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UI in the News

May, 2004

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Rice Measures Civic Culture Among Groups (Scientific American, June 2004)
Recent decades have seen a revival of interest in civic culture, sometimes called social capital or civic republicanism. As the term is generally used, it includes a high level of trust and tolerance, an egalitarian spirit, volunteerism, an interest in keeping informed and participation in public affairs. Political scientists TOM W. RICE of the University of Iowa and Jan L. Feldman of the University of Vermont have measured civic culture among ancestry groups in the U.S. They find that Americans of Scandinavian and British descent have the highest levels of civic culture, with those of French, Irish, German and Dutch descent having somewhat lower levels; those of Italian and Spanish descent have decidedly lower levels. A subscription is required to read the full article, but a summary may be found at:
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa006&colID=19&articleID=00047EBC-6694-10A9-A47783414B7F0000

Kraft Says Flood-Ravaged Heirlooms Can Be Saved (Detroit Free Press, May 28)
Cherished books, old photos and clothing covered in dark, greasy mud - soiled by flood damage - shouldn't automatically be tossed to the curb. Preservation experts say most paper products can be salvaged if they are worked on within 72 hours of being damaged. "You're so overwhelmed that you just want to get rid of it," said NANCY E. KRAFT, head of the University of Iowa Library's preservation department. "I hate to see people throw out their wedding dress, or their baby blanket or old photos. They might be able to save them. There is no guarantee but it's worth a shot." This story also appeared on the Web site of MICHIGAN LIVE, the online Web site for a consortium of Michigan newspapers.
http://www.freep.com/news/statewire/sw98543_20040527.htm

Ferentz Cheers Dying Student (Omaha World Herald, May 28)
When it became apparent that Bruce Hayden Miller would not be able to attend his graduation ceremony, the Cedar Falls School District brought a ceremony to him. Miller, 18, who suffered from muscular dystrophy, was given his diploma last week at the Cedar Valley Hospice Home in Waterloo. He died Sunday, the day of the Cedar Falls High School Class of 2004 graduation. An avid University of Iowa football fan, Bruce Miller had begun corresponding with Hawkeye Coach KIRK FERENTZ shortly after Iowa's Outback Bowl victory. Just last week, he met the coach at a banquet at the Sunnyside Country Club in Waterloo. "I know that meant a lot to him," said Megan Dreyer, Miller's sister. "He was the biggest Hawkeye fan."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1107655

Art Exhibit Features Works by Lasansky (Art Daily, May 28)
The University of Miami's Lowe Art Museum will host "Latin American Graphics: The Evolution of Identity from The Mythical to The Personal" from June 19 through July 25, 2004. Encompassing 44 graphic works by 39 artists in a variety of media, the exhibition surveys the evolution of the modern and contemporary print from the mid-20th century to the present. Among the artists whose work is on display is Mauricio Lasansky, who established a print department at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.artdaily.com/section/news/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=10518

Carter: Pharmacists Help Reduce Drug Interactions (Heart Center Online, May 27)
People with high blood pressure who take four or more medications very often experience interactions between the drugs they're prescribed, a study shows. However, the rate of these interactions may be reduced somewhat when a pharmacist is intensively involved in their care. Up to 10 percent of adverse drug events involve drug-drug interactions, at a projected societal cost of more than $177 billion per year, the researchers note in the May issue of the American Journal of Hypertension. Dr. BARRY L. CARTER from the UI College of Pharmacy and colleagues set out to see if the frequency of this problem could be curbed by greater pharmacist involvement. They enrolled 1,377 Medicaid patients with high blood pressure in the Iowa "pharmaceutical case management" (PCM) program and followed them for 9 months. All of the patients were taking four or more oral medications in their total medication regimen.
http://www.heartcenteronline.com/myheartdr/home/research-detail.cfm?reutersid=4405

Carter Studies Drug Interaction (Reuters, May 27)
People with high blood pressure who take four or more medications very often experience interactions between the drugs they're prescribed, a study shows. However, the rate of these interactions may be reduced somewhat when a pharmacist is intensively involved in their care. Up to 10 percent of adverse drug events involve drug-drug interactions, at a projected societal cost of more than $177 billion per year, the researchers note in the May issue of the American Journal of Hypertension. Dr. BARRY L. CARTER from the College of Pharmacy at the University of Iowa in Iowa City and colleagues set out to see if the frequency of this problem could be curbed by greater pharmacist involvement. This article also appeared on YAHOO NEWS.
http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsArticle.jhtml?type=healthNews&storyID=5266484&section=news

Author Attended UI (Washington Post, May 27)
A book review of "This Side of Married," by Rachel Pastan, notes that the author attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A59009-2004May26.html

Local Veteran Is UI Alumnus (Woodlands Villager, May 27)
For veterans like Dick Seidler and their families, Memorial Day is not a holiday from work and an excuse to barbecue. It's a day to reflect on what it means to have served in the military. Seidler, 82, who lives in The Woodlands, served 42 years in the U.S. Air Force, both as an enlisted and Reserve member, and retired as a colonel. He joined at age 21 in January 1942, after the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. He had already received a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Texas.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=11806613&BRD=1572&PAG=461&dept_id=183019&rfi=6

Gillan Comments On Heptazines (Chemical & Engineering News, May 26)
The chemistry of an odd family of nitrogen-rich molecules discovered over 150 years ago is enjoying a renaissance, thanks to a new appreciation for its potential in creating carbon nitride materials. Known as tri-s-triazines, or heptazines, the molecules share a triangular core group, C6N7, of three fused triazine rings. Chemists can vary what's attached to the triangle's corners, from hydroxyl groups to azides. These molecules have rigid structures and are frequently photoluminescent, and most are thermally stable. In the past few years, a flurry of papers on heptazine research have signaled renewed interest in this area. "It's like an old photograph that someone took out of a drawer and put back on the wall," says EDWARD G. GILLAN, chemistry professor at the University of Iowa, whose lab recently created an azide-substituted heptazine.
http://pubs.acs.org/cen/news/8221/8221earlyscience.html

Kerber Comments On Emergence Of Women Professionals (Orlando Sentinel, May 26)
A story about the Notable American Women series, which is scheduled for publication late this year, says the biographical dictionary was published initially by the Harvard University Press in 1971 and has now become a "who's in/who's out" filtering exercise for its editors. A quick glance nets you such diverse but indisputably notables as comedian Lucille Ball and social activist Dorothy Day; dancer Martha Graham and civil-rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer; Hollywood diva Rita Hayworth and anthropologist Margaret Mead. By the time the first volumes came out in 1971, the so-called "second wave" of feminism -- whose origin is often dated to the 1963 publication of Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique -- had gathered enough momentum to start rocking America's sociocultural boat. In profession after profession, women began forcing their way through previously barred doors. The study of history proved no exception, though the first women through those doors didn't have an easy time of it. "The scorn was incredible," says LINDA KERBER, a prominent University of Iowa scholar and former president of the Organization of American Historians. Kerber is talking about the resistance she and her colleagues encountered, even in the early 1970s, to the notion that studying women was a legitimate academic endeavor. Yet to examine the world from this new perspective was tremendously energizing as well. "All the inherited history has to be redone. There ain't no girls in it!" she says. "And suddenly, they matter."
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/lifestyle/orl-livnotablewomen052604may26,0,6456188.story?coll=orl-home-entlife

UI Alumnus Teaches Music In Texas (Dallas Morning News, May 26)
A feature on David Stone, a trumpeter and a music teacher at Eubanks Intermediate School in Tarrant County, Texas, says his goal at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was to become the principal trumpet player for the Chicago Symphony. But spending hours on end in the practice room didn't appeal to him. So he dedicated himself to learning as much as he could about teaching music. When a job opportunity brought his wife to Texas, he was thrilled to find a job teaching in "the band state." http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/city/tarrant/stories/052604dnnorteacher.cad15.html

Liu Comments On Male Asian Stereotypes (Chicago Tribune, May 25)
Wanting to know what the mostly Asian American class considered desirable, Professor Darrell Hamamoto asked: What posters are on your bedroom walls? After an uncomfortable silence, Hamamoto got the names he expected -- celebrities including Brad Pitt. There wasn't an Asian among them, which reinforced what he has long believed: that cliches and stereotypes about Asian men have rendered them sexual afterthoughts. The stereotypes have a clear emotional effect on Asian American men, said WILLIAM LIU, an assistant professor of counseling psychology at the University of Iowa. Those who live in predominantly non-Asian communities begin to loathe their appearance and develop ideals of beauty that value blond hair and blue eyes. Some court non-Asian women exclusively as a sign of status because "they're able to overcome stereotypes and cultural prohibitions," Liu said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/chi-0405250034may25,1,3008900.story?coll=chi-leisuretempo-hed

Kerry Prospects Rise In IEM (Chicago Tribune, May 25)
Analysts Henry Dickson and Charles Reinhard of Lehman Brothers on Monday published a report that picks sectors and stocks likely to benefit from a Bush win or a John Kerry win. A Bush portfolio includes drugmakers, oil drillers, utilities, asset managers, automakers and high-end retailers. A Kerry portfolio includes health-care facilities, government-sponsored enterprises, home builders, annuity purveyors and mass retailers. The Kerry portfolio has outperformed the Bush portfolio since late April, according to the Lehman Brothers' report. But Kerry's prospects began to rise at the beginning of the year, according to futures trading on the 2004 president's race sponsored by the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS at the University of Iowa.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/printedition/chi-0405250157may25,1,3310217.column

Baron Comments On Pain Study (Washington Times, May 25)
A patient's recollection of pain associated with a medical or dental procedure may be more intense than the pain actually experienced, a new report has found. The report, published in the Journal of Pain, suggests that the negative recollection associated with a dreaded visit to a dentist, periodontist or doctor may have more to do with how emotionally stressed the patient was during the experience rather than how much pain he or she endured at the time. ROBERT BARON, a professor of psychology at the University of Iowa, said these findings demonstrate the importance of health care providers recognizing and treating "not just the clinical symptoms of disease, but the emotional reactions of patients during treatment. Failure to do so will often heighten the patients' negative recollection of treatment stress, which, in turn, will be likely to discourage them from seeking follow-up or continued treatment," Mr. Baron said.
http://washingtontimes.com/national/20040524-103159-6969r.htm

Faculty Work, Pay Report Cited (Omaha World Herald, May 25)
Faculty at Iowa's three public universities work at or above the national average, but lag in salary, according to a report from the Board of Regents. The latest report showed that faculty at Iowa State University averaged the most hours worked in a week, 58.2 hours for the school year that began last fall. Faculty at the University of Iowa averaged 57.1 hours per week; at the University of Northern Iowa, the average hours worked per week was 54.6. KATHERINE TACHAU, president of the Faculty Senate at the University of Iowa, noted that the report also highlighted lagging salaries. Professors at all three universities work at or above the national average of hours, but their salaries rank near the bottom when compared with their peers at other institutions, she said. "That's a worrisome combination for faculty retention," Tachau said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1104890

Smiley Studied At UI (Sacramento Bee, May 24)
A feature on author Jane Smiley says that in college she studied English, first at Vassar College and then at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sacbee.com/content/lifestyle/story/9409816p-10334113c.html

UI's Cancellation Of Bradley Game Cited (The National Review, May 24)
In a column titled "Impromptus," the magazine's managing editor cites a number of instances where he argues that political correctness and the liberal agenda have overrun the country. As an example, he notes the recent decision by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to cancel its baseball game against Bradley University (Peoria, Ill.) because Bradley is called "the Braves."
http://www.nationalreview.com/impromptus/impromptus200405240842.asp

