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UI in the News

June, 2004

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Gurnett Blames 'Slippage' For Longer Saturn Day (New Kerala, June 30)
How long is a day on Saturn? Is it getting shorter? Scientists are faced with these questions after data collected by the unmanned spacecraft Cassini -- that is almost at Saturn's doorstep -- found the ringed planet's day to be six minutes shorter than earlier records, according to sciencedaily.com. According to DON GURNETT, principal investigator for the Cassini radio and plasma wave science instrument, University of Iowa, "It appears there is some kind of slippage between the deep interior of the planet and the magnetic field, which controls the charged particles responsible for the radio emission." He attributed the disparity in reading to the fact that Saturn's rotational axis is nearly identical to its magnetic axis. New Kerala is based in India.
http://www.newkerala.com/news-daily/news/features.php?action=fullnews&showcomments=1&id=26235

Gurnett Comments On Cassini Mission (Wired, June 30)
NASA's Cassini space probe has already aided scientists to make a second discovery about Saturn, even though the craft is still a day away from beginning its main mission. Signals detected by the probe show that Saturn's natural radio emissions are more like the sun's than the Earth's, and that a Saturnian day is not as short as once thought. NASA announced the radio discovery on Monday, saying that it was based on data returned from the probe over the past year. The data showed that Saturn's radio rotational period -- a measurement often used to determine the length of a day on a planet -- was nearly six minutes longer than when measured by the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1980 and 1981, respectively. "Although Saturn's radio period has clearly shifted substantially since the Voyager measurements, I don't think any of us could conceive of any process that would cause the rotation of the entire planet to actually slow down," said University of Iowa space physicist DON GURNETT, principal investigator for the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument.
http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,1282,64034,00.html?tw=wn_tophead_3

Gurnett, Kurth Discuss Saturn Mission (Spaceflight Now, June 29)
Although the Cassini spacecraft is scheduled to officially arrive at the planet Saturn on June 30, scientists studying the planet's magnetosphere received an official welcome on June 27 when a burst of plasma wave noise indicated that Cassini had crossed the planet's bow shock -- the region where charged particles flowing outward from the sun collide with Saturn's magnetic field or magnetosphere. University of Iowa Space Physicist DON GURNETT, head of the team that is analyzing radio and plasma wave emissions, says, "This is exciting. After nearly seven years, we finally got there! This marks the beginning of the scientific investigation for the people who will study the planet's magnetosphere." BILL KURTH, Cassini team member and UI senior research scientist, compared the bow shock to a sonic boom.
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/cassini/040629plasma.html

Gurnett Comments On Length Of Day On Saturn (CBS News, June 29)
Scientists who figured they knew how long a day lasted on Saturn are having second thoughts. The Cassini spacecraft has been listening to natural radio signals from Saturn, the most reliable method of determining a day's length. Cassini's transmissions show a complete rotation takes 10 hours, 45 minutes and 45 seconds, plus or minus 36 seconds, NASA said in a statement Monday. That's about six minutes longer than earlier measurements. But scientists doubt the planet is rotating more slowly. They are looking instead for something deep inside Saturn that would cause variability in the radio pulse. "I don't think any of us could conceive of any process that would cause the rotation of the entire planet to actually slow down," said DON GURNETT, a Cassini scientist who works at the University of Iowa. Gurnett said there appears to be "some kind of slippage between the deep interior of the planet and the magnetic field, which controls the charged particles responsible for the radio emission." The Associated Press story also appeared on the websites of THE STATESMAN, based in India; CNN.Com;
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/06/29/tech/main626662.shtml

Gurnett Discusses Saturn Findings (Astrobiology Magazine, June 29)
On approach to Saturn, data obtained by the Cassini spacecraft are already posing a puzzling question: How long is the day on Saturn? Cassini took readings of the day-length indicator regarded as most reliable, the rhythm of natural radio signals from the planet. The results give 10 hours, 45 minutes, 45 seconds (plus or minus 36 seconds) as the length of time it takes Saturn to complete each rotation. Here's the puzzle: That is about 6 minutes, or one percent, longer than the radio rotational period measured by the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew by Saturn in 1980 and 1981. Cassini scientists are not questioning Voyager's careful measurements. And they definitely do not think the whole planet of Saturn is actually rotating that much slower than it did two decades ago. Instead, they are looking for an explanation based on some variability in how the rotation deep inside Saturn drives the radio pulse. "The rotational modulation of radio emissions from distant astronomical objects has long been used to provide very accurate measurements of their rotation period," said Dr. DON GURNETT, principal investigator for the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument, University of Iowa, Iowa City. "The technique is particularly useful for the giant gas planets, such as Jupiter and Saturn, which have no surfaces and are covered by clouds that make direct visual measurements impossible."
http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=1043&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0

Reporter Tries Iowa Electronic Markets (Salon, June 29)
A reporter writes: "Last week wasn't the best for George W. Bush. At home, "Fahrenheit 9/11," Michael Moore's anti-Bush polemic, broke box office records. In Iraq, blood spilled anew -- bombings, beheadings and brutality dominated the headlines. Then there was the foul-mouthed vice president, the bestselling former president, and a couple of dispiriting polls. In other words, taken together, these seem like good times for John Kerry. Yet last week on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, I dumped my shares of John Kerry futures -- and I was proud to do it, too. The IEM is a real-money Web-based trading system run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's business school. Among some political scientists and economists it is thought to be extremely good at predicting the results of presidential elections. This should cause heartache to Democrats, because ever since June 1, when the IEM's most popular presidential market opened for trading on the 2004 race, shares of John Kerry futures have been badly trailing those of Bush."
http://www.salon.com/tech/feature/2004/06/29/iowa_market/index.html (subscription required)

Doern Comments On New Antibiotic (Readers Digest, July 2004)
In April the FDA approved telithromycin, or Ketek, a new drug designed to treat drug-resistant respiratory illnesses, including pneumonia, bronchitis and sinusitis. Like other classes of antibiotics, ketolides block bacteria's ability to make life-sustaining proteins. But older drugs disable protein manufacture in just one location; ketolides strike two spots, seriously reducing the chance of resistance, says microbiologist GARY DOERN, an antibiotics expert at the University of Iowa.

UI Study Examines Summer Mortality Rates (New York Times, June 29)
July, popular belief has it, is a perilous time to get sick. Come July 1 every year, thousands of newly minted medical school graduates flood teaching hospitals to begin residency programs. Despite the lore, there is little scientific evidence that the fear is really warranted. Several studies in the past few years have searched in vain for the phenomenon. One of the largest, published in The Journal of General Internal Medicine in 2003, compared hospital deaths and lengths of stay from July to September to the rates for other months in teaching and nonteaching hospitals. The researchers, Drs. WILLIAM A. BARRY and GARY E. ROSENTHAL of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, reviewed the records of more than 48,000 patients admitted to intensive care units in 28 hospitals in Ohio from 1991 to 1997. They found no significant difference in mortality rates or lengths of stay in the July-through-September period. The article also appeared in the SPARTANBURG (S.C) HERALD JOURNAL and WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/29/health/29case.html?ex=1089172800&en=10b4054417bc94da&ei=5006&partner=ALTAVISTA1

Gurnett Comments On Length Of Day On Saturn (USA Today, June 29)
Scientists who figured they knew how long a day lasted on Saturn are having second thoughts. The Cassini spacecraft has been listening to natural radio signals from Saturn, the most reliable method of determining a day's length. Cassini's transmissions show a complete rotation takes 10 hours, 45 minutes and 45 seconds, plus or minus 36 seconds, NASA said in a statement Monday. That's about six minutes longer than earlier measurements. But scientists doubt the planet is rotating more slowly. They are looking instead for something deep inside Saturn that would cause variability in the radio pulse. "I don't think any of us could conceive of any process that would cause the rotation of the entire planet to actually slow down," said DON GURNETT, a Cassini scientist who works at the University of Iowa. Gurnett said there appears to be "some kind of slippage between the deep interior of the planet and the magnetic field, which controls the charged particles responsible for the radio emission." The Associated Press story also appeared in the TIMES LEADER and STAR-NEWS in Pasadena, Calif.; HINDU NEWS; CNN; ABC NEWS; FORBES.COM; NEW YORK TIMES; ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION; GREENVILLE DAILY REFLECTOR, OMAHA WORLD HERALD; WILMINGTON MORNING STAR and CHARLOTTE OBSERVER in North Carolina; SPRINGFIELD NEWS SUN and AKRON BEACON JOURNAL in Ohio, TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT, BRADENTON HERALD and THE LEDGER in Florida; SAN LUIS OBISPO NEWS TRIBUNE, MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD and SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS in California, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, MIAMI HERALD; DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE and ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS in Minnesota; FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM in Texas; KANSAS CITY STAR; MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS; BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, TUSCALOOSA NEWS and TIMES DAILY in Alabama; SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER; MACON TELEGRAPH in Georgia; and many other media outlets.
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2004-06-29-saturn-spin_x.htm

Columnist Writes About Logo Controversy (Clarion Ledger, June 29)
The paper's sports columnist writes about the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's request that the University of Southern Mississippi change its Golden Eagle logo, claiming it is too much like Iowa's Hawkeye logo. "If you read on down in the story, you found that this could wind up being a case for lawyers who specialize in matters of intellectual property. Intellectual? Here's a prediction: If this ever gets to court, any judge with a brain bigger than a sparrow's will throw it out faster than a hummingbird's heartbeat." The paper is based in Mississippi. http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040629/COL0504/406290346/1173/SPORTS

UI Petitions Southern Miss To Drop Logo (Biloxi Sun-Herald, June 29)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has petitioned Southern Miss to scrap its bird head logo, which was introduced about 18 months ago and bears some resemblance to the one that adorns Hawkeyes apparel. "They say their fans are confused," Southern Miss athletics director Richard Giannini said. "I don't understand. If you put them side by side, they're not that much alike. They have a Hawkeye, we have a Golden Eagle." The paper is based in Biloxi, Miss.
http://www.sunherald.com/mld/thesunherald/sports/9035930.htm

Tomkovicz Comments On Miranda Rulings (Christian Science Monitor, June 29)
The US Supreme Court yesterday walked carefully through America's most important law designed to protect accused criminals during police interrogation. Upholding a decision by the Missouri Supreme Court, the high court ruled 5-4 that police may not under most circumstances deliberately question a suspect twice -- the first time without advising suspects of their right to remain silent -- in order to elicit incriminating statements. It shows you how badly they're spilt over Miranda, what it means and how much breadth it could be given," says JAMES TOMKOVICZ of the University of Iowa College of Law in Iowa City, who filed amicus brief in one of the cases. "One of the more unfortunate aspects is that these badly split opinions -- which were tied to the facts in the case -- provide little guidance to law enforcement officers and the courts in future cases."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0629/p10s01-usju.html

