught napping, the press didn't cover itself in glory - did anyone confidently predict the result of the US election? The gambling community, perhaps. A glance at the returns of some of the world's biggest betting exchanges shows that President George W. Bush remained a clear favorite with punters right down to the wire.  On the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM), run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as a forum for experimental online betting, participants gave Bush a 51.2 percent chance of re-election on the eve of the poll - a score that tallied precisely with his eventual share of the popular vote, at the last count. The same story appeared on the Web site of SLATE.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/3982073.stm

UI Ballet Professor Thompson Dies Suddenly (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 5)
Basil Thompson, 67, a former ballet soloist and ballet master for the Joffrey and Milwaukee ballet companies, died Tuesday in Lynchburg, Va., of cardiac arrest. He was on sabbatical from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he had taught since 2000.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-passings5.2nov05,1,679611.story?coll=la-headlines-california

UI Alumnus to Play Superman (USA TODAY, Nov. 5)
Brandon Routh could not have chosen a more perfect Halloween costume last year. He showed up at a costume contest at Hollywood's hip Lucky Strike bowling alley wearing a black suit, a tie and a pair of geeky thick-rimmed glasses. His starched white shirt was unbuttoned just so, revealing a blue undershirt emblazoned with the Superman logo. His hair was perfect, right down to the curl on his forehead. He was so convincing, he won first place. Flash-forward a year. That Clark Kent-Superman getup is no longer just a Halloween costume. The relatively unknown actor, 25, was thrust into the spotlight Oct. 21 when Warner Bros. announced that Routh would star in its long-awaited Superman movie. Routh, an Iowa native, attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for a year.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2004-11-04-superman-routh_x.htm

Alumnus Leads Minnesota Community College (Minnesota Sun Publications, Nov. 5)
Katherine Hiyane-Brown says she feels right at home on the campus of Normandale Community College. Hiyane-Brown hit the ground running in mid-summer after she was named the president of Normandale, the largest of Minnesota's community colleges. She earned her Master's degree in instructional design and technology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.mnsun.com/story.asp?city=Bloomington&story=147235

Gurnett Recorded Sounds of Saturn's Rings (New Scientist, Nov. 4)
Saturn's magnificent ring system - a huge disc resembling an old gramophone record - turns out to share another property with the LP: it constantly emits a melodic series of musical notes. The surprising discovery was made by radio and plasma wave detectors on board the Cassini spacecraft as it passed over Saturn's rings during its arrival at the planet in July. The tones are emitted as radio waves. DON GURNETT of the University of Iowa says his team reduced their frequencies by a factor of five to bring them into the range of human hearing. Gurnett says he was "completely astonished" when he heard the musical notes. The tones are short, typically lasting between one and three seconds, and unlike the ethereal sliding tones associated with other cosmic processes, every one is quite distinct. The evidence suggests that each tone is produced by the impact of a meteoroid on the icy chunks that make up the rings.
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996639

Lewis-Beck Model Closely Calls Election Results (The Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 4)
The small band of political scientists who specialize in forecasting presidential elections had a lot more to crow about this year than in 2000, when their predictions that Al Gore would win a large share of the popular vote -- and, implicitly, the election -- went far astray.  This year's election was kinder to the forecasters' models. Political scientists offered seven predictions in September, at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, and four of those predictions turned out to fall within 2.5 percentage points of President Bush's actual popular-vote share of 51.6 percent. (That was the number as of late Wednesday, with 99 percent of the nation's precincts reporting.) One nearly correct model was created by the team of MICHAEL S. LEWIS-BECK, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa, and Charles Tien, an associate professor of political science at Hunter College of the City University of New York. Their model measures economic growth, the incumbent's popularity, and the number of jobs created; they predicted that Mr. Bush would win 49.9 percent of the popular vote.
http://chronicle.com/prm/daily/2004/11/2004110402n.htm

Squire: Bush Capitalized On Rural Vote (Globe & Mail, Nov. 4)
Using opposition to same-sex marriage and other emotional issues such as abortion, as well as concerns over security, the Bush campaign managed to make sure these voters turned out in droves on election day. He sought out millions of uninterested voters and transformed them into enthusiastic Bush backers. The problem for the Democrats is that they have failed to connect with small-town Americans, who tend to be quite religious. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said the Republicans were able to turn a narrow win in the state for Democrat Al Gore in 2000 into a small victory for Bush on Tuesday by increasing their vote in rural areas and small towns. "The Republicans were able to mobilize their rural constituency most on values . . . and this in face of an agricultural economy that's not terrific," Squire said. "The people in small towns and on farms stayed with the Republicans largely because of concerns over larger social issues." The paper is based in Canada.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20041104/ELXNBUSH04/TPInternational/Americas