UI Presidential Search Costs Cited (Buffalo News, May 24)
The University at Buffalo's recent national search for a new president cost almost $220,000, according to a report released Friday by the university. The retainer fee and other expenses charged by the private search firm retained by the UB presidential search committee represents 73 percent of the cost, nearly $161,000. The rest of the money paid for visits to the campus by candidates for the position, the cost of advertising for the position and the expenses of committee members and staff. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's most recent search, which took five months, cost $177,204, according to a February article in the Daily Iowan, the campus newspaper. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20040524/1038335.asp

David Disputes 'Torture Lite' Label (International Herald Tribune, May 24)
When a reporter asked Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld recently to comment on allegations of torture at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, he demurred. While he was comfortable with the word "abuse," he hesitated to use torture to describe what happened in Abu Ghraib. Instead he substituted another T-word: "terrible." Rumsfeld is not alone; no one else in America seems able to say "torture," either, writes MARCELLA DAVID, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, in an op-ed piece. The media have picked up Rumsfeld's cue that while this is terrible, it isn't that bad -- and further emphasize that it is neither as extensive nor horrific as that perpetrated by Saddam Hussein's regime. Of course, under Saddam torture wasn't as extensive and horrific as in Nazi Germany. But does that mean that thousands of Iraqis weren't tortured? Clearly, no. The truth is that we Americans simply don't get to make ourselves feel better by refusing to call what happened at Abu Ghraib torture or by characterizing it as "torture lite." Such an attitude ignores the accusations that some prisoners were sodomized or killed; it disregards the chilling photo of the hooded prisoner hooked up to wires; it discounts the reports of the International Committee of the Red Cross that many prisoners bear evidence of nerve damage. Indeed, it nurtures the culture that gives rise to incidents of abuse and torture.
http://www.iht.com/articles/521345.html

Weinstock Discusses Worms, Intestinal Ailments (New Kerala, May 23)
According to new research, helminths or intestinal worms can be used to combat Crohn's disease, an incurable disorder of the intestine characterized by abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding, weight loss and fever. In the study, about three-fourths of people with Crohn's disease given pig whipworm in a popular drink went into remission, reports JOEL V. WEINSTOCK, MD, professor of gastroenterology- hepatology and director of the Center for Digestive Diseases at the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City. Weinstock explains that there is solid logic behind the unconventional approach. Crohn's disease, like many other disorders, is a disease of the 20th century, he says. And one of the major differences between "now" and then is that kids no longer get worms, Weinstock says. The paper is based in India. A version of the story also ran on WEBINDIA.
http://www.newkerala.com/news-daily/news/features.php?action=fullnews&showcomments=1&id=18549

Voigt Leads Study On Organ Boards (Medical News Today, May 23)
The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) currently utilizes scores based on the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) or Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease (PELD) to prioritize patients waiting for liver transplants. The MPS (MELD/PELD score) is a well-validated measure of short-term mortality from liver disease, however, referring physicians who believe a patient faces a greater mortality risk than predicted by the MPS can request accelerated listing. Regional review boards can approve or deny these requests, and a new study published in the May 2004 issue of Liver Transplantation -- the official journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS) -- shows that these boards fairly and accurately distinguish between high and low risk patients. Their denials of physicians' requests for accelerated listings do not increase mortality for those patients. To determine the effect of regional review board decisions on the mortality of physician-referred patients, researchers led by MICHAEL D. VOIGT of the University of Iowa, analyzed 1,965 nationwide referrals to UNOS regional review boards. They noted which cases were approved and which were denied, and gathered information about patient deaths while awaiting transplantation. They found that there was no significant difference in survival to transplantation whether accelerated listing was approved or denied for adult or pediatric cases. The website is based in East Sussex, U.K.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/index.php?newsid=8592

Cochran: Counseling Has Less Stigma Today (Omaha World-Herald, May 23)
About 2,300 initial consultations were given at the University of Iowa Counseling Service this year -- double the number 20 years ago. Students are more willing to seek treatment today because problems carry less stigma than they did in the early 1980s, said Dr. SAM COCHRAN, director of counseling services. There also has been a change in the types of problems reported, he said. Twenty years ago, many of the students were coping with anxiety over exams or broken romances, he said. More recently, students seek help for serious depression, anxiety and eating disorders.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1642&u_sid=1103415

Liu Comments On Male Asian Stereotypes (Alameda Times-Star, May 23)
Wanting to know what the mostly Asian American class considered desirable, Professor Darrell Hamamoto asked: What posters are on your bedroom walls? After an uncomfortable silence, Hamamoto got the names he expected -- celebrities including Brad Pitt. There wasn't an Asian among them, which reinforced what he has long believed: that cliches and stereotypes about Asian men have rendered them sexual afterthoughts. The stereotypes have a clear emotional effect on Asian American men, said WILLIAM LIU, an assistant professor of counseling psychology at the University of Iowa. Those who live in predominantly non-Asian communities begin to loathe their appearance and develop ideals of beauty that value blond hair and blue eyes. Some court non-Asian women exclusively as a sign of status because "they're able to overcome stereotypes and cultural prohibitions," Liu said. The paper is based in California.
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/living/8693148.htm

UI Tuition Noted (Kansas City Star, May 21)
On Thursday, the Kansas Board of Regents heard proposals from the universities for tuition increases for the 2004-2005 school year totaling $38.7 million. A semester's tuition would rise to $2,055 at Kansas State University; $1,575 at Wichita State University; $1,205 at Emporia State University; $1,316 at Pittsburg State University; and $1,107 at Fort Hays State University. KU Chancellor Robert Hemenway said that even with last year's tuition increase, KU resident undergraduate tuition for the year, including a general campus fee, still was below that charged at the University of Missouri ($6,558), the University of Nebraska ($4,771) and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ($4,993).
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ac611caa9d8ea9481f52c1e6fa0d9410&_docnum=5&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=cb14946d2cb9708b59b3e20d2adeb72d

UI Study Shows Worms Help Bowel Disorders (NY Newsday, May 21)
Having intestinal worms actually may be a good thing, say scientists studying treatments for irritable bowel disorders. University of Iowa researchers have been using pig whipworms to treat Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, having patients ingest parasitic worm eggs in a glass of Gatorade. Dr. JOEL WEINSTOCK, lead researcher and UI professor, said the theory is that the deworming of people in industrialized countries may be responsible for the increased incidence of disorders such as Crohn's and colitis. Both are painful, chronic inflammatory bowel disorders that can cause diarrhea, cramping and numerous complications. This story also appeared on the Web sites of the HARTFORD COURANT, COLUMBIA (S.C.) STATE, WORCESTER TELEGRAM, BALTIMORE SUN, LOS ANGELES TIMES, NY TIMES, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.nynewsday.com/news/health/wire/sns-ap-worm-treatment,0,4661575.story?coll=sns-ap-health-headlines

Kerber Discusses Early Days of Feminism (Washington Post, May 21)
By 1971, the so-called "second wave" of feminism -- whose origin is often dated to the 1963 publication of Betty Friedan's "The Feminine Mystique" -- had gathered enough momentum to start rocking America's sociocultural boat. In profession after profession, women began forcing their way through previously barred doors. The study of history proved no exception, though the first women through those doors didn't have an easy time of it. "The scorn was incredible," says LINDA KERBER, a prominent University of Iowa scholar and former president of the Organization of American Historians. Kerber is talking about the resistance she and her colleagues encountered, even in the early 1970s, to the notion that studying women was a legitimate academic endeavor. Yet to examine the world from this new perspective was tremendously energizing as well. "All the inherited history has to be redone. There ain't no girls in it!" she says. "And suddenly, they matter."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A44061-2004May20_2.html

Regents May Link Major, Tuition (Omaha World Herald, May 21)
University officials are considering charging students based on their major, year in school and the university they attend, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1101687

Budget Cuts Eliminate UI Tech Jobs (Omaha World Herald, May 21)
Budget cuts at the University of Iowa have forced layoffs to the Information Technology Services Department, university officials said. Seventeen employees learned last week that they will lose their jobs immediately or have them phased out over the next year, officials said. There are 238 people employed in the department. "We are hoping these people will find other jobs at the UI," said STEVEN FLEAGLE, the department's interim chief information officer. "We are actively helping them find other jobs."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1101713

Alumnus Runs for Michigan Legislature (Oceana Herald Journal, May 20)
Marc Libants of Newaygo/Brooks Township announced recently his candidacy for state representative in Michigan's 100th District (Lake, Oceana and Newaygo Counties). Libants has a political science degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=11762602&BRD=2051&PAG=461&dept_id=430588&rfi=6

UI Certificate Of Need Study Cited (Atlanta Journal-Constitution May 20)
An opinion columnist writes that Georgia has been well-served for three decades by a health care regulatory system it shares with many states: certificate of need requirements for construction of major medical facilities. CON regulations were put in place for an economic reason -- to help keep health care costs reasonable. They work because of an economic reality in health care, that the law of supply and demand is backward. CON also helps maintain quality of care. After all, there's a reason they call it medical "practice" -- if physicians in an overbuilt market can't perform a given procedure on a regular basis, they get rusty. This, too, has been documented; a 2002 study by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found fewer heart surgeries per hospital, and a 22 percent higher mortality rate, in non-CON states.
http://www.ajc.com/opinion/content/opinion/0504/20equal.html

Field Trips To UI Museum Cut (Coshocton Tribune, May 20)
Call it a cookie cutter formula. One set of educational standards to be met by all of this country's children regardless of race, native language or religion. And there you have the federal law known as No Child Left Behind. While thumbing through a March issue of TIME magazine, one article proclaiming the merits of teaching our kids to become better test-takers caught the columnist's attention. Garfield/Franklin elementary in Muscatine, Iowa, was on the dreaded Schools in Need of Improvement list two years ago. Now they are a success story. The students there are better readers, mathematicians -- and of course, test takers. But what has this accomplishment cost? Students at this Iowa school no longer eagle watch on the Mississippi River, go on field trips to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY or have two daily recesses. There is simply no time. The agenda now is preparing for the next test. The newspaper is based in Ohio.
http://www.coshoctontribune.com/news/stories/20040520/opinion/463425.html

UI May Join Study On Class Rank, Admissions (Lincolnshire Review, May 20)
When Stevenson High School students apply to colleges next year, some will not have to worry about class rank. Those applying to George Washington University, Illinois State University, Indiana University, Northwestern University, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and University of Illinois-Urbana -- and possibly five other schools -- will see their individual class ranks converted into a percentile range on their transcripts. The change is part of a pilot study approved by the school board on Monday, which the board believes will benefit more students and lessen some of the pressure students feel about class rank. Other schools to be approached for participation in the study include DePaul University, Duke University, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Miami University (Ohio), and University of Michigan. The newspaper is based in suburban Chicago.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/lr/05-20-04-296077.html

Gable Comments On Wrestling's Future (Indianapolis Star, May 20)
Runners, swimmers and gymnasts will go to the Athens Olympics to fight for medals. Wrestlers will fight to preserve their sport. Title IX, a 1972 law prohibiting sex discrimination in education programs, contributed to the elimination of many college wrestling teams in the United States. Less publicized, but more damaging worldwide, have been reductions in weight classes and wrestlers at the Olympic Games. The United States will determine its Athens teams in freestyle, Greco-Roman and women's wrestling at the Olympic Trials, which begin Friday at the RCA Dome in Indianapolis. To those inside the sport, it is bewildering to have wrestling under siege. It has long been part of the culture. Nine American presidents were wrestlers, including George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. "We're always having to look over our shoulder," said DAN GABLE, a 1972 Olympic champion and former University of Iowa coach.
http://www.indystar.com/articles/9/148005-3619-036.html