Kutcher Returning To Modeling (Miami Herald, June 29)
Ashton Kutcher is returning to his modeling career after signing to become the face of Zoo York clothing, imdb.com reports. The Punk'd star, who quit his biochemical engineering degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1997 to become a model, is to front the skate- influenced collection of clothes and accessories, produced by Ecko Unlimited, starting next month. The article also appeared on the website of WXNA-TV and WOKR-TV in New York; WTEV-TV in Florida; WBEX and WKKJ radio in Chillcothe, Ohio.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/living/people/9035639.htm

Macbride Founded Lakeside Labs (Omaha World Herald, June 29)
At the Iowa Lakeside Laboratory, students spend summers learning about natural resources in 40 buildings spread across 143 acres. Faculty come from around the country, and local residents use the lab to study the area's water quality. Other students come from as far away as Croatia to visit the world's foremost authority on diatoms, a type of algae. "The way you learn here is ideally the way you should learn," said Jane Shuttleworth, executive director of the Friends of Lakeside Laboratory. Lakeside Laboratory began as a private endeavor in 1909 by a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor, Thomas Macbride, and other colleagues. They purchased the 5-acre plot with their own money to give students a chance to learn about nature in the field, rather than only from books.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1135066

Parrott: Iowa Wants Southern Miss To Scrap Logo (Clarion Ledger, June 28)
University of Iowa officials have asked the University of Southern Mississippi to get rid of its Golden Eagle logo, saying it looks too much like the Hawkeyes' trademark. "We've had the 'Tiger Hawk' logo for 20, 25 years, and the Southern Mississippi logo seems confusingly similar," Iowa spokesman STEVE PARROTT said. "We congratulate Southern Mississippi on its taste in logos, but we've contacted Southern Mississippi and asked them to change it, because we feel it's too close to ours." Officials at Southern Miss are balking. "I'm not sure what the whole deal is," athletics director Richard Giannini said. "But I don't think they look anything alike. The only thing they have in common is they are both bird heads and they're both the same color, but there's no other similarity." Southern Miss introduced the new Eagle-head logo in January 2003 as part of a brand-identity campaign that included standard colors, fonts and logos for all aspects of the school's athletics. The logo had avoided the radar of Iowa officials until Southern Miss hired men's basketball coach Larry Eustachy, who previously coached at Iowa State University. Media coverage of the hiring in Iowa brought the issue to the attention of school officials. The paper is based in Mississippi. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the SUN HERALD, the BILOXI SUN HERALD and WTOK-TV, all in Mississippi; TALLAHASSEE.COM and the BRADENTON HERALD, both based in Florida; the CONTRA COSTA TIMES, SAN LUIS OBISPO TRIBUNE, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS and MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD, all in California; the CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER; the COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER and the MACON TELEGRAPH, both in Georgia; the CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania; the ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS and the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, both in Minnesota; the MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS; the FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL in Indiana and many other media outlets.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040628/SPORTS030104/406280359/1025/SPORTS

Johnson Took Part In Hormone Replacement Therapy Study (BBC News, June 28)
A major study which cast doubt on the safety of hormone replacement therapy may have been flawed, say scientists. The US Women's Health Initiative (WHI) research found HRT use increased the risk of heart attacks and strokes. The study, involving 16,000 women, was stopped three years early in 2002, and many women were scared off using HRT. However, Yale University scientists now say design flaws meant that study could not have detected any positive impact of HRT on heart health. In February, Professor SUSAN JOHNSON, of the University of Iowa, a WHI investigator, said the study's message had been widely misunderstood, and that HRT was effective treatment of women with severe menopausal symptoms.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/3845761.stm

Geology Student Headed To UI (Maryville Daily Times, June 28)
Dogs in the Rockford area have not been very hospitable to geology students mapping rock formations in the area. Obviously, they are unaware that students enrolled in the Wright State University Field Camp have been coming to Blount County for 34 years. According to instructor Carol Winhusen, the Wright State University Field Camp is the only field camp east of the Mississippi River. Most geology field camps are in the western part of the United States. The students have a topographical map of the area and must shade in different types of rock formations. For Cindy Wambsgans' group, that has meant following a shale bed, which goes along Martin Mill Pike near Central Point Baptist Church. Wambsgans is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University who will be attending graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Tennessee.
http://www.thedailytimes.com/sited/story/html/167249

UI Takes Part In Math Competition (Allentown Morning Call, June 28)
A team of 15 high school students from the Lehigh Valley finished 10th out of 88 teams in the American Regions Math League contest on June 5 at Penn State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and San Jose State University. This was the best performance ever for the Lehigh Valley team, which has competed in the contest for 12 years. The paper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.mcall.com/news/local/all-b4_5mathjun28,0,1379751.story?coll=all-newslocal-hed

UI To Fill Writers' Workshop With - Wink - Realtors (The Spoof, June 28)
With the headline "Realtors Not Happy About Assigned Faculty Housing," a faux news story reports that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA today fired all faculty members in its prestigious creative writing program and replaced them with Realtors who had $4 million or more of residential sales during the preceding year. "We finally realized that Realtors, not English majors, are the people with the most fertile imaginations and the most exciting writing skills," said a university spokesperson. "They don't obsess for years over crafting the perfect sentence. They come into the office and multi-task. They don't require quiet. They don't require pencils. They don't complain about the quality of the coffee." Among the books slated for discussion will be "Open House," "Little House on the Prairie," "Do The Windows Open", "Homeward Bound", "The House of Seven Gables" and "A Room With a View". The Spoof is a website of satire based in the U.K.
http://www.thespoof.com/news/spoof.cfm?headline=s2i5043

Bush Prospects Tracked By IEM (Business Week, June 28)
In an article about how stock markets might be affected by the presidential elections, it's noted that President Bush's predicted margin of victory shrank from six percent to one percent on the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS. But Bush's recent progress toward the exits in Iraq, coupled with continued strong job gains at home, are lifting the incumbent's prospects. "Only a fool would bet on this election," says Larry Sabato, director of the University of Virginia's Center for Politics.
http://www.businessweek.com/@@83XbvYUQzWmHDQ4A/magazine/content/04_26/b3889624.htm

Weinstein Says Casts Should Be Kept Dry (Newsweek, June 28)
Breaking a bone is almost a childhood ritual. So is getting signatures on your cast-and keeping it dry. Because bacteria thrive on moisture, wetness can lead to a serious infection. To help keep the cast dry, use a sturdy bag and fasten it with duct tape or rubber bands. But doctors still discourage kids from getting soaked. "No child's life is going to be ruined by a short time not being in the water," says Dr. STUART WEINSTEIN, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at the University of Iowa.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/5251145/site/newsweek/

IEM Noted As Prediction Market (New Republic, June 28)
The IEM is noted in a review of James Surowiecki's book "The Wisdom of Crowds: Why the Many Are Smarter Than the Few and How Collective Wisdom Shapes Business, Economies, Societies, and Nations." Since 1988, the University of Iowa has run the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, which allow people to bet on the outcome of presidential elections. As a predictor, the Iowa Electronic Markets have produced extraordinarily accurate judgments, often doing better than professional polling organizations. In the week before each of the last four elections, the predictions in the Iowa market have shown an average absolute error of just 1.5 percentage points, a significant improvement over the 2.1 percentage point error in the final Gallup Polls.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=3f650226621d19d5acea35c204c3f555&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=17560b7bad4ef9b68e721abb29505fca

UI Alumna To Play Organ In Concert (Charleston Post and Courier, June 27)
The Chamber Music Society of Charleston will present a concert in the Great Hall of the Old Exchange Building at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. This concert is the third in the Old Exchange Series, a set of five historically inspired concerts that feature music for the cello, harpsichord and countertenor. The musicians will be in period attire and will perform by candlelight. The program will feature the music of Bach, Purcell, Telemann and Scarlatti. Musicians are Richard Bordas, countertenor; Julia Harlow, harpsichord; and Timothy O'Malley, cello. Harlow is organist and director of music at the Second Presbyterian Church and also teaches music appreciation and harpsichord at the College of Charleston. She has a degree in organ from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a master's degree in early keyboard performance and doctorate in organ performance from the University of Oregon. In her spare time, Harlow plays the bagpipes with the Charleston Police Pipes and Drums Corps.
http://www.charleston.net/stories/062704/ash_27artsa2.shtml (subscription required)

Skorton Approves Rules For Recruit Visits (Omaha World Herald, June 27)
No drinking by minors. No sexual harassment. And nobody younger than 19 in bars after 10 p.m. Those are the written rules for athletic recruits when they make campus visits to the University of Iowa that President DAVID SKORTON approved on Friday. Skorton said the guidelines will be implemented immediately to ensure the "highest ethical standards" for the university and the athletic department. The guidelines will be distributed to all recruits, athletes, coaches and hosts. The rules will be reviewed before visits occur. "It's very specific," school spokesman STEVE PARROTT said. "If you're not of legal age, you should not be drinking. If they're not new, they're explicit now."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=1133830

Adams Stresses Need For Quick Treatment In Strokes (Washington Post, June 27)
A hemophilia drug sharply cuts the chances that victims of the most devastating type of stroke will die or be severely disabled, providing the first possible treatment for brain hemorrhages, researchers reported Saturday. An international study involving 400 patients found that a single infusion of the drug, a synthetic version of a naturally occurring protein, given within three hours after onset cut by about one-third the risk of death or severe disability among patients in the midst of a bleeding stroke. This type of stroke hits about 80,000 Americans each year and about 2 million people worldwide. The advance underscores the need to seek treatment quickly when people experience stroke symptoms, said HAROLD ADAMS, a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa. Versions of the story also ran on the website of the CONTRA COSTA TIMES in California, the WICHITA (Kans.) EAGLE and the CANTON (Ohio) REPOSITORY.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A8613-2004Jun26.html

Scottish Fiddler Attended UI (Lorain Morning Journal, June 27)
When Scottish fiddle teacher Bruce Erwin is asked what he does in his spare time, he replies, "Just fiddle around." But Erwin not only fiddles in his leisure time, he also teaches violin and Scottish fiddle as his occupation. Erwin grew up in Dallas and earned degrees in violin performance, a bachelor's from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1973 and a master's from Baylor in 1985. The paper is based in Missouri.
http://www.morningjournal.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=12114626&BRD=1699&PAG=461&dept_id=46371&rfi=6

Squire Book On Legislative Candidates Cited (Kansas City InfoZine, June 26)
Even though eight U.S. governors are women -- more than at any time in history -- the number of female candidates in the pipeline for the highest state office is stagnating. In state legislatures, the number of female lawmakers has leveled off, after a steady upward climb that began when women first entered state office in the 1920s and built steam with the women's movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s, according to research by the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. Thirty-seven percent of women, compared with 18 percent of men, never thought of running until somebody asked them, according to research by professors Gary Moncrief of Boise State University and PEVERILL SQUIRE of the University of Iowa, authors of the 2001 book, "Who Runs For the Legislature?" InfoZine is a news website based in Kansas City, Mo.
http://www.infozine.com/news/stories/op/storiesView/sid/2611/

