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UI in the News

March, 2004

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UI Study Cited (New York Times, March 31)
Six years after Medicare began paying for an annual mammogram for women over 40, only 51.8 percent of the eligible women over 50 had at least one mammogram in 2001 or 2002, according to the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. That translates to about 7.6 million women nationwide. The numbers suggest older women may be misjudging the value of regular breast cancer screenings. Lorna Johns was part of a women's health study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1994 and had two mammograms -- one by the university, the other ordered by her doctor. "I had two in a short time and I thought, 'I won't have one this year,'" she said. She was 68 when her doctor discovered a lump during a 1996 exam. A lumpectomy soon followed, then radiation therapy to help rid Johns of one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in women. This Associated Press article also appeared March 31 on the web site of the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Mammograms.html

Mahoney Studies Weight Gain, Heart Damage (The Medical Posting, March 31)
Rapid weight gain in the early teen years can damage a heart by early adulthood, according to a three-decade study in Iowa. The study involved almost 1,000 children from the city of Muscatine who were enrolled in the 1970s at an average age of 15 years. Researchers recently followed them up to see the effects of weight gain on heart health. They found that the fattest teens had become adults with early signs of hardening of the arteries. For women, the odds of hardening of the arteries increased two- to three-fold if they were obese as children. "Modifying this risk factor for coronary disease (obesity) has an important public health implication," says Dr. LARRY MAHONEY of the University of Iowa in Iowa City. The Medical Posting is a wholly owned imprint of the Medical Post, the Rogers Media newspaper for the Canadian medical profession, published 46 times a year. http://www.medicalposting.ca/children/article.jsp?content=20040331_092701_2324&topStory=y

Katen-Bahensky Comments On Transplant Case (Omaha World Herald, March 31)
The director of University Hospitals says there was "no need" to recycle unused prescription drugs in the hospital's transplant program. "One of the most disturbing aspects of this whole episode is that it was all so unnecessary," DONNA KATEN-BAHENSKY said in a guest opinion column for the Iowa City Press-Citizen. Two nurse managers were fired and three nurses were disciplined for allegedly giving unused drugs to patients who couldn't afford them. Hospital officials learned of the matter in January and said no patients were harmed. University of Iowa police continue to investigate. University spokesman TOM MOORE said the university takes each transplant patient through a series of programs about their medications before and after the transplant. And, he said, there is a program to provide patients with an emergency supply. "I'm told there are no gaps. As soon as a patient tells us, 'I'm out of meds and I can't afford to get more,' we issue them meds on an emergency basis," Moore said. "If there are concerns about a lot of paperwork or red tape, that is not the situation," he said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=1051966

Vibhakar Opposes Abortion Ban In Suit (Omaha World-Herald, March 31)
Dr. JILL VIBHAKAR does not perform "partial-birth" abortions. Yet, the Iowa City abortion provider remains opposed to banning the controversial procedure. Vibhakar said the ban could cause doctors who fear prosecution to take measures that place women at greater health risks, such as injecting a chemical into the womb to kill the fetus. The ban -- passed by Congress and signed into law last year -- prohibits what opponents call "partial-birth" abortions, which are known in the medical world as intact dilation and extraction, or D&X. The Lincoln trial, which has no jury, is one of three under way simultaneously across the country. Trials challenging the ban as unconstitutional also started Monday in New York and San Francisco. Vibhakar, who works at the Emma Goldman Clinic for Women and the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is one of four doctors who filed suit in Nebraska to challenge the law. They are represented by the Center for Reproductive Rights in New York.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1051782

Cain Comments On Gay Marriage, Financial Rights (Billings Gazette, March 31)
Gay marriage is creating financial questions that go beyond the bonds of matrimony and into the heart of the tax code. The practice, which has sparked controversy and constitutional challenges, highlights the discrepancies between the financial rights of traditional and same-sex couples and the way the two groups are taxed. PATRICIA CAIN, a University of Iowa provost, tax-law professor and gay-rights expert, said same-sex marriage goes beyond the symbolism of two individuals joining hands in marriage. She said it is an issue of granting the same legal and financial rights given to one group but not another. "If it's not full parity, it's discrimination," Cain said. The paper is based in Montana. A version of the story also ran on the website of the PRESS-ENTERPRISE in California. http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2004/03/31/build/state/22-gay-finance-rights.inc

Quinlisk Declares Measles Outbreak In Iowa (KETV, March 30)
State health officials and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday that there is a third confirmed case of measles in Iowa. This third case was connected to an air traveler on a March 12 Detroit-to-Cedar Rapids flight. Friday, the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory confirmed that a second person had measles. That case was also connected to the March 12 passenger. Iowa Department of Public Health's Dr. PATRICIA QUINLISK called it a "measles outbreak." The TV station is based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/iowabureau/2961439/detail.html

Dyer Organized Nancy Drew Conference (Kansas City Star, March 30)
At the University of Iowa, journalism professor CAROLYN STEWART DYER helped organize an academic conference about Nancy Drew in the 1990s. The conference inspired a book, "Rediscovering Nancy Drew", which Dyer co-edited. Dyer says several women at the conference said Nancy Drew was the source of some of their best character traits. They're clever. They think logically. They're comfortable with their own braininess. The books instilled in them a love of reading and inspired their career choices. The conference took shape because of a connection between the University of Iowa and Nancy Drew. The series' author, Carolyn Keene, was the pen name of Mildred Wirt Benson, the first person to earn a master's degree in journalism at the university. She died two years ago at 96.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/entertainment/8305018.htm?1c

Noyes Explores Hypochondria Therapy (New York Times, March 30)
Hypochondria, a disorder that afflicts one of every 20 Americans who visit doctors, has been one of the most stubborn puzzles in medicine. Dr. RUSSELL NOYES, an emeritus professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, is exploring whether interpersonal therapy, which encourages patients to examine their social and family relationships for clues to their problems, is effective. Inevitably, some patients will stand by their hypochondriacal convictions in the face of any effort to dislodge them. The story also appeared in the WILMINGTON (N.C) DAILY STAR, the SPARTANBURG (S.C) HERALD-JOURNAL and the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.
http://www.wilmingtonstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040330/ZNYT04/403300364/1010/STATE

Hygienic Lab To Examine Wastewater Spill (Agri News, March 30)
About 2,000 gallons of untreated wastewater spilled into Storm Lake after a mechanical malfunction at the Tyson Fresh meats plant, officials said. A plugged bar grate caused the wastewater to overflow March 23 shortly after 6 a.m. Employees used sandbags to contain the wastewater while the problem was identified and repaired. The large volume of cold water in the lake will help dilute the wastewater and minimize the impact on the lake, said Julie Sievers, Department of Natural Resources specialist. Samples have been sent to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY for analysis. Agri News is based in Rochester, Minn.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/310020567379985.bsp

Test Determines Pre-Term Delivery (Reuters, March 29)
Testing pregnant women for a protein called fetal fibronectin is useful for "ruling out" a preterm delivery, new research suggests. This may provide reassurance that a delivery is not imminent so it's okay to return to work or resume normal activities. If the test is negative, the chances of delivering early are very slim. With a positive result, however, the meaning is less clear -- delivery may or may not occur early. In the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dr. M. PATRICK LOWE and colleagues at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, note that fetal fibronectin is present in vaginal fluids early in pregnancy, and then it disappears and doesn't return until about 34 weeks of gestation. Its reappearance is thought to signal the body's preparations for labor.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=healthNews&storyID=4691825

Jones Told Diebold About E-Voting Worries (Wired, March 29)
A story that posits how e-voting may threaten democracy says DOUG JONES, a computer scientist at the University of Iowa and a member of Iowa's voting system board of examiners, found problems with Diebold's electronic voting machines in 1997 when his state was considering buying the systems. Jones was particularly disturbed by a problem found by others regarding the encryption key that was coded into the system and was the same for every voting machine. He told Diebold about his finding, but a non-disclosure agreement prevented him from going public. "I was disappointed to see that the company had done nothing to fix the problems in all of these years," Jones said. A version of the story also ran on the website of AXISOFLOGIC.COM, which declares itself "committed to publishing and disseminating news and information that contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of current events and history on the part of our readers," and on COMMONDREAMS.COM, which covers "breaking news and views for the progressive community" and is based in Portland, Maine.
http://www.wired.com/news/evote/0,2645,62790,00.html

Scott-Conner: Anatomy Knowledge Crucial (Contra Costa Times, March 29)
A story about the scandals reported this month with donated cadavers at UCLA and Tulane University says the hours devoted to formal anatomy training are sharply down in medical schools. Dr. CAROL SCOTT-CONNER, a professor of surgery at the University of Iowa who is president of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists, said she was not sure "that every medical student needs an intensive anatomy course." "But everybody needs to learn anatomy," she said, adding that actively participating in a dissection is a better way to learn than looking at an exhibit or a computer screen. Even when the details of anatomy and the Latin names fade from a doctor's memory, memories of the experience remain vivid, Scott-Conner said. The paper is based in California. A version of the story also ran on the website of the TORONTO STAR.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/8302627.htm

UI Viewed As Partner In Research Collaboration (Star-Telegram, March 29)
Some of Texas' greatest minds are backing a Washington-led effort to remobilize science's attack on disease, but a few fear that it will hurt funding efforts that have fueled major medical breakthroughs for decades. The National Institutes of Health's new "roadmap" aims to achieve bold advances in research by increasing collaboration and high-risk research. Nearly all researchers see the need for collaboration, saying that modern-day science has become too complicated for one scientist or even one institution to tackle alone. For example, Dr. Tom Yorio, UNT Health Science Center graduate school dean, has applied for an NIH grant that involves collaboration with Alcon Labs in Fort Worth and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. They hope the $2 million, five-year grant will help them understand more about glaucoma, an eye disease that affects 2 million worldwide and often causes blindness. The paper covers Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/startelegram/news/state/8303022.htm

Football Visits Violated UI Guidelines (Omaha World-Herald, March 29)
At least three football recruits at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA said they spent time with Hawkeye players in off-campus apartments or in bars during their official visits -- in violation of the school's written guidelines. The Des Moines Register reported Sunday that athletes and university officials admitted to the visits in interviews. An athletic department policy states that "all entertainment of the prospective student-athlete should be confined to the university campus." Additionally, an Iowa City ordinance bans people under age 19 from being in bars after 10 p.m. The recruits said no sex or alcohol was involved in their Iowa City visits. Iowa's recruiting practices are being investigated by a university- appointed member of the Iowa attorney general's office after statements by Nick Patton, a high school quarterback from Winfield, Kan., who said he had consensual sex during his campus visit last September.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=1050120

UI Alumna Penned Early Nancy Drew Books (Christian Science Monitor, March 29)
A story about the return of Nancy Drew mysteries says the character was written in the early years of the series by a tough-minded UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate named Mildred Wirt Benson, who went on to be a journalist and a pilot. She worked from outlines provided by Edward Stratemeyer, who'd cooked up the idea of Nancy in the late 1920s.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0329/p09s02-coop.html

Vibhakar Is Plaintiff In Lawsuit (Sarasota Herald-Tribune, March 29)
Nebraska abortion provider Dr. Leroy Carhart again finds himself at ground zero in the caustic national debate over abortion. On Monday, federal judges in San Francisco, New York and Lincoln will begin trials over challenges -- including one by Carhart -- to the Partial-Birth Abortion Act passed by Congress last year. The Nebraska lawsuit was filed by Carhart, who practices in Bellevue and is also licensed in Iowa, Indiana, Kansas, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Wisconsin; Dr. William Fitzhugh, who is licensed in Virginia; Dr. William Knorr, medical director and co-owner of the Savannah Women's Medical Clinic in Savannah, Ga., and licensed in Alabama, South Carolina and New York; and Dr. JILL VIBHAKAR, who practices medicine at Emma Goldman Clinic for Women and at the University of Iowa College of Medicine Hospital in Iowa City, Iowa. The paper is based in Florida. Versions of the story also ran on the website of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS and the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE in California and ACCESS NORTH GEORGIA.
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040328/APN/403280720

Gurnett Captured Sounds Used In 'Sun Rings' (Arizona Central, March 28)
A story about "Sun Rings, the new composition by Terry Riley, who founded Minimalism long before Philip Glass took it up, says it is "based on sounds of space collected by University of Iowa Professor DON GURNETT over a 40-year period," according to a Web site (www-pw.physics.uiowa.edu/space-audio/KronosSounds.html) devoted to the piece. The Kronos Quartet, fabled champions of the avant-garde, will perform the work at 7:30 tonight at the Scottsdale Center for the Arts. "This isn't ambient music, where you can just turn your mind off and let yourself get lost in a forest of sounds," says David Harrington, Kronos founder and first violinist. "Terry has done computer manipulation of various sound sources, and the Kronos plays over top of that." It's the source of those sources that makes "Sun Rings" unique. Plasma is a very hot gas of charged particles, found in space. (Most of the sun's material is plasma.) When "perturbed," to use the physicist's term, plasma's electrons oscillate, setting up waves. Voyager was equipped with a plasma wave receiver, designed by Gurnett to capture the frequency and length of the waves. These were then translated into their sonic wave equivalents. Voilà! "Sound" from space. Harrington was captivated.
http://www.azcentral.com/ent/arts/articles/0328kronos28.html

Papelis Leads Study Of High-Tech Brake System (Chicago Tribune, March 28)
Drivers in cars with high-tech systems that apply the brakes to individual wheels maintained much better control of their vehicles in difficult driving situations, according to a study conducted at a government lab. Drivers lost control just 3.4 percent of the time when the electronic stability control system was on, compared to 27.9 percent when it wasn't, according to the study. The system automatically applies brakes when it senses the car isn't heading in the direction the driver intended. It is marketed under various names, including StabiliTrak, Dynamic Stability Control and AdvanceTrac. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers conducted the study using the federal government's National Advanced Driving Simulator. Continental Teves Inc. and Bosch Corp., the main producers of electronic stability-control systems, provided software and paid for the tests, though researchers worked independently. Electronic stability control takes its cues from the driver. If the driver isn't steering, it's less effective, said YIANNIS PAPELIS, a lead researcher on the Iowa study. In the test, most drivers tried to steer away from the danger.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/automotive/chi-0403270295mar28,1,6698529.story

UI Study On 'Locally Grown' Labels Cited (Press-Herald, March 28)
A story about the benefits -- both real and imagined -- of eating locally grown produce says that according to a recent marketing study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the terms "locally grown" and "family farm," when attached to a food product, are the advertising equivalent of chicken soup for the hungry person's soul. They soothe us by harking back to simpler times when green onions could give you killer breath but not actually kill you, when all fish was good for you, when "carbohydrate" wasn't a four-letter word, and when beef still was for dinner. The paper is based in Portland, Maine.
http://www.pressherald.com/insight/stories/040328doironpiece.shtml