UI Hygienic Lab Tests Rabid Bat (Omaha World Herald, May 20)
An 11-year-old boy who was bitten by a rabid bat is undergoing a series of rabies shots. "He was sleeping and heard some rustling in the room, so he sat up and when he did so, the bat bit him in the neck," said Jackie Hall, public information officer for the Scott County Health Department. The child's parents captured the bat, which bit the child in mid-April. It was sent to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB in Iowa City, where it tested positive for rabies.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=1100713

Weinstock Explains Worm Treatment (HealthCentral.com, May 19)
For the millions of Americans who suffer from digestive diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease or Crohn's disease, a host of new drugs offer hope, according to new research. Experts gathering in New Orleans for Digestive Diseases Week said at a teleconference Tuesday that many of the medications show promise because they deliver targeted rather than general attacks against the disease-causing process. Dr. JOEL WEINSTOCK, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, reported success in treating Crohn's with intestinal worms, or helminths, which work by suppressing the immune response and thus reducing the disease symptoms. In the study, Weinstock gave 29 patients the so-called ova therapy in a drink every two weeks for 24 weeks. At the end, 79 percent of patients had a response and 72 percent were in remission. "This may prove to be an effective new treatment," he said. A version of this article appeared May 19 on the website of Forbes.
http://www.healthcentral.com/news/NewsFullText.cfm?id=519056

Weinstock: Crohn's Patients Benefit From Worms (WebMD, May 19)
Call it the medical edition of Fear Factor. Researchers report they are using helminths -- intestinal worms -- to combat Crohn's disease, the miserable, incurable disorder of the intestine characterized by abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding, weight loss, and fever. In the study, about three-fourths of people with Crohn's disease given pig whipworm in a popular drink went into remission, reports JOEL V. WEINSTOCK, MD, professor of gastroenterology-hepatology and director of the Center for Digestive Diseases at the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City. The study was presented at a major medical meeting of digestive disorders experts. Weinstock explains that there is solid logic behind the unconventional approach. Crohn's disease, like many other disorders, is a disease of the 20th century, he says. And one of the major differences between "now" and then is that kids no longer get worms, Weinstock says. "Children [in developed nations] are no longer exposed to helminths," he tells WebMD. "Worms used to be around in their gastrointestinal tract, in their bloodstream."
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/87/99477.htm?lastselectedguid=%7B5FE84E90-BC77-4056-A91C-9531713CA348%7D

UI Factory Farm Study Cited (Grist Magazine, May 19)
Over the past decade, the livestock industry has steadily expanded and "concentrated animal feeding operations" (CAFOs) have grown increasingly concentrated, displacing smaller, family-owned farms. As more animals are packed into massive factory farms, the facilities produce ever larger heaps of excreta, which emit noxious air pollutants, including ammonia and hydrogen sulfide, both of which are on par with cyanide and arsenic as hazardous substances, as well as volatile organic compounds and particulate matter from fecal dust. In the past 10 years, nearly a dozen people have died in CAFOs in the U.S. from exposure to these gases, and according to a study released in February 2002 by Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, up to 70 percent of workers exposed to pollutants at CAFOs in the U.S. are afflicted with acute bronchitis and 25 percent with chronic bronchitis. Grist is an online environmental magazine.
http://www.gristmagazine.com/muck/muck051904.asp

UI Alumna Named Teacher Of Year In Viera, Fla. (Voices News, May 19)
Ann Pare Ehler, daughter of Donald and Carol Pare of Southbury, earned the Teacher of the Year honor at Manatee Elementary School in Viera, Fla. Ehler was a graduate of Pomperaug High School, while there she played field hockey and ran track and field for Linda Dirga. Upon graduation she went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on a full scholarship to continue playing field hockey competitively and pursue her teaching career in physical education. In 1997 she graduated from Iowa and moved to Florida with her husband Howard and began her teaching career. The paper is based in Connecticut.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=11666503&BRD=1380&PAG=461&dept_id=157525&rfi=6

Raymond Comments On Time Clerking For Marshall (Chester Daily Local, May 19)
In the third part of a three-part series, the paper examines the life of Thurgood Marshall, the attorney (and future U.S. Supreme Court justice) who successfully argued against public school segregation in the landmark case of Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, decided 50 years ago this week. Marshall, who died on Jan. 24, 1993 at 84, was later frustrated by arguments that affirmative action equated to reverse discrimination, said Juan Williams, author of "Thurgood Marshall, American Revolutionary," Yet some clerks who worked for him saw Marshall as an optimist. MARGARET RAYMOND, a law professor at University of Iowa College of Law, was a clerk for Marshall in 1986 and 1987. "He had seen the pendulum swing," Raymond said. "He would put matters in perspective. We would think, 'Oh, such and such case will be decided the wrong way and this will be the end of the world' and he would laugh at that a little bit. He would not be prepared to give up. He would never give up." The paper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.dailylocal.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=11714134&BRD=1671&PAG=461&dept_id=17782&rfi=6
Regents OK New Hospital Executive Board Committee (Omaha World-Herald, May 19)
The Iowa Board of Regents has approved a new committee structure for overseeing the five institutions it oversees. The six committees approved Tuesday by voice vote are: Oversight and Compliance; Investment; Education and Student Affairs; Economic Development; Human Resources; and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS EXECUTIVE BOARD COMMITTEE. Each committee will have at least five board members. The five schools overseen by the regents are the University of Iowa, Iowa State University, the University of Northern Iowa, the Iowa School for the Deaf and the Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1099678

New Chef Attended UI (Journal Standard, May 19)
When Linda Cannova Beckman called and asked John Walt if he would be guest chef for a night at Cannova's restaurant, he was thrilled to be able to cook up a couple of specials in his hometown. Being showcased at home was special to John. He decided his two featured dishes would be breast of chicken with prosciutto and mozzarella and crepes stuffed with ricotta and sausage with a pesto cream sauce. Walt, a new chef who graduated with honors (Class of 2004) from the Culinary Institute of America, is the son of John and Susan Walt of Freeport. He graduated from Aquin High School in 1993 and earned his bachelor's degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1998 before he went to culinary school - America's top cooking school - in Hyde Park, N.Y. He is a member of the American Culinary Federation (ACF) and the Research Chef Association (RCA). The paper covers northwest Illinois.
http://www.journalstandard.com/articles/2004/05/19/daily_features/flavor/features01.txt

Ciochon Interviewed About Book 'Dragon Bone Hill' (Radio New Zealand, May 18)
RUSSELL CIOCHON
, a professor in the University of Iowa Department of Anthropology, was interviewed live for 25 minutes on Jim Mora's Morning Show on Radio New Zealand. The topic of the interview was Ciochon's new book, "Dragon Bone Hill: An Ice Age Saga of Homo erectus". Radio New Zealand is an "NPR-like" network that broadcasts nationwide on a variety of AM and FM stations throughout New Zealand and the surrounding region.

Liu Comments On Male Asian Stereotypes (Monterey County Herald, May 18)
Wanting to know what the mostly Asian American class considered desirable, Professor Darrell Hamamoto asked: What posters are on your bedroom walls? After an uncomfortable silence, Hamamoto got the names he expected -- celebrities including Brad Pitt. There wasn't an Asian among them, which reinforced what he has long believed: that cliches and stereotypes about Asian men have rendered them sexual afterthoughts. The stereotypes have a clear emotional effect on Asian American men, said WILLIAM LIU, an assistant professor of counseling psychology at the University of Iowa. Those who live in predominantly non-Asian communities begin to loathe their appearance and develop ideals of beauty that value blond hair and blue eyes. Some court non-Asian women exclusively as a sign of status because "they're able to overcome stereotypes and cultural prohibitions," Liu said. The paper is based in Monterey, Calif.
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/living/8693148.htm

Fick Comments On UIHC Malpractice Claims (Omaha World-Herald, May 18)
The state has paid more than $13.9 million to settle medical malpractice claims against University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and its doctors in the last five years. The 769-bed complex logged 631,433 clinic visits and 41,809 admissions in the fiscal year ended last June 30. "When you see a half-million (patients) a year, you're going to generate a number of suits," said Dr. DANIEL FICK, associate dean for clinical affairs in the university's College of Medicine. But the hospital stands up well in comparison with peers when it comes to malpractice payments, said Fick, who pointed to Medicare's estimate that four percent of what it pays is for medical malpractice. Payments by two insurance groups covering malpractice claims against the university -- a Faculty Practice Plan for more than 800 staff in the medical school, and the hospital's state-supported insurance plan -- are well below that, he said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1642&u_sid=1098384

Former UI Professor Comments On Meditation (White Plains Journal News, May 18)
Transcendental Meditation critics are skeptical of the Committee for Stress-Free Schools' research about the benefits of TM, which they say is rarely conducted by independent researchers. "To hear them speak about this, you would think this is the greatest thing since ice cream," says Barry Markovsky, a researcher of social networks and sociology department head at the University of South Carolina. "It's a way to hoist an actual religion onto unknowing people and a way to turn a profit." Marokovsky spoke out publicly against the group when he was a professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in White Plains, N.Y.
http://www.nyjournalnews.com/newsroom/051804/e0118tm.html

Williams Play Reviewed (Village Voice, May 18)
A review notes "the 26-year-old Thomas Lanier Williams, not yet self-christened Tennessee, wrote 'Spring Storm' for a graduate playwriting seminar at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He read it aloud to the class, got laughed at, and put the script away in a drawer; it wasn't found again till after his death. The moral is that student laughter can be both smart-alecky and justified. Looked at with sympathetic hindsight, by those who know Williams's later works, 'Spring Storm' is like a seedbed full of green shoots waiting to flower; scrutinized for its own sake, it's a jumpy, overwritten, clumsily melodramatic work, full of flaws that would linger on to haunt Williams even at his best."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=c51a8bc1992e22c26e45bb85bd7a67f3&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=daccc08c5e00a2c549eea569b4bac9d8

Merrill On Religion/Secularism Panel (The Star of Malaysia, May 18)
CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, University of Iowa's International Writing Program director and author, participated in a panel discussion in Malaysia entitled "Religion's Challenge to Secularism in the Contemporary Age." The discussion was organized by Star Publications, the Asian Centre for Media Studies and Kala Publishers, and included Malaysian writers, theater directors and critics.
http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2004/5/18/nation/8005060&sec=nation

Alumna Honored For Teaching (Northwest Indiana Times, May18)
Valparaiso University business professor Mary Christ has been awarded the university's Caterpillar Award for Excellence in Teaching. Christ, an assistant professor of accounting in the College of Business Administration, earned her doctorate from the University of Texas, a master's degree from the University of Wisconsin and a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://nwitimes.com/articles/2004/05/18/news/porter_county/986119f471fdaf9786256e98000475a7.txt

Virtual Hospital Noted (Houston Chronicle, May 17)
You assume that your medical providers have the most current information on health care, but how can you know if that's true? VIRTUAL HOSPITAL, at www.vh.org, is the result of an effort by the University of Iowa to create a health sciences library. It has been evolving since 1992 and offers thousands of textbooks and booklets for both health care providers and patients. Several topics are highlighted each month, including those with seasonal relevance. They also cover the hottest health topics that are making the news of the day. The information is presented in a way that is easy to read and provides enough data to give you a basic understanding of the topic.
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/tech/weekly/2575538