UI Press Publishes Prairie Books (Contra Costa Times, June 26)
Ever since European pioneers first saw North America's midsection more than 200 years ago, most people have considered its vast expanse of prairie to be "the great American desert," a barren landscape meant to be either crossed or plowed under. More than 90 percent of it has been turned into farms, towns and commercial developments. Even many environmentalists working to protect spectacular mountain ranges, wild rivers and old-growth forests have viewed the prairie as little more than empty land. That perception is rapidly changing. Across the Midwest and beyond, projects to preserve or restore prairie landscapes are winning broad support. Environmental groups are investing millions of dollars in them. When naturalists who run prairie preserves call for volunteer help, they are often overwhelmed by the number of people who turn up. Publishing houses are also taking advantage of growing public interest in the prairie landscape. This spring the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS reprinted the 1982 book widely credited with setting off the modern fascination with prairies, "Where the Sky Began: Land of the Tallgrass Prairie," by John Madson. The same press has also just published "Prairie: A North American Guide," which describes prairie preserves in 10 states and two Canadian provinces.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/nation/9019084.htm (subscription required)

Bibas Comments On High Court Sentencing Ruling (New York Times, June 25)
The Supreme Court invalidated the criminal sentencing system of the state of Washington on Thursday in a decision that also cast doubt on whether the 20-year-old federal sentencing guidelines can survive a constitutional challenge. Justice Antonin Scalia's majority opinion held that the Washington system, permitting judges to make findings that increase a convicted defendant's sentence beyond the ordinary range for the crime, violated the right to trial by jury protected by the Sixth Amendment. The facts supporting increased sentences must be found by a jury beyond a reasonable doubt, Scalia said. While the federal system is considerably more complex, it places judges in much the same role, empowering them to make the factual findings that determine the ultimate sentence and requiring nothing more to support those findings than a "preponderance of the evidence." That is the legal system's lowest standard of proof, while "beyond a reasonable doubt" is its highest. While Scalia said that "the federal guidelines are not before us, and we express no opinion on them," that statement appeared to be simply marking time. "There is nothing to suggest that the federal guidelines would get different treatment," STEPHANOS BIBAS, a former federal prosecutor who is now a sentencing expert at the University of Iowa law school, said in an interview. A version of the story also ran on the websites of the LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS and the CONTRA COSTA TIMES in California.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/25/politics/25SCOT.final.html

McLeod Discusses Music Downloading Debate (New York Times, June 25)
KEMBREW MCLEOD, an assistant professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa and the author of "Owning Culture," is the author of a guest column on the debate over the downloading and sharing of copyrighted music.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/25/opinion/25MCLE.html

Reporter Attended UI (Grand Forks Herald, June 25)
On its 125th anniversary, the Herald takes a long look back and salutes celebrated alumni, including Vilhjalmur Stefansson, the famed explorer from Mountain, N.D., who covered the University of North Dakota campus news for the Herald as a student. After expulsion from the university, he worked briefly for the Grand Forks Plaindealer before going on to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in North Dakota.
http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/9007395.htm

Artist Attended UI College Of Education (Lexington Herald-Leader, June 25)
Bottom of the Sea, a fiber art wall hanging by self-trained painter and fiber artist Mary Craik of Louisville, was recently awarded best of show by the Lexington Art League in its current Expressions of a Lifetime exhibit. The exhibit, which runs through Sunday at the Loudoun House, is a juried collection of works by artists older the 50 and will be featured at tonight's Fourth Friday event. Craik, 80, is the oldest artist exhibiting. "I made my first dress in 1932 when I was eight years old and my first quilt in 1936. Unfortunately, the 1937 Ohio Valley flood destroyed the quilt, and it was more than 50 years before I made the second one." Craik, sidetracked and a bit discouraged at not being able to make a living doing the type of work she really enjoyed, eventually earned a doctorate in educational psychology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Kentucky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/entertainment/8998451.htm

Storyteller Attended Writers' Workshop (The Omaha Reader, June 25)
A story about storyteller Nancy Duncan says the Nebraska Arts Council's Artist of the Year, who was diagnosed with terminal cancer, says she's considered her cancer from every conceivable angle. She's talked frankly about it in stories. In the published "Losing and Getting" her cancer-ridden breast converses with her healthy left breast in a stream of bitterness, guilt and humor. She's talked about losing her hair but gaining a new appreciation for life. She's performed her cancer story for many audiences but especially for women who are cancer survivors, patients and potential victims. Expressive by nature, Duncan first heeded her talents as a writer, earning a scholarship to the prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP in 1958. It was there, as a student, she met and married Harry Duncan, then a teacher and fine arts press director. Eventually, she and Harry moved to Omaha, where he ran the Abattoir Editions press at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.
http://www.thereader.com/createpage.asp?contentID=2466

Rushton Participates In GIS Cancer Study (Newsday, June 24)
Under pressure from activists, Congress in 1993 ordered the cancer institute, a federal agency based in Bethesda, Md., to build a database known as the Long Island Geographical Information System, or GIS. Researchers selected by the cancer institute would be able to use powerful statistical and mapping software to measure how closely various kinds of pollution matched up with the addresses of Long Islanders who have been diagnosed with breast or other cancers. The GIS was finished in 2002, four years behind schedule. Institute officials spread the word in scientific publications and online discussion groups, and traveled to major conferences to describe the GIS' capabilities in poster presentations. So far, though, not one scientist has expressed interest. "I would have thought they would have had some takers by now, certainly," said GERALD RUSHTON, a University of Iowa geographer who chairs the institute's advisory board for the Long Island GIS.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/longisland/ny-liclus243865343jun24,0,7903505.story?coll=ny-top-headlines

Amendola Comments On Athletic Shoes (Philadelphia Daily News, June 24)
Rick Burkholder has been an NFL trainer for 11 years, the last five with the Eagles. He understands as well as anybody that injuries are a part -- a very big part -- of the game. But when many of those injuries keep happening to the same part of the body, well, he starts to wonder whether it's more than just a coincidence. He is convinced the lighter, less-rigid cleats that are being made by the NFL's two licensed footwear manufacturers -- Nike and Reebok -- are a big reason for the Eagles' recent foot-injury epidemic, as well as the rise in mid-foot injuries league-wide. "Shoe quality clearly is decreasing," said Dr. NED AMENDOLA, the director of sports medicine at the University of Iowa and the team physician for the Iowa football team and the NBA's Toronto Raptors. "They're not providing nearly as much support as they used to. They don't provide as much heel and foot control as they did before. The sole is much more flexible. You can twist it at the mid-foot portion of the sole. Generally, after a player suffers a foot injury, you either do a shoe modification or [put] an orthosis in the shoe to prevent excess mobility and stress. You increase the stiffness and rigidity of the sole of the shoe so that, as you jump and run, the sole of the shoe absorbs the shock and it doesn't have to go through the foot. If physicians are treating the ones who have been injured with a more stable platform, it's fair to say it would make sense to treat everybody with a more stable platform as a means to try and prevent these injuries."
http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/sports/8998734.htm

UI Law Student Comments On Internship (Arizona Business Gazette, June 24)
Summer stints in law firms are sexier, more intense incarnations of internships found in most other industries. The workload can be heavy -- drafting memos, researching and tagging along with partners to trials, depositions and public hearings. The summer associates don't take on the role of lead attorneys or make the most crucial decisions, but they get a taste of how the legal profession really works and how it affects people's lives. But while these students are testing out firms, their summer schedules are padded with dinners at partners' homes, weekend trips, Diamondbacks suite tickets and other chances to mix and mingle. Michelle Roddy finished her second year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before coming to Quarles & Brady Streich Lang this summer. She and the other summer associates recently took a weekend trip to Greer. "Frankly, it's the people that make coming to work enjoyable, which is why getting to know people outside of the law firm instead of in strictly business settings makes me care a lot more about the work that I'm doing," said Roddy, 23.
http://www.azcentral.com/abgnews/articles/0624associates24.html

UI Press Publishes Prairie Books (New York Times, June 24)
Ever since European pioneers first saw North America's midsection more than 200 years ago, most people have considered its vast expanse of prairie to be "the great American desert," a barren landscape meant to be either crossed or plowed under. More than 90 percent of it has been turned into farms, towns and commercial developments. Even many environmentalists working to protect spectacular mountain ranges, wild rivers and old-growth forests have viewed the prairie as little more than empty land. That perception is rapidly changing. Across the Midwest and beyond, projects to preserve or restore prairie landscapes are winning broad support. Environmental groups are investing millions of dollars in them. When naturalists who run prairie preserves call for volunteer help, they are often overwhelmed by the number of people who turn up. Publishing houses are also taking advantage of growing public interest in the prairie landscape. This spring the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS reprinted the 1982 book widely credited with setting off the modern fascination with prairies, "Where the Sky Began: Land of the Tallgrass Prairie," by John Madson. The same press has also just published "Prairie: A North American Guide," which describes prairie preserves in 10 states and two Canadian provinces.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/24/national/24prairie.html?ex=1088654400&en=ef05f49edfed957d&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Kraft Fights Mold, Preserves Books (Omaha World Herald, June 24)
In the summer of 2002, an unusually large number of mold spores set upon Iowa City. NANCY KRAFT, the head of the University of Iowa's Preservation Department, was shaken by the thought. Her job is to protect the 4 million books, films and other holdings at the campus libraries, and mold is a serious threat. "It felt like we were being assaulted," she said. But instead of recoiling at the threat, Kraft and her crew of eight employees were ready to fight the enemy. They drew their inspiration from the film "Ghostbusters." "We just got goofy one afternoon," she said. "We were running around with our face masks and our lab coats. We said 'We're the moldbusters.'" The moldbusters are a recent development. The university has always repaired its damaged books, but it didn't open a preservation office until the early 1990s.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1131169

President's House Renovation Nearly Complete (Omaha World Herald, June 24)
A nearly $3 million renovation of the home of the University of Iowa president is almost finished. Work on the house, built in 1908, began last fall. It should be completed by late August, a spokesman said. University spokesman ROD LEHNERTZ said most of the work involves replacing the electrical and plumbing systems and adding a sprinkler system. No money was left to replace some rickety furniture, so it will stay, he said. The first floor of the house is public space, and is used for fund-raising events. The Iowa Board of Regents requires the president to live on the second floor.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1130990

UI-Developed Tests Cited (KATV.com, June 23)
Arkansas ninth graders had average scores for reading comprehension. State Education Director Ken James says the scores are a positive sign. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA-developed Iowa Test of Basic Skills and Iowa Test of Educational Development replaced the Stanford Achievement Test last April. The basic skills test was given to more than 33,000 fifth graders, and the educational development test was given to more than 33,000 ninth graders. The Iowa tests, like the Stanford tests, are graded on a system that compared results to the nation's average score. The 50th percentile represents the average. A version of this story also appeared on the web site of KARK-TV in Little Rock.
http://www.katv.com/news/stories/0604/154813.html