Colangelo Comments On TM (South Bend Tribune, Nov. 4)
Transcendental Meditation -- the practice of invoking a state of deep relaxation by mentally repeating a word, or mantra, is being implemented in some schools. Advocates say TM can spread success at other schools, and groups promoting it recently have appeared at public schools in New York, California, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Kentucky and other places. But critics, and there are plenty, say Transcendental Meditation in public schools straddles the line between church and state, and that other forms of meditation would be just as effective for students. University of Iowa education professor NICK COLANGELO also notes that studies indicating benefits of TM have yet to break into some of the main education journals and, until that happens, "I think everybody's going to be a skeptic on it." The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2004/11/04/faith.20041104-sbt-MICH-D4-Transcendental_Medit.sto

Squire: Many Voters Concerned About Moral Issues (Orlando Sentinel, Nov. 4)
Across the nation and in Florida, the dominant issues of terrorism and moral values spelled victory for George W. Bush. The fact that moral values ranked second among Florida voters' concerns -- and No. 1 nationally -- indicates that Bush tapped into something that runs deeper than the voter pool of white conservative Protestants: the "Religious Right." In Florida, only 15 percent of voters identified themselves as white conservative Protestants. And though they gave Bush 95 percent of their vote, that's not enough to give him a 52 percent-47 percent victory over Democratic Sen. John Kerry. "I don't think the only people who are concerned about moral issues are evangelical Christians," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political-science professor. "There is a pretty broad swath of people from other religions who have reservations about these things." The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/elections/orl-asecvalues04110404nov04,1,5500539.story?coll=orl-news-headlines

Squire: Kerry Did As Well As Possible In Election (AlterNet, Nov. 4)
With President Bush winning the first popular vote majority in 16 years over Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts, but adding almost no new states to his column since 2000, the 2004 election has revealed a political landscape that remains deeply, and almost immovably, divided -- but one in which Republicans now seem to hold a clear upper hand. Significantly, many of Kerry's voters were primarily motivated by opposition to Bush, rather than by strong enthusiasm for their own candidate -- suggesting that anger may not have proved the motivating force many Democrats once believed it would be. Kerry also struggled to connect with voters on a personal level, never managing to turn dissatisfaction with Bush's policies into a clear majority of support for his candidacy. But others argue that Kerry actually faced an enormous challenge in running against an incumbent president during wartime -- and point out that the senator managed to come extremely close to winning. "Kerry did about as well as the Democrats could have hoped," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "I'm not sure either candidate could have done much more than they did to change the course of the election." The story originally appeared in the CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR.
http://www.alternet.org/election04/20400/

Rietz Touts Accuracy Of IEM (Slate, Nov. 3)
The exit polls were way off. The pre-election opinion polls weren't much better. But how did the markets do at predicting the outcome Tuesday night? The Iowa Electronic Markets, which has been around at the University of Iowa since 1988, offer winner-takes-all contracts, which pay off $1 if your candidate wins and nothing if he loses, as well as contracts on the percentage of the national two-party vote share. (IEM limits investors to $500 in wagers.) THOMAS RIETZ, a University of Iowa professor and an IEM director, said this summer that a comparison of 596 opinion polls with Iowa's presidential futures prices at the time the polls were taken shows that the futures prices were closer to the actual result 76 percent of the time.
http://slate.msn.com/id/2109137/