Nurse Changes Careers (Appleton Post-Crescent, May 17)
Brian Green was a registered nurse working in the pediatric intensive care unit at Mayo Medical Center in Rochester, Minn., nearly four years ago when he decided to change careers. After the time at Mayo, and four years previously at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS, he decided to become a police officer. He joined the Appleton Police Department in September 2000. "There was no part of that (nursing) job I was unhappy with," he said. "This is just something I always wanted to do." The Post-Crescent serves the Appleton-Neenah-Menahsha area in Wisconsin.
http://www.wisinfo.com/postcrescent/news/archive/local_16006138.shtml

Copp Discusses Hispanic Folk Artist (Fort Wayne News Sentinel, May 17)
Paco Felici, a communications manager in the Texas Attorney General's office, has become one of the country's rising Hispanic folk artists, thanks in part to the University of Iowa Press. KAREN COPP, an expatriate Texan now working at UI Press as design and production manager, commissioned him about two years ago for a book cover. Copp said university presses often publish serious subject matter whose authors give specific instructions about how the covers should be portrayed. But she knew she wanted something more playful for "Humor Me: An Anthology of Humor by Writers of Color." Felici illustrated the cover with three figures -- one with purple lips, one with blue, another with green skin. "It had everything mixed up, and it was obviously not trying to portray something realistically," Copp said. "It was fanciful."
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/living/8685812.htm

New Zealand Poet To Be At UI (Stuff New Zealand, May 17)
Poet, novelist and playwright Vivienne Plumb is off on a three-month writers' residency at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the United States. The Wellington writer will represent New Zealand at the 2004 International Writing Program, which is a partnership between the University of Iowa and Creative New Zealand.
http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,2910221a4501,00.html

Workshop Alumna Patchett Memoir Is Reviewed (New York Times, May 16)
Author Joyce Carol Oates reviews "Truth and Beauty," a memoir by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITER'S WORKSHOP alumna Ann Patchett about her relationship with the late author Lucy Grealy, also a UI alumna. Of the book, Oates writes "it can be no surprise that the memoir of a friendship that ends in the premature death of a gifted writer does not make for cheerful reading. And yet there is much in "Truth & Beauty" that is uplifting, a testament to the perennial idealism and optimism of the young."
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/16/books/review/16OATESL.html

Davidson Discusses Gene Therapy (Contra Costa Times, May 16)
So far, the work of Dr. Krys Bankiewicz, a professor of neurological surgery at UC San Francisco, indicates that monkeys greatly benefit from gene therapy treatment. At a seminar, Bankiewicz shows videos of monkeys with a Parkinson's-like syndrome before and after gene therapy. Bankiewicz has spent the past eight years testing the therapy in animals, readying it for human clinical trials. In the "before" video, a monkey struggles while reaching for treats on a platform. He's on L-dopa, but his wrist shakes with the tremor characteristic of Parkinson's. After gene therapy, the same monkey easily accomplishes the task. "The evidence from the Bankiewicz laboratory is really very, very encouraging," said BEVERLY DAVIDSON, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa. "The animal models are some of the best out there."
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/8680257.htm?1c

Gronbeck Says Governor May Have Ethical Issues (The State, May 16)
South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford is having political problems because he told a joke, but inserted the names of members of his family into the story and claimed it was true. If Sanford borrowed the story from the web or somewhere else and inserted his family's names, "It is an ethical problem," said BRUCE GRONBECK, who heads the University of Iowa Center for Media Studies and Political Culture. "It shows inordinately poor political judgment," Gronbeck said. "If you don't know enough that you have to be able to claim your own words, you're in trouble." Such problems have dogged politicians for ages. Gronbeck said he was reminded of U.S. Sen. Joe Biden, D-Delaware, who dropped out of the presidential race in 1987 after he was accused of plagiarizing passages of a speech by a British politician. The State is based in Columbia, S.C.
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/news/politics/8678656.htm

Covington Says Kerry Is In Tough Spot (Washington Times Record News, May 15)
To attack President Bush over Iraq or not to attack, that is the question facing Sen. John Kerry. "A Kerry strategy of too aggressively attacking Bush could backfire," said CARY COVINGTON, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Unfortunately for Kerry, he has little ability to shape the public's view of Bush. That will be determined by events beyond either man's control." The Times Record News is based in Washington, Texas.
http://www.timesrecordnews.com/trn/nw_washington/article/0,1891,TRN_5707_2890220,00.html

Jones Says Software Glitch Is Serious (Miami Herald, May 15)
The company that makes the touch-screen voting machines for Miami-Dade and Broward counties said Friday that they will have to work around a glitch in the machines' auditing system because the software that would correct it will not be certified by the state in time for the fall elections. University of Iowa professor DOUGLAS JONES, who formerly chaired the Iowa Board of Examiners for voting machines and electronic voting systems, attended the meetings in Miami-Dade. "It doesn't corrupt votes, but it's a flat out error. Auditing is one of those things that is incredibly important."
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/local/8671922.htm?1c

Merrill To Participate In Malaysia Religion Symposium (The Star, May 14)
CHRISTOPHER MERRILL
, author and director of the University of Iowa's International Writing Program, will participate in a seminar in Malaysia about religion and secularism. The Star is based in Malaysia.
http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2004/5/14/nation/7981632&sec=nation

UIHC To Request Rate Increase (Omaha World Herald, May 14)
Higher prices for drugs and supplies, annual staff raises and rising utility costs are prompting administrators at Iowa's biggest hospital to raise health care prices next year. Next week, officials at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS say they will ask the Iowa Board of Regents to approve a 9.5 percent rate increase for fiscal year 2005, which starts July 1.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1642&u_sid=1095485

Regents To Consider Tuition Policy Changes (Omaha World Herald, May 14)
Iowa's three public universities would no longer be required to charge the same tuition under a proposal to be considered by the State Board of Regents. The regents have had a policy for more than a decade that required Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa to charge the same tuition. The proposal issued Thursday said that policy may be outdated.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1095486

UI Alumni Retire From Idaho State Faculty (State Journal, May 14)
Two alumni of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are retiring from the faculty of Idaho State University: Barbara Bain, who received her M.A. in speech pathology, and Mark Trinklein, who earned his M.A. in media production. Each is profiled in separate stories. The State Journal is based in Pocatello, Idaho.
http://www.journalnet.com/articles/2004/05/13/news/local/news13.txt
http://www.journalnet.com/articles/2004/05/13/news/local/news14.txt

Alumna Worked At California High School (Los Angeles Times, May 14)
Huntington Beach High School can be justly proud to have had many fine heroes of the chalkboard. As students, we don't think of these individuals as having a life of their own, just someone to assign homework to do when we'd rather be out doing something that was more fun. Being able to type a neat business letter fell to Helen Carey and her students in typing class. Carey grew up in Fonda, Iowa, and attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, pursuing her hobbies of swimming, tennis and photography. Helen joined the Waves and was stationed in San Francisco. She attended Cal State Long Beach and taught school in Redlands before coming here to teach.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/indynews/columnists/la-hbi-lookback13may13,1,7734775.story

Exhibition Examines UI Alumna's Work (Art Museum Network News, May 14)
" Ana Mendieta: Earth Body, Sculpture and Performance 1972-1985" is the most comprehensive survey to date of the artist's work. It aims to place Mendieta's art in a broader, international context and to examine her life and development as an artist. The exhibition premieres at the Whitney Museum of American Art on July 1, launching a four-venue national tour. Mendieta is an alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://news.amn.org/press.jsp?id=2191

UI Foundation Raises Goal To $1 Billion (Chronicle, May 14)
'GOOD, BETTER, BEST': That's the name of the current fund-raising campaign at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. But in keeping with prevailing trends in higher-education philanthropy, it could also be called "Keep It Coming." Late last month Iowa officials announced that they would raise the campaign's goal from $850 million to $1 billion.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i36/36a03003.htm

Jones Comments On Voting Machines (San Jose Mercury News, May 13)
The federal government is spending hundreds of millions of dollars to modernize the nation's voting booths in the hope of avoiding a repeat of the divisive Florida recount of 2000. But critics warn it could produce something worse in November: no meaningful recount at all. The reason is that many states, including a dozen where the presidential race is expected to be closest, will be using new electronic voting machines that record votes digitally. There will be no physical ballots to recount. Short of obtaining a court order to examine the electronic voting system's software code, candidates must trust that the machines were properly programmed and adequately tested before each election. But computer scientists who have reviewed pre-election testing processes said the simple tests used by local jurisdictions do little besides check that a ballot is properly laid out. They cautioned that the complex nature of computer code makes electronic machines uniquely vulnerable to accidental programming errors or malicious tampering. And they warned the widespread practice of sending machines home with election workers before an election creates a dangerous opportunity for fraud. "If I have the machine home in my basement, I can take it apart, I can replace the microprocessor, I can replace anything I want," said DOUG JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. "You run the risk of unlimited manipulation of votes." A version of this Associated Press article also appeared May 13 on the web site of the ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/politics/8655721.htm?1c

Andrejevic Comments On Humiliation (San Diego Union-Tribune, May 13)
To some observers of American pop culture, it's not hard to draw a straight line from the humiliation and degradation seen in the now infamous treatment of the Iraqi war prisoners to some of the fare offered in the entertainment media. But not everyone strings the dots together in the same way. MARK ANDREJEVIC, a communication-studies professor at the University of Iowa, said, "I think viewers make a pretty clear distinction between 'Fear Factor' and the images of abuse we saw over the past few days." And even those people who want to trivialize the violence as "spirited high jinks" are probably motivated "by a jingoistic desire to humiliate perceived enemies at least as much as by generalized desensitization related to pop culture." He acknowledged, though, that there might be relevant connections between what happens in pop culture and what happens during interrogations of prisoners. "One interesting question would be to consider whether the use of humiliation in pop culture might foster greater acceptance of humiliation techniques in the interrogation of suspects," he said. "The current discussion is not being framed in these terms. Perhaps it should be."
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/features/20040513-9999-1c13prison.html

Alumnus Named Hospital CEO (Indianapolis Star, May 13)
Clarian Health Partners, Indiana's largest hospital system, named Jonathan R. Goble as chief executive officer of its upcoming Carmel hospital. A native of Illinois, he earned an undergraduate degree in biology from Illinois Wesleyan University, a master's degree in health administration from Tulane University and a master of business administration degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.indystar.com/articles/4/145906-6584-031.html

ISU Grad With 4 Majors May Attend UI Law School (Omaha World Herald, May 13)
Jess Phelps, a recent graduate of Iowa State University, doesn't do anything the easy way. That explains why the farm boy from Malvern received four degrees from two ISU colleges. A combination of good planning and spontaneity were how Phelps ended up with majors in agricultural business, international agriculture, economics and history. He finished them all in four years. Phelps plans to attend law school this fall at either Drake University or the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and hopes to pursue a career in agricultural law.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1094175

UI Hospitals Propose Rate Increase (Omaha World Herald, May 13)
Executives of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS want to raise the price of visiting the hospital in Iowa City and its statewide network of clinics, under a plan released Wednesday. The proposal, included in the hospital's quarterly report to the Iowa Board of Regents, would raise rates 9.5 percent, hospital officials said. The plan will be presented to the board at its meeting Tuesday in Council Bluffs. The proposed rate increase mirrors a similar increase approved by the board last year.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1642&u_sid=1094393