Niebyl Develops Anti-Nausea Drug Combination (WIS TV, June 23)
Fresh coffee is a great way to start the day for many Americans, but during Stephanie Rosazza's last pregnancy, coffee was pure torture: "I couldn't even stand the smell of it." Rosazza, like as many as 90 percent of pregnant women, was suffering form morning sickness. "I was so sick that I couldn't even get out of bed to brush my teeth." She says anti-nausea medicines didn't work then, so this time around obstetrician and gynecologist Dr. JENNIFER NIEBYL of the University of Iowa College of Medicine recommended something different, a combination of Vitamin B6 and an over-the-counter sleeping tablet called Unisom. Niebyl says, "This particular combination of drugs has been thoroughly tested. The risk of birth defects is identical in the women who take the drug and the ones who don't." WIS TV is located in Columbia, SC.
http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S=1959937

Harkin Asks For Housing Rule Change (Omaha World Herald, June 23)
U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, says he will ask federal officials to change regulations that allow middle-class and affluent college students to live in taxpayer-subsidized, low-income housing in Iowa City and other cities. The action was in response to a newspaper investigation that documented how hundreds of UNIVERSTY OF IOWA students and scholarship athletes have been living in Pheasant Ridge Apartments, a large complex in Iowa City that was built for the needy. At the same time, several thousand poor families, people who are homeless or disabled and the elderly face long waiting lists to get into the apartments.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1638&u_sid=1129886

Alumnus Conducts Canadian Choirs (Telbec, June 23)
Two world premieres are to be sung during the 8th Unisong Festival by 400 choristers in 12 choirs representing every Canadian province conducted en masse by Edmonton's Dr. Leonard Ratzlaff on Canada Day, July 1, in Southam Hall in the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. Ratzlaff has been a member of the faculty of the Department of Music at the University of Alberta since 1981 and obtained his graduate degrees in choral conducting from UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.cnw.ca/fr/releases/archive/June2004/22/c7547.html

Man Burned In UI Fire (Omaha World Herald, June 23)
A man working in a laboratory in a chemistry building at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was burned in a flash fire, officials said. The fire happened about 9:30 p.m. Monday after the man spilled a highly flammable solvent on his arm and outside a vented work area, said Capt. Larry Kahler of the Iowa City Fire Department.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1129879

Clark Cleared By Election Officials (Guardian, June 22)
Federal election officials have cleared former presidential candidate Wesley Clark of any wrongdoing for accepting payment from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for a speech he delivered there last September after announcing his presidential bid. Clark's campaign said last October that he would return the money from the Sept. 19 foreign policy speech at Iowa's law school, but three students filed a complaint with the Federal Election Commission anyway. They contended that Clark violated rules barring candidates from accepting payment for speaking at campaign-related events. FEC lawyers concluded that the law school made reasonable efforts to maintain an academic tone during Clark's appearance, and that campaign-related events held off campus didn't involve the university. The commission agreed, voting 5-0 last month to dismiss the complaint. The Associated Press story also appeared on the websites of the DAYTONA BEACH (Fla.) NEWS-JOURNAL; WJLA-TV in Washington, D.C.; OMAHA WORLD HERALD; MLIVE.COM; BOSTON GLOBE; BUCKS COUNTY (Pa.) COURIER-TIMES; LOS ANGELES TIMES; NEW YORK NEWSDAY; ALLENTOWN (Pa.) TIMES; THE STATE in South Carolina; MIAMI HERALD; SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE; SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, SEATTLE POST-INTELLEGENCER; ABC NEWS; NEW YORK TIMES; and the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,1282,-4230368,00.html

War Novel Author Taught At UI (Arizona Republic, June 22)
A great American novel could come from the war in Iraq, says David Morrell, author of one of the best-known novels about the Vietnam War, "First Blood." "First Blood" was Morrell's first novel, published in 1972 while he was teaching at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/arizonaliving/articles/0622mystery22.html

Pharmacist Honored (Monmouth Daily Review Atlas, June 22)
Pharmacist Jim Vugteveen's business was named as the Monmouth Chamber of Commerce's "Spotlight of the Month." Vugteveen is a 1960 graduate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Review Atlas is based in Monmouth, Ill.
http://www.reviewatlas.com/articles/2004/06/21/news/news2.txt

Stapleton Comments On HIV Research (Long Beach Press-Telegram, June 20)
American researchers think they've figured out why a seemingly harmless viral infection helps extend the lives of people with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The viral infection appears to prime the immune system, helping to prevent HIV from successfully attacking white-blood cells, the scientists report in the June 19 issue of The Lancet. "The next thing we have to do is determine a way to mimic the effect of this virus and learn how to make it persist, so it can continue to induce these changes in the cell that help HIV," said co-author Dr. JACK STAPLETON, director of the University of Iowa HIV Program, in a written statement. The paper is based in California. A version of the story also ran on the website of the LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS in California. A version of the story also ran on the website of FORBES.
http://www.presstelegram.com/Stories/0,1413,204~24494~2224806,00.html

Durham Comments On Racy Teen Magazines (Omaha World-Herald, June 20)
Remember when teen magazines were more concerned with makeup than making out? When articles dealt with proms, not promiscuity? Not anymore. Today's teen magazines, like the kids who read them, are changing, and some parents are not happy with what their daughters are reading. The shift from fairly innocent articles to sexier content began in 1988 when Sassy hit the newsstands. The trend continued as magazines such as Cosmo Girl and Teen Vogue were launched in the past couple of years to tap into a growing and more sophisticated teen audience. Now girls as young as 11 or 12 are exposed to articles such as "How to kiss a boy," "Think you're ready for sex?" and "Get your best butt." "Even the articles about fitness aren't about how to make yourself strong, but about how to 'look hot,'" said GIGI DURHAM, a University of Iowa journalism professor who has studied the impact of sexy media images on preteen and teenage girls. A version of the story also ran on the website of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=1125190

Former Visiting Professor Joins Conservatory (Lorain Morning Journal, June 20)
Amelia Kaplan will join the Oberlin Conservatory of Music composition department as an assistant professor. She has a bachelor's degree in physics from Princeton and a doctorate in music composition from the University of Chicago. She received the ASCAP Young Composers' Award in 1992 and spent the last four years as a visiting professor of composition and theory at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Ohio.
http://www.morningjournal.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1699&dept_id=46377&newsid=12023442&PAG=461&rfi=9

Segura: Official Language Law Was GOP Hate-Baiting (Houston Chronicle, June 20)
A columnist asks, "Can John Kerry be seriously considering a vice-presidential running mate who as a state senator voted for and who as governor signed into law a bill to make English the official language -- no matter the explanations?" At issue is Tom Vilsack of Iowa, a small-town lawyer with a great personal story. Orphaned, adopted, dedicated, politically successful, his state's first Democratic governor in more than 30 years and re-elected in 2002. To hear some Democrats tell it, Vilsack, 53, is near the top of Kerry's list of prospective running mates. Questions about Vilsack and his state's long battle over English-as-official-language crystallized Thursday in an Associated Press story from Iowa that said signing the measure two years ago could hurt his chances with Kerry. Vilsack, facing re-election, had rejected pleas of Iowa's small but growing Hispanic community and some Democratic activists to veto the measure, even if it meant that the Legislature would enact it over his disapproval. Recalling the moment in a telephone interview on Friday, GARY M. SEGURA, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said: "It was horrendous. The law was a clear example of Republican hate-baiting ... There was nothing in it but 'Don't speak Spanish.' It was classic symbolic politics."
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/editorial/2636053

Tse To Perform In Malaysia (The Star, June 20)
In the coming week, Malaysians will get the chance to watch KENNETH TSE, a "young virtuoso" of the saxophone (as he was called in the New York Times) perform in Ipoh, Kuala Lumpur and Kota Kinabalu. As most people are familiar with the sound of the saxophone only through jazz, blues and pop music, Tse aims to educate the public on the beauty and versatility of this instrument in classical repertoires. Besides performing, he is also a professor of saxophone at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the United States. "When I joined the school band, I fell in love with the instrument because of the voice-like quality of its sound. I played in the band most of my younger days and was exposed to wonderful classical music," says Tse, who was born in Hong Kong but currently resides in America. The paper is based in Malaysia.
http://thestar.com.my/lifestyle/story.asp?file=/2004/6/20/features/8239731&sec=features

UI Mentioned In Story On New MSU President (Lansing State Journal, June 19)
A story about Michigan State University's selection of longtime Provost Lou Anna Simon to succeed President Peter McPherson -- a surprise move that comes at a time of historic change for the nation's seventh-largest university -- says that many on campus were excited about having a female leader. With Simon in charge, both of Michigan's major universities will be led by women. The University of Michigan picked then-UNIVERSITY OF IOWA President Mary Sue Coleman as its president in 2002. The paper is based in Michigan. A version of the story also ran on the website of the DETROIT FREE PRESS.
http://www.lsj.com/news/local/040619_simon_1a-4a.html

UI Alumnus Named Medical Examiner (Crystal Sun Post, June 18)
The Hennepin County Board of Commissioners last week appointed Andrew Baker the new Hennepin County medical examiner, effective June 12. Baker is appointed for a four-year term and succeeds Garry Peterson, who is retiring after 30 years of service to Hennepin County, 20 of those years as medical examiner. Baker graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE in 1992 and completed his pathology residency in 1997. After completing a post-graduate fellowship in forensic pathology with the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office in 1998, Baker served as an Air Force forensic pathologist for the U.S. Armed Forces for four years. His duties included forensic work surrounding the attack on the USS Cole and identification of victims at the Pentagon after Sept. 11, 2001. Baker also was part of a forensic team in Kosovo in 1999 that processed crime scenes, recovered and documented human remains and performed autopsies on victims of that conflict. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the MINNETONKA SUN SAILOR, RICHFIELD SUN CURRENT, NEW HOPE SUN POST, LAKEVILLE SUN CURRENT, INVER GROVE HEIGHTS SUN CURRENT, ROBBINSDALE SUN POST, EDEN PRAIRIE SUN CURRENT,
BROOKLYN PARK SUN POST, WEST ST. PAUL SUN CURRENT, EDINA SUN CURRENT
- all in Minnesota - and many other media outlets.
http://www.mnsun.com/story.asp?city=Crystal&story=138212

Stapleton Helps Unlock HIV Mystery (News-Medical.Net, June 18)
UI researchers have unlocked part of the mystery of how a harmless virus known as GBV-C slows the progression of HIV and prolongs survival for many patients. The report appears in the June 19 issue of The Lancet, the leading British medical journal. The findings provide the clearest insight yet into the biological mechanisms of GBV-C, a benign cousin of the hepatitis C virus. "The next thing we have to do is determine a way to mimic the effect of this virus [GBV-C] and learn how to make it persist, so it can continue to induce these chemokines and these changes in the cell that help HIV," said senior investigator JACK STAPLETON, UI professor of internal medicine.
http://www.news-medical.net/default.asp?id=2583

Alumnus To Broadcast AAA All-Star Game (Our Sports Central, June 18)
Brett Dolan, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and radio play-by-play announcer for the Tucson Sidewinders, has been announced as one of the radio announcers for this year's Triple A all-star game.
http://www.oursportscentral.com/services/releases/?id=3048966&l_id=&t_id=