McNally's 'Troublemakers' Won UI Press Award (Chicago Tribune, March 28)
A story about author John McNally says his first book, "Troublemakers," won the 2000 John Simmons Short Fiction Award from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS and introduced a variety of odd and often hilarious characters, mostly teenagers living in working-class Chicago suburbs or southern Illinois.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/booksmags/chi-0403270269mar28,1,5705073.story

Community Development Director Is Alumnus (Kansas City Star, March 27)
A story about the impending retirement of Merriam, Mo.'s community development director, Paul Glaves, says the motorcycling enthusiast grew up in Grand Forks, N.D., and earned a bachelor's degree in public administration at the University of North Dakota-Grand Forks in 1974. One year later, he earned a master's degree in urban planning from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The labors of his first job, downtown development coordinator for the City of Iowa City, yielded the well-known City Plaza pedestrian mall on the University of Iowa campus.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascitystar/news/local/states/kansas/counties/johnson_county/cities_neighborhoods/shawnee/8287049.htm?1c

Grant Keeps Up The Fight For Athletic Diversity (ESPN.com, March 26)
She coached field hockey, netball and track in Scotland in the 1950s. She coached basketball in Canada in the 1960s. In the 1970s, she became the University of Iowa's first women's athletic director and, with the birth of Title IX, one of its most passionate champions. CHRISTINE GRANT is well into her 60s, Title IX is nearly half her age, but still she fights the good fight from her office in Iowa City. The silver-haired associate professor in Iowa's Department of Health and Sports Studies doggedly returns phone calls. After a series of events that seem, at the very least, to have stymied the women's athletic movement -- including an aggressive reexamination of Title IX by the current Bush administration -- she still is not at a loss for words. "I think we're sitting at the crossroads," Grant says, digging through her files and rustling papers. "While the participation numbers have been going up for women quite well in Division I-A, the recruiting budgets and total expenses for women's athletics are pathetically below where they should be."
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=1766642

Grant Discusses Women's Sports Data (Boston Globe, March 26)
When the Boston College women's basketball team took on Eastern Michigan in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, talk was, of course, of numbers -- seeds, won-loss records, shooting percentages. There probably wasn't much, if any, talk of EADA numbers. The Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act, passed by Congress in 1994, requires colleges and universities with intercollegiate athletic programs to collect information on their men's and women's teams annually and distribute the data -- including participation rates, staffing, revenues, and expenses -- through the Department of Education. Under the 1998 Higher Education amendments, the DOE became fully responsible for collecting and disseminating the information; the NCAA is not involved. The question is: Does anybody know the EADA numbers exist? "You can never tell if you're making progress in women's athletics without data," said CHRISTINE GRANT, retired UI women's athletic director and associate professor of health and sports studies. "The intent of it was to shame universities into doing the right thing. And, to a certain extent, it's had that effect, but not the effect it could have because we envisioned that prospective student-athletes would have access to that data. And they do -- they just don't know it. They don't know about the EADA. They don't know to ask an institution, `Could I see your EADA report?' "
http://www.boston.com/sports/colleges/womens_basketball/articles/2004/03/26/they_earn_their_keep/

UI, ASU Offer Transgender Identity Protection (East Valley Tribune, March 26)
Arizona State University has revised its nondiscrimination policy to include "gender identity," making it the fourth public university to extend such protections to transgender students and employees. One of the other three universities is the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Tribune is located in Scottsdale, Ariz.
http://www.aztrib.com/index.php?sty=19222

Curious Collection Of Alumnus On Display (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, March 26)
An exhibit of weird and wacky items collected by late artist Dean Eckert opens at the St. Louis Artists Guild this weekend. Eckert earned his Ph.D. in art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/News/St.+Louis+City+%2F+County/F23C9045B4FBA59186256E63001A94F6?OpenDocument&Headline=Wacky,+weird+and+wonderful+will+go+on+display+at+exhibit++
Bell Discusses Infant Steroid Hazards (New York Times, March 26)
A powerful steroid that protects premature infants from chronic lung disease can also lead to long-term neurological damage and severe motor problems, a new study has found, and should only be used as a last resort to save lives. "There was a pretty good body of evidence that we were likely causing neurological problems or at least putting these babies at risk," said Dr. EDWARD F. BELL, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa and a member of the committee that made the recommendation. "There are emergency situations where the drug will need to be used, but only when parents have full knowledge of the risks involved."
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/26/health/26LUNG.html?ex=1080882000&en=df06415d74708be5&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Abortion Funding Block Fails (Atlanta Journal Constitution, March 26)
An attempt to prevent some Medicaid patients from obtaining abortions at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Hospitals and Clinics failed Thursday. This story also appeared on the Web sites of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, PALM BEACH POST, NEWSDAY, WICHITA EAGLE, FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, FORTH WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL and numerous others.
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared/health/ap/ap_story.html/Health/AP.V3859.AP-Abortion-Fundin.html

Alumnus Wins Writing Award (The Hook, March 25)
Ross Howell jr., an alumnus of the UI WRITER'S WORKSHOP, received a runner up award in The Hook's annual fiction writing contest.
http://www.readthehook.com/stories/2004/03/25/coverFictionWinners2004Slo.html

Hovenkamp: U.S. Microsoft Decree Has Little Effect (Computer World, March 25)
European Union sanctions in its five-year-long antitrust case against Microsoft could have more of an impact on the software company's business than remedies handed down in the U.S. government's case, according to legal analysts, industry insiders and parties involved in the legal proceedings. "The consent decree appears not to be working," says HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law. "Microsoft market share has not come down at all. The remedy in the U.S, hasn't had any significant effect." The publication is based in New Zealand.
http://www.computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/0/1D9794B3DB07A1BACC256E62000E8206?OpenDocument

Squire Comments On 'Show Us The Jobs' Tour (Common Dreams, March 25)
Starting with a rally in St. Louis this evening, 51 workers from all walks of life -- one from each state and the District of Columbia -- will share their frustrating, frightening and often infuriating experiences of economic dislocation with voters in eight political swing states. The eight-day "Show Us the Jobs" bus tour, organized by the AFL-CIO, will stop at a food pantry in Minneapolis and a shuttered manufacturing plant in Milwaukee. Participants will flip pancakes with workers who expect to get pink slips from a closing Electrolux plant in Greenville, Mich. They will tour homes sold in foreclosure in Youngstown, Ohio, and commiserate with college graduates unable to find work in Morgantown, W.Va. At every stop they will press their central theme: The recession might be over, but the pain is not. The workers on the AFL-CIO bus tour hope their painfully personal testimony will undercut the Bush administration's optimism. "They're tapping into a sense of uncertainty that's pervasive out here," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. Common Dreams, based in Portland, Maine, presents "breaking news and views for the progressive community."
http://www.commondreams.org/headlines04/0324-06.htm

'Sun Rings' Performed in Arizona (Tucson Citizen, March 25)
Terry Riley's "Sun Rings" for string quartet and choir, will be performed tomorrow by the Kronos Quartet with The Arizona Choir under Bruce Chamberlain, director of choral activities at the University of Arizona School of Music. The whole project started snowballing in 2000 when Kronos first violinist and group leader David Harrington became aware of sound recordings from NASA's Voyager missions which wound their way through the outer planets and out beyond the solar system. The sounds Kronos is using in this piece are actually Voyager spacecraft data on shifting plasma fields translated by plasma physicist DON GURNETT into the audible spectrum. "It was Donald Gurnett who invented a machine called the Plasma Wave Receiver. This machine is able to transform plasma waves into sonic information. Some of the sounds are from Saturn and moons of different planets, and from the earth itself. It's really fascinating. You might hear lightning on a different planet." Harrington immediately thought of Terry Riley, partly because at the time Kronos was recording his "Requiem For Adam" and partly due to hearing some reissues of recordings of Riley's '60s experiments in sound. Riley loved the idea, and he and Harrington set off to Iowa City where Gurnett works for the University of Iowa. "Terry described meeting Don Gurnett as 'kind of like meeting Galileo or Newton,' " Harrington recalls. "You just don't expect that you're going to walk into an office like that and feel like you understand the universe for a minute (laughs). That's what it felt like to me. I never thought the violin was going to lead me toward this. It was really cool." Gurnett's voice is among the sounds one hears in "Sun Rings." The Citizen is based in Tucson, Ariz.
http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/index.php?page=living&story_id=032504e1_kronosquartet

Noyes Quoted In Story On Therapy (Health24.com, March 24)
An intense course of behavioral therapy can rid many people of the persistent, distressing and false belief that they suffer from a serious disease, new research finds. The study is a notable advance about hypochondria, a problem that affects a surprisingly large number of Americans, but one that rarely gets the treatment it needs, says Dr. Arthur J. Barsky, director of psychiatric research at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He is the lead author of a report on the study in the March 24/31 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. It's significant that the study is being published in a journal that reaches many family doctors, says Dr. RUSSELL NOYES Jr., professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Iowa who has researched hypochondria. "Quite often people with this sort of disturbance go to a general practitioner feeling that they have a lot of symptoms and worried that they might have cancer or some other serious condition," Noyes says. "The doctor can't find anything, and the person is told that the problem is in the head, which only adds to distress." Health24.com, based in South Africa, is a comprehensive health information provider and part of the Media24 (Naspers) Group.
http://www.health24.co.za/news/Mind_Psychology/1-930,26998.asp

Hovenkamp Comments On European Microsoft Ruling (Internet News.com, March 24)
The European Commission has fined Microsoft a record US $613 million (497.2 million euro) after it found the company abused its "virtual monopoly" with its Windows operating system and broke European antitrust law governing competition. As part of the remedies it ordered Wednesday in addition to the fines, the EU said Microsoft has 90 days to unbundle its Windows Media Player software from its operating system for PC makers. A ruling that Microsoft must produce a version of player-free version of Windows would make it a lot easier for other media player providers to get their software on the desktop. But requiring an EU-specific version of Windows could hurt not only Microsoft but also computer makers, according to HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa and the author of numerous books on antitrust law. "Traditionally, OEMs have been reluctant to support two or more competing versions of the same software," Hovenkamp told internetnews.com . "They have the expense and headache of supporting two applications instead of one."
http://www.internetnews.com/bus-news/article.php/3330341

Nancy Drew's First Author Attended UI (Los Angeles Times, March 24)
Nancy Drew is back in town, in Simon & Schuster's newly launched "Nancy Drew Girl Detective" series. That the books have been written by a succession of writers under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene may be, more than anything else - even that famous blue roadster - the reason that Nancy has endured. Thanks to her various creators, and just like the rest of us, she's always changing. In her earliest incarnation, Nancy was a fierce, occasionally gun-toting firebrand who didn't bother with a boyfriend. If she had to steal evidence at a crime scene, she did it with moral clarity and in a perfect frock. The character was written in those first years by a tough-minded UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate named Mildred Wirt Benson, who went on to become a journalist and a pilot. She worked from outlines provided by Edward Stratemeyer.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/opinion/la-oe-rehak24mar24,1,1853708.story

Squire Comments On 'Show Us The Jobs' Tour (Los Angeles Times, March 24)
Starting with a rally in St. Louis this evening, 51 workers from all walks of life -- one from each state and the District of Columbia -- will share their frustrating, frightening and often infuriating experiences of economic dislocation with voters in eight political swing states. The eight-day "Show Us the Jobs" bus tour, organized by the AFL-CIO, will stop at a food pantry in Minneapolis and a shuttered manufacturing plant in Milwaukee. Participants will flip pancakes with workers who expect to get pink slips from a closing Electrolux plant in Greenville, Mich. They will tour homes sold in foreclosure in Youngstown, Ohio, and commiserate with college graduates unable to find work in Morgantown, W.Va. At every stop they will press their central theme: The recession might be over, but the pain is not. The workers on the AFL-CIO bus tour hope their painfully personal testimony will undercut the Bush administration's optimism. "They're tapping into a sense of uncertainty that's pervasive out here," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-tour24mar24,1,177420.story?coll=la-headlines-nation

Noyes Quoted In Story On Therapy (Palm Beach Post, March 23)
An intense course of behavioral therapy can rid many people of the persistent, distressing and false belief that they suffer from a serious disease, new research finds. The study is a notable advance about hypochondria, a problem that affects a surprising large number of Americans but one that rarely gets the treatment it needs, says Dr. Arthur J. Barsky, director of psychiatric research at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He is the lead author of a report on the study in the March 24/31 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. It's significant that the study is being published in a journal that reaches many family doctors, says Dr. RUSSELL NOYES Jr., professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Iowa who has researched hypochondria. "Quite often people with this sort of disturbance go to a general practitioner feeling that they have a lot of symptoms and worried that they might have cancer or some other serious condition," Noyes says. "The doctor can't find anything, and the person is told that the problem is in the head, which only adds to distress." The paper is based in Florida. A version of the story also ran on the website of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION in Georgia.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/psyc/518027.html

Stumbo Recommends More Water (Tucson Citizen, March 23)
A recent study from the Institute of Medicine reports that coffee, tea, milk, fruit juice and even soft drinks can be tallied into your total water intake. According to the study, about 80 percent of total water intake came from drinking water and beverages and 20 percent came from food. The study notes that its recommendations are for healthy, sedentary people in temperate climates. Prolonged physical activity and heat exposure will increase water loss. That means people in those situations might need to up their daily fluid intake. Children also are more vulnerable to dehydration, says PHYLLIS STUMBO, a research nutritionist at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine. "It's certainly safe to say, 'Drink another glass of water. It won't hurt you,'" Stumbo says. The paper is based in Arizona.
http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/index.php?page=living&story_id=032304e1_water

Scott-Conner Comments On Teaching Anatomy (New York Times, March 23)
Dr. CAROL SCOTT-CONNER, a professor of surgery at the University of Iowa and president of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists, said she was not sure "that every medical student needs an intensive anatomy course. But everybody needs to learn anatomy," she said, adding that actively participating in a dissection is a better way to learn than looking at an exhibit or a computer screen. Even when the details of anatomy and the Latin names fade from a doctor's memory, memories of the experience remain vivid, Dr. Scott-Conner said. A version of this story also appeared March 23 in the SPARTANBURG (S.C.) HERALD-JOURNAL.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/23/health/23CADA.html?ex=1080622800&en=12fd362f3a8f73ec&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Damasio: Facts, Logic Not Enough (Washington Post, March 23)
The next time you lock horns with your boss, your friend or your spouse and she tells you to leave emotion out of it, tell her that science proves that's a lousy idea. Block that emotion and all you're likely to produce are bad decisions. That heretical insight is at the heart of a revolution today in neuroscience and psychotherapy. Researchers working with patients with brain damage from stroke, seizure or surgery have traced behavioral problems to the loss or malfunction of an emotion-processing center. "If that [neural connection to emotional memories] is broken down," says University of Iowa neuroscientist ANTONIO DAMASIO about one such case, "you're at the mercy of facts and logic, and that just is not enough." What does any of this have to do with psychotherapy practice today? Simply this: If emotion is so central to our behavior that we can't bypass it without cost, then therapeutic approaches that appeal principally to logic and reason are bound to fail.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A16473-2004Mar22.html