Convicted Hacker Once Attacked UI System (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, May 13)
Labeled a domestic terrorist by the prosecutor and a liar by the judge, Rajib K. Mitra was sentenced Wednesday to serve eight years in federal prison for interfering with Madison police radio frequencies. The sentence brings to a close a case that authorities said involved 10 months of disruptions to Madison emergency radio frequencies. Mitra, 26, was convicted in March of two counts of transmitting communications to a protected police computer. Having been introduced by his mother, Norma, to amateur radio at a young age, Mitra developed a talent for computers as a teenager. Mitra was caught breaking into computer mailboxes at his mother's real estate office in 1996. Then, in separate cases in 1997 and 1998, he was convicted of hacking into computer systems at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/wauk/may04/228998.asp

Smiley Earned Ph.D. At UI (Sacramento Bee, May 12)
Jane Smiley, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of 11 novels -- including "A Thousand Acres," "Moo" and "Horse Heaven" -- is The Bee Book Club's author of choice for May. Smiley lives near Monterey, has three children and owns horses that she tries to ride daily. She holds three college degrees, including a doctorate from the University of Iowa. She was a professor for 15 years at Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in California.
http://www.sacbee.com/content/lifestyle/story/9265596p-10190669c.html

Johnson Comments On Semantics (New York Times, May 12)
In the Kobe Bryant sexual assault case, a case that has attracted so much media attention, words and their meaning have become the common currency. Legal experts and communications specialists said the semantics about victim and defendant -- and a big debate, still to come, over how to define "consent" in sexual relations -- could be crucial precisely because every utterance is amplified by the cameras and courtroom scribblers. "What you have a vocabulary for, you are able to perceive," said NICHOLAS JOHNSON, a visiting professor of law at the University of Iowa College of Law in Iowa City and a former member of the Federal Communications Commission. "Just look at the labels on legislation, like the Clear Skies Initiative, the Patriot Act, No Child Left Behind. Labels make an enormous difference, and lawyers are in the word business." A version of the story also ran on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/11/sports/basketball/11CND-KOBE.html?ex=1084939200&en=f566505941026645&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Liu: Stereotypes Impact Asian-American Men (Los Angeles Times, May 12)
Hundreds of Asian American men are writing books and poems and creating web sites in hopes of redefining themselves by combating the enduring notion that they are sub-masculine. Many are offended that Asian men are projected as power players when it comes to intellectual intercourse but bystanders in the world of romance. The stereotypes have a clear emotional effect on Asian American men, said WILLIAM LIU, an assistant professor of counseling psychology at the University of Iowa. Those who live in predominantly non-Asian communities begin to loathe their appearance and develop ideals of beauty that value blond hair and blue eyes. Some court non-Asian women exclusively as a sign of status because "they're able to overcome stereotypes and cultural prohibitions," Liu said.
http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-et-pierson12may12,1,5142041.story

Rubenstein Coauthors Heart Valve Defect Research (Science Daily, May 12)
The surprising discovery, in genetic studies of transparent zebrafish embryos, suggests that the cause of some human congenital heart valve defects may lie not in the genes for the formation of the valve itself, but in genes used in the heart muscle that pumps the blood. About 1,600 valve defects are diagnosed each year in the U.S. and few of the genes responsible for these defects have been identified. The research team found that a mutation in a single gene involved in heart contraction interfered with the development of the heart valve. While the mutation would kill a human embryo, the discovery shows that normal heart contraction is required for normal valve formation, so even temporary glitches in the early heartbeat might cause valve defects. Coauthors of the research include PETER A. RUBENSTEIN, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine; and KUO-KUANG WEN, Ph.D., a research scientist; MELISSA MCKANE, a senior research assistant; and JIHUI REN, a graduate student, all working in Rubenstein's Iowa lab.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/05/040511040405.htm

Cameras To Watch For Herky Vandalism (Omaha World Herald, May 12)
After more vandalism on statues of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA mascot, officials plan to watch the fiberglass birds like a hawk. Officials are investing in surveillance cameras to keep an eye on Herky statues at one downtown intersection. "We've had a lot of trouble with that corner," said Josh Schamberger, executive director of the Iowa City/Coralville Convention and Visitors Bureau. In the latest vandalism, someone ripped part of the shirt worn by the We Can Do It Herky, a tribute to women who worked during World War II. Last week, someone took fake dollar bills from the statue and also stole the hat from Rhinestone Cowgirl, a statue across the street. The 75 statues scattered around Iowa City and Coralville are meant to mark the 75th anniversary of Kinnick Stadium next fall. The public art project is known as "Herky on Parade."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1093314

Hawkeyes Propose Curfew For Recruits (Omaha World Herald, May 11)
Potential athletic recruits at the University of Iowa would face a curfew while visiting the campus under proposed guidelines to be included in a revised recruiting handbook. Recruits for the school's 24 sports programs would be required to return to university-paid hotel rooms at a certain time -- probably 12:30 a.m. each night of a campus visit. The only major addition to current policy under the proposal which still must be approved by the university's Board of Control would be the curfew, Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY said. "We debated midnight, we debated 12:30 and we debated 1:30," Bowlsby said. "I wouldn't be surprised if it ended up at 1, but at least it's something that draws the recruiting day to a close. That doesn't mean a kid's not going to go back out again. We don't have much control over that." The change comes after Iowa's football program was cleared last month of any wrongdoing in a football prospect's sexual liaison during a visit to campus.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=1092699

Squire: Kerry Should Avoid Bashing Bush (Globe and Mail, May 11)
With the news out of Iraq a toxic mix of growing U.S. military casualties and searing images of Americans in uniform abusing their Iraqi captives, President George W. Bush's re-election prospects should be grimmer than ever. Yet John Kerry, his Democratic rival, has failed to make major gains in public opinion polls. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, doesn't see much political advantage to Mr. Kerry in attacking Mr. Bush, particularly over his Iraq strategy. "He's probably best advised to step aside and leave Bush to stew in his own policies," Prof. Squire said in an interview yesterday. "Americans are pretty much cemented in their views right now," he added. "Republicans will stick with Bush until there's a major disaster, unless something cataclysmic occurs." The paper is based in Toronto.
http://www.globeandmail.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20040511/KERRY11/TPInternational/TopStories

Tiwari Comments On Open Outcry Trading (Financial Times, May 11)
Proponents of open outcry trading have received a rare boost with a study showing that this traditional method can be more efficient than electronic trading in certain trading environments. The findings, in a study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the City University of New York, comes as electronic trading appears set to drive open outcry towards extinction through lower costs and faster trade execution. The study, carried out on the equities trading floor at the American Stock Exchange in October 2001, found that floor brokers "added value through improved order handling". ASHISH TIWARI, assistant professor of finance at the University of Iowa and one of the study's authors, told the Financial Times: "By strategically timing the execution of trades to match the prevailing liquidity in the market the net result is that you are able to lower realized spreads. There are some lessons here. It's not that the cost of access is lower it's higher on the floor but it may be worth your while using the floor because the floor traders are essentially acting like smart order books, responding to the ebb and flow of liquidity."
http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1083180428780

Black Comments On Compulsive Shopping (Bankrate.com, May 11)
Not only is compulsive shopping tacitly condoned by our materialistic
society, it is just as widely misunderstood. For starters, according to DONALD BLACK, M.D., a University of Iowa psychiatry professor who specializes in obsessive-compulsive disorder, compulsive shopping isn't a true compulsion at all, but instead an impulse control disorder. "A compulsion is a behavior that is produced to counteract an upsetting thought; for example, I'm contaminated or dirty, therefore I will deal with that anxiety by washing my hands more," he says. "There is no upsetting thought prompting compulsive shopping. It is a very pleasurable impulse and people act on those impulses."
http://www.bankrate.com/brm/news/advice/20030314a1.asp

Hawkeyes Propose Curfew For Recruits (Sports Illustrated.com, May 11)
Potential athletic recruits at the University of Iowa would face a curfew while visiting the campus under proposed guidelines to be included in a revised recruiting handbook. Recruits for the school's 24 sports programs would be required to return to university-paid hotel rooms at a certain time -- probably 12:30 a.m. each night of a campus visit. The only major addition to current policy under the proposal which still must be approved by the university's Board of Control would be the curfew, Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY said. "We debated midnight, we debated 12:30 and we debated 1:30," Bowlsby said. "I wouldn't be surprised if it ended up at 1, but at least it's something that draws the recruiting day to a close. That doesn't mean a kid's not going to go back out again. We don't have much control over that." The change comes after Iowa's football program was cleared last month of any wrongdoing in a football prospect's sexual liaison during a visit to campus. The Associated Press story also appeared in the KANSAS CITY STAR, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, MONTERERY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, TALLAHASSEE.com, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, SAN LUIS OPBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, KANSAS.com , CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, CHARLOTTE (N.C. ) OBSERVER and other newspaper web sites.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/football/ncaa/05/11/bc.fbc.recruitinvestiga.ap/index.html

Composer Is UI Alumna (Bozeman Daily Chronicle, May 11)
" Open," a new sound installation project from Laurel Yost and Chad Langford, took place on May 2 at the Reynolds Recital Hall on the Montana State University campus. Featuring sculpture by Debra Ramsdell and a percussion installation designed by Jeff Vick, the music for the project was constructed by Laurel Yost from sounds such as splashing water, car blinkers and traffic noise, and manipulated by computer to form rich, shifting textures of everyday sonic experiences. Yost, an associate professor of music at MSU, did her doctoral studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper serves Bozeman, Mont.
http://bozemandailychronicle.com/articles/2004/05/11/features/music/01yost.txt

O'Connor House Opens To Public (Macon Telegraph, May 11)
For nearly 20 years, Andalusia, the farm of author Flannery O'Connor was off limits to visitors. Now visitors may tour the grounds around the main house and several rooms in the house. In 1945, O'Connor went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to earn a Master of Fine Arts degree. There she participated in a writers' workshop in which she produced a collection of short stories that were later expanded into her first novel. The Telegraph is based in Macon, Ga.
http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/living/8633958.htm

Dreher Speaks On Medical Marijuana (Charlottesville Daily Progress, May 11)
Pregnant women with morning sickness and children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder might try taking marijuana, according to experts who will speak at an international conference in Charlottesville. Mary Lynn Mathre, president of Patients Out of Time, said it's well known that marijuana can reduce pain and stimulate appetite, which is helpful for AIDS patients. But she said people who attend the Third National Clinical Conference on Cannabis Therapeutics will hear about lesser-known benefits of the drug. For example, a California physician will present new research on how marijuana might help calm children with ADHD. The youngest known cannabis patient in the United States, who at age 2 was given cannabis to treat hyperactivity and anxiety, also will speak. In addition, the dean of the University Of Iowa College of Nursing, MELANIE DREHER, will discuss how cannabis can provide relief to pregnant women with morning sickness.
http://www.dailyprogress.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=CDP%2FMGArticle%2FCDP_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031775381679&path=!news
Russell Comments On Macular Degeneration Study (Forbes.com, May 11)
People who develop age-related macular degeneration tend to die earlier than those who don't get the vision-robbing disease, a new study reports. Why this happens isn't known, but experts suspect eye problems such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts may be a sign of early aging or other pervasive systemic health problems, such as heart disease. Dr. STEPHEN R. RUSSELL is an associate professor of ophthalmology at the University of Iowa. "We have known for a long time that patients with AMD have higher incidence of cardiovascular disease, and they are also weaker than normal," he said. "Why this is the case isn't known," he added, "but it does go along with the idea that there is general systemic disease." The article also appeared on the web site of WFIE-TV in Indiana.
http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2004/05/10/hscout518857.html