Grant Sports Report Cited (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 18)
Having a big-time college football team is getting more expensive -- and not just in dollars spent. For the second year in a row, the number of male athletes declined precipitously at the 54 colleges that field Division I-A football teams but that are excluded from the lucrative Bowl Championship Series. And, for the first time, the number of female athletes at those institutions was down slightly, too. Eight Division I institutions announced last year that they would drop men's sports. And a study by CHRISTINE H.B. GRANT, former director of women's athletics at the University of Iowa, found that the majority of NCAA members dropping men's teams were Division I-A colleges that were outside the six Bowl Championship Series leagues, which provide their members with millions of dollars each year in television royalties and football bowl-game contracts.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i41/41a03402.htm

Former UI Medical Fellow Writes About Colonoscopies (Ithaca Journal, June 17)
Virginia Yip, M.D., provides answers to questions about colonoscopies. A brief bio at the end of her column says that Yip is board certified in radiology and serves on the medical staff of Cayuga Medical Center. She completed fellowship training in body imaging at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and has been performing virtual colonoscopy at the medical center since 2003. The paper is based in New York.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/news/stories/20040617/lifestyle/659715.html

UI Freshman Is Youngest Electoral College Member (Chicago Sun-Times, June 17)
Kiran Patel is working at a fast-food restaurant this summer to pay for her freshman year of college, but she could have a much bigger job by winter: deciding who wears the title "President of the United States." The teenager from Cedar Rapids is one of the youngest members ever of the Electoral College, elected in April just days after her 18th birthday. In a speech at the April convention, Patel promised to use her position to help interest young people in politics and to emphasize the importance of their vote. She plans voter registration drives next fall as a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she will study microbiology and anthropology. She's also organizing one at Taco Bell, where she works the night shift.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/elect/cst-nws-elector17.html

Regents Give Skorton Two Percent Raise (Omaha World-Herald, June 17)
The Iowa Board of Regents on Wednesday gave slim raises to the presidents of the state's three universities. The regents approved two percent raises for the leaders of the University of Iowa, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa during a meeting in Okoboji. The raises mean Iowa President DAVID SKORTON and ISU President Gregory Geoffroy will earn $293,250 for the fiscal year that begins July 1, while UNI President Robert Koob will take home $231,050. The 2 percent raises followed identical increases a year ago. Last year's pay raise was the lowest in a decade.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1124516

Squire Comments On Interest In First Ladies (San Antonio Express-News, June 16)
The adage "behind every good man stands a good woman" sounds downright archaic these days, almost laughable. Except, it would seem, when it comes to first ladies. Or potential first ladies. No first lady in recent memory better illustrates the notion of first wife as supportive helpmate than Nancy Reagan, whose love for the recently deceased President Ronald Reagan has achieved legendary status. Fiercely loyal and protective, she stood behind her "Dutch" every step of the way, striking down those who might hurt her husband. Besides the growing prominence of first ladies in past decades, another factor with our obsession with political wives stems from "the overall explosion in the amount of news we have today," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "We have so many media outlets chasing stories that it's just a natural outgrowth to focus on the wives, the families." In our media-saturated culture, we want all the details, the grittier the better.
http://www.mysanantonio.com/global-includes/printstory.jsp?path=/salife/family/stories/MYSA061104.1P.candidatewife.14d9004aa.html

Incoming Freshman Youngest Electoral College Member (New York Times, June 16)
Kiran Patel is working at a fast-food restaurant this summer to pay for her freshman year of college, but she could have a much bigger job by winter: deciding who wears the title "President of the United States." The teenager from Cedar Rapids is one of the youngest members ever of the Electoral College, elected in April just days after her 18th birthday. In a speech at the April convention, Patel promised to use her position to help interest young people in politics and to emphasize the importance of their vote. She plans voter registration drives next fall as a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she will study microbiology and anthropology. She's also organizing one at Taco Bell, where she works the night shift. The Guardian is based in the U.K. Versions of the story also ran on the website of the SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, the COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, KANSAS.COM, the ATLANTA (Ga.) JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, the FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, the MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, WJLA-TV in Washington, D.C., THE GUARDIAN in the U.K. and many other media outlets.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Young-Elector.html

Regents Study Skorton Salary (Omaha World Herald, June 16)
The Iowa Board of Regents is to decide at a meeting today whether to increase salaries of the presidents of the three state universities. Salaries of the presidents of the University of Iowa and Iowa State University fall in the bottom half of peer group rankings, according to a report released Monday by the Board of Regents office. The $287,513 paid to ISU President Gregory Geoffroy and Iowa President DAVID SKORTON ranks seventh among presidents' salaries at the 11 universities considered to be peers, according to the report. The $226,519 paid to University of Northern Iowa President Robert Koob is fifth among salaries at 11 peer universities. The regents, meeting in Okoboji, completed personnel evaluations for the presidents in executive session Tuesday, board spokeswoman Barb Boose said. The board will decide the size of raises today, she said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1123597

UI Considers Most Ice Cream Additives Safe (The Star, June 16)
A story about the many additives to ice cream manufacturing says such additives are generally considered safe and that scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Health Center reported that locust bean, guar and xanthan gums are safer to human health than carrageenan. Carrageenan, which is an extract of Irish moss or other algae, is the most popular additive used in food such as in dairy, confectionery, bakery and seafood products. It is also used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. The Star is based in Malaysia.
http://thestar.com.my/lifestyle/story.asp?file=/2004/6/16/features/8178995&sec=features

UI: Gene Therapy May Aid Huntington Patients (Washington Times, June 15)
U.S. researchers have found gene therapy may be used to treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease, for which there is no cure. Neurodegenerative diseases are caused when the brain accumulates mutant proteins. In Huntington's disease, these proteins worsen symptoms that include dementia, uncontrolled muscle movement, deteriorating cognitive processes and personality disintegration. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA injected corrective DNA and RNA sequences into mice that had a disease that mimics spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, which eventually leaves patients unable to walk. They found the injections eliminated pockets of damaged brain tissue in the mice and corrected the physical symptoms of the disorder.
http://washingtontimes.com/upi-breaking/20040615-014747-1604r.htm

IEM's Prediction Accuracy Noted (Wired, June 15)
Justin Wolfers, an economics professor at Stanford University who studies political wagering, and other political analysts believe trading exchanges are often accurate forecasters of political events. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a political futures market run by the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business, claims that its market, which allows traders to bet up to $500, frequently outperforms polls in predicting election results. In the Iowa market's last major election event -- last year's California gubernatorial recall -- traders were off by less than 1 percent in forecasting the margin of victory for Arnold Schwarzenegger.
http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0,1283,63849,00.html?tw=wn_tophead_1

Hovencamp Comments On Antitrust Suit (Bloomberg News, June 15)
Roche Holding AG and BASF AG won a partial victory in their bid to limit the damage from a record vitamin price-fixing conspiracy, as the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a ruling permitting billions of dollars in new claims. The justices, voting 8-0 in Washington, rejected one argument that non-U.S. customers were using to press an antitrust suit in American courts against Roche, BASF and 12 other onetime vitamin makers. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust law at the University of Iowa and advised the defendants in the case, called the decision a "big victory" for the vitamin makers. "I just don't see any way they are going to make a showing they were injured by domestic harm," he said.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000100&sid=avo0Cx8DRNIM&refer=germany

UI Alumna Comments On Minority Faculty Recruiting (Chicago Tribune, June 14)
Despite years of effort by schools and millions of taxpayer dollars, the number of minorities teaching in state university classrooms has barely budged during the last decade, according to Illinois Board of Higher Education statistics. African-Americans make up barely five percent and Hispanics less than three percent of Illinois public university faculties, according to the latest Board of Higher Education statistics. The numbers are even lower at Illinois private institutions, where African-Americans compose 3.9 percent and Latinos 2.1 percent of full-time faculty, according to board figures. Illinois figures mirror national trends, where African-Americans are 5.1 percent and Hispanics 2.9 percent of full-time faculty at American colleges and universities, numbers that have changed less than a percentage point during the 1990s, according to data compiled by the American Council on Education, a Washington-based organization representing 1,800 college and university administrators. The problem of recruitment and retention is particularly acute for smaller, rural schools like Eastern Illinois University in Charleston. Not only are schools like Eastern generally able to offer less in terms of salary and research packages, they find themselves at a geographical disadvantage. Caridad Brito, an associate professor of psychology at Eastern, said she loves the collegiality of her department. "I felt we shared the same values," said Brito, who received her doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. But Brito knows that many minority faculty candidates aim for jobs in more urban settings. As long as that's the case, she says, schools like Eastern will face continued obstacles in recruitment. "I'm not sure there are a lot of quick fixes," Brito said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0406140140jun14,1,5001158.story?coll=chi-news-hed

Alumnus Sought UI For Film Studies (Wisconsin State Journal, June 14)
David Bordwell, 56, who retired this spring after 30 years as a film studies professor at UW-Madison, is an equal opportunity cinephile. A frequent guest at film festivals all over the world, he has written books about such movie legends as Eisenstein, Ozu and Dreyer. At the moment, however, he is lavishing his scholarly attention on "Back to the Future" and other popular movies from the last few decades, which he considers under-appreciated gems. As a college student in the '60s, Bordwell got in on the ground floor of an emerging academic field: film. There were no film courses at SUNY-Albany when Bordwell enrolled there in 1965, so he found English courses with a film component. He re-started the campus film society, enabling him to book the movies he wanted to see. There were also arthouse cinemas in Albany, and even the mainstream theaters showed double features. Bordwell was up to his eyeballs in movies. After college, he spent a year teaching English before chucking it all in to pursue his Ph.D. in film studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, one of a handful of programs granting advanced degrees in film.
http://www.madison.com/wisconsinstatejournal/local/76331.php

Patchett Book Reviewed (Pittsburg Post-Gazette, June 13)
Ann Patchett's new book "Truth And Beauty" is not a novel but a memoir. Subtitled "A Friendship," it describes Patchett's 20-year relationship with the writer Lucy Grealy, and it is her most resonant and impassioned love story yet. Patchett and Grealy met as graduate students at the prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, where they shared a classically dingy little apartment. Patchett narrates these years as her own "Portrait of the Artists as Young Women," describing the two of them furiously writing, talking, drinking, Lucy, especially, looking desperately for love in sexual relationships. "Iowa City in the eighties was never going to be Paris in the twenties," Patchett writes, "but we gave it our best shot."
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04165/330482.stm