First-Time Voters Observed (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 3)
As many as 1.5 million Iowans--a record--were expected to vote in the Nov. 2 election. At an Iowa City recreation center, first-time voters in UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sweatshirts and senior citizens passed under the gaze of poll watchers and a polling-place staff headed by Linda Yanney. "For political junkies, this is like Christmas every four years," she said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0411030361nov03,1,4083883.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Trading Volume High in IEM (Pittsburg Post-Gazette, Nov. 3)
John Kerry stock, in a "winner-take-all" contest run by the University of Iowa's Iowa Electronic Markets hit 68 cents per share at 4:45 p.m. EST, on Nov. 2 vs. 32 cents for President Bush. For most of the campaign, Bush had been either leading his rival or running neck and neck. But the past couple of days have brought a huge increase in trading volume, sending the number of shares changing hands to roughly 40,000, or 10 times normal on Monday, said GEORGE NEUMANN, co-founder and director of IEM.  Neumann said that in the past several days, daytime trading has tended to give Kerry a lift that sometimes decreases overnight. He said IEM sponsors were at a loss to explain the pattern, but there was some speculation that it might be a "student effect" with students dominating trading during the day. The IEM, founded in 1988 as a research tool for students and faculty, has since opened its political markets to outside traders.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04308/405588.stm

Weiner Comments On Antibody Drugs (Winston-Salem Journal, Nov. 3)
About 20 experimental drugs using Medarex antibodies are in various stages of testing. Since 1986, 17 antibody drugs have been approved in this country, mostly in the last six years. They include seven cancer drugs, among them, Erbitux for colorectal cancer; Remicade and Humira for rheumatoid arthritis; three drugs for preventing organ transplant rejection and Xolair for asthma. Dr. GEORGE WEINER, director of the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa, said antibody drugs also have promise against infections, heart and blood vessel diseases, and various immune system disorders. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031778907346&path=!business&s=1037645507703

Stocks Retreat on Election Talk (New York Times, Nov. 3)
Stocks retreated in late trading Tuesday amid speculation that surveys of voters leaving the polls were showing Senator John Kerry ahead in the presidential election. The Standard & Poor's 500-stock index erased most of its advance and the Dow Jones industrial average snapped a five-day rally. Mr. Kerry led Mr. Bush by 18.1 percentage points in trading on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a nonprofit political betting system run by the University of Iowa, as of 4 p.m. New York time. Two hours earlier, Mr. Bush had a 3.8 percentage point advantage over Mr. Kerry in the Iowa market. The article originally appeared on BLOOMBERG NEWS.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/03/business/03stox.html

UI Ballet Master Basil Thompson Dies (MSNBC.com, Nov. 2)
BASIL THOMPSON, an internationally acclaimed ballet master on sabbatical from the University of Iowa, died Tuesday in Lynchburg, Va., of sudden cardiac arrest. He was 67. Thompson, trained by the Sadlers Wells Ballet School in London, was a former soloist with the American Ballet Theatre in New York and former artistic director of the Milwaukee Ballet. He also was a former ballet master of the Chicago-based Joffrey Ballet, and only recently had reconstructed "Petrouchka" for the Joffrey's Nureyev Tribute. ALAN SENER, chairman of the University of Iowa dance department, said he had last seen Thompson at a performance of "Petrouchka" last week. "I sat one row behind his family, where I watched him dance all the parts from his seat," Sener said. He said the university had lost a tremendous asset in Thompson. "He provided a very valuable bridge between the professional field and academe. He was loved by the students and he provided an exuberance, a sense of vitality and a love of life, which he brought to both his teaching and his work on stage," Sener said. The Associated Press story appeared on the websites of NEW YORK NEWSDAY,  the MIAMI HERALD, SEATTLE POST-INTELLEGENCER, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, and numerous others.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6393148/

Artist Sets Up Press (San Diego Union-Tribune,  Nov. 2)
For more than 30 years, artist Jack Ragland's large printmaking press languished in crates and storage sheds, first in Iowa and later in his Fallbrook home. Scoured, oiled and reassembled in its new quarters at the Art Studios of Fallbrook, it has become the focal point of a new center for North County Printmakers. Ragland acquired the press more than 30 years ago after using a similar one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S art department.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/northcounty/20041103-9999-m1m03tffall.html

IEM Prices Noted on Election Day (Reuters, Nov. 2)
Online traders have swung in late trading on Tuesday toward Democratic challenger John Kerry topping George W. Bush for the U.S. presidency, perhaps driven by unconfirmed Internet Weblog reports of exit polls that showed Kerry with an early advantage. The Iowa Electronic Markets, which has been trading election contracts since 1988, also showed a switch with the winner-takes-all contract showing a 52.3 percent probability of Kerry victory compared with 45.6 percent for Bush.  As of midnight Monday, Bush had a statistically insignificant 51 percent probability of winning the popular vote in the election, according to the Iowa contracts, slightly ahead of Kerry's 49 percent. The Iowa exchange traded 44,000 contracts on Monday. "What you're seeing is people have very strong opinions but they're very evenly split," said TOM RIETZ, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, which runs the exchange as a way of studying markets. "We've never seen anything like this before."
http://www.reuters.com/financeNewsArticle.jhtml?type=bondsNews&storyID=6693325