Williams Play Reviewed (New York Newsday, May 11)
There is much to learn from "Spring Storm," the "lost" Tennessee Williams melodrama of 1937 that had its New York premiere last night at the new Logo Theatre in the historic old playhouse at St. Clement's. Williams wrote this for a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA play-writing seminar when he was 26 and still using his given name, Thomas. "The Glass Menagerie," his first success, was eight years away.
http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/stage/ny-etspring3794828may11,0,1140811.story?coll=ny-theater-headlines

Weinstock Uses Worms To Treat Bowel Ailments (Los Angeles Times, May 10)
Some scientists believe that swallowing a concoction of certain parasites may relieve the often-debilitating symptoms of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two most common inflammatory bowel disorders. Irritable bowel disorders affect an estimated 1 million to 2 million Americans. They most often strike teenagers and young adults, and symptoms -- ulcers, bleeding, severe abdominal pain or uncontrollable diarrhea -- can persist for life. Chronic sufferers are at a higher risk for colon cancer and can experience malnutrition, anemia and social isolation. "They're afraid to ride in cars or go to restaurants because they might soil themselves," says Dr. JOEL WEINSTOCK, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City who helped devise the worm therapy. Weinstock hit on the idea about a decade ago when he noticed that the incidence of inflammatory bowel disorders in industrialized nations had increased substantially over the last 50 years, coinciding with vast improvements in sanitation and personal hygiene.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-lab10may10,1,2259316.story

Damasio Comments On Brain, 'Quirky' Behaviors (New York Times, May 10)
As the number of Americans with brain disorders grows, so has skepticism toward the grab bag of syndromes they are being tagged with, from A.D.D. to Asperger's to bipolar I, II or III. But in a new kind of disabilities movement, many of those who deviate from the shrinking subset of neurologically "normal" want tolerance, not just of their diagnoses, but of their behavioral quirks. Overcoming the human suspicion of oddity will be hard, the more so because the biological basis of many brain disorders can't be easily verified. Usually, all anyone has to go on is behavior. "It's a tough one," wrote one participant in an online discussion of Asperger's syndrome. "Was that woman," he asked, just "unwilling to think about others' feelings, not caring about whether she's boring me with the minute details of her breakfast wrap?" Or, he asked, was she "really truly incapable of adapting herself to social mores?" Science is beginning to clear up such questions, said Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO, a neurologist at the University of Iowa Medical Center, by identifying distinct brain patterns and connecting them to behavior. But, he added, only society can decide whether to accommodate the differences. "What all of our efforts in neuroscience are demonstrating is that you have many peculiar ways of arranging a human brain and there are all sorts of varieties of creative, successful human beings," Dr. Damasio said. "For a while it is going to be a rather relentless process as there are more and more discoveries of people that have something that could be called a defect and yet have immense talents in one way or another." Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, the SPARTANBURG (S.C.) HERALD,
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/09/weekinreview/09harm.html?ex=1084680000&en=4a60985193d4ac62&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

UI Press Reissues 'Where The Sky Began' (Chicago Sun Times, May 9)
The paper reviews the recently reissued book by John Madson "Where the Sky Began: Land of the Tallgrass Prairie" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, $19.95). What produced this grassland? Madson, an Iowa native, looks at the part played by geology, weather and soil and the ongoing impact of plants and animals -- including humans. You might think the topic would be as dry as a July day in South Dakota, but the author draws you in, awakening curiosity about subjects you may not even think you're interested in.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/books/sho-sunday-paper09.html

Ballet Dancer Attended UI (Bismarck Tribune, May 9)
A story about Cheryl Soscia, a NAPA parts deliverer by day and professional ballet dancer for the Northern Plains Ballet by night, says she studied dance at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, accepted an apprenticeship with Colorado Ballet and then went on to Bismarck to train with Anthony Noa, the company's artistic director.
http://www.bismarcktribune.com/articles/2004/05/09/news/life/lif01.txt

Dilg Displays Oil Paintings In St. Louis (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, May 9)
Schmidt Contemporary Art in St. Louis has mounted an elegant little show of small oil paintings by JOHN DILG, a painter who teaches at the University of Iowa. His well-crafted works have the look of being brand-new but having always existed.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/reviews.nsf/0/19CD111BD37D53CC86256E8E00006307?OpenDocument&Headline=Three+galleries+along+McPherson+offer+vitality+and+variety

Redlawsk Comments On Jobs, Campaign (Chicago Tribune, May 7)
President Bush, arguing that his prescription of tax relief is healing the economy and creating jobs, is taking that campaign message to voters in two states he lost by narrow margins four years ago. But DAVID REDLAWSK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said the employment issue isn't "quite as intense" in the state as it is in the Rust Belt states. "While companies in Iowa cut back," Redlawsk said, "it wasn't the same as if it were Ohio and Michigan," where Bush went on the first leg of his campaign bus tour Monday and Tuesday.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/bal-bush0507,1,1609450.story

Redlawsk Comments On Jobs, Campaign (Rapid City Journal, May 7)
President Bush, arguing that his prescription of tax relief is healing the economy and creating jobs, is taking that campaign message to voters in two states he lost by narrow margins four years ago. But DAVID REDLAWSK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said the employment issue isn't "quite as intense" in the state as it is in the Rust Belt states. "While companies in Iowa cut back," Redlawsk said, "it wasn't the same as if it were Ohio and Michigan," where Bush went on the first leg of his campaign bus tour Monday and Tuesday. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the BOSTON GLOBE, ALBANY (N.Y.) TIMES UNION, FOX NEWS, ORLANDO SENTINEL, IDAHO STATE JOURNAL, HELENA (Mont.) INDEPENDENT RECORD, MUNSTER (Ind.) TIMES, THE GUARDIAN (U.K.), NATCHEZ (Miss.) DEMOCRAT, NEWSDAY and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.rapidcityjournal.com/articles/2004/05/07/ap/Headlines/d82docm00.txt

Squire Comments On Iraq War Poll Findings (Cape Cod Online, May 7)
The Gallup Poll finds public opposition to the war in Iraq is at an all-time high -- and support for President Bush's handling of the broader war against terrorism is at an all-time low -- after the deadliest month for U.S. troops and revelations about the abuse of Iraqi prisoners by American forces. Some observers say the latest polling mainly shows how divided Americans have become, suggesting that the nation will remain sharply split into the long summer of campaigning, through the political parties' nominating conventions and into November's election. "The electorate is very clearly polarized," said PEVERIL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. The same story appeared on the web sites of the SEATTLE (Wash.) TIMES, KANSAS CITY STAR, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.capecodonline.com/cctimes/pollfinds7.htm

Perlman Interviewed For SARS (Australian Broadcasting Company, May 7)
STANLEY PERLMAN
, a University of Iowa virologist, was interviewed for a story about the World Health Organization examination of new findings that suggest the SARS virus could be transmitted as easily as a handshake. A study conducted by the First Military Medical University in Guangzhou in southern China and published in the British Journal of Pathology, says SARS was found in the sweat glands of four infected patients. Perlman has studied coronaviruses for 22 years and he warns that the distinction needs to be made between the infectious virus and viral traces.
http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2004/s1103901.htm

Bowlsby: Policy Prohibits UI Vs. Florida State (The Lakeland Ledger, May 7)
The University of Iowa probably would say no if it received a lucrative offer to play Florida State in a made-for-TV football game. The reason: Florida State is nicknamed the Seminoles. Iowa has a policy, approved by its athletic department governing board in 1994, that prevents the scheduling of non-conference games with schools that have American Indian mascots. "We would probably not accept a preseason game against an institution which had a Native American mascot," Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY said after being asked specifically about Florida State. "We have some control over that." The paper is based in Lakeland, Fla. The story also appeared on the web sites of MICHIGAN LIVE, NEWSDAY, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040507/APS/405070624

Second Arrest In UI Residence Hall Fire (Omaha World Herald, May 7)
A second arrest has been made in connection with a trash fire at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA dormitory last month, university police said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1089151

Skorton: Misunderstanding Should Be Explained (Chronicle of Higher Ed., May 7)
Americans' confidence in higher education remains strong and steady, even though elected officials in statehouses and the U.S. Congress expressed plenty of skepticism this past year about how colleges are run -- weighing proposals, for instance, that would have controlled tuition increases or changed what they perceived as a liberal bias on campuses. That is a key finding of an extensive new national poll of public opinion of higher education, conducted for The Chronicle. But Americans complained about some of the day-to-day practices of colleges. Three-fourths said that higher education placed too much emphasis on sports, and that colleges should do away with "legacy" admissions, the practice of giving extra consideration to applicants whose relatives attended the same institution. And while the public lauded colleges for their quality, 68 percent said that institutions could maintain those standards while reducing costs. It is a question that college officials often hear, and one that they typically answer by drawing a picture of an ignorant public that fails to understand all the challenges that go into running a campus -- keeping faculty salaries competitive, maintaining facilities, and staying current with technology, to name a few. But DAVID J. SKORTON, president of the University of Iowa, said the poll results over all showed that college officials need to stop being so "arrogant" in answering the public's legitimate concerns. "If there is poor public understanding of what we do, it's our issue, it's our problem," Mr. Skorton said. "It's too facile to say that people don't understand what we do. If there is poor public understanding, we are the ones who bear the burden of explaining it."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i35/35a00101.htm

Williamson Comments On e-Textbooks (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 7)
Pearson Education, a leading textbook publisher, announced late last month that it would offer online versions of hundreds of its textbooks this fall at half the cost of the printed versions. The move appears to be a response to criticism by student groups who say textbook prices are too high. The e-books will be available via an online service called SafariX, which Pearson is creating. The service's Web site will include more than 300 of the company's most popular titles, in an array of subjects. Students will be able to buy password-protected "subscriptions" to the online version of each textbook to read via any Web browser. They will be able to search the text and to print out a certain number of pages at a time. STEPHEN D. WILLIAMSON, a professor of financial economics at the University of Iowa, is the author of a book on macroeconomics that will sell on SafariX for $59.50, down from its list price of $119. Pearson told him about his book's inclusion in SafariX in an e-mail message a day after the company publicly announced the program. He says he is concerned that Pearson's security measures will not work, and he wonders how the lower price will affect the royalties he gets from the book. Wendy Spiegel, a spokeswoman for Pearson, says authors' royalties could be affected, depending on what individual contracts specify. Mr. Williamson sees motivations behind the plan other than offering students lower prices and more choices in format. "A big part of this book business has been churning out new editions every two to three years, so you can kill off the used-book market," he says. With online versions, "they don't have to worry about the used-book market. They don't give you a physical book that can be resold."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i35/35a03702.htm

Author Attended UI (Philadelphia Inquirer, May 6)
A Q&A with William Lashner, a local lawyer and writer of legal thrillers, notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. "It's two years in the bubble, where all you care about is writing as well as you can, seeing if you like to do it," Lashner said. "Basically, your job is to write every day. A lot of people went there and found they didn't like doing that. You're in your room alone, pounding away. It's a question of whether you want to spend the rest of your life doing that."
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/8598870.htm?1c