Bush Ahead In IEM (Sunday Times of London, June 13)
The search for a different form of political forecasting -- one that ignores day-to-day swings in voter opinion and focuses on the likely result -- has led to the creation of the new futures market. On the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) and several similar exchanges the "commodities" are politicians and investors bet on their prospects. Investors can choose either Bush or Kerry. Each candidate has a "price" that moves up and down according to investor interest, like a company share. On the IEM, investors in the winning candidate will be paid $1 a share. Investors were yesterday paying 51 cents for a share in Bush and 47 cents for Kerry; an effective judgment by market forces that Bush is likely to win by 51-47 percent. A recent University of Iowa study of the IEM's performance in 49 domestic and foreign elections found that the market had an average margin of error of only 1.3 percent -- well below opinion poll margins.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=37879c366d48642685ba51c6b69aa0e1&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=74ca5fdf35340030d56ff952d78474da

Rynes Leads Outsourcing Discussion (Washington Post, June 13)
The newspaper provides an excerpt of a discussion on outsourcing moderated by SARA L. RYNES, chair of the department of management & organizations, Henry B. Tippie College of Business, University of Iowa.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A35982-2004Jun11.html

Patchett, Grealy Bonded In Workshop (Washington Post, June 13)
What's most surprising about Truth & Beauty: A Friendship, Ann Patchett's first book of nonfiction, is that a book about writers could be so sweet, a reviewer notes. Patchett and Lucy Grealy were best friends from the moment they became roommates at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP in 1981. They shared a depressing apartment, bought spaghetti with their last pooled pennies and got smashed at local bars, where they talked deep into the night about "King Lear" and, of course, sex. "Iowa City in the eighties was never going to be Paris in the twenties," Patchett writes, "but we gave it our best shot." The nature of the unlikely friendship, too, will strike a chord with many readers. Patchett, the hick from Tennessee, was even-keeled, reliable, punctual, a neat-freak. Manhattan club-hopper Grealy was the drama queen: extravagant, adventuresome but also occasionally gloomy, needy, possessive.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A33072-2004Jun10.html

Durham: Teen Magazines Stress Image (Atlanta Journal Constitution, June 13)
Today's teen magazines, like those who read them, are changing, and some parents aren't happy with what their daughters are reading. The shift from fairly innocent articles to sexier content began in 1988 when Sassy hit the newsstands. The trend continued as new magazines such as Cosmo Girl and Teen Vogue were launched in the last couple of years to tap into a growing and more sophisticated teen audience. Now girls as young as 11 or 12 are exposed to articles such as "How to kiss a boy," "Think you're ready for sex?" and "Get your best butt." "Even the articles about fitness aren't about how to make yourself strong, but about how to 'look hot,' " says GIGI DURHAM, a journalism professor at the University of Iowa who has studied the impact of sexy media images on preteen and teenage girls. The emphasis on sex is less of a concern to Durham than the focus on body image. In interviews with middle-school girls, she found that many were influenced by media presentations of beauty. "The focus in these magazines is making yourself desirable to boys," Durham says.
http://www.ajc.com/news/content/living/0604/14teenmags.html

Andrejevic: To Many, 'Reality' Beats Fiction (Charleston Post Courier, June 13)
Whether it's homely women being transformed into beauty queens on Fox's "The Swan," or real beauty queens eating fermented squid guts on NBC's "Fear Factor," or even a movie like Michael Moore's upcoming "Fahrenheit 9/11" that poses polemical attacks as documentary truth, our national notion of what is "real" has undergone a transformation of its own. "People like reality TV because it's not as predictable and formulaic as the fictional stuff," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa, who interviewed a cross section of fans and participants for his new book, "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched." "Of course," he continues, "fiction is something that was designed to actually be more interesting than real life. But the fans of reality TV I talked to felt that it was more interesting because the formulas of fiction had gotten played out."
http://www.charleston.net/stories/061304/art_13reality.shtml

McLeese Likes 'Family-Friendly' Prince (Minneapolis Star Tribune, June 13)
Prince's parties might not be meant to last, but this one -- the Musicology Tour, headed to St. Paul for three shows this week -- is meant for kids of all ages. The Minneapolis rocker, who turned 46 last week, announced his intentions to Jay Leno on "The Tonight Show." The once licentious libertine, who is now a practicing Jehovah's Witness, has made a big point that this tour is family-friendly. "I wouldn't have had any problem taking my daughters, who are 17 and 14," said University of Iowa journalism Prof. DON MCLEESE, who covered Prince for two decades for newspapers in Chicago and Austin, Texas, and attended the Ames show with his wife. "This was definitely a PG-13-rated show instead of an R. Before, whatever connection he would have had with [his fans] would have been sexual; there was no sexuality involved this time. When he brought all those people onstage, it was kind of a bring-the-whole-family, Up With People moment."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/919/4818652.html

Alumna Writes About Communication (Aberdeen American News, June 13)
Anne Holmquest, who teaches communication at Northern State University and holds a doctorate in communication studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, writes a column about the tendency of many people to force their opinions on others without listening or engaging in discussion.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/americannews/news/opinion/8913726.htm

UI Press Book Cited (St. Petersburg Times, June 13)
In three essays written over 20 years, a liberal, pacifist mother struggles to understand her conservative son, a proud soldier and member of the NRA. Janet Burroway is the Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor Emerita at Florida State University and the author of novels, plays, stories and essays. Her most recent book of essays is Embalming Mom, published in 2002 by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.sptimes.com/2004/06/13/Floridian/My_son__my_soldier__m.shtml

Alumna Recalls WAC Service (Palm Beach Post, June 12)
When World War II burst upon the U.S., 60,000 women volunteered for the Women's Army Corps and enjoyed all the rights and aggravations of military service. One woman who harkened to the call of the khaki couldn't answer. Viola "Butch" Hinrichs -- now 80 and living in Stuart -- was 18 and lived in Clinton, Iowa, with her family. If you weren't 21, you needed a note from your parents, and her folks said nothin' doing. Hinrichs was stuck at home until the day she turned 21 and caught a bus to the Des Moines Army recruiting office and joined the WACs. After her service, with her savings and the GI Bill, she got a two-year accounting degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and then got a job as an accountant for Louis-Allis Co. in Milwaukee, a manufacturer of electric motors.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/accent/content/auto/epaper/editions/today/accent_04aca0c976efa1b600ae.html

UI Cuts Classes To Fund Faculty Raises (Omaha World Herald, June 12)
Iowa's three state universities will be cutting classes and reducing teaching staff as the schools shift their budgets to increase faculty and staff pay in the budget year that begins July 1. FRED ANTCZAK, associate dean of the University of Iowa's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said the budget cuts over the past four years have left students with less flexibility. "I think there are going to be more and more problems for students getting the classes they need at the times they can use them," he said. The Iowa Board of Regents next week will consider a $3.1 billion budget proposal from the universities and schools for the deaf and blind. In recent years, the universities have significantly increased tuition to balance budgets. But tuition increases haven't made up for state aid shortages. The state did not give the universities money for salary increases. To raise faculty and staff pay -- the biggest budget priority for the schools and the largest portion of budgets -- the universities plan to divert money from other areas of the schools. Faculty pay will increase two percent at Iowa State University, 3.75 percent at the University of Northern Iowa and one percent to 2.5 percent at the University of Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1120484

Man Charged In UI Student Death (Arlington Heights Daily Herald, June 11)
A 21-year-old Arlington Heights man was charged Wednesday in the murder of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA senior, police said. Daniel Corbett turned himself in early Wednesday morning and was charged with second-degree murder. Police said Corbett fought and struck 23-year-old Michael Paul Kearney around 2 a.m. Dec. 31 of last year, driving Kearney's head into a concrete wall at the Kum & Go convenience store parking lot in Iowa City.
http://www.dailyherald.com/cook/main_story.asp?intID=381498

Alumnus Remembers Reagan Calling UI Football Games (Jacksonville News, June 11)
As a freshman quarterback at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1934, Orval Matteson recalls seeing "a nicely dressed young fellow" walking the sidelines during practices, talking to players and going to great lengths to get to know each one of them personally. When he inquired as to who this man was, he told that Dutch was a local radio personality who announced the games over the airwaves. While Reagan only spoke to upperclassmen (freshmen were not eligible to play during those days) Matteson admired him from afar during his first year in Iowa City. "I was amazed that this guy was spending so much time talking with the players and getting to know all of them," noted Matteson. "He came to at least three practices a week all season long and spent the entire time talking to the players. He never asked about plays or what we were planning for an upcoming game, he was genuinely interested in getting to know each and every guy on the team." The News is based in Alabama.
http://www.jaxnews.com/news/2004/jn-localnews-0610-searp-4f10n2636.htm

UI Study Shows Music Has Health Benefits (Huntington Herald Dispatch, June 11)
According to the American Music Therapy Association, music can aid in pain reduction, coping with stress, easing depression, aiding memory loss and stimulating the immune system. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study showed patients needing ventilation assistance found a single music therapy session reduced stress by decreasing heart and respiratory rates. Research has also shown premature infants exposed to lullaby singing had shorter stints in the hospital and faster weight gain.
http://www.herald-dispatch.com/2004/June/11/LNlist5.htm

UI Graduate Is Medical Examiner (St. Paul Pioneer Press, June 10)
A story about Andrew Baker, the new chief medical examiner for Hennepin County, notes that he attended medical school and completed a pathology residency at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/8884298.htm

Chicago Man Charged In Death Of UI Student (Chicago Tribune, June 10)
An Arlington Heights man turned himself in to Iowa City police early Wednesday to face second-degree murder charges in the December fatal beating of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student. In a complaint filed in District Court in Iowa City, police said Daniel Howard Corbett, 21, got into a fight with Michael Paul Kearney, 23, about 2 a.m. Dec. 31. Corbett is accused of punching Kearney and driving his head into a concrete wall at the Kum & Go convenience store, 323 E. Burlington St., less than a mile from campus. Police said Kearney's friends revived him and took him home, but someone found him unconscious later that morning and called an ambulance to take him to the University of Iowa Hospital. Kearney died of blunt force head injuries Jan. 10.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/north/chi-0406100294jun10,1,5664750.story

Reagan Announced UI Football Games (Buffalo News, June 10)
The life of the 40th president of the United States spanned nearly the entire 20th century, and his career in radio, the movies and finally national politics took him from the small-town Midwest, to Hollywood, to Washington and the capitals of the world and then finally back to California. From 1932 to 1937, he worked as a radio announcer in Davenport, Iowa, then in Des Moines. He announced UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football games and Chicago Cubs baseball games.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20040610/1039363.asp

Retiring Writing Teacher Sent Students To UI (Catonsville Times, June 10)
On June 17, Gary Blankenburg will retire after 32 years as an English teacher at Catonsville High, where he headed the school's creative writing program. Under Blankenburg's guidance, the program has consistently produced graduates who go on to some of the top writing institutions in the country, among them the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Maryland.
http://news.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?pnpID=351&NewsID=553218&CategoryID=8381&show=localnews&om=1