Stumbo Recommends More Water (The Olympian, March 23)
A recent study from the Institute of Medicine reports that coffee, tea, milk, fruit juice and even soft drinks can be tallied into your total water intake. According to the study, about 80 percent of total water intake came from drinking water and beverages and 20 percent came from food. The study notes that its recommendations are for healthy, sedentary people in temperate climates. Prolonged physical activity and heat exposure will increase water loss. That means people in those situations might need to up their daily fluid intake. Children also are more vulnerable to dehydration, says PHYLLIS STUMBO, a research nutritionist at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine. "It's certainly safe to say, 'Drink another glass of water. It won't hurt you,'" Stumbo says.
http://www.theolympian.com/home/news/20040323/living/9976.shtml

Gould Comments On Teen Smoking Prevention (Rocky Mountain News, March 23)
These two teenagers are an absolute mess. She has brain cancer, lung cancer, kidney cancer, stomach ulcers, wrinkled skin and bad breath -- among other things. He suffers from bladder cancer, emphysema, heart disease, cataracts, dead feet and impotence -- among other things. They are the "Iowa Smoking Teens" -- life-sized cutouts created by the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa to give young people a graphic look at the dangers of cigarettes. "Smoking is a pediatric disease," said RENEE GOULD, a nurse with the center's Thoracic Oncology program. "Unfortunately, our program doesn't see smokers until they're about 40 years old and have been smoking the majority of their lives." Gould and colleagues take the life-sized cutouts and the posters to schools, state fairs and health fairs. "If we can keep one person from smoking by showing these striking images, it's worth our visit," Gould said.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/health_and_fitness/article/0,1299,DRMN_26_2748975,00.html

Schmidt Comments On Emotional Intelligence (Baltimore Sun, March 22)
A story about the study of "emotional intelligence" says that contrary to common perception, traditional tests of general mental ability (GMA) or IQ do not measure some single, fixed genetic aptitude. They measure a variety of mental skills, as well as the ability to learn -- qualities that are partly linked to genes. These generally include numeric ability, verbal fluency and spatial aptitude (the ability to rotate and visualize objects mentally). Each of these skills functions differently in each individual: A mechanic may have sublime spatial skills but limited numeric ability, and vice versa for an accountant. But the idea is that by measuring several things at once you detect an intelligence that shares all three, said FRANK SCHMIDT, an industrial psychologist who studies intelligence testing at the University of Iowa. Psychologists have been searching for ways to improve the effectiveness of the GMA test for about a century but have not been able to do so, Schmidt said. A person who scores high on a 15- to 30-minute general mental ability test goes on to become a productive and valued employee about 50 percent of the time, his research shows. Although thousands of studies have looked at GMA, there is scant research about emotional intelligence, Schmidt said. But, he adds, "there's no question that people like the sound of emotional intelligence much better than they do things like 'general mental ability' or 'IQ.'" A version of the story also ran March 20 on the website of the CONTRA COSTA TIMES in California.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/bal-emotions032204,0,4346008.story?coll=bal-business-headlines

Bezanson: Court's Interpretation Confusing (National Law Journal, March 22)
Law professors believe the phrase "under God" is an unconstitutional inclusion in the Pledge of Allegiance, but believe the Supreme Court justices will uphold its constitutionality, anyway. In part, that's because the Constitution's Establishment Clause has been interpreted by the Court in so many different ways over the years. The Supreme Court has taken four, and perhaps five, different approaches in its establishment clause cases, creating a jurisprudence that is "now in a shambles and nobody can really understand it and put it all together," said RANDALL BEZANSON of the University of Iowa College of Law.
http://www.law.com/jsp/nlj/PubArticleNLJ.jsp?id=1079640446659

Playwright Greenidge Attended UI (Boston Globe, March 22)
A story about Kirsten Greenidge, whose play "Sans-culottes in the Promised Land" was performed last summer in Madison, Wis., and is now being produced at the 28th Humana Festival of New American Plays in Louisville, Ky., says she traces her influence to David Hancock, a playwright who came to speak at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's MFA program in playwriting, which Greenidge graduated from in 2001. "He said most writers have six to eight characters in their heads and they just keep recycling them," Greenidge said.
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2004/03/21/writing_who_she_knows/

Actress Attended UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, March 21)
In two decades of stage work, Laura Esping has pursued theater not to claim the spotlight but as a way to fulfill social and personal ideals. Her stage career, which began when she hopped a yellow bus to tour Midwestern prisons during her senior year of college, is as colorful and dramatic as any of the roles she has played. After undergraduate work at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Esping bounced around the Midwest in that prison show. She did not intend to become an actor. "I really wanted to be a nurse -- to help people," she said. At the University of Iowa, she took journalism courses and volunteered at the radio station. Then, in her senior year, she met John Bergman, founder of England's Geese Theatre Company, "who had this wild concept of bringing original plays to prisons," she said. Esping enrolled, and spent the next four years "living in hallways or steam rooms, touring prisons all over. Since then, I've been drawn to projects with some deeper social resonance."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1555/4669411.html

Jones Named Dean Of UI Law School (New Haven Register, March 21)
A Connecticut law professor has been named the new dean at the University of Iowa's College of Law. CAROLYN JONES, a native of Carroll and Iowa alumna, will be the first woman to lead the law school. She will replace longtime dean N. WILLIAM HINES, who is retiring on July 1 after 28 years. Jones, 48, a law professor at the University of Connecticut, was selected from a field of 239 candidates considered by a search committee. "She was unique among the candidates because she was a native of Iowa and had Iowa degrees, and an Iowa law degree in particular," said law school professor ADRIEN WING, who led the committee. Jones received her bachelor's degree and law degree from the University of Iowa. She was on the staff of the Iowa Law Review as a student and returned twice as a visiting law professor since graduation. The paper is based in Connecticut. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of NEWSDAY and the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=11153976&BRD=1281&PAG=461&dept_id=31007&rfi=6

UI Lab Tested Nebraska Lake Water (Grand Island Independent, March 21)
Grand Island, Neb., is trying to buy two private lakes whose owners allege were polluted by the Grand Island wastewater treatment plant. Charles "Jesse" and Evelyn James, 5035 Fort Kearney Road, said an outside well on their property -- located two miles east of the city's outfall ditch and Jerry and Pam Miller's lake -- was tested at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and showed high levels of caffeine. Caffeine was also found in high levels in the Miller lake through testing at the University of Iowa lab. "Caffeine only comes from human waste," Miller said of why he suspects the wastewater treatment plant of the pollution. The paper is based in Nebraska.
http://www.theindependent.com/stories/032104/new_lakes21.shtml

Ceilley: Sun Not Safest Source Of Vitamin D (The Marion Star, March 20)
Many children and adults aren't getting enough vitamin D, and it could have serious health consequences. The body can make its own vitamin D with the help of the sun, but production is stymied by poor sunlight in winter, and many people limit their sun exposure -- as well as their kids' -- the rest of the year to protect themselves against skin cancer. Some dermatologists are concerned about using sun exposure to get vitamin D. "It's not a healthy way of getting vitamin D," says Dr. ROGER CEILLEY, past president of the American Academy of Dermatology and a clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa. "You can get it in other ways, certainly not going out and baking yourself in the midday sun, promoting skin cancer and suppressing your immune system." Ceilley says damage could result from cumulative sun exposure. He urged people to avoid unnecessary sun, especially at midday, and to use appropriate clothing or sunscreen to protect their skin. The paper is based in Ohio.
http://www.marionstar.com/news/stories/20040320/localnews/117156.html

Lutgendorf Studies Fatigue After Breast Cancer (NPR, March 20)
Fatigue strikes tens of thousands of breast cancer survivors; medical researchers are beginning to suspect it has a lot to do with how our bodies either do or do not succeed at handling severe stress. In another study at the University of Iowa, SUSAN LUTGENDORF has found yet a further interaction between prolonged stress and cancer. Lutgendorf has been looking at how three stress hormones -- cortisol and two forms of adrenaline, norepinephrine and epinephrine -- affect ovarian tumor growth. For tumors to grow, they must create blood vessels, and to do that, they have to generate a chemical called VEGF. Lutgendorf's question was: What do these stress hormones do to VEGF? UI researchers added stress hormones to ovarian cancer cells, allowed them to grow, and then tested the amount of this particular tumor growth factor, VEGF, and found that indeed, norepinephrine and, to a lesser extent, epinephrine, greatly increased tumor production of this factor. Next, they treated tumor cells with a beta blocker. "We found among a small group of ovarian cancer patients that those who reported high levels of social support before they had surgery had lower levels of VEGF, and that people who were reporting higher levels of distress had higher levels of this substance," Lutgendorf said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=c9b288bafcce61a2ab3d407d4d19f300&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=9156f9fd769a5754c44d530b015cff1f

UI Alumnus Builds Stem Cell Research Facility (New York Times, March 19)
A profile of Dr. Wise Young, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumnus and the chairman of Rutgers University's department of cell biology and neuroscience, is featured. It will be his task to take the proposed $6.5 million in state money and raise the rest to create the New Jersey Stem Cell Research Institute. It would be run by Rutgers and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and based at a center to be built in New Brunswick. "We hope to create a critical mass for stem cell research," Dr. Young said during an interview in his campus office.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/19/nyregion/19profile.html

UI Graduate Student Is Editor Of Literary Digest (readthehook.com, March 19)
A profile of TED GENOWAYS, a student in the UI English graduate program who is also the editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review, appears.
http://www.readthehook.com/stories/2004/03/18/facetimeLooksEasyNewivqriE.html

Iowa GOP Bill Limits Abortions At UIHC (Omaha World Herald, March 19)
Republican lawmakers proposed changes that would prevent some Medicaid patients from obtaining an abortion at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Hospitals and Clinics. Under current law, women may obtain Medicaid-funded abortions only in the case of rape, incest, when the mother's life is endangered, to assist in a spontaneous abortion or if the fetus is deformed.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1039657

Alumna Named Kansas Newspaper Editor, Publisher, (Kansas City Star, March 18)
Dena Sattler, marketing and advertising director of The Garden City Telegram since last July and a former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, has been named editor and publisher of the newspaper. A version of this story also appeared in the GARDEN CITY (Kan.) TELEGRAM.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/local/8219867.htm?1c

Kohatsu Discusses Medical Flip Flops (Arizona Republic, March 18)
When the National Academy of Sciences recently concluded that one's sense of thirst -- not a set number of glasses of water -- should determine the amount of liquid to drink each day, this respected scientific group overturned yet another widely held piece of health advice. Add that to a growing list of recommendations that recently have been tweaked, changed or outright discarded. In addition to ensuring full employment for health journalists, this trend has left many consumers baffled, annoyed and discouraged. "People want science to be definitive, but anyone who has explored science knows that it is an evolving process," said NEAL KOHATSU, president-elect of the American College of Preventive Medicine and an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa's College of Public Health. "Rarely is there a single definitive study. It's a matter of looking at patterns over time and seeing the results come up by different investigators."
http://www.azcentral.com/health/wellness/articles/0317oldadvice-ON.html

Schmidt Comments On Emotional Intelligence (Arizona Republic, March 18)
A story about the study of "emotional intelligence" says that contrary to common perception, traditional tests of general mental ability (GMA) or IQ do not measure some single, fixed genetic aptitude. They measure a variety of mental skills, as well as the ability to learn -- qualities that are partly linked to genes. These generally include numeric ability, verbal fluency and spatial aptitude (the ability to rotate and visualize objects mentally). Each of these skills functions differently in each individual: A mechanic may have sublime spatial skills but limited numeric ability, and vice versa for an accountant. But the idea is that by measuring several things at once you detect an intelligence that shares all three, said FRANK SCHMIDT, an industrial psychologist who studies intelligence testing at the University of Iowa. Psychologists have been searching for ways to improve the effectiveness of the GMA test for about a century but have not been able to do so, Schmidt said. A person who scores high on a 15- to 30-minute general mental ability test goes on to become a productive and valued employee about 50 percent of the time, his research shows. Although thousands of studies have looked at GMA, there is scant research about emotional intelligence, Schmidt said. But, he adds, "there's no question that people like the sound of emotional intelligence much better than they do things like 'general mental ability' or 'IQ.' "
http://www.azcentral.com/health/wellness/articles/0317EQOLP-ON.html

Boulder D.A., A UI Alumna, Criticized (Denver Post, March 18)
Serious law-enforcement investigations in the late 1990s might have stopped freewheeling football recruiting practices alleged at the University of Colorado and prevented the current storm of controversy at the school, some critics of Boulder District Attorney Mary Keenan say. The Boulder district attorney's decision-making in the late 1990s has become one focal point in a broader controversy over the way Keenan has handled the recent CU rape-and-recruiting scandal. Rather than use the law-enforcement tools at her disposal, critics say, Keenan placed the responsibility on the university to clean up its act. Other critics say Keenan jumped to conclusions about CU's football program, unfairly castigating the university with sweeping allegations without having conducted a thorough investigation. Still others contend her statements about CU's football program are rooted in a bias against black players. Keenan sharply disputes these criticisms, saying she thought the university was taking care of the problem. One reason she chose not to go forward with an investigation, Keenan says, is that she makes a policy of not bringing sexual assault cases without the cooperation of the victim. Keenan, 53, joined the Boulder district attorney's office in 1983. She graduated from UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LAW SCHOOL with honors in 1978.
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~30780~2024670,00.html

Distinguished Printmaker Is UI Alumnus (Grand Rapids Press, March 18)
Takeshi Takahara, professor of printmaking and drawing at the University of Michigan's School of Art and Design, has had a distinguished career, and his work is in many prominent collections in Michigan, Massachusetts, Kyoto, Japan and elsewhere. He received a bachelor's degree in economics from Hosei University in Tokyo and his master's degree in printmaking from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/grpress/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/107953860166280.xml

Theater Piece Draws On UI Experience (San Francisco Chronicle, March 18)
A review of a one-woman show, "Adventures of a Black Girl ... in Search of Academic Clarity and Inclusion: Monologue," written and performed by Edris Cooper-Anifowoshe, notes that the artist grapples with troubling questions that cover everything from childhood racial curiosity and adult insensitivity to coping with a white- bread curriculum at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and students protesting the African American perspective of her class at San Francisco State. "Adventures" is a potentially powerful piece still in search of its final form, the reviewer says.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/03/16/DDGIM5K35E1.DTL&type=performance