Lewin: Names Make Statement On Couples' Identity (Boston Herald, May 6)
According to a recent study, the number of college-educated women keeping their surnames dropped from 23 percent in 1990 to just 17 percent in 2000. Local lesbians, too -- who can marry in Massachusetts starting May 17 -- are altering their appellations, though in far fewer numbers than straight women and for very different reasons. For same-sex couples, the question of identity is more comprehensive: With their unions not recognized legally, sharing a surname is a way to identify as a family. "Oftentimes people pick a name that makes a statement about their identity as a couple," said ELLEN LEWIN, an anthropology professor at the University of Iowa and expert on same-sex commitment ceremonies. Lewin estimates that less than a quarter of same-sex couples elect to change their names when they commit. When they do switch, Lewin said, they follow various routes: They hyphenate, pick the name of one partner, merge the two names in whole or part, or choose an entirely new name out of the air or from their family history.
http://theedge.bostonherald.com/lifeNews/view.bg?articleid=685

Marshall Studies Infant Fluoride Exposure (Reuters, May 6)
Fluoride in water has helped prevent millions of cavities, but the results of a new study suggest that infants who drink large amounts of beverages that contain fluoride may be at risk for discoloration of their primary teeth. In particular, infants who drank the most water-based beverages, particularly infant formulas made with water, were more likely to develop a condition called dental fluorosis when they were older. But for most children, the level of fluoride in the water supply is unlikely to make them susceptible to fluorosis, the study's lead author emphasized. Levels of dental cavities, or caries, have plummeted as a result of the fluoridation of water systems and the widespread availability of fluoridated toothpaste. But as is the case with any nutrient, "some is good, but more is not necessarily better," according to Dr. TERESA A. MARSHALL of the University of Iowa College of Dentistry in Iowa City.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=healthNews&storyID=5050390

Miller: Iraqi Deaths Not Relevant To American Public (Tehran Times, May 6)
Iraq policy is only a low priority for American voters and the mounting civilian casualty toll there is unlikely to damage President Bush's reelection chances, political analysts and pollsters say. "If a few hundred or even a few thousand Iraqis get killed, the average American citizen doesn't see that as relevant to them," said University of Iowa political scientist and pollster ARTHUR MILLER. One factor influencing U.S. opinion will undoubtedly be presumptive Democratic nominee John Kerry's willingness to make Bush's handling of Iraq a major campaign theme. Right now, he seems more inclined to focus his campaign on domestic issues. "A case could be made against Bush, linking the deaths to his promises of how the war would promote democracy throughout the Middle East and linking it to the huge amount of money we are spending there," said Miller. "But if the candidates don't talk about it, the public won't react and can't react," he said.
http://www.tehrantimes.com/Description.asp?Da=5/6/2004&Cat=4&Num=003

UI Has Indian Nickname, Won't Play Braves (WorldNetDaily.com, May 6)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA baseball team canceled a game scheduled yesterday with Bradley University because of the Illinois school's "Braves" nickname, but Iowa's moniker also has Indian origins. University of Iowa sports teams are known as the Hawkeyes, the popular nickname for the state. The origin of the name is traced back to a 19th century newspaper publisher who wanted to honor Chief Black Hawk, and to a white scout named Hawkeye who lived among the Delaware Indians in James Fenimore Cooper's novel "The Last of the Mohicans." Iowa decided in February to cancel its matchup with Bradley because "Braves" violates the university's policy to schedule non-conference games with teams that have Indian mascots, the campus paper, the Daily Iowan reported. World Net Daily calls itself "a fiercely independent news site committed to hard-hitting investigative reporting of government waste, fraud and abuse."
http://worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=38354

UI Herky Statues Damaged (Omaha World Herald, May 6)
Four eccentrically adorned UNIVERSITY OF IOWA mascot statues were vandalized, less than a day after they were unveiled. A Herkyman statue placed on the Pedestrian Mall lost its cape. A Rhinestone Cowgirl Herky at the corner of Linn Street and Iowa Avenue lost its hat. The "We Can Do It, Herky" was robbed of fake dollar bills from its fist, and music sheets were missing from "Cultural Herky" on Pentacrest Southeast. The fiberglass statues, valued at $7,500 each, were unveiled Monday. They were vandalized Monday night.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1088088

Bones Found At Prison Sent To UI Archaeologist (Omaha World Herald, May 6)
The Iowa State Penitentiary, America's oldest prison west of the Mississippi River, has a secret. What appear to be human skeletal remains have been found at a construction site inside the maximum security prison in Fort Madison, prison officials said Wednesday. The bones were found along a filled-in trench Monday following heavy weekend rain. The bones were to be sent to the State Archaeologist's Office at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for closer inspection.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1088126

Father Who Ran, Hoping For Miracle, Attended UI (The Tennessean, May 5)
A column recounts CNN National News Desk Director Wayne Drash's decision to hope for a miracle for his sick infant son in exchange for his running his first marathon. When Drash's son William was born in September 2003, he nearly died before he even had a chance to see his parents. Almost immediately, the infant began to experience seizures that nearly killed him. As a result, he suffered brain damage. The story says Drash, who earned a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, trained for the Country Music Marathon in Tennessee. Then, in January, the boy's doctors made a miraculous discovery. Drash's son's brain had somehow healed itself and he was given a clean bill of health.
http://www.tennessean.com/local/columnists/piarrot/archives/04/04/50796119.shtml?Element_ID=50796119

Army Officer Who Met Future Wife In Kuwait A UI Alumnus (Newsday, May 5)
A story about two Army officers who met and fell in love while they were in Kuwait says the man, Capt. Leonard Sloat, who served in Gulf War One, Kosovo and Bosnia and is now stationed at Fort Irwin in California, grew up in Muscatine, Iowa, and went to college at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he received a degree in social work.
http://www.newsday.com/news/columnists/ny-nydugg053787553may05,0,3518341.column?coll=ny-news-columnists

Cullen: Eradicate Nose Bacteria To Reduce Surgery Infections (The Age, May 4)
Eradicating the bacteria in a patient's nose has been proven to reduce infections that patients pick up in hospitals after surgery, according to an international surgeon. JOSEPH CULLEN, an associate professor of surgery at the University of Iowa and fellow of the American College of Surgeons, said about a quarter of patients carried the same bacterium in their nose -- Staphylococcus aureus, or golden staph -- the most common cause of infections in post-operative wounds. Cullen, who will speak at a surgeons' congress in Melbourne today, said a study of more than 3600 patients found treating those who were carrying the organism in their nose could reduce the rate of post-operative infections by 50 per cent. But he said treating every patient carrying the bacterium in their nose would be time consuming and costly, as not all carriers would become infected. The paper is based in Australia.
http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2004/05/04/1083635132443.html

Kohatsu Comments On Medical Advice (Pittsburg Post-Gazette, May 4)
A growing list of medical recommendations have recently been tweaked, changed or outright discarded. In addition to ensuring full employment for health journalists, this trend has left many consumers baffled, annoyed and discouraged. "People want science to be definitive, but anyone who has explored science knows that it is an evolving process," said NEAL KOHATSU, president-elect of the American College of Preventive Medicine and an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa's College of Public Health. "Rarely is there a single definitive study. "It's a matter of looking at patterns over time and seeing the results come up [with] by different investigators."
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04125/310511.stm

UI MBA Alumnus Opens Restaurant (Los Alamos Monitor, May 4)
Hiep Pham came to Los Alamos, N.M. with a mission: to try to bring the best Thai food possible to the area. Pham has been in town only a month and a half, but he has made big changes to his restaurant, Lemongrass & Lime. The restaurant, located at 159 Central Park Square in Los Alamos, reopened and now offers Thai food along with Vietnamese dishes. Pham received an MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.lamonitor.com/articles/2004/05/03/headline_news/news07.txt

Regents Conflict of Interest Policies May Change (Omaha World Herald, May 4)
The Iowa Board of Regents may revamp its conflict of interest policies and form a new hospital committee in the wake of criticism over its new president. John Forsyth, who was appointed as the nine-member board's president on April 21, is chief executive of Wellmark Inc., the state's largest private health insurance company, which does millions of dollars in business with state universities each year. His position could create a conflict of interest for the board, which is set to meet next on May 18 and 19 in Council Bluffs. Gov. Tom Vilsack nominated Forsyth to the board. Forsyth was confirmed by the Iowa Senate before starting his six-year term this month. During the Senate confirmation process, doctors and others questioned how Forsyth could serve the state board while at the same time representing the private insurer. Their complaints grew when he was elected to lead the board, which also serves as the board of trustees for UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS in Iowa City.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1085889

Brinig: Courts Likely To Follow California (Christian Science Monitor, May, 3)
A decision by the California Supreme Court is setting the stage for a national shift on one of the most contentious areas of divorce law. By keeping a mother from moving to Ohio with her children against the father's will, the court is sending legal tremors across the United States. Eight years ago, a California Supreme Court decision gave custodial parents -- who are overwhelmingly mothers -- broad powers to move as they wished, and it became the basis for many other states' laws. Now, the same court has moderated its stance, giving noncustodial parents more of a legal voice in the process, and suggesting that its initial ruling had been misapplied. The decision comes at a time when the fathers' rights movement has been gaining momentum in state courts and legislatures. But California's ruling stands as perhaps the strongest endorsement yet of the idea that the balance of power between divorced parents has swung too far toward mothers - and that judges and lawmakers must try to stake out a new middle ground. "It seems to me, since many states relied on [the 1996 California ruling] to decide what to do with their own relocation principles, as though there may be some rethinking of custody rules," says MARGARET BRINIG, a professor of family law at the University of Iowa. "You get these sorts of swings."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0503/p01s02-usju.html

UI Infertility Study Cited (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, May 3)
In-vitro fertilization has come a long way since the birth in 1978 of the world's first "test tube" baby, Louise Brown. Thanks to improved technology, the procedure has a higher success rate than it did a decade ago, and doctors now report fewer multiple births. A key reason for fewer triplets, quads and quints is that doctors began voluntarily limiting the number of embryos they implant in infertile women. And yet, reproductive specialists encounter patients every day who, because of the expense, emotional toll or advancing age, say they would prefer twins--or more. In the March issue of Fertility and Sterility, reproductive endocrinologists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who surveyed more than 400 infertility patients found that 20.2 percent said they would prefer a multiple birth. Of that group, 94 percent hoped for twins; 2 percent wanted triplets and 4 percent said they would be happiest with quadruplets or more. "Thus a sizable minority prefers the situation that the medical community is trying hard to avoid," the authors wrote.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/living/8567110.htm

Noyes Studies Hypochondria (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, May 3)
Hypochondria, a disorder that afflicts one of every 20 Americans who visit doctors, has been one of the most stubborn puzzles in medicine. Dr. RUSSELL NOYES, an emeritus professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, is exploring whether interpersonal therapy, which encourages patients to examine their social and family relationships for clues to their problems, is effective. Inevitably, some patients will stand by their hypochondriacal convictions in the face of any effort to dislodge them.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/living/8567104.htm?1c