Redlawsk: Money, Recognition Key For Grassley Challenger (USA Today, June 9)
Sen. Charles Grassley, Iowa's senior Republican, has held elective office continuously since 1958. He won re-election to the Senate in 1998 with 70 percent of the vote. He holds a campaign war chest approaching $6 million, and he will help the state GOP work to maintain control of the Legislature and lead the charge for President Bush's re-election campaign this fall. That connection with the Bush presidency will be a key campaign issue for Grassley's Democratic challenger, former state lawmaker and eastern Iowa attorney Art Small. Political observers said Grassley's apparent invincibility has kept high-profile Democrats from pursuing his seat. "It's always hard to knock off a longtime incumbent and especially hard to do it if you can't raise the money," said DAVID REDLAWSK, assistant professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "Some significant percentage of voters will not have heard of Art Small when they go in to vote." Small has organized a campaign staff and has attracted some media interest in the campaign. "There's certain amount of fascination in a guy standing up like this," Redlawsk said. "He's building a small but progressive organization of young folks. The David and Goliath environment appeals to some people."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/state/iowa/2004-06-09-grassley-in-iowa_x.htm

UI Patient Met Reagan In 1984 (Lancaster Newspapers, June 9)
She met President Ronald Reagan 20 years ago in one whirlwind moment, but Julie Templin will never forget him. How tall he seemed, especially when he leaned in to envelop Templin -- a leukemia survivor -- in a hug in front of a cheering crowd of thousands. Templin was just 18 when she captured media attention in 1983 and '84 for becoming only the seventh person in the nation to undergo an experimental bone marrow transplant between unrelated people. On Jan. 11, 1984, she underwent the $200,000 operation at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL with bone marrow donated by an Iowa lab technician, Sandy Greear. Doctors found Greear through a computerized donor bank. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.lancasteronline.com/pages/news/local/6999

Davidson Reveals Gene Therapy At Conference (WebIndia123.com, June 9)
A study presented last week at the American Society of Gene Therapy in Minneapolis, Minn. has revealed that gene therapy could ease the symptoms of some devastating brain disorders like Huntington's disease. BEVERLEY DAVIDSON of the University of Iowa in Iowa City and her colleagues hope that gene therapy will help treat such diseases. The approach involves trying to correct genetic abnormalities by injecting an animal or person with corrective sequences of DNA or RNA. According to Nature, the researchers tested their therapy in mice with a disorder that mimics a disease called spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, which leaves sufferers progressively less able to walk. The therapy eliminated pockets of damaged brain tissue from the mice and corrected the physical symptoms of the disease.
http://www.webindia123.com/news/showdetails.asp?id=40277&cat=World

Campbell Research On Muscular Dystrophy Cited (Medical News Today, June 9)
Muscular dystrophy is a group of genetic diseases characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Working with mice with a type of the disease, researchers have found that by expressing an enzyme that attaches sugar molecules to a protein essential for proper muscle structure, they can restore normal muscle function. Interestingly, the scientists found evidence of similar benefits when they expressed the protein, known as LARGE, in cells from patients with similar types of muscular dystrophies with distinct gene defects, suggesting that this approach may have clinical benefits for patients with the debilitating disease. The study, led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator KEVIN P. CAMPBELL at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, was published online in the journal Nature Medicine on June 6, 2004. Medical News Today is based in the U.K.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=9292

Orange Prize Judge Critical Of Workshop Fiction (The Guardian, June 9)
In a column by Katharine Viner, the editor of Guardian Weekend and one of the five judges of the Orange prize for fiction, Viner said there were two particularly low points during the judging process. "One was when I had a run of books about nothing. These were usually by authors from the US, who have attended prestigious creative writing courses, often at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. They are books with 500 pages discussing a subtle but allegedly profound shift within a relationship. They are books where intricate descriptions of a man taking a glass out of the dishwasher, taking a tea-towel off a rail, opening out the tea-towel, then delicately drying the glass with the tea-towel, before pouring a drink into the glass, signify that he has just been through a divorce. At one point, I rang a friend and shouted at her, 'I wish some of these bloody writers would write about Iraq!'" The Guardian is based in the U.K.
http://books.guardian.co.uk/orangeprize2004/story/0,14334,1234431,00.html

UI Political Markets Cited (Globe & Mail, June 8)
Investors who aren't satisfied with wagering on the prospects of Nortel Networks Corp. or gold bullion can now make bets on the hour-by-hour prospects of the Canadian federal political parties, courtesy of the Shorcan Index Election Indicator. Launched yesterday by a Toronto-based bond brokerage house that's trying to raise money for charity, the index allows punters to make money, or lose their shirts, based on the percentage of the popular vote won by each of the five major parties in the June 28 election. Money that Shorcan makes from running the contest will be donated to the Boys and Girls Club of Canada, and the company is asking clients to do the same. The Shorcan index picks up on a political futures market that's been run on world events such as U.S. presidential elections since 1988 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The school has proven a better indicator of where the voters will go than national polls. The newspaper is based in Toronto.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20040608/RELEC08/TPBusiness/Canadian

Research Team Left UI After Therapeutic Cloning Ban (Times Picayune, June 8)
The frightening news for research advocates is that both houses of the Louisiana Legislature have passed far-ranging legislation on human cloning that would criminalize a type of embryonic stem cell research that many mainstream scientists think holds promise for treating diabetes, Alzheimer's, spinal cord injuries, heart disease and other serious ailments. Technically known as somatic cell nuclear transfer, so-called "therapeutic cloning" involves removing the nucleus from a human cell such as a skin cell, implanting it into an unfertilized egg, and stimulating the cell to reproduce. Researchers hope the resulting stem cells can be used to grow pancreatic tissue or spinal cord cells. The particular promise of stem cells derived this way is that they would match the patient's DNA, thus reducing the risk of rejection. Some people worry that, if the ban passes, researchers and biotech companies might choose to locate elsewhere. It's not an idle threat. After Iowa banned therapeutic cloning, a major research team left the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for the more hospitable environs of Northwestern University in Illinois, and they took millions in federal research dollars with them.
http://www.nola.com/news/t-p/index.ssf?/base/news-0/1086677736183090.xml

Fisher Comments On Tax Incentives (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, June 8)
It comes as no surprise that Minnesota's biosciences stronghold lies in medical devices, according to a report released Monday by the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) at a meeting in San Francisco. After all, the state is home to Medtronic Inc., the world's largest medical technology company, plus St. Jude Medical Inc. and a host of smaller device firms. The report by Battelle Memorial Institute, an Ohio-based research company, and SSTI, a nonprofit organization that encourages scientific and technological growth, doesn't appear to make any kind of value judgment in terms of whether or not taxpayers should finance economic development of the biosciences. "In the long run, sometimes these incentives [such as tax-free zones] pile up and never disappear," said PETER FISHER, a professor of economics at the University of Iowa. "They're very hard to rescind, so some states end up eroding their revenue base and they can't maintain their school systems, their park systems. The quality of public services is also a factor that is used to attract companies."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/4816956.html

UI Ends Summer Graduation (Omaha World Herald, June 8)
Summer graduation at the University of Iowa will end after this summer, university officials said. Starting with the 2005 graduating class, students who finish course work during the summer will have to participate in spring or winter ceremonies. Eliminating the ceremony would save the university $8,000 to $10,000 per year, said Patricia Cain, special assistant to the provost. Last year, 315 graduate and undergraduate students participated in the summer ceremony, said LARRY LOCKWOOD, university registrar. "Lots of undergraduate students don't attend the summer ceremony because they can take a three-week course, get out of their lease on May 31 and leave on June 1," Lockwood said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1116633

Valedictorian To Attend UI (Northwest Herald, June 8)
Pat Smith wore a black graduation gown Monday night. He also fiddled with the tassel dangling from his graduation cap and joked with classmates before filing into the McHenry High School East Campus gym. Though he blended with the 270 students, Smith's route to commencement was anything but average. He discovered he had leukemia while he was a freshman, and he spent his entire sophomore year out of class, working with tutors, his family and friends while battling the disease. He exemplifies the diversity that makes valedictorian Anne Raven proud of her classmates. Raven, with a 4.5 grade-point average, was the sole valedictorian. She plans to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to study communications and journalism.
http://www.nwherald.com/CommunitySection/307297338504552.php

UI Press Cited (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 8)
One of the participants in an upcoming writing conference is Kristin Kovacic, a writer and editor in Pittsburgh. She teaches creative writing at the High School for the Creative and Performing Arts and in the graduate writing program at Chatham College. She is the editor of the anthology "Birth: A Literary Companion," published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/entertainment/s_197717.html

UI Political Markets Highly Accurate (Bloomberg, June 7)
Shorcan Group, a Canadian bond broker, has set up a new futures market that allows investors to trade on the outcome of a federal election for the first time. The Toronto-based firm began taking orders today, allowing investors to bet on any one of the five major political parties registered for the June 28 vote. Early trading suggests investors are following the most recent election polls, which put the ruling Liberal Party and the opposition Conservative Party in a tie. A similar market has been operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA since 1988 for U.S. elections. The university has recorded an average 1.37 percentage point margin of error in presidential elections, compared with an average margin of 2 to 2.5 percentage points for polls, according to the school's web site.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000082&sid=aCs6Emcs8lRY&refer=canada

Davidson Comments On RNAi Research (Science Magazine, June 7)
For the first time, researchers have used small RNA molecules packed into viruses to treat mice with an inherited disease. The achievement improves the odds that RNA interference (RNAi) will reach human clinical trials. Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) are inherited diseases in which nerves degenerate and cause loss of coordination and spasticity. Both diseases stem from a defective protein. Removing the toxic protein is a tricky task, one that current drugs can't tackle. RNAi is a new candidate, because it derails the specific messenger RNA (mRNA) that helps manufacture the defective protein. To test the approach, BEVERLY DAVIDSON of the University of Iowa in Iowa City and colleagues built a virus that, after infecting a cell, produces short hairpin RNA corresponding to defective ataxin-1, the cause of SCA. Mice treated with the RNAi virus showed signs of improvement; they kept their balance on a rotating rod longer than untreated diseased mice (but not as long as healthy mice), Davidson reported June 4 and 5 at a meeting of the American Society of Gene Therapy.
http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2004/607/1

Bowlsby Questions Alleged Origin Of 'Hawkeyes' (Chronicle, June 7)
Does "Hawkeyes," the nickname for the University of Iowa's athletics teams, refer to a character in a James Fenimore Cooper novel? Or does it honor Chief Black Hawk? The issue may seem arcane, but it's at the center of a brewing controversy over Iowa's 10-year-old ban on scheduling games with teams that have American Indian mascots. The university calls the use of such mascots "demeaning and offensive." But World Net Daily, an online news site, reported the possible link to Chief Black Hawk last month, shortly after Iowa's baseball team canceled a game against the Bradley University Braves. "I've lived in Iowa my entire life and I have never heard the connection between Black Hawk and the Hawkeyes," says ROBERT A. BOWLSBY, the university's athletics director. No American Indians have complained about the Hawkeye name, he adds.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i40/40a00502.htm