UI's Hovenkamp Comments On EU's Microsoft Suit (Internetnews.com, March 18)
Discussions aimed at reaching an antitrust settlement between Microsoft and the European Commission have fallen apart, which means the world's largest software company will be facing penalties and fines in a five-year-old antitrust case. At issue is whether Microsoft limited the ability of other companies to create software that interoperates with its Windows operating system and froze out RealNetworks' RealPlayer by tying its own Windows Media Player into the operating system. The penalties that Microsoft is facing could include a fine of up to 10 percent of its annual revenue. The EU could also require Microsoft to create a version of the Windows OS that doesn't include Media Player, and to include competitive players with the standard Windows package. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa and the author of numerous books on antitrust law, said that requiring an EU-specific version of Windows could hurt not only Microsoft but computer makers. "Traditionally, OEMs [original equipment managers] have been reluctant to support two or more competing versions of the same software," he said. "They have the expense and headache of supporting two applications instead of one."
http://www.internetnews.com/bus-news/article.php/3327801

Recruit Disputes Kansas State Player's Claim (Lebanon Daily Record, March 17)
A high school football player's claim that he had consensual sex during an official recruiting visit to the University of Iowa last fall has been discredited by a player who visited campus at the same time. Earlier this month, Nick Patton, a standout quarterback from Kansas, stirred controversy when he told reporters from the Manhattan (Kan.) Mercury that his sexual encounter appeared set up, either by his player host or football officials. Patton, who was recruited by several top schools, later recanted his story, saying he met the woman at an Iowa City bar and later met her at his hotel, which was paid for by the football program. The allegation is now being investigated by an attorney hired by the university, and a final report is pending. But Patton's claim was disputed Monday by one of the six high school players brought to campus that weekend. Cortney Grixby, of Omaha, Neb., said he spent much of his two-day visit with Patton. Grixby said he and Patton returned together to their hotel rooms and he never saw a woman with Patton. Iowa coach KIRK FERENTZ has denied his program or players had anything to do with the incident. Ferentz also said he would reevaluate the team's policies for recruiting visits and educating Hawkeye players assigned to host recruits. The paper is based in Missouri. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the PITTSBURG MORNING SUN in Kansas and the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.lebanondailyrecord.com/articles/2004/03/17/sports/news06.txt

Van Allen Colleague 'Rocket Man' Dies (Los Angeles Times, March 17)
A story announcing the death at 93 of William H. Pickering, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory director known affectionately as "Rocket Man" who pulled together the nation's first successful satellite launch in only three months and who later led the exploration of the solar system that culminated with the landing this year of two successful rovers on Mars, said the satellite's payload was a Geiger counter constructed by radiation physicist JAMES VAN ALLEN of the University of Iowa to measure cosmic rays. On Jan. 31, 1958, just 83 days after the team had received the go-ahead, Explorer 1 was launched from Cape Canaveral, Fla. Pickering, who was waiting in Washington, D.C., could not declare the launch a success until the satellite had completed its 90-minute orbit. Shortly after midnight, Pickering, Van Allen and Von Braun held an exuberant news conference in Washington at which they displayed a model of Explorer 1 over their heads in a picture that marked America's entry into the space race and Pickering's proudest moment. That satellite and Explorer III, which was launched in March 1958, discovered the Van Allen radiation belt, which encircles the Earth. Pioneer III, a modified Explorer launched in December of that year, discovered a second, higher radiation belt when it reached an altitude of 63,000 miles. A photo of Pickering, Van Allen and Wernher von Braun accompanies the article. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the ORLANDO SENTINEL and the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.latimes.com/news/obituaries/la-me-pickering17mar17,1,4103770.story

Van Allen Space Colleague Dies (New York Times, March 17)
William H. Pickering, a leader of the first successful spaceflight by the United States and its first two decades of planetary exploration, died on Monday at his home in La Cañada Flintridge, Calif. He was 93. Dr. Pickering's death, from pneumonia, was announced by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in nearby Pasadena, where he was director from 1954 to 1976 and oversaw the first of the country's robotic missions to the Moon, Venus and Mars in the opening years of the space race between the United States and the Soviet Union. Explorer 1, built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was launched on Jan. 31, 1958. It carried a simple Geiger counter for radiation studies provided by Dr. JAMES VAN ALLEN of the University of Iowa, and was hoisted into orbit by a rocket developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun, the former German rocketeer. In the early hours of Feb. 1, the three men waited in a Pentagon office for word that the craft had made its first orbit. Then they drove through deserted streets to the National Academy of Sciences for a triumphant news conference. The three -- Dr. Pickering, Dr. Van Allen and Dr. von Braun -- stood and jubilantly raised a model of the rocket high above their heads. The picture became a classic of the early space race. It captured the moment the United States entered the space age and, as his friends have said, Bill Pickering's proudest moment. A photo of Pickering, Van Allen and von Braun accompanies the article.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/17/national/17PICK.html

Smith Leads Team Studying HPV-Head Cancer Link (Reuters Health, March 16)
Infection of cells in the mouth with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is a risk factor for head and neck cancer, new research indicates. As reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Dr. ELAINE M. SMITH of the University of Iowa and colleagues detected cancer-causing HPV in oral cells from 22.9 percent of 201 patients with head and neck cancer, but from only 10.8 percent of 333 cancer-free subjects. HPV 16 was the most frequently detected type, present in 19 percent of cancer patients and 10 percent of healthy subjects. After accounting for other factors like tobacco and alcohol use, the risk of head and neck cancer was still significantly greater in subjects infected with cancer-causing HPV types, compared with uninfected individuals. The risk was not increased among those infected with HPV types not associated with cancer. A version of the story also ran on the website of YAHOO! NEWS.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=healthNews&storyID=4581601

UI Education Alumna Named Principal (Topeka Capital-Journal, March 16)
The Auburn-Washburn Unified School District 437 board of education has selected Martha W. Cassidy as the 2004-2005 principal for Wanamaker Elementary School. Cassidy is an assistant principal at Scott Technology Magnet School. She is in her eighth year as an employee of Topeka Public Schools. Cassidy graduated from The University of Kansas with a bachelor's degree in education in May 1988. She received her master's degree in educational administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in August 1993. The paper is based in Kansas.
http://www.cjonline.com/stories/031604/bre_wanamaker.shtml

UI Cited In Story On No Child Left Behind Act (Mother Jones, March 16)
A story about problems with the No Child Left Behind Act says that the law forces schools to "teach to the test," shunning the humanities for easily measurable math and science and thus stiffing students on a well-rounded curriculum, as TIME MAGAZINE reported in its March 1 issue: "Here are some of the things kids at Garfield/Franklin elementary in Muscatine, Iowa, no longer do: eagle watch on the Mississippi River, go on field trips to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY and have two daily recesses. A sensible bargain has been struck: literacy first, canoe trips later. But there are more substantive losses too. Creative writing, social studies and computer work have all become occasional indulgences. Now that the standardized fill-in-the-bubble test is the foundation upon which public schools rest--now that a federal law called No Child Left Behind mandates that kids as young as nine meet benchmarks in reading and math or jeopardize their schools' reputation--there is little time for anything else."
http://www.motherjones.com/news/dailymojo/2004/03/03_526.html

UI Nets $100,000 From Outback Bowl (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, March 16)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has nearly $100,000 left over after paying the food, travel and lodging bills from its January trip to the Outback Bowl in Tampa, Fla. Final accounting figures released by the university Monday show a balance of $97,882. The university was paid $1.35 million for appearing in Jan. 1 bowl game.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/503/4666075.html

Kohatsu Discusses Medical Flip Flops (Washington Post, March 16)
When the National Academy of Sciences recently concluded that one's sense of thirst -- not a set number of glasses of water -- should determine the amount of liquid to drink each day, this respected scientific group overturned yet another widely held piece of health advice. Add that to a growing list of recommendations that recently have been tweaked, changed or outright discarded. In addition to ensuring full employment for health journalists, this trend has left many consumers baffled, annoyed and discouraged. "People want science to be definitive, but anyone who has explored science knows that it is an evolving process," said NEAL KOHATSU, president-elect of the American College of Preventive Medicine and an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa's College of Public Health. "Rarely is there a single definitive study. It's a matter of looking at patterns over time and seeing the results come up by different investigators."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A61744-2004Mar15.html

Hovenkamp Comments On EU/Microsoft Agreement (Internet News, March 16)
Representatives of 15 European Commission member governments have given unanimous approval to a draft decision that supports antitrust penalties against Microsoft. The decision is widely believed to include a fine as well as order the company to open up its Windows operating system so that other companies' server software can interoperate with it. The EU reportedly turned down an offer of providing competitors' software on a CD to be shipped with new computers. "It's clear why the commission is rejecting that," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa and the author of numerous books on antitrust law. "There has never been a history of success for secondary applications where the primary one was installed on the computer. It's simply not going to work."
http://www.internetnews.com/bus-news/article.php/3325821

Sexual Allegations Against UI Football Refuted (Chicago Tribune, March 16)
A high school football player's claim that he had consensual sex during an official recruiting visit to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last fall has been discredited by a player who visited campus at the same time. A story on the same topic was published on the Web sites of the CNN/SI.com, KANSAS CITY STAR, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, PITTSBURG (Kan.) DAILY SUN and the BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD.
http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/college/football/cs-0403160233mar16,1,3582615.story?coll=cs-college-print

Play Mentions UI Curriculum (San Francisco Chronicle, March 16)
Playwright Edris Cooper-Anifowoshe looks at various aspects of race in America from the inside in "Adventures of a Black Girl ... in Search of Academic Clarity and Inclusion," her new show at Intersection for the Arts. An autobiographical monologue in more than one voice, "Adventures" is a provocative if somewhat unfinished riff on race relations through the eyes of the author as everything from a graduate student challenging a "Euro-centric" curriculum to an African American child chosen to integrate an elementary school. It's an entertaining and often provocative show at this point. Cooper-Anifowoshe raises and grapples with troubling questions that cover everything from childhood racial curiosity and adult insensitivity to coping with a white-bread curriculum at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and students protesting the African American perspective of her class at San Francisco State. But "Adventures" is a potentially powerful piece still in search of its final form.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/03/16/DDGIM5K35E1.DTL

Playwrights Met At UI (Chicago Tribune, March 15)
Playwright Brett Neveu, who hails from Newton, Iowa, sings, plays the tambourine and writes lyrics for a band called Dad Factory. He also writes a lot of plays. His latest, "American Dead," is a tale of small-town grief and private reckoning that made its premiere at the American Theater Company. Playwright Rebecca Gilman, a close friend of Neveu's and his wife, artist Kristen Neveu, since their collective college days at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, calls Neveu's work that of "a minimalist, and if you don't take time to read between the lines, you might not get the depth of what's there. I've always loved his stuff, and I find it truly sad. I think he just loves his characters. `American Dead' really got to me. I was bawling at the end. Yet he's got this great sense of the absurd."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/chi-0403150092mar15,1,1173885.story?coll=chi-leisuretempo-hed

Schmidt Quoted On Intelligence Tests (Los Angeles Times, March 15)
A story about the study of "emotional intelligence" says that contrary to common perception, traditional tests of general mental ability (GMA) or IQ do not measure some single, fixed genetic aptitude. They measure a variety of mental skills, as well as the ability to learn -- qualities that are partly linked to genes. These generally include numeric ability, verbal fluency and spatial aptitude (the ability to rotate and visualize objects mentally). Each of these skills functions differently in each individual: A mechanic may have sublime spatial skills but limited numeric ability, and vice versa for an accountant. But the idea is that by measuring several things at once you detect an intelligence that shares all three, said FRANK SCHMIDT, an industrial psychologist who studies intelligence testing at the University of Iowa.
http://www.latimes.com/business/careers/work/la-he-ei15mar15,1,6389395.story?coll=la-headlines-business-careers

UI Students To Aid Hurricane Victims (Outer Banks Sentinel, March 15)
In a continued effort to bring relief to victims of Hurricane Isabel, the Dare Volunteer Center concluded its Neighbors helping Neighbors campaign Thursday. An 18-wheel truck arrived in Hatteras Village, bringing a trailer with $28,000 worth of appliances, mattresses, furniture, flatware and other day-to-day items lost by families during Isabel. Up next is the Repairs for Dare program, which will try to identify elderly or disabled residents on fixed incomes to perform proactive maintenance on their homes. The group will be pressure-washing houses, building ramps and replacing floors for elderly people. Hawley has already started visiting houses to plan for the project. On Saturday, 20 students from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are coming to help the DVC begin construction of a ramp at an elderly woman's home. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://obsentinel.womacknewspapers.com/articles/2004/03/13/features/2stumpy.txt

Poet Wright Attended Writers' Workshop (Danville Advocate, March 14)
The Centre College English program will sponsor a poetry reading by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Charles Wright, the Souder Family Professor of English at the University of Virginia, at 7 p.m. Thursday in Weisiger Theatre on campus. The event is part of the Centre College Reading Series, sponsored by the English program. Wright's poems reflect deeply on human concerns, truth, nature and death. He became involved with poetry when he served in the army. Stationed in Verona, Italy, he began reading the poetry of Ezra Pound and Eugenio Monte, and was so taken by these poems that he began to experiment with his own poems and enjoyed the results. After retiring from the army, he returned to the United States to study poetry at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he attended the famous IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and earned a master's degree.
http://www.amnews.com/public_html/?module=displaystory&story_id=5588&format=html

UI Workshop Alumnus Returns To Chicago (Chicago Tribune, March 14)
John McNally has come home again. The Oak Lawn-born author ("The Book of Ralph," Free Press) is one of the featured guests at Columbia College Chicago's Story Week Festival of Writers. McNally took up writing at Southern Illinois University, where he got a bachelor's degree. He got a master's from the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and a doctorate from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. His first book was "Troublemakers" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2000), a well-received collection of short stories. These days he's an assistant professor of English at Wake Forest University in North Carolina, and he's working on two screenplays in Los Angeles.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/q/chi-0403140040mar14,1,4962330.story

Alumna Critiques UI Campus Tour Video (Akron Beacon Journal, March 14)
An alumna reviews two video campus tours sent to her by a colleague, one of her alma mater the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and one of Oberlin College (chosen at random by her colleague). "The Iowa video made me sentimental as I saw the campus that I haven't seen in nine years," the reporter says. "That proved to me that it was a good representation of the campus tour to show what the campus, some classrooms and some dorms looked like." A version of the story also ran on the website of the MIAMI HERALD.
http://www.ohio.com/mld/beaconjournal/8177578.htm