IEM Projections Listed (BusinessWeek.com, Nov. 2)
The Iowa Electronic Markets is a real-money futures market maintained by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Tippie College of Business, which provide probability estimates for events such as elections. The futures contracts are priced for the GOP maintaining control of both houses. Indeed, the market is priced for either a GOP pickup in House seats or for no change in composition. The odds for the Senate aren't quite as strong, with around a 50-50 odds of a Republican pickup In the Presidential contest, the chances of a Bush win narrowed through the debates but then widened. The futures contracts still point to a Bush win, which is in contrast to the mixed opinion polls.
http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/nov2004/nf2004112_5321_db038.htm

Squire Comments on Congressional Races (Kansas City Star, Nov. 2)
Predicting the political landscape of the country's statehouse races isn't easy because the parties are clinging to razor-thin margins. The divide between Republican and Democratic legislators is so narrow in 23 states that a loss or gain of just a handful of seats could swing control to the opposite party in 28 legislative chambers. Power could change hands by a shift of just three seats in 18 state senates and a change of five seats in 10 lower chambers. At stake is the chance to set the legislative agenda. "There's been so much attention on the presidential race that a lot of these other (legislative) races have gotten lost," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa who has tracked legislative races across the country and is co-editor of Legislative Studies Quarterly.

IEM Noted as Legal Market (The Age , Nov. 2)
It is technically illegal to bet on a presidential election in the US, but the University of Iowa business school runs a trading site called the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS that is open to the public. It is legal because the university uses it for educational purposes. Traders can buy or sell contracts based on who they think will win. Earlier this week, a Bush contract was more expensive than a Kerry contract, meaning punters - sorry, traders - think Mr. Bush will win. The three professors who set up the scheme say it has predicted the winner of all but one of the presidential elections since 1988.. The Age is based in Australia. The article also appeared in the SYNDEY MORNING HERALD
http://www.theage.com.au/news/World/Robo-Bill-puts-himself-on-the-line-for-Kerry/2004/11/02/1099362141377.html?oneclick=true

IEM Trading Tightens Up (Pittsburg Post-Gazette, Nov. 2)
Online trading in presidential futures late yesterday seesawed between President Bush and Sen. John F. Kerry. As of 4:45 p.m. EST yesterday on the Iowa Electronic Markets, stock in the Bush campaign was at 50.1 cents per share compared with rival Kerry's shares, which traded at 49.4 cents each in a winner-take-all contest. Just 15 minutes before, Kerry held the edge. The gap between the two has narrowed considerably in recent weeks, during which traders gave Bush a 61 percent chance to Kerry's 39 percent chance of winning as recently as a week ago. Investors in the IEM market can put in as little as $5 or as much as $500 to buy futures contracts based on the outcome of the 2004 presidential election.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=714e687ec6ff6af64c5ab6d44a018393&_docnum=27&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVA&_md5=81569922f3270b7d1806682ea8804700

Squire Comments on Election Maps (San Bernardino Sun, Nov. 1)
CBS News election coverage featured 2-D and 3-D maps that integrated demographics, exit poll results and vote counts using software from Redlands-based ESRI. CBS had access to thousands of maps broken up by about 30 different variables race, blue collar vs. white collar, education levels and voting methods. "For an astute observer looking at them, they could be very useful,' said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa who has frequently provided election-night analysis for Iowa television stations." The trick is whether you can make sense of all the information." The newspaper is based in California.
http://www.sbsun.com/Stories/0,1413,208~12588~2506992,00.html

Colangelo Comments on TM (Rednova.com, Nov. 1)
Transcendental Meditation - the practice of invoking a state of deep relaxation by mentally repeating a word, or mantra is being implemented in some schools. Advocates say TM can spread success at other schools, and groups promoting it recently have appeared at public schools in New York, California, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Kentucky and other places. But critics, and there are plenty, say Transcendental Meditation in public schools straddles the line between church and state, and that other forms of meditation would be just as effective for students. University of Iowa education professor NICK COLANGELO also notes that studies indicating benefits of TM have yet to break into some of the main education journals and, until that happens, "I think everybody's going to be a skeptic on it."
http://www.rednova.com/news/display/?id=99520