Rautiaiman Comments On Farm Hazards For Kids (New York Times, May 3)
A recent study on child farm accidents found that giving farming parents the safety guidelines can cut injuries to children in half. The study was conducted over 21 months on 845 farms in central New York by the Bassett Research Institute and the New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health. The survey also found there are more hazards to children on farms than health experts previously thought. The Bassett report documents for the first time the effect the 62 guidelines, created by the Marshfield, Wis.-based National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Injury, had on reducing children's injuries. Farms that followed the guidelines had just 13 injuries from tasks covered in the standards compared with 26 injuries on farms that didn't follow the guidelines. However, another 146 injuries were caused by things outside the safety recommendations, such as horseback riding. "Even though we have these efforts, it's still an issue that hasn't been solved," said RISTO RAUTIAIMAN, an assistant professor of agricultural health and safety at the University of Iowa. "On farms, children are in the same environment as adults where all the hazards exist. You do not see children on a construction site or in an industrial situation." Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared May 3 on the web sites of the COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, BISMARK (N.D.) TRIBUNE, WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, BOSTON.com, TROY (N.Y.) RECORD, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, KENTUCKY.com, TALLAHASSEE.com, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, PENN LIVE in Pennsylvania, MLIVE in Michigan, WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM, the LEDGER in Florida, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, OCALA (Fla.) STAR BANNER, SPRINGFIELD (Ohio) NEWS SUN, ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, KANSAS.com, the TIMES DAILY in Alabama, FORT WORTH (Tex.) STAR TELEGRAM, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, MIAMI HERALD, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, THE STATE in South Carolina, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, BALTIMORE SUN, and CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/business/AP-Farm-Scene.html

Hansen Advises Realistic Finals Goals (Centre Daily Times, May 3)
A list of tips for surviving final exams includes one from SARAH HANSEN, a health educator at the University of Iowa. "Don't think you -- or your academic performances -- need to be perfect," she wrote about handling finals stress for a Web site (www.uistudenthealth.com). Hansen noted that "perfectionism is a huge time waster." Instead of trying to make everything you do -- papers, presentations, studying -- exactly perfect, she wrote, set your sights on more-realistic, "but still acceptable," academic goals. You are, after all, more than your grade-point average, and there is life after finals week. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/sports/horse_racing/kentucky_derby/8577659.htm

UI Professor, Wife Die In Apparent Suicide (Omaha World Herald, May 3)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor and his wife who were upset over health problems were found dead of an apparent suicide. Donald McDonald, 72, and his wife Barbara, 70, were found Saturday morning in the garage of their home in this town just west of Iowa City. Authorities said they were seated in their sport utility vehicle, holding hands. A compact disc of flute music was playing, they said. McDonald, an environmental scientist who studied microorganisms in Iowa's lakes and rivers, taught at the University of Iowa for about 35 years before retiring in the late 1990s.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1085003

Whiston Says Juries Not Moved By Insanity Defense (Omaha World Herald, May 3)
Richard Huffman is a rarity in Iowa - a criminal defendant who was found not guilty by reason of insanity. To this day, the 35-year-old drifter and anti-car crusader is convinced that agents of the auto industry stalked and then gassed him in 1998. That's apparently what led him to splash gasoline on a gas pump at Gasby's Conoco in Iowa City and then light it on fire. Criminal defendants rarely mount insanity defenses - in large part, lawyers said, because they rarely succeed. Insanity defenses must meet a high legal standard, and prosecutors usually fight them. Jury members usually aren't sympathetic to the defense either, according to JOHN WHISTON, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1085002

UI Herky Parade Starts Today (Omaha World Herald, May 3)
The Herky Parade starts today. That's when 75 statues of the UNIVERSITY OF IOIWA mascot, Herky the Hawk, will be unveiled at locations around Iowa City, Coralville and University Heights. The 6-foot, 350-pound statues were painted and decorated by local artists. "Herky on Parade" is the launching point for the 75th anniversary celebration of Kinnick Stadium on Oct. 5. The statues will be on display until at least November, organizers said. Among the statues are Coca-Cola Herky, Elvis Herky, Captain Ameriky, Marilyn MonHerky and Andy Warhawk.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1084967

Kinnick Papers Cited (New York Times, May 2)
The death of the former Arizona Cardinals safety Pat Tillman with the Army Rangers in Afghanistan on April 22 recalled other athletes who have served and died for the United States. One of those, Nile Kinnick, an Iowa running back who won the 1939 Heisman Trophy, was a naval aviator who died when his plane went into the sea on a training mission off the aircraft carrier Lexington in June 1943. Excerpts are drawn from material in the special collections department, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LIBRARIES, and published in "A Hero Perished: The Diary and Selected Letters of Nile Kinnick," edited by Paul Baender (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 1991).
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/02/sports/football/02KINN.html?ex=1084075200&en=11db4a1a6e39e1fe&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Damasio Launched Study of Emotion (Los Angeles Times, May 2)
What humans possess, jokes economist Colin Camerer, "is basically a monkey brain with a good publicist." That's his conclusion from observing the results of experiments by scientists at Caltech and elsewhere, who are peering into the human brain to see how we think - and finding they can predict the decisions their subjects will make. Scans made at an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) lab would typically be used to map an injury or diagnose disease. But here in Pasadena, the images help scientists understand the role that emotion plays in our economic choices. These studies suggest practical insights into how emotions affect our lives. Camerer suggests that in important negotiations, over, say, a new job, it might be wise to acknowledge the power of emotion, and delay making a decision until feelings cool. But that's not as easy as it sounds, because the human hunger for fairness is, apparently, a primal urge. In an experiment at Emory University, scientists trained female monkeys to trade tokens for food. When some monkeys saw that a monkey received a better treat for her tokens-a sweet grape instead of cucumber slice-they would disrupt the bargaining. Sometimes the resentful monkeys would pay the token but refuse the cucumber. Sometimes the cucumber was thrown on the floor. The more unfair the trade, the more a monkey would display disgust. The experiments with monkeys and MRI technology have largely evolved from the clinical observations in the 1990s by a single neurologist, ANTONIO DAMASIO of the University of Iowa. By studying people who suffered damage to parts of the brain, Damasio found that feelings can be a shortcut message system, drawing on our lifetime of experiences to prod us in a direction before the slower process of reasoning produces an answer. Fear, delight, dread and other emotions arise as what Damasio terms "somatic markers" that grab our attention. They are often felt as a physical sensation-that hollow feeling in the pit of the stomach that signals dread based on our many experiences. They help whittle down the range of choices we face when making a decision.
http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/magazine/la-tm-decisions18may02,1,4098038.story

Regents President Denies Conflict (Omaha World Herald, May 1)
The new president of the Iowa Board of Regents is the chief executive of a private insurance company that does millions of dollars in business with state universities every year. John Forsyth, appointed last week as the board's new president, is chief executive of Wellmark Inc., the state's largest private health insurance company. Forsyth said he would remove himself from any regents decision involving Wellmark or other health insurance providers. He said he has asked Wellmark's chief financial officer, David Southwell, to handle all business dealings with universities. But some university officials are concerned about a potential conflict in Forsyth's dual role and question whether the board can impartially review contracts with Wellmark and other health care providers. "The potential concern would be that we'd have one person on both sides of the negotiations," said SHELDON KURTZ, a law professor and member of the University of Iowa's Funded Retirement and Service Committee. Members of the board have "got to make some decisions about the conflict of interest inherent in this situation," said RANDALL BEZANSON, a law professor and former administrator at the University of Iowa. Forsyth said he is sensitive to the perception of conflict but said it is no different from regent members who are alumni of the state universities or have children enrolled in the schools. He said he is exploring a new board structure that would leave him out of direct involvement in hospital decisions.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1083488

UI Sleep Study Cited (Jerusalem Post, May 1)
How do animals exposed to 24-hour light retain their wake-sleep habits, and how do mammals in the Arctic -- which is characterized by months of full light followed by months of full darkness -- retain their sleep and awake habits in such unusual circumstances? After analyzing the reactions of certain mammals following 82 days of continuous daylight in the summer and 82 days of continuous darkness in the winter, a team of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers may have begun to identify a clue. The study, presented a few weeks ago at the American Physiological Society's annual scientific conference in Washington, D.C., showed that free-living animals in the Arctic had regular sleep-awake cycles, despite having 82 days of continuous sun. The intriguing question is whether or not these animals have found a clue in the external environment to take the place of the missing sunset. The researchers hypothesize that because the sun during this period is nearer the horizon at one part of the day, this might act as a clue for the biological clocks.
http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1083468519477&p=1006953080053

In Tight Admissions Game, Student Applies To UI (Orlando Sentinel, May 1)
A story about exploding college enrollments and the resulting increase in competition for acceptance describes a local high school senior waiting to hear from colleges. Though many of her classmates applied to Florida state universities, Mia Rommel, who'd spent the first 13 years of her life in Texas, did not. Instead, she applied to six universities -- including "safety schools" such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Texas. The news trickled in slowly. Iowa accepted her; Texas, which is jammed with its own population explosion, did not. She was not accepted by her first choice, Georgetown University, but cried tears of joy while opening a "fat" envelope from second choice George Washington University.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/orl-livcolchoice01050104may01,0,334385.story?coll=orl-home-entlife

Blanck Explains Supreme Court ADA Decision (May 2004, 360.com)
This week the Supreme Court broke from recent anti-ADA decisions and ruled that states may be sued for not making courthouses accessible to people with disabilities. In large part, the ruling is based on the idea that court access is a fundamental constitutional right. States must offer to all individuals a meaningful opportunity to due process. Bottom line: Everyone gets their day in court. It was a narrow 5-4 win, and a narrow ruling. The Court only addressed the issue of access to courts -- not all services, programs and activities of state and local governments as noted under Title 2 in the ADA, such as accessible voting areas. Why such a limited decision? " It was the only way to get it passed. For Justice O‚Connor to sign on, someone who has fallen on the states-right's side in previous ADA cases, it had to be a very tailored decision focused only on court access as a fundamental right," says PETER BLANCK, director of the University of Iowa's Law, Health Policy and Disability Center and lead author of Disability Civil Rights Law and Policy. "It is a very narrow victory, but it is still a victory." 360.com is an online magazine for people with disabilities. The site requires registration.
http://www.360mag.com/home.cfm

Forsythe Comments On IEM Predictions (Hemispheres Magazine, May 2004)
This year, Americans will see repeated references to the Iowa Electronic Markets, a futures market in which people buy and sell contracts on the candidate they think will be elected president. ROBERT FORSYTHE helped set up the IEM at the University of Iowa. "At any point in time, you can use the price of the contracts as a prediction of the probability that each candidate will be the winner," Forsythe says. According to one analysis of the last four presidential elections, the Iowa market was compared with 600 surveys and its results were closest to the election results 75 percent of the time. "It's been demonstrated that the price system in a futures market does a pretty good job of aggregating and disseminating the pieces of information that are in the trader's heads," Forsythe said. Hemispheres is published by United Airlines.

Acclaimed Writer Was IWP Participant (Seoul Times, April 30)
Korean writer Kim Young Ha had to wait for the congratulations on his latest book, "Black Flower." He was stuck in Iowa, participating in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM. Two days after it was published he was sitting in the middle of the United States, an ocean and a continent away from the book's reception. "I really would have liked to enjoy the feeling of publishing the book," he said. "My friends. The cheers. The congratulations. The publishers and the critics and the 'Your book is great.' And me saying 'Thank you, thank you.'" From a distance he watched, as the book took on a life of its own. "Every morning I checked the readers' comments on the Korean online bookstores," he said, understandably curious to the response back home. "One professional reviewer says that it could be my number one novel." In November, Kim Young Ha was nominated for the Hankook Ilbo Literary Award, but came in as a runner-up.
http://theseoultimes.com/ST/?url=/ST/db/read.php?idx=240

 

 

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