UI Alumnus To Speak On Joplin's Opera (Corvallis Gazette Times, March 13)
Many people know and love Scott Joplin's ragtime music, but lesser well known is that Joplin also composed an opera. In this month's Inside opera lecture pianist John Maddy will discuss Joplin's groundbreaking opera in a lecture "Treemonisha and Scott Joplin," at 10:15 a.m. Saturday, March 13, at Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, 645 N.W. Monroe Ave. The lecture is sponsored by Opera Theater Corvallis. Maddy earned his bachelor's in piano performance from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and his master's degree in piano and music history from the University of Oregon. The paper is based in Oregon. http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2004/03/14/entertainment/entertainment_roundup/brief13.txt

Man With UI Ties Levels Ethics Charges Against Legislator (al.com, March 13)
An ethics complaint alleges that state Rep. Alvin Holmes has used his elected office for personal gain in obtaining a full-time teaching position at Alabama State University where some faculty members complain he's given "preferential treatment." Holmes, D-Montgomery, has a $42,250 contract to teach a world history class and also receives a $21,344 check annually for work as a community relations assistant at ASU. Republican activist and lawyer Jim Zeigler of Mobile said he will file an ethics complaint Monday against Holmes, accusing him of using his elected office for personal gain. In a telephone interview, faculty senate chairman and associate professor Derryn Moten said his criticism and that of other faculty members isn't a "personal attack." Moten said he believes Holmes has traded political influence for "preferential treatment" at ASU in a relationship going back to about 1975. Moten, who arrived in Montgomery in 1996 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was surprised to learn that Holmes has a tenured position in the Humanities Department, but hasn't participated in faculty meetings, committees or even commencements. Al.com is news about Alabama provided by several newspapers in that state, including THE HUNTSIVLLE TIMES, MOBILE REGISTER and BIRMINGHAM NEWS. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE in Florida and the TIMES DAILYand TUSCALOOSA NEWS in Alabama.
http://www.al.com/newsflash/regional/index.ssf?/base/news-6/107922895285391.xml

UI's Ties To Nancy Drew Series Cited (Seattle Times, March 13)
The original Nancy Drew books were published during the 1930s. But contemporary sales of these titles, which now number in the hundreds, show their enduring popularity. And publishing giant Simon & Schuster has launched a new line of Nancy Drew books, which give her a new look, a new car and a new attitude. The named author of the original series, Carolyn Keene, was a pseudonym for a number of ghostwriters who worked on the series, including a plucky journalist named Mildred Wirt Benson. Benson -- who learned to fly at age 59 -- was the first woman to earn a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She eventually found work with the Toledo Blade -- she was still writing for that daily newspaper when she died in 2002 at age 96. In her spare time, she penned more than 130 books, including 23 Nancy Drew titles. (Benson's Washington Post obituary noted that since 1930, more than 200 million Nancy Drew books have been sold in 17 languages, including Malay, Spanish, Icelandic and Hebrew.) Benson lived a life that rivaled Nancy's fictitious existence. In "Rediscovering Nancy Drew" (edited by CAROLYN STEWART DYER and Nancy Tillman Romalov; UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS) Benson said that "I was probably a rough-and-tumble newspaper person who had to earn a living, and I was out in the world. That was my type of Nancy." But she bristled at any suggestion that Nancy was a feminist.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/living/2001877846_kari13.html

Former UI Student Donates 'Zines (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 12)
Minneapolis Community and Technical College's most notable collection of writing may never attract antiquarian book collectors or Ivy League literary scholars. Rather, the publications in this collection speak to punk-rock kids, young lesbians, anarchists, geeks and weirdoes. They are part of the college's collection of some 3,500 zines -- a gathering of the sort of ephemera usually ignored by academic libraries. "Zines are the true underground," says Thomas Eland, the librarian at the community college who helped start the collection. "Part of the reason that we have the collection of zines is to educate people that they exist." Not to be confused with magazines, zines are small, self-published items, often photocopied onto cheap paper and stapled together in someone's basement. They are popular in punk-rock circles and among teenagers. They generally reflect leftist politics and contain ruminations, satire, polemics and poetry of the young and idealistic, the rebellious and the oppressed. The Minneapolis community college started building its collection a few years ago, when it received a donation of about 1,000 zines from Chris Dodge, the librarian at the progressive magazine Utne. Mr. Dodge got in touch with Mr. Eland. They were both Lefties, knew each other through library circles in Minneapolis, and worked on practically the same block downtown. Mr. Dodge also had an affinity for the community college, where he got a two-year degree 20 years ago, after dropping out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i27/27a04801.htm

NCAA May Ban Visits For Football Recruits (Springfield News Sun, March 12)
Facing allegations of colleges wooing high school athletes with sex, alcohol and lavish accommodations, the NCAA told Congress on Thursday that it may ban paid campus visits for football recruits altogether. One of those wooings is alleged to have taken place at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last fall. The university is currently investigating the claims. The News Sun is located in Ohio. This story also appeared on the Web site of the ROCKY MOUNT (N.C.) TELEGRAM.
http://www.springfieldnewssun.com/sports/content/shared/sports/stories/0312_RECRUIT.html;COXnetJSessionID=ARMCf9sFPk21B1dmfV3Ji67QqrmAPTn4XvqcK752nu3hUPsjhaVS!-1343944998?urac=n&urvf=10791024669570.7852123028366468

UI Study: Marketing Doesn't Deter Student Drinking (ABCNews.com, March 12)
Perceptions about friends' drinking habits affect college students more than marketing campaigns that encourage them to abstain or use alcohol responsibly. That's the conclusion of a University of Iowa study in the latest issue of Health Communication. "Social-norms" ads and poster campaigns use facts or statistics to correct student misconceptions about the drinking habits of their fellow students. The message is that most students are moderate drinkers or non-drinkers. While social-norms campaigns are all over college campuses, the authors of this new study contend there are flaws in this approach to reducing student drinking. "These campaigns are based on the assumption that students don't really know what the correct norm is, that they are likely to underestimate how many people are really drinking responsibly, and that a 'correct' message will change their behavior," said SHELLY CAMPO, assistant professor of community and behavioral health at the university. "These campaigns also assume that students want to be like the typical college student, which is difficult to define, particularly at a college or university with a large or diverse student population."
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/living/Healthology/drinking_college_kids_healthday_040312.html

Dyer Comments On 'New' Nancy Drew (CHED Radio, March 11)
CAROLYN DYER, professor of journalism at the University of Iowa, was the guest for a 15-minute segment on a live radio news program broadcast from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Dyer discussed the revival of Nancy Drew in a new series of books that updates the character. She talked about Mildred Benson, the first person to earn a master's degree in journalism at the UI, who wrote 25 of the first 30 books in the Nancy Drew series under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene. Dyer was asked to compare the popularity of the original Nancy Drew books with the current craze for Harry Potter. "The appeal of Nancy Drew or Harry Potter is it keeps on going," she said. "When you get done with one there's another one to pick up and then another." She said she expected the new Nancy Drew books to be popular, recalling that children who attended the UI's 1993 Nancy Drew Conference snapped up books from the sellers who attended and wound up "all over the building lying on the floor, tucked in corners reading whichever books they got their hands on." She said that while the new books are updated the vocabulary is still a bit old fashioned and the tone is "quiet and dignified." This item is not available online.

UI Law Alumna Leads Arizona Foundation (Arizona Business Gazette, March 11)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW
alumna Barb Dawson has been named president of the Arizona Foundation for Legal Services & Education. Dawson joined the Phoenix law firm of Snell & Wilmer in 1989 and is a litigation partner. She practices commercial and tax litigation, representing clients in state and federal civil trial and appellate courts.
http://www.azcentral.com/abgnews/articles/0311lawrail11.html

Alumna Named President Of Foundation Board (Arizona Republic, March 11)
Barb Dawson was named president of the Arizona Foundation for Legal Services & Education. Dawson, a partner in a Phoenix law office, practices commercial and tax litigation. She received a juris doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW and has been chairwoman of the state Bar's Local Services Committee. She has been on the foundation's board since 1998.
http://www.azcentral.com/abgnews/articles/0311lawrail11.html

Cartoonist Alumnus Profiled (Cleveland Free Times, March 11)
Dean Norman reflects on how he became a cartoonist: "My dad was an accountant. He had to add figures all day. I thought, I could draw funny pictures! That would be so much more fun than sitting at a desk." A teenager growing up in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Norman signed up for a mail-order cartooning course, hoping to someday become a magazine or comic-strip artist. "I never dreamed of doing greeting cards," says Norman, now 70 and retired from a 30-year career working for the two greeting-card giants, Hallmark and American Greetings. By the time he graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1956, general-interest magazines like "The Saturday Evening Post," "Look" and "Collier's" were folding, and the once-lucrative market for freelance cartoons was drying up. Fortunately, executives at Hallmark spotted a cartoon series Norman drew for his college newspaper, and offered him a job. "I kept thinking someday I'd break into newspapers. I never did," he says, laughing.
http://www.freetimes.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=1177

Musician/Poet Attended UI (Windy City Times, March 11)
A music columnist writing about recent CD releases comments on Manalapan (City Salvage), the second full-length album by Brady Earnhart. He writes that Earnhart is first and foremost a poet (he received an MFA in poetry from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA) and his lyrics have a sophistication and sensitivity that is rare in the contemporary queer music scene.
http://www.windycitymediagroup.com/gay/lesbian/news/ARTICLE.php?AID=4337

UI To Defend Mock Trial Title (Hartford Courant, March 10)
A story about a local community college's Mock Trial team, which will compete in the American Mock Trial Association national championship tournament, at Drake University law school in April, notes that the local students will compete against defending national champions from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and stalwarts such as the University of Chicago and Notre Dame.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/local/ec/hc-manmock0310.artmar10,0,2575596.story

Ferentz Backs Review Of Recruitment Visit Rules (ESPN, March 10)
University of Iowa officials will reevaluate how the football program handles official recruiting visits. The review is part of the school's response to a Kansas newspaper report that a football prospect had consensual sex with a female student during his official visit last fall. The university said coach KIRK FERENTZ supports the review. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of WJXX-TV in Jacksonville, Fla., the NEW YORK TIMES, the PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL, the TIMES PICAYUNE in Louisiana, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, the CLEVELAND (Ohio) PLAIN DEALER, the LOUISVILLE (Ky.) COURIER JOURNAL, the PHILADELPHIA (Pa.) INQUIRER, the PITTSBURGH (Pa.) POST GAZETTE, the JACKSONVILLE (N.C.) DAILY NEWS, USA TODAY, WTNH-TV in Connecticut, the ATLANTA (Ga.) JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, FOX-TV, CNN/SI, the SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS and many other media outlets.
http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id=1755546

UI To Review Recruit Visit Rules (Pittsburg Morning Sun, March 10)
University of Iowa officials say they will take a fresh look at policies governing how the football program handles official recruiting visits of prospective Hawkeye football players. University spokesman STEVE PARROTT said Tuesday that the football program has no written policy, except for NCAA rules, for the official campus visits that are an essential part of college recruiting. Hawkeye football coach KIRK FERENTZ said he supports reevaluating how his program conducts the visits, university officials said. The review is one part of the university's response to a Kansas newspaper report that highly touted high school quarterback Nick Patton had consensual sex with a female student during his official visit last fall. Parrott also said Tuesday that MARK SCHANTZ, the university's attorney, has clamped down on officials making any more public statements about the case pending the completion of an investigation already under way. University President DAVID SKORTON said Friday that Big Ten officials had been notified of the incident and the university's independent investigation. The paper is based in Kansas.
http://morningsun.net/stories/031004/spo_20040310011.shtml

Nancy Drew Expert Dyer At UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, March 10)
Seventy-four years after she collared her first criminal, 18-year-old amateur sleuth Nancy Drew and her friends Bess and George and boyfriend Ned Nickerson are back on the trail in the small yet amazingly crime-filled town of River Heights in a whole new series of books, coming out in March from a Simon & Schuster imprint. "One of the reasons she's still culturally significant is that, however the stories change, most of them managed to retain the sense of adventure and autonomy that Nancy has," said CAROLYN DYER, the co-editor of "Rediscovering Nancy Drew." Dyer teaches at the School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Iowa, where she led a Nancy Drew conference in 1993 to honor one of their most famous alumni: Mildred Wirt Benson, who earned a master's degree in journalism from the school in 1927 -- the first person to do so.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/384/4651078.html

Author Dybek Attended UI (Chicago Tribune, March 10)
" The Coast of Chicago," a collection of stories set in ethnic working class areas of the city by Chicago native Stuart Dybek, is the latest selection for the city's One Book, One Chicago program, Mayor Richard Daley announced Tuesday. Dybek, who said he spent rainy afternoons in neighborhood libraries, graduated from St. Rita High School in 1959 and went on to earn degrees at Loyola University Chicago and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0403100240mar10,1,4809128.story?coll=chi-news-hed

UI Medicine Alumnus Publishes Cell Study (Medical News Today, March 10)
Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and the Montreal Proteomics Network at McGill University have published the most complete picture to date of the components of the molecular machinery that controls the entry of nutrients and other molecules into cells. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA (PNAS), Dr. Peter McPherson and colleagues used proteomics, the large-scale study of proteins, to identify the protein complement of clathrin-coated vesicles. McPherson received both B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from the University of Manitoba and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/index.php?newsid=6442

Herbarium Case In Judge's Hands (Omaha World-Herald, March 10)
A Johnson County District Court judge has heard the arguments. Now he must decide who should have custody of the 135-year-old University of Iowa herbarium -- or if the court even has jurisdiction. Supporters and opponents of a planned move of the 250,000 plant specimens to Iowa State University presented their arguments Monday before Judge Patrick Grady. For now, an injunction remains in place preventing any transfer. A flurry of legal filings led to the hearing, including affidavits from herbarium curator DIANA HORTON, who opposes the move, and WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD, a University of Iowa law professor and interim director of the school's Museum of Natural History who supports the move. Boyd called the herbarium an "orphan" collection that will find a good home at Iowa State. Iowa General Counsel MARK SCHANTZ argued Monday that the matter should be handled internally, because the herbarium is state property. Horton and other opponents of the move could simply file an administrative appeal to the decision, Schantz said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1030051

UI Pulls Plug On Party-Promoting Page (Omaha World-Herald, March 10)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA administrators are crashing the party. Iowa sophomore Jeff Nylen sent a mass e-mail to students Thursday advertising a new Web site featuring night life in Iowa City and asking students to access the page by using their university log-in information. The site will feature weekly house-party schedules, bar specials, personal ads and a chat room. But university administrators told the Web site's creators they were violating university policy and must remove the log-in. The student-run Web site will be relaunched March 25.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1030251

Vehicle Stability Study Noted (Newsday, March 9)
Although fewer than one in 10 new cars have it, electronic stability control can reduce the risk of the driver losing control by as much as 88 percent, a new study has found. In tests on a U.S. government driving simulator, drivers lost control of the "vehicle" 3.4 percent of the time when the electronic skid control system was engaged but 27.9 percent when it wasn't, according to the study's authors, who presented results yesterday at a convention of auto engineers in Detroit. "We're confident that if the system was available in all vehicles there would be a significant reduction in loss-of-control type accidents," said YIANNIS E. PAPELIS, one of the authors. The study made public yesterday was conducted by the University of Iowa, which runs the safety administration's driving simulator near Iowa City.
http://www.nynewsday.com/business/ny-bzslip093701127mar09,0,1112855.story?coll=nyc-business-headlines

Air Standards Bill Debated (AgriNews, March 9)
Farmers, doctors, lobbyists and air quality experts spoke at a legislative public hearing Monday on a bill that would restrict changes to the state's air quality standards. State regulators spent two years developing new standards for hydrogen sulfide and ammonia emissions, a health concern for neighbors of livestock operations. State lawmakers stepped in last year to prevent implementation of the new rules after businesses complained they were too broad. The House bill requires the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to conduct a three-year study of hydrogen sulfide, ammonia and odor around livestock operations. The DNR then could use the results to develop new standards that would be subject to rigorous public scrutiny. Until then, state agencies are prohibited from adopting pollution limits more severe than federal standards. Those standards are thousands of times less stringent than recommended by scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University, said Catharine Fitzsimmons, chief of the DNR's Air Quality Bureau.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/340543936724772.bsp
The article also appeared on the website of the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.