Nelson Explains IEM Trading (United Press International, Nov. 1)
One futures market indicator is IEM a small-futures exchange run by the faculty at the University of Iowa Henry B. Tippie College of Business. They have been forecasting election results since 1988 based on a market where traders buy and sell contracts centered on the latest political news. Traders purchase and sell these contracts based on whom they think the most-likely candidate will be to win the election, not on actual personal preference. There are 3,000 registered accounts on IEM but only 1,100 have made transactions since the market opened in June. The vast majority of traders -- 99 percent -- are living in the United States and half of them are academics.The site which is research based is a not-for-profit trade exchange where traders do not make hundreds or thousands of dollars. In fact for every contract won, traders make $1. They are limited to making transaction amounts ranging from $5 to $500. But for all intensive purposes, IEM works very much like a market in which traders can buy and sell at any time they want. According to economic professor FORREST NELSON of the University of Iowa, markets are stronger indicators when it comes to forecasting presidential elections than polls. "There is a financial initiative to get it right," said Nelson, "The numbers are immediate feedback to traders, which is better than a civil service poll. And it causes traders to collect more information (before purchasing or selling a share)."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ca957fd9d40d899dc4b34f55f6516442&_docnum=57&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVA&_md5=cb19d5a8a0eaf587c312bd62bd0cc9fa

IEM Futures Market Explained (Canadian Broadcasting Company, Nov. 1)
Since 1988, the University of Iowa has run a forum where traders can buy and sell contracts on who will prevail in the world's most-watched quadrennial race. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) is the best known of the so-called "political futures" markets.  It works much like the local racetrack. People buy contracts on who they think will win, not who they want to win (as in a poll). With real money on the line (trades range from $5 US to $500 US), there's no room for wishful thinking or sloppy sentiment. People bet on perceived winners. So Democrats could end up voting for Kerry but betting on Bush...and vice-versa.  So what is the University of Iowa's winner-takes-all market saying about the 2004 election? As of Nov. 1, Bush was ahead, but his lead was shrinking. The Bush contract (which cost more than 70 cents US in late September) was going for about 54 cents US. The Kerry contract cost 46 cents US.  That means that the IEM's participants believe that Bush has a 54/46 chance of getting at least one more vote than John Kerry.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/viewpoint/vp_mcfeat/20041101.html

Jones Comments On Colorado Use Of E-Voting (Rocky Mountain News, Nov. 1)
Two Colorado companies are no doubt hoping for a relatively glitch- free election Tuesday. Ciber Inc. and SysTest Labs are among three companies nationwide authorized by state officials to test the accuracy of touch-screen voting systems that more than 45 million Americans will have the opportunity to use. The ATM-like machines are a target of controversy, in part because some experts question the reliability of the software that operates the new systems. Ciber of Greenwood Village and SysTest of Denver test and "qualify" the software and related components to ensure they meet federal standards. A third company, Wyle Laboratories, headquartered in El Segundo, Calif., performs trial runs that ensure the machines operate correctly under various conditions and environments. SysTest also is authorized to do so. "This is looking like it's going to be one of the most closely scrutinized elections ever," said DOUGLAS JONES, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. The paper is based in Colorado.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/technology/article/0,1299,DRMN_49_3295153,00.html

Jones Comments On Prevalence Of Ballot Hand-Counting (WMTW, Nov. 1)
When Mainers cast their votes Tuesday, most communities will end up counting the ballots by hand. The secretary of state says about 80 percent of Maine communities count ballots by hand. Broken down by population, 65 percent of Maine citizens vote on paper ballots that are read by optical scanning machines, and 35 percent vote on paper ballots counted by hand. DOUGLAS JONES is a computer scientist at the University of Iowa who studies voting machines. He says North Dakota, Wyoming and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan also have unusually high numbers of communities that tally their votes by hand. The station is based in Portland, Maine.
http://www.wmtw.com/Global/story.asp?S=2504649