UI Probes Recruiting Visit (Lawrence Journal World, March 9)
A deputy state attorney general will investigate a University of Iowa football prospect's sexual liaison with a student during a campus visit last fall, university President DAVID SKORTON announced Monday. Douglas Marek will look into reports by a Kansas newspaper that high school quarterback Nick Patton had sex with a student he met on campus, and whether football players or team officials had anything to do with the encounter. Skorton announced he would appoint an independent investigator Friday, the day the Manhattan Mercury reported the story based on an interview with Patton. The quarterback since has denied university officials had anything to do with his encounter with the woman. "Although the young man involved in this incident has told another newspaper that the Manhattan Mercury story was incorrect, and that no one from the University of Iowa was involved in arranging this relationship, I believe that we should follow through with an investigation," Skorton said in a statement. The Journal Star is based in Lawrence, Kans. The Associated Press story also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, PITTSBURG (Kans.) MORNING SUN, KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, WOWT- TV in Omaha, Neb., MONTEREY (Calif.) HERALD, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, THE STATE in South Carolina, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE and the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.ljworld.com/section/prepsports/story/163688

Recruit Backs Off Statements (Wichita Eagle, March 9)
A Winfield High football player recruited by Iowa now says the university had nothing to do with a sexual encounter he had with a woman during his campus visit. Nick Patton was quoted by the Des Moines Register in a copyright story Monday as saying he initiated contact with the woman in a bar and had consensual sex with her at his hotel room, which was paid for as part of his recruiting visit. A deputy state attorney general in Iowa will investigate the original allegation, Iowa president DAVID SKORTON announced Monday. "Although the young man involved in this incident has told another newspaper that the Manhattan Mercury story was incorrect, and that no one from the University of Iowa was involved in arranging this relationship, I believe that we should follow through with an investigation," Skorton said in a statement. The Eagle is based in Wichita, Kans. The Associated Press story also appeared on the websites of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and the WINFIELD (Kans.) DAILY COURIER.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/sports/8138372.htm

Squire: Vilsack Not As Popular As Earlier In Tenure (Stateline.org, March 9)
A profile of Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack notes that his second term as governor has been marred by partisan bickering. "Vilsack is not as popular now as he has been at other points in his tenure," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "It's just a very contentious time in Des Moines right now and the governor contributes to that some, but he's not solely responsible for the current atmosphere."
http://www.stateline.org/stateline/

UI: We Take Allegations Seriously (WJW-FOX, March 8)
A football player now claims he had sex with a student during a recruiting visit to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last fall. The university is investigating allegations that sexual favors were promised to high school students to get them to choose the school. Those who run Iowa's football program say they're taking the allegations very seriously. The station covers Cleveland, Akron and Canton, Ohio.

Kansas Paper Reports On Recruit's Story (WDAF-Fox, March 8)
The Manhattan (Kans.) Mercury reports a Kansas high school football player had sex with a student during his recruiting visit Sept. 20. Nick Patton says his host Abdul Hodge took him back to his townhouse where he hooked up with a woman. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's president is asking for an investigation. The station covers Kansas City, Mo. A similar story aired on WBRC-FOX in Birmingham, Ala.

Quarterback's Claims Reported (KNSW-TV, March 8)
High school quarterback Nick Patton claims the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA may be using sex to recruit students there. Patton says during a trip to the Iowa campus, he had sex with a woman he met. She also came to Kansas several times to visit him. Sources associated with the football program has told reporters they did not have a part in arranging or continuing the relationship between these two young people. Still, the university president has named an outside investigator to look into the allegation. The station covers the Wichita-Hutchinson area in Kansas.

UI Responds To Allegations (KETV-ABC, March 8)
The University of Iowa is responding to allegations revolving around sex and a high school recruit. Nick Patton is the student athlete at the center of the controversy. Patton, out of Winfield, Kans., says he had sex with a co-ed while visiting the Iowa campus last September. In an interview with the Manhattan (Kans.) Mercury, he claims the encounter may have been set up and felt the woman was 'assigned' to him. The allegations have prompted the University to take immediate action. DAVID SKORTON, University of Iowa president said: "I think it's very important that we respond in a transparent, immediate way to a concern, especially in light of national concerns about recruiting practices. So, we're going to have an independent investigator, and as soon as I have the results of that investigation I'll be sharing it with you." The station is based in Omaha, Neb.

UI To Investigate Allegations (KMOV-CBS, March 8)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA plans to investigate allegations that a sexual favor was arranged for a football recruit. The university president said the people who run his football program have assured him they have nothing to do with incident. The recruit claims he had sex with a university coed during his visit. He said his host took him to a town house, where the woman was waiting. The station is based in St. Louis, Mo.

Football Recruit Allegations To Be Investigated (WISH-CBS, March 8)
The president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is calling for an investigation to alleged sexual favors for football recruits. The man says the people who run his football program have assured him they had nothing to do with bringing two people together for a sexual encounter. Nick Patton told the Manhattan Mercury that he had sex with a university coed during his recruiting visit but he said he believes it's an isolated incident. The station is based in Indianapolis, Ind.

Sex Allegations Cited (WDJT-CBS, March 8)
There are new allegations this morning involving a major college football program. Former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football prospect Nick Patton claims he had sex with a female student during his recruiting visit last fall. And that the encounter was more or less arranged by his host. Now the university president is calling for an investigation. The probe at Iowa follows a similar scandal at the University of Colorado, where a female player claims she was raped. The station is based in Milwaukee.

Moore: UI Hospital Responds To Calls On Firings (Omaha World-Herald, March 8)
A group of transplant patients is trying to help two former nurses get their jobs back after they were fired from University Hospitals for giving unused prescription drugs to other patients. "I don't think these nurses should be blasted for being compassionate," said Dan Fitzgerald, a member of a transplant patient support group in Cedar Rapids. "(One of the nurses) worked at the transplant program since its inception 40 years ago. She was the icon of transplants and one of the sweetest persons on earth. I love this woman to death. For her to get fired, it's an outrage." Fitzgerald, 50, received a liver transplant in 1999 and said he remembers the two nurses who were fired. "When I was at my worst, she was at her best," he said. "They are real people. They sat with my wife when I was in surgery. She didn't have anyone to sit with and those nurses made sure she wasn't alone through it." The patients have started phone and write-in campaigns to the hospital to get the nurses reinstated. The nurses who were fired were accused of taking prescription drugs from deceased patients and those who no longer needed it and giving it to patients who couldn't afford it. University Hospitals spokesman TOM MOORE said several hospital officials have been contacted by patients about the matter. "When concerned citizens contact us, we respond directly to them on a case-by-case basis," Moore said
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=102819

Papelis Comments On NADS Study (CTV, March 8)
Drivers in cars with high-tech systems that apply the brakes to individual wheels maintained much better control of their vehicles in difficult driving situations, according a study conducted at a U.S. government lab. Drivers lost control just 3.4 percent of the time when the "electronic stability control" system was on, compared to 27.9 percent when it wasn't, according to the study being released Monday at the Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress in Detroit. The system automatically applies brakes when it senses the car isn't heading in the direction the driver intended. University of Iowa researchers conducted the study using the federal government's National Advanced Driving Simulator. Electronic stability control takes its cues from the driver. If the driver isn't steering, it's less effective, said YIANNIS PAPELIS, one of the lead researchers on the Iowa study. During the test, most drivers tried to steer away from the danger, a good move when the braking system is engaged. "People do fight for their lives," Papelis said. "That's what the system requires you to do." CTV is based in Canada. A version of the story also ran on the websites of WTOP RADIO in Washington, D.C., the CHICAGO SUN TIMES, the MIAMI HERALD, the INDIANAPOLIS STAR, AZ CENTRAL.COM, CANADA.COM, the WINNIPEG (Canada) SUN, the NATIONAL POST in Canada, the SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, the WICHITA (Kans.) EAGLE, the CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, the KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, the BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, WILKES BARRE (Penn.) WEEKENDER, the BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, NEW YORK NEWSDAY, the LOS ANGELES TIMES, YAHOO NEWS, the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD and many other media outlets.
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/1078754176474_50/?hub=SciTech

Recruit Claims Paper Misquoted Him About Woman (WQAD-TV, March 8)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is expected to name an independent investigator today to look into a high school football recruit's visit to Iowa City last September. But the Des Moines Register reports that Nick Patton, the top high school quarterback in Kansas, says a reporter misquoted him as saying the athletics department may have assigned a woman to have sex with him as part of the visit. Patton tells the Register he met the woman at a bar and later brought her to his hotel room, where they had consensual sex. In the original story in the Manhattan Mercury newspaper, Patton is quoted as saying an Iowa linebacker he stayed with set up the encounter at his townhouse. The reporter stands by his story, which also says the woman came to visit Patton in Kansas and brought him gifts. The investigator will try to sort out the details. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1694493&nav=1sW7LMQt

Davis: Students Gaining Weight At Twice Parents' Rate (Ivanhoe, March 8)
Researchers at the 44th American Heart Association's Annual Conference say today's teenagers are gaining weight at twice the rate of their parents. "We expected that today's teens would be somewhat more obese but were surprised by the magnitude of the change," says study author PATRICIA H. DAVIS, M.D., a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa. Researchers in Iowa compared the body mass index, a measure of obesity, of 228 adolescents between ages 15 and 18 to the BMI of their parents. Both groups were analyzed at the same age, but 20 years apart. Studying teenagers and their parents allowed the researchers to remove some of the genetic components that could be responsible for the variability in obesity. A BMI of normal weight is between 18.5 and 24.9. Between the generations, the BMI increased from 22.97 to 24.24 among boys, and 21.9 to 24.4 among girls. Therefore, the rate of weight gain during current teen years is double what it was 20 years to 30 years ago. The study also shows cholesterol and blood pressure are more strongly related to obesity in teens today, putting them at greater risk for cardiovascular disease. Ivanhoe is a web site covering medical breakthroughs, family health and issues important to women. It is based in Winter Park, Fla.
http://www.ivanhoe.com/channels/p_channelstory.cfm?storyid=8170

UI Investigates Claim Of Sex Offer (ESPN, March 7)
A scroll on ESPN says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is appointing an independent investigator to look into a claim by a former football prospect that he had sex with a student he met during his recruiting visit in September and that the meeting was arranged by the UI for recruitment purposes. Other stations that mentioned the news in a scroll at the bottom of the screen included KPHO-CBS in Phoenix, Ariz., WFOR-CBS in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and WIVB-CBS in Buffalo, N.Y.

Station Reports On Allegations (WBBM-CBS, March 7)
A second major U.S. university is launching an investigation into alleged sexual favors for football recruits. A football recruit at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has said he had sex with a female student during a recruiting trip last fall. Nick Patton says his host took him to a town house where he met up with the unnamed woman. The university president says he has been assured that the school had nothing to do with the encounter. The station is based in Chicago.

President Calls For Investigation (WAWS-FOX, March 7)
Controversy at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA tonight over sex and football. A local newspaper reports a football player had sex with a student during a recruiting visit. The incident reportedly took place Sept. 20 in Iowa City. The recruit says his host player hooked him up with the woman. The president of the University of Iowa is now calling for an investigation into the alleged incident. The station is based in Jacksonville, Fla.

Recruit's Allegation Under Scrutiny (KETV-ABC, March 7)
Sex, scandal and football recruiting -- that mix has produced a mess in Boulder. But the University of Colorado might not be alone. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is dealing with some serious allegations from a high school recruit. Winfield, Kansas quarterback Nick Patton told a newspaper that he had sex with a student while on a recruiting visit to Iowa last September. He claims the encounter may have been set up by his campus host. Iowa's president is calling for an investigation. Patton is not a member of the Iowa program. The station is based in Omaha, Neb.

UI Denies Claims By Football Recruit (WJBK-FOX, March 7)
Sex and football, causing controversy at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA now. A popular recruit, Nick Patton, tells a local paper there he was hooked up for sex, with an unidentified woman during the visit to the school. Patton picked a different school. Now, the university's president wants an investigation into claims of sexual favors for recruits. Patton says he thinks his case was an isolated incident. Officials with the football program say they have nothing to do with the allegations. The station is based in Detroit, Mich.