Weiner Comments On Antibody Drugs (Desert Sun, Nov. 1)
About 20 experimental drugs using Medarex antibodies are in various stages of testing. Since 1986, 17 antibody drugs have been approved in this country, mostly in the last six years. They include seven cancer drugs, among them, Erbitux for colorectal cancer; Remicade and Humira for rheumatoid arthritis; three drugs for preventing organ transplant rejection and Xolair for asthma. Dr. GEORGE WEINER, director of the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa, said antibody drugs also have promise against infections, heart and blood vessel diseases, and various immune system disorders. The paper is based in California. A version of the story also ran on the website of the ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT GAZETTE.
http://www.thedesertsun.com/news/stories2004/business/20041101001848.shtml

Jones Quoted About Maine Ballot Counting (Portland Press-Herald, Nov. 1)
Paper ballots are still counted by hand in 80 percent of Maine communities on Election Day. And despite a national movement toward computerized voting machines, Maine officials want to tread lightly when it comes to changing what has worked. DOUGLAS JONES, a computer scientist who studies voting machines at the University of Iowa, says it appeared Maine has an unusually high number of communities still counting ballots by hand. In that way, Maine is similar to North Dakota, Wyoming and Michigan's Upper Peninsula. "In places like that, it's sensible not to go overboard on technology," he said. The paper is based in Maine. A version of the story also appeared on the website of THE MORNING SENTINEL in Maine.
http://pressherald.mainetoday.com/news/state/041101paperballots.shtml

Colangelo: TM in Schools has Skeptics (RedNova, Nov. 1)
Here in the American headquarters of Transcendental Meditation, people like to brag that, much as in Garrison Keillor's fictional Lake Wobegon, "all the children are above average." The secret, school officials say, is Transcendental Meditation -- the practice of invoking a state of deep relaxation by mentally repeating a word, or mantra. But critics, and there are plenty, say Transcendental Meditation in public schools straddles the line between church and state, and that other forms of meditation would be just as effective for students. Critics contend most private schools that charge $12,000 a year for high school tuition likely would be able to post similar numbers. University of Iowa education professor NICK COLANGELO also notes that studies indicating benefits of TM have yet to break into some of the main education journals and, until that happens, "I think everybody's going to be a skeptic on it." The same story appeared on the Web site of the EUGENE (OR) REGISTER GUARD, OCALA (FL) BANNER STAR and AKRON BEACON JOURNAL.
http://www.rednova.com/news/display/?id=98967

UI Democratic Party Club Plans Campaign Blitz (Globe & Mail, Nov. 1)
In the final hours of a bitterly divisive presidential campaign, opposing armies of activists are waging a vast ground war to ensure that the record numbers of Americans who are registered to vote actually turn up at the polling stations. Iowa saw a 140,000-strong increase in voter registration this year, and Democrats are counting on most of those new registrants -- many of them under 25 -- to support Sen. John Kerry. Karen Emmerson, head of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Democratic Party club, organized a weekend blitz with hundreds of volunteers going floor-to-floor in the dorms and door-to-door in the surrounding neighborhoods. The club was planning to hold a "midnight madness" event after the trick-or-treaters finished their rounds last night, going through the campus area to drop off campaign literature. The paper is based in Canada.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20041101/CAMPTURNOUT01/TPInternational/Americas

Jones: E-Voting Systems Flawed (Wired, Nov. 1)
In 1996, a federal testing lab responsible for evaluating voting systems in the United States examined the software for a new electronic voting machine made by I-Mark Systems of Omaha, Nebraska. The tester included a note in the lab's report praising the system for having the best voting software he had ever seen, particularly the security and use of encryption. DOUG JONES, Iowa's chief examiner of voting equipment and a computer scientist at the University of Iowa, was struck by this note. Usually testers are careful to be impartial. But Jones was not impressed with the system. Instead, he found poor design that used an outdated encryption scheme proven to be insecure. He later wrote that such a primitive system "should never have come to market." But come to market it did. By 1997, I-Mark had been purchased by Global Election Systems of McKinney, Texas, which in turn was purchased by Diebold in 2002. Diebold marketed the I-Mark machine as the AccuVote-TS and subsequently signed an exclusive $54 million contract to supply Georgia with the touch-screen machines statewide. In 2003, Maryland signed a similar agreement. Last year, computer scientists found that the Diebold system still possessed the same flaws Jones had flagged six years earlier, despite subsequent rounds of testing. "I thought surely something must have changed in all of that time," Jones said. "There's really very little excuse for the examiners not to have noticed."
http://www.wired.com/news/evote/0,2645,65535,00.html?tw=wn_tophead_1

 

 

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