Claims Against UI Football Program Detailed (KAKE-TV, March 7)
A Winfield quarterback told a Manhattan newspaper he got what he thinks could be sexual favors during a recruiting visit to the University of Iowa. The allegation comes at a time when sex-related scandals are plaguing college football. Nick Patton's claims have prompted the school to launch an investigation. Patton told the Manhattan Mercury that he had consensual sex with a University of Iowa student during his recruiting visit to Iowa City. He says he was introduced to that student through his host, Iowa linebacker Abdul Hodge. Patton says he doesn't know if the athletic program set up the encounter. But he told the paper it seemed like it. "But it's the first time he had been through recruiting, so he didn't know," reports the Manhattan Mercury. Iowa football coach KIRK FERENTZ issued a strong denial, saying they are not in the practice of prearranging anything of that nature, nor will they condone it. They do a thorough job on preparing their hosts on what is to take place. But the allegation has prompted University of Iowa president DAVID SKORTON to launch an independent investigation.
http://www.kake.com/news/headlines/635236.html

Alleged Recruiting Visit Sexual Encounter Cited (Sports Illustrated, March 7)
A high school football recruit's alleged sexual encounter with a woman during an official visit to the University of Iowa occurred at an address familiar from another high-profile athletic controversy, The Des Moines Register reported. An independent investigator appointed by the university president will look into the claim by high school quarterback Nick Patton that he had consensual sex with a woman he met on campus during the recruiting visit last September. In a copyright story, the Register reported Sunday that university officials have learned that the encounter took place at 725 Orchard St. in Iowa City -- the same half of a duplex where current Iowa basketball player Pierre Pierce lived during a 2002 criminal investigation. That incident led to Pierce's pleading guilty to an assault charge and publicly apologizing for engaging in "inappropriate sexual conduct with a fellow student." Last week, Patton told a Kansas newspaper that he wasn't certain whether the encounter was arranged by his player host or team officials. Iowa coach KIRK FERENTZ has denied that players or coaches could be involved. Patton is committed to play for Kansas State next fall. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, THE STATE in South Carolina, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, and many other media outlets.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/football/ncaa/03/07/bc.fbc.recruitinvestiga.ap/

Campo Study On Drinking Ads Cited (Atlanta Journal Constitution, March 7)
Advertising campaigns rail against it and many university administrators devote much of their work to stamping it out. The problem: Binge drinking by college students. But researchers question whether the efforts are doing any good, especially since statistics suggest undergrads are drinking just as much as they did 10 years ago. Teaching students the risks involved with drinking is critical, says SHELLY CAMPO, an assistant professor of community and behavioral health at the University of Iowa. But she says some advertising campaigns simply don't work. In a study released last year, Campo and her colleagues found that so-called "social norm" ads failed to make an impact. The ads try to take advantage of the powers of peer pressure by telling students how much others drink -- or don't drink. For example, the ads might say "most students have four or fewer drinks when they party." Versions of the story also ran on the websites of KPHO in Phoenix, Nev., the ATLANTA (Ga.) JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, the PALM BEACH (Fla.) POST, HEALTHCENTRAL.COM, DRKOOP.COM, HEALTH DAY and other media outlets.
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/alco/517397.html

Football Allegations Cited (Kansas City Star, March 7)
Nick Patton -- a Kansas State Wildcats' quarterback recruit -- made news this past week when it was discovered he had consensual sex with a University of Iowa student when he was on his recruiting trip there in September. Iowa President DAVID SKORTON has called for an investigation. Patton could not be reached for comment Saturday.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/sports/colleges/kansas_state_university/8125216.htm

Peters Comments On Risks Of Company Incentives (The State, March 7)
Last month, Tennessee-based Dollar General announced it will build a $70 million distribution center on a field in rural Union County, S.C. The household-goods discounter said it plans to employ 600 people. That's enough jobs to theoretically cut the county's unemployment rate nearly in half. Union's jobless rate of 11.2 percent in December was seventh-highest among the state's 46 counties. Those jobs will come at a price. Union County and the state of South Carolina are offering millions in incentives to lure the retailer to a location that's roughly 15 miles from the nearest major highways, interstates 26 and 85. In total, Dollar General is eligible to receive roughly $45 million in tax credits and grants from the state, plus county tax breaks worth hundreds of thousands of dollars more over 15 years, state and local officials said. ALAN PETERS, a University of Iowa professor and economic-development expert, called the incentives offered Dollar General "very high," but not "absolutely spectacularly high." Giving generous incentives to bring companies to rural areas they would otherwise pass over is risky, he said. Often, once the public money runs out, the company finds it no longer makes economic sense to operate in the location, he said. The State is based in Columbia, S.C.

UI Library Alumna Runs Outreach Program (Laramie Boomerang, March 7)
The Outreach program, provided by the Albany County Public Library, brings books to people who aren't able to leave their homes as easily as they used to, from the regular run-of-the-mill hardback and paperback books, to large-print, magazines and even books on tape or CD. The person responsible for distributing reading material throughout town is the new Outreach librarian, Ruth Hitchcock. Hitchcock grew up in Pocahontas, Iowa, and received two degrees while living there. The first was from Iowa State University, where she earned a biology degree. After that, she earned her second degree in library science at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Wyoming.
http://www.laramieboomerang.com/news/more.asp?StoryID=100881

Former UI Pediatrician Leads Effort (Galveston County Daily News, March 7)
Marie Hokanson is one of up to 180,000 people suffering from post-polio syndrome, a relapse of the weakness or paralysis of the paralytic polio they contracted decades earlier. Health officials in Galveston will mark the 50-year anniversary of the first successful field trials of that vaccine with an intense effort in April to raise the island's low infant immunization rates. The last major outbreak in the United States was in 1979, when polio struck 17 Amish and Mennonite people in Iowa, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Wisconsin and Canada. None had been vaccinated against polio because of their religious beliefs except for an infant who received the vaccine shortly before becoming ill. Later tests showed the infant had been infected previously. Dr. Martin Myers, a UTMB pediatrician who in 1979 was at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and helped care for two of the victims, is leading the local effort to raise infant immunization rates. He said the 1979 outbreak was contained by very high immunization rates in the surrounding communities "That of course is the point of what we are doing," said Myers. "It's this whole concept of community immunity. Unless the whole community is protected, our children are not." The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.galvnews.com/story.lasso?wcd=18438

Vonnegut To Speak At Lehigh Commencement (Allentown Morning Call, March 7
Kurt Vonnegut, an author who combined science fiction, social satire and dark comedy for novels such as "Slaughterhouse Five," will speak during Lehigh University's 136th commencement at 10 a.m. May 24 in Goodman Stadium. Vonnegut will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. Vonnegut was a lecturer at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP from 1965-67, a lecturer in English at Harvard University in 1970 and a distinguished professor at the City College of New York from 1973-1974. The paper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.mcall.com/news/local/all-b11_4vonnegutmar07,0,7224059.story?coll=all-newslocal-hed

UI Student: Ritalin Tempts Non-ADD Students (Chicago Tribune, March 7)
The controversial prescription drug Ritalin, best known as a treatment for children diagnosed with attention deficit disorder, has been co-opted by a new population: healthy people trying to boost their mental performance. If a child not struggling with ADD takes Ritalin in a pill form, he might feel he has an above-average attention span. "It's related to the pressure students feel to do well at classes," said Katie Finn, 20, a junior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who knew of peers in high school who would fake attention deficit for a prescription of Ritalin. "It's a study enhancer, and people take it with the goal of being more focused." Finn said she has been tempted to try it herself, but so far she hasn't. "At times I feel distracted and would love to be focused, but my fear is the risk associated with it," she said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/q/chi-0403070438mar07,1,3057200.story?coll=chi-leisureq-hed

UI Investigates Claims Of Sexual Favors (CNN, March 6)
A story about the University of Colorado's strict new rules for football recruits, which are being hailed as a badly needed step that will burnish the university's battered image and perhaps keep athletes from wrongdoing, says that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA appointed an independent investigator on Friday to look into an allegation that a high school football prospect received sexual favors during an official visit to the Iowa City campus last fall.
http://edition.cnn.com/2004/US/Central/03/06/university.assault.ap/

Recruit Claims Sexual Favors Given During UI Visit (Dodge City Globe, March 6)
A top Kansas State University football recruit has told The Manhattan Mercury that he received what could appear to be sexual favors during a recruiting visit to the University of Iowa. Nick Patton, a 2004 signee with the K-State Wildcats, has admitted to having consensual sex with a University of Iowa co-ed, who he declined to name, during his recruiting visit. The occurrence happened on Sept. 20, the Saturday night of his two-night stay on the Hawkeyes' campus in Iowa City. Iowa football coach KIRK FERENTZ denied the allegations, "We are not in the practice of prearranging anything of that nature, nor will we condone it. We do a thorough job of preparing our hosts on what is to take place." K-State football coach Bill Snyder spent a portion of Thursday afternoon talking to "the appropriate" people involved and termed it just a "boy meets girl" relationship. "There's not a finer gentleman who has control of his program than Kirk Ferentz," Snyder said. "He knows what is going on within his program. I am confident that this is not a big deal or his deal." The Globe is based in Kansas.
http://www.dodgeglobe.com/stories/030604/spo_0306040022.shtml

Davis Confirms Teenagers Getting Fatter (San Francisco Chronicle, March 5)
Teenagers are putting on the pounds at more than twice the rate their parents did at the same age, scientists reported Thursday in a study suggesting that genes have little to do with the fattening of America's youth. Researchers, including PATRICIA DAVIS, University of Iowa associate professor of neurology, gathered in San Francisco for an American Heart Association conference on cardiovascular disease prevention disclosed a host of study results, many of them pointing to familiar culprits driving the weight gains being seen in young people today. In terms the kids might understand, it all boiled down to this: hella too much food, especially the kind that isn't good for you, and hella not enough exercise. This story also appeared on the Web site of HEALTH DAY.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/03/05/MNGQE5F1JN1.DTL

Gurnett Helped Inspire Sun Rings Musical Composition (Boston Globe, March 5)
Terry Riley laid the cornerstone of minimalism when he composed "In C" in 1965. The piece has been played thousands of times since, and is widely studied and performed in educational settings. In 1965, Riley was 29 and not ready yet to become an Old Master, so he has tried ever since to stay out on the cutting edge where "In C" put him. A 25-year association with the Kronos Quartet has helped keep him -- and the quartet -- continuously evolving. Their latest collaboration arrives in the Cutler Majestic Theatre Sunday afternoon when Kronos plays Riley's "Sun Rings," a work commissioned in part by the NASA Art Program and incorporating both images and sounds gathered by the space probes Voyager and Galileo. Riley confesses he was surprised to learn that there were sounds in space; most of us have been taught that space is silent. "I met Dr. DON GURNETT at the University of Iowa," Riley said recently from his home in California. "He's a very turned-on guy and glad to share his discoveries. He explained to me that there are charged electrons in space and they do produce a variety of sounds. He developed the recording equipment to make those sounds audible to our ears. He gave me hundreds of audio samples that he had made, and from them I culled out the ones I thought I could build a piece around. There are even some sounds of Earth, recorded from space. I looped the sounds so that I could hear them over and over again and understand their textures, timbres, rhythms, and melodies, and they went onto a prerecorded track that the Kronos Quartet plays along with."
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2004/03/05/rileys_newest_work_is_out_of_this_world/

Study Finds Benign Virus Likely Guards Against AIDS (The Advocate, March 5)
A new national study seems to confirm the accuracy of an earlier study that showed that men infected with the AIDS virus live much longer if they also happen to be infected with an obscure virus similar to hepatitis. The study reinforces a startling finding by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers. The second virus, known as GBV-C, is common but relatively unknown. Until a few years ago, researchers thought it had no effect on humans. But in 2001, University of Iowa researchers said that it appeared to offer significant protection from the AIDS virus. The researchers also participated in the new study, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. With the new results in hand, the team is talking about testing GBV-C by purposely infecting people with it and tracking how they fare. Other stories about this topic appeared on the Web sites of SCIENCE MAGAZINE, eTAIWAN NEWS, PLANET OUT, GAY.COM,
http://www.advocate.com/new_news.asp?ID=11556&sd=03/05/04

Regents To Consider Kinnick Renovations (Omaha World Herald, March 5)
The State Board of Regents will consider next week whether to give final approval to an $87 million renovation of Kinnick Stadium, the 75-year-old home of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football. The board also is expected to review proposals from the state's three public universities to raise the cost of room and board for the upcoming academic year, according to documents released Thursday. The renovation at Kinnick has created a split of sorts on the board since the idea was introduced a year ago.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=1025301

Alumna To Discuss Abusive Boyfriends (Monmouth Review-Atlas, March 4)
Vicki Crompton Tetter, who has a MA in counselor education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, will participate in a women's health summit at Yorkwood High School in Yorkwood, Ill. March 27. She tells about an incidence of dating violence that cost her daughter her life and the resulting "journey" it has sent her on. The Review-Atlas is based in Monmouth, Ill.
http://www.reviewatlas.com/articles/2004/03/04/news/news3.txt

Stapleton: Benign Virus May Help AIDS Patients (CNN.com, March 4)
A harmless virus common in the general population delays the development of AIDS, according to a study released on Wednesday that could help researchers find new treatments for the epidemic. The benign virus can persist in the body for years and appears to interfere with HIV, the AIDS virus, which affects 40 million people worldwide and has killed another 30 million. Both HIV and the benign virus, known as GBV-C, infect the same types of cells. JACK STAPLETON of the University of Iowa and his colleagues found that HIV-infected men who were no longer infected with GBV-C after five to six years died nearly three times faster than men who continued to show signs of the infection. And once the GBV-C virus was gone, the AIDS virus seemed to attack with renewed vigor. "So not only was having a persistent infection better survival-wise than not having an infection, but the subset of men who lost their virus did the worst. It's very unusual that there would be a good virus," Stapleton told Reuters. The study appears in the March 4 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. A version of this story appeared March 4 on the web sites of the HOUSTON CHRONICLE, WFIE-TV in Indiana, KPHO-TV in Phoenix, HEALTHCENTRAL.com, KLAS-TV in Nevada, MSNBC, WEBMD, BETTERHUMANS.com in Canada, YAHOO NEWS, REUTERS, HEALTHDAY and NEW SCIENTIST.
http://www.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/conditions/03/04/aids.virus.reut/

Poremba Comments On Monkey Calls (ScienCentral News, March 4)
Researchers have discovered that some monkeys process the sounds of other monkeys in their brains much like the way people process language. AMY POREMBA, a psychologist at the University of Iowa, wanted to learn more about what goes on in monkeys' brains when they communicate. She and her team used positron emission tomography (PET) to scan the brains of eight healthy rhesus monkeys as they listened to the calls of other monkeys and other sounds. They found that monkeys process their calls with the left side of their brains, the same part we use when we listen to human speech. "Only when they listened to the monkey calls did we see this left hemisphere more active than right hemisphere," Poremba says. "So it seemed to be very specific for their communication types of sounds such as language processing in the humans. When you play monkey calls in particular, their particular communication sounds, then you get something that looks very similar to the human's. You get more activation, more energy use on the left hemisphere than the right, matching the pattern that's normally shown in humans."
http://www.sciencentral.com/articles/view.php3?language=english&type=article&article_id=218392192

Ceilley Sees Rise In Men Seeking Botox (The Medical Posting, March 4)
More men are turning to Botox injections in a search for younger-looking skin, but they can expect to pay more for the procedure than women. Botox, or botulinum toxin type A, is a powerful muscle paralyser that temporarily reduces the appearance of frown lines by blocking the muscle contractions that cause the skin to crease. Because men often have larger muscles than women, they require at least twice as much Botox to get the same effect, and the procedure must be repeated every three or four months to maintain the results. Dr. ROGER CEILLEY, a dermatologist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, says Botox is probably attracting more men to cosmetic procedures because it requires no time off work and has a high safety profile. "Men's attitudes are changing. Men are taking more interest, I think, in physical fitness, and they want to look as good as they feel. There are more things that can be done now that can make them look the age they are. They don't want to look older than they are and don't want to look angry. Some of the frown lines can make men look stern." The Medical Posting is a health news web site based in Canada.
http://www.medicalposting.ca/men/article.jsp?content=20040304_083949_2548&topStory=y

Windschitl: Risk Not Well Understood (Tulsa World, March 4)
Odds are people think the glass is half empty when it is overflowing and half full when it is about to run dry, according to a new University of Florida study on attitudes about risk. The research about perceptions of optimism and pessimism shows people brace for the worst when risk is low and are unduly confident about avoiding bad things, even when it's likely such events will happen. PAUL WINDSCHITL, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa, said it would be "problematic" for a doctor who communicates risk estimates to assume that people will accept it as stated. "The Dockery findings are consistent with the notion that people tend to tailor their interpretations of a risk estimate to fit with their own personal circumstances," he said. "Often this personal tailoring makes perfect sense, but there are also times in which people's interpretations are influenced by factors that aren't relevant to their actual risk."
http://www.tulsaworld.com/HealthStory.asp?ID=040304_He_MENpressure21304_1

Tracking Stock Study Cited (Financial Times, March 3)
Another tracking stock bit the dust this week, as Sprint said it would merge its wireless tracker with the parent company's stock. Will anyone mourn the trackers' passing, aside from the bankers who earned fees from them? Trackers were fashionable in the boom years, but now look so last century. The idea was to allow companies to tap into investor enthusiasm for 'new-economy' businesses that might be buried within a stodgy corporate whole, without requiring the parent company to give up control of any assets. The result was often disappointing. A new study by MATTHEW BILLETT and ANAND VIJH of the University of Iowa found that the tracking stocks in their US sample underperformed several benchmarks by an average of more than 12 per cent per year in the three years following their creation.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=04a9221ecd0e1646b8dd5e3838b0813d&_docnum=10&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVA&_md5=ac0dfc262c92849f93251ce4befe9074

Squire: Kerry Earned Democratic Frontrunner Status (Miami Herald, March 3)
A story about Sen. John Kerry's overwhelming win in the "Super Tuesday" primaries quotes PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political scientist who closely tracked Kerry's rise, fall and rebound to victory in the state's Jan. 19 caucuses. Squire said Kerry has come a far distance from the entitlement to the nomination that he often projected through the first half of 2003. "For so long he behaved as if he would get the nomination because it was his due rather than something he had to struggle for," Squire said. "Now he has that passion, though it still ebbs and flows a bit, but he has come to the point where it is fair to say he has earned it."
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/national/8095422.htm

Cram Comments On Post-Weight-Loss Plastic Surgery (MSNBC.com, March 3)
Driven by the American obesity epidemic and by the high-profile success stories of celebrities such as NBC's Al Roker and the novelist Anne Rice, the number of surgical weight-loss, or bariatric, procedures is expected to top 144,000 this year, according to the American Society for Bariatric Surgeries. But the road to weight loss doesn't always end there. Many of those patients will seek a plastic surgeon to help their formerly obese bodies look more normal. Five years ago Dr. ALBERT CRAM, chief of plastic surgery at the University of Iowa, used to perform one tummy tuck or body lift a month on patients who had lost massive amounts of weight. Now his department averages one or two a week. "It's growing significantly," he says.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/3972656/

Squire: Kerry Earned Democratic Frontrunner Status (Boston Globe, March 3)
A story about Sen. John Kerry's overwhelming win in the "Super Tuesday" primaries quotes PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political scientist who closely tracked Kerry's rise, fall and rebound to victory in the state's Jan. 19 caucuses. Squire said Kerry has come a far distance from the entitlement to the nomination that he often projected through the first half of 2003. "For so long he behaved as if he would get the nomination because it was his due rather than something he had to struggle for," Squire said. "Now he has that passion, though it still ebbs and flows a bit, but he has come to the point where it is fair to say he has earned it."
http://www.boston.com/news/politics/president/articles/2004/03/03/kerry_kept_eye_toward_a_win/

UI Alumna Guest Speaker At Diversity Event (Hamilton Journal-News, March 3)
A story with the dateline of Oxford, Ohio, reports that on Thursday, people from all cultures and backgrounds will gather to celebrate women of color, weaving the threads of culture and personal experiences at the annual Women of Color Celebration and Luncheon. The featured guest speaker is Nancy "Rusty" Barcelo, vice president of minority affairs at the University of Washington, whose commitment to diversity has been widely recognized. Barcelo has been hailed as both a leader for transformational change and an astute visionary practitioner. She made the long climb from being the only Chicano student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to her current position and has altered the landscape of higher education in the process, according to university officials. The paper is based in Ohio.
http://www.journal-news.com/news/newsfd/auto/feed/news/2004/03/02/1078283743.26609.6941.2027.html;COXnetJSessionID=AFqljFMpjhfGsUgb9K0als2xxCsUTWOcnYcHY2PqO8vACIjltkxM!-169744124?urac=n&urvf=10783237490720.8876339910277244

UI Alumnus Named Journalism Educator of Year (Atkins Chronicle, March 3)
Van A. Tyson was honored by the Arkansas Press Association as Journalism Educator of the Year at the winter convention. In addition to being publisher of The Atkins Chronicle and The Dover Times, Tyson has taught at Arkansas Tech University since 1973. He served 15 years as head of the Department of Speech, Theatre and Journalism at Tech during which time the curriculum and faculty expanded from two full-time journalism teachers to today's five full-time and three part-time journalism teachers. He has a B.A. from Arkansas Tech University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in English from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. He has done graduate work in journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa City, where he taught beginning reporting labs as a graduate assistant. The paper is based in Arkansas.
http://www.atkinschronicle.com/3-3tyson.htm

Disputed Ruling By Moeller Cited In Negotiations (Miami Herald, March 2)
A story filed from Moraine, Ohio, says the long-running labor dispute between Delphi Corp. and the union representing hourly workers at its Moraine air-conditioning compressor plant moved a step closer to resolution Monday. Workers approved a tentative four-year local contract with the Troy, Mich.-based auto parts supplier that will trigger Delphi's withdrawal of a federal lawsuit against the union and retirement buyouts for as many as 188 of the workers. Also upon ratification, the union said Delphi agreed to withdraw its lawsuit against the IUE-CWA in U.S. District Court in Dayton. In the lawsuit, filed in November, Delphi argues the arbitrator in the case -- LON MOELLER, a business professor at the University of Iowa -- overstepped his bounds and that his ruling is a financial drain on the company, costing it $43.5 million in 2003 and another $50 million this year.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/national/8088894.htm

Jones Comments On Electronic Voting (New York Times, March 2)
More than two centuries of elections in the United States have resulted in paper-based voting systems secured by a multitude of checks and procedures. New electronic voting systems require voters to trust computers and the people who program them, a trust that computer security experts say is unwarranted. The subject is not hypothetical. Millions of voters will cast ballots on electronic machines today in the biggest test so far of the technology. To address security concerns, researchers are proposing new ways of voting that do not require voter trust in people or software. "A trustworthy system of elections must rest on one central principle: trust no one," said Dr. DOUGLAS W. JONES, a professor of computer science at the University of Iowa and a member of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/02/science/02VOTE.html

Legislator Discusses Air Quality Standards (Agri News, March 2)
Air quality standards are likely to be revisited this session of the Iowa Legislature or first thing next session. Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman David Johnson, who served on the committee that developed the bill calling for air quality standards two years ago, said standards are important, but they have to be based on realistic science. "Iowa State University has basically removed itself from the original study with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that set the standards,'' Johnson said.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/313807018529114.bsp

Prosecutor Outlines Hacker Case (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, March 2)
A former University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student accused of interfering with Madison police radio frequencies did so on one occasion because he was angry about a speeding ticket, Assistant U.S. Attorney Tim O'Shea told a jury Monday. In his opening statement, O'Shea recounted how Rajib K. Mitra, 25, was found guilty of speeding in a Madison court and assessed a $163 fine on Nov. 11. O'Shea said Mitra went home to his North Orchard Street apartment and within an hour downloaded sexually explicit audio files from the Internet and was "piggy-backing" them over the Madison Police Department's radio frequencies. O'Shea said Mitra's preoccupation with law enforcement stemmed from his two previous convictions on charges related to computer hacking. In 1998, Mitra was convicted of hacking into the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's computer systems while he was a student there. Because he was on probation for hacking into a University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee computer system, he was sentenced to 40 days in jail.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/wauk/mar04/211510.asp

Sadler Led Sexual Assault Study (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, March 2)
In an editorial about reports of servicewomen in the Persian Gulf being sexually assaulted or raped by other soldiers, a study of more than 500 female veterans last year by the University of Iowa and Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center is noted. The study found that the workplace environment has much to do with the risk of sexual assault. "Our findings suggest that if sexual harassment is allowed in the workplace, women in those environments have a significantly increased risk of being raped," said ANNE SADLER, a researcher who led the study.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/opinion/162724_militaryed.html

Bezanson Discusses Blackmun (Roll Call, March 1)
UI law professor RANDALL BEZANSON discusses the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, whose papers are being opened to the public by the Library of Congress on March 4. Bezanson is one of Blackmun's former law clerks. Registration is required to enter this site.
http://www.rollcall.com

Herbarium Lawsuit Filed (WQAD-TV, March 1)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA faculty members are heading to court to try to stop the transfer of a collection of dried plant specimens to Iowa State University. Their lawsuit claims that University of Iowa administrators made misleading statements to rush the transfer and have ignored attempts to keep the herbarium at Iowa. The university says the move is a way to save money by getting rid of programs that are redundant. The herbarium is a collection of 250,000 dried plant specimens and is scheduled to be moved to Ames on March 15. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill. The Associated Press story also appeared in the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1678230&nav=1sW7LBhU

Hunnicutt Interviewed About 'Time Poverty' (BBC Radio 4, March 1)
'Time Poverty' describes a state of modern living where we are over-worked and under pressure to succeed. It was first coined in the States where the average American works nine weeks a year longer than us Europeans, and stress and burn-out are higher than ever. BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure at University of Iowa, and John de Graaf, coordinator of the 'Take Back Your Time Day' campaign, are interviewed about causes and effect of time poverty.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours/
To listen to the interview: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours/ram/youandyours_20040301_1.ram

UI Law Journal Study Noted (Money, March 1)
Are mutual fund fees fair and square? That's the big issue in a tussle between the Investment Company Institute, the fund industry's lobbyist, and two academics whose fund research has given New York State attorney general Eliot Spitzer Ammo in his assault on fees. The profs' 2001 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA law journal article argues that investors in large-cap mutual funds are paying more than twice what pension funds are for stock-picking services. Why? Because pension funds negotiate with outside advisers to get the lowest fees, while mutual funds, whose boards are dominated by the advisory firms hired to run the funds, essentially negotiate with themselves.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7a6d48e669df683d09e5e6a4f1d76636&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=a6d5a8165835439d069275375fcf380f

Muscatine School Featured (Time, March 1)
Here are some of the things kids at Garfield/Franklin elementary in Muscatine, Iowa, no longer do: eagle watch on the Mississippi River, go on field trips to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY and have two daily recesses. A sensible bargain has been struck: literacy first, canoe trips later. But there are more substantive losses too. Creative writing, social studies and computer work have all become occasional indulgences. Now that the standardized fill-in-the-bubble test is the foundation upon which public schools rest -- now that a federal law called No Child Left Behind mandates that kids as young as nine meet benchmarks in reading and math or jeopardize their schools' reputation--there is little time for anything else.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7a6d48e669df683d09e5e6a4f1d76636&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=b509f984a84db8be7e3ebdbe1492d06d

Yin Offers Opinion On Stewart Case (Tech Central Station, March 1)
A columnist writes about the government's case against Martha Stewart going to the jury this week. He says the presiding judge dismissed the securities fraud claim last week. The false statement and obstruction of justice charges, however, will go to the jury. The remaining counts against Stewart thus include: (1) conspiracy to obstruct justice, make false statements, and commit perjury in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 371; (2) making false statements in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1001; and (3) obstruction of justice in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1505. After an exchange of blog posts, University of Iowa law professor TUNG YIN convinced me that the government's allegations, if proven beyond a reasonable doubt, constitute a technical (arguably hyper-technical) violation of those provisions. Even so, as a matter of sound prosecutorial discretion, those claims never should have been brought. (Based in Washington D.C., Tech Central Station is a web-based news site that reports on technology and financial markets.)
http://www.techcentralstation.com/030104C.html

UI Presidents House Under Renovation (WQAD-TV, March 1)
Work to renovate the 100-year-old house of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA president is moving along a head of schedule. The nearly $3 million renovation project includes replacing plumbing, electrical, and heating and ventilation systems. Some of the systems are original parts of the house. School officials had projected that work would be done in September or October. Now they say work could be finished in August. Other work includes replacing decade-old carpet with refinished hardwood floors and the addition of a sprinkler system. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1677007&nav=1sW7LB7b

Former UI Student Runs For Congress (Odessa American, March 1)
Biographies for Texas candidates running for election or re-election to Congress include a bio on Democrat Elaine King Miller, 54, a professor of higher education running unopposed for U.S. REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 11. The story says Miller had post-doctoral training at Harvard University in management and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF BUSINESS in organizational behavior and management. The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.oaoa.com/news/nw022904j.htm

UI Removes Fruit-Bearing Ginkgos (The Citizen Online, March 1)
Say goodbye to the smelly trees. The University of Iowa is removing four Ginkgo trees that have caused an offensive stench every fall at the center of campus. The university said the trees' malodorous and messy fruit was a consideration, but not the principle factor, in the decision. BOB BROOKS, a campus architect, said two trees already were removed as part of a major utility project that began last summer. The other two will be removed this spring because of other maintenance concerns, he said. Dropped mushy fruit from the 50-year-old trees, located in a courtyard known as the Pentacrest, forced some students to find creative routes to class. But when a student leader asked campus planners to get rid of the trees in the fall of 2002, biology professors pleaded for tolerance. "I don't understand getting rid of wonderful, fascinating trees," said biologist DIANA HORTON, who said Ginkgo biloba trees can live up to 1,500 years and are "living fossils." The fruit of the Ginkgo changes from a green to a golden color every fall, giving off the stench for at least about a month, Horton said. Whoever chose the trees decades ago may not have known about the mess and odor. Ginkgo trees may not bear fruit for the first 20 years. The Citizen Online is the web presence of the ROCKDALE CITIZEN and the NEWTON CITIZEN, which cover Conyers and Covington, Ga.
http://www.citizenonline.net/citizen/archive/article103A0491DE534BB1A522334B2429C1C3.asp

 

 

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