Robinson's New Novel Anticipated At BookExpo (USA Today, June 7)
Former President Bill Clinton's keynote speech Thursday at BookExpo America in Chicago became a celebration both of Clinton the president and of Clinton the author of "My Life," which comes out June 22 with a first printing of 1.5 million. Clinton's memoir captured most of the attention at BookExpo, but not all. Other works likely to be heard about in the fall include novels by Tom Wolfe, Cynthia Ozick and MARILYNNE ROBINSON, whose "Gilead" is her first fiction since she debuted with "Housekeeping" in 1980. "The reason it took this long is that I have many other interests," said Robinson, who has since written two nonfiction books and teaches at the University of Iowa. "I'm glad to have this book done, but I wasn't really worried about it. And besides, with just one book I've doubled the number of novels I've written." Versions of the story also ran on the websites of SALON, the NEW YORK TIMES, the SPRINGFIELD NEWS SUN in Ohio, THE HERALD NEWS in Massachusetts, the DAYTONA (Fla.) BEACH NEWS-JOURNAL, HOUSTON (Texas) CHRONICLE, the NEW ORLEANS (La.) TIMES PICAYUNE, the RAPID CITY (S.D.) JOURNAL, the NORTH COUNTY TIMES in California, PHILLY.COM, FOX 23 NEWS in Albany, N.Y., THE GUARDIAN in the U.K., the COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Ohio, the MIAMI HERALD and many other media outlets.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2004-06-06-clinton-bookexpo_x.htm

Kletzing Wins NASA Grant (Omaha World Herald, June 7)
A University of Iowa researcher has received nearly half a million dollars to study how the sun interacts with the Earth's magnetic field. CRAIG KLETZING, project principal investigator and associate professor in the department of physics and astronomy, was given the $475,000, three-year NASA grant. The grant is part of a larger $1.6 million NASA project led by Kletzing that includes co-investigators from other schools and corporations. Kletzing plans to launch two nearly identical rockets from Norway in December 2005. The rockets will observe effects that act like a switch by permitting energy to be transferred between the solar wind and the Earth. That reaction is responsible for causing the northern lights, as well as occasional interruptions in radio and satellite communications.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1115788

Brown Comments On Business Owner Changes (Detroit News, June 7)
Current career patterns show workers will change jobs seven to eight times during their working lives. So it would not be unusual for a worker to switch employers during a change of ownership, specialists said. The changes new owners might make vary greatly, said KEN BROWN, assistant professor of management and organizations at the University of Iowa. "Sometimes there are no appreciable changes," he said. "At the local restaurants in Iowa City, there are students who work there who don't even know there's been a change of owners."
http://www.detnews.com/2004/money/0406/07/e06-175296.htm

UI Law Alumna Joins Alaska USA Trust Co. (Anchorage Daily News, June 7)
A business notes column reports that Janet Tempel joined Alaska USA Trust Co. as trust officer, providing individualized trust services for clients in Alaska and throughout the United States. Tempel, who has a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has 20 years of experience in business law and estate planning. Alaska USA Trust Co., a wholly owned subsidiary of Alaska USA Federal Credit Union administering $3.5 billion in assets, provides personal trust and investment services, as well as institutional investment and custody services.
http://www.adn.com/business/story/5165781p-5098202c.html

Reagan Once Broadcast UI Games (Washington Times, June 7)
A story remembering Ronald Reagan's life and career says the 40th U.S. president, who died last week, broadcast UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football games - on the scene. He quit the sportscasting racket after taking a Hollywood screen test while covering the Cubs in spring training at Catalina Island and being signed to a contract. The rest is, literally, history.
http://washingtontimes.com/sports/20040607-011224-5566r.htm

Reagan's Work As UI Announcer Cited (International Herald Tribune, June 7)
During the Depression, a former teacher urged former president Ronald Reagan, who was 21 at the time, to try his hand at radio, where he might capitalize on his interest in sports and acting. After some big stations turned him down he landed a job at WOC in Davenport, Iowa, broadcasting UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football games. When the football season ended, Reagan was out of work again. But two months later, WOC hired him as a staff announcer at $100 a month. Versions of the story also ran on the website of the SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, the MARIN (Calif.) INDEPENDENT-JOURNAL, THE PASADENA (Calif.) STAR-NEWS, and other media outlets.
http://www.iht.com/bin/print.php?file=523667.html

Reagan's Play-By-Plays Of Hawkeye Games Recalled (Newsday, June 7)
Graduating in the midst of the Depression, in 1932, former President Ronald Reagan landed a job as a radio sports announcer, first at WOC in Davenport, Iowa, then at WHO in Des Moines, providing play-by-play for UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football games and Chicago Cubs baseball games.
http://www.nynewsday.com/news/nationworld/nation/ny-reagan0606,0,3653052.story?coll=ny-nation-big-pix

UI Extends Invitation To New Zealand Biotech Firms (New Zealand Herald, June 7)
Iowa rolled out the red carpet on the weekend for a group of mostly tiny New Zealand biotech companies which might some day use the state's services to grow genetically modified food. The US "corn state" of just under 3 million people is committed to genetic modification. About half its corn and 85 per cent of its soybeans have been modified to withstand Monsanto's Roundup weed killer. Kannan Subramaniam, general manager of the Fonterra/Auckland University joint venture LactoPharma, said he had found two organizations that "have potential for working with us in the future in developing bioactives" - commercially valuable substances in cow's milk or other biological material, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which along with Iowa State offered space in its incubator to New Zealand companies moving into North America. "But what really interests me in Iowa is that they are so similar to us in their culture, in their literacy, in the way they do things and in their agricultural origins," Subramaniam said.
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/businessstorydisplay.cfm?storyID=3570971&thesection=business&thesubsection=agriculture&thesecondsubsection=general
Reagan Radio Work, UI Coverage, Cited (Chicago Tribune, June 6)
At an early age, former President Ronald Reagan was enthralled with the idea of making a name for himself in Hollywood, although Broadway would have been fine too. Because of his love of sports and communication skills, he was advised to try his luck as a broadcaster after graduating from Illinois' Eureka College. He sought interviews at several Chicago radio stations, but a small-town novice didn't stand a chance against the many experienced applicants stranded by the Depression. A secretary at WMAQ wisely recommended that he hone his skills in the "sticks" before returning to the big city. Eventually, Reagan persuaded the manager of Davenport, Iowa's WOC ("World of Chiropractic") to give him a shot announcing a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football game--for $5 and car fare--and that led to other jobs at the station. He would move on to WHO in Des Moines, where he improvised a re-creation of a Chicago Cubs game when the telegraph wire broke down.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0406060272jun06,1,343735.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Andrejevic: To Many, 'Reality' Beats Fiction (San Jose Mercury News, June 6)
Whether it's homely women being transformed into beauty queens on Fox's "The Swan," or real beauty queens eating fermented squid guts on NBC's "Fear Factor," or even a movie like Michael Moore's upcoming "Fahrenheit 9/11" that poses polemical attacks as documentary truth, our national notion of what is "real" has undergone a transformation of its own. "People like reality TV because it's not as predictable and formulaic as the fictional stuff," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa, who interviewed a cross section of fans and participants for his new book, "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched." "Of course," he continues, "fiction is something that was designed to actually be more interesting than real life. But the fans of reality TV I talked to felt that it was more interesting because the formulas of fiction had gotten played out."
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/entertainment/television/8842301.htm?1c

Johnson Comments On Baltimore E-Mail Dilemma (Baltimore Sun, June 6)
Millions of old e-mail messages are clogging Baltimore's municipal computers, so the city is going to start automatically deleting any messages older than 90 days. A common practice in private business, the move raises questions when made by a municipality, which has a responsibility to retain certain public records. Figuring out which messages can and can't be trashed will be no easy task given the informal nature of e-mail, in which agency business sometimes gets mixed with personal messages -- without benefit of capital letters or punctuation, said NICHOLAS JOHNSON, who teaches courses on cyberlaw at the University of Iowa College of Law. "People in e-mails have abbreviations and God-awful grammar and just dash something off," he said. "It certainly doesn't rise to the level of a formal white paper that would be prepared by government -- everything from, 'Could we make lunch 12:15 instead of noon?' to 'I think we should decide the case this way.' It's an incredible mix of personal, significant, relatively insignificant. And it's very difficult to sort through all that."
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/bal-md.email06jun06,0,3597562.story?coll=bal-local-headlines

UI Welcomes New Zealand Biotech Visitors (Omaha World-Herald, June 6)
State officials are spending time and money courting business and government leaders from around the world in hopes of attracting jobs in the biotechnology industry. During the past week, two dozen visitors from New Zealand have traversed the state, visiting Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, veterinary medicine facilities, biotech companies and farms.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=46&u_sid=1115263

Reagan Broadcast Four UI Games For $35 (Washington Post, June 6)
With radio becoming an integral part of American life in 1932, former President Ronald Reagan auditioned for a sports announcer's job at WOC, Davenport, Iowa. He had to stand in front of a microphone in a studio and make up a game. With extraordinary detail and excitement in his voice, he recounted much of the fourth quarter of a game in which he played for Eureka -- only in his fictitious version, Eureka won a game it actually lost. WOC hired him to broadcast football. "How do you do, ladies and gentlemen. We are speaking to you from high atop the Memorial Stadium of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. . . ." he recalled in an early autobiography, "Where's the Rest of Me?" He was paid $35 total to do four Iowa games.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A18878-2004Jun5.html

Polumbaum: Chinese Not Fooled (Daytona Beach News Journal, June 4)
Ever since the Tiannanmen Square Massacre, China's government has labeled it a "counter-revolutionary rebellion" and force was necessary to preserve the country's economic and political stability. "I don't think Chinese people were fooled by it," said JUDY POLUMBAUM, a China expert and journalism professor at the University of Iowa. "They could read between the lines." While some Chinese say Tiananmen was a "terrible tragedy," others do not believe it was as important as the world made it out to be, she said. "China has moved on," Polumbaum said. "Its economic reforms have gotten back on track." Today it is a booming country, being blamed for concrete shortages in the United States, as it prepares for the 2008 Olympics.
http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/News/Headlines/03NewsHEAD03060404.htm

IEM Shows Efficiency Of Markets (CBS MarketWatch, June 4)
A columnist writing about the efficiency of financial markets points to a Dublin-based futures exchange that took contracts on when CIA Director George Tenet would resign. After being down for several weeks, the price increased significantly in the weeks leading up to Tenet's actual resignation. Another example, he says, is the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, a real-money futures exchange run by the University of Iowa that has allowed for betting on the outcome of each presidential election since 1988. Over the past four elections, this exchange's average forecast error has been about half that of the major polling organizations.
http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?guid=%7BFB2B923B-1B4D-496E-8A47-671D3DCC39F2%7D&siteid=google&dist=google

Sims Comments On Online Graduate Student Recommendations (Chronicle, June 4)
A growing number of colleges are requesting, or even requiring, that recommendations for graduate-school applicants be sent via Web forms. Graduate schools have good reason for wanting the kinds of information that is requested on such forms, says LESLIE B. SIMS, senior scholar in residence and director of the external-grants program at the Council of Graduate Schools and a former graduate-school dean at the University of Iowa. "Letters of reference have often not been very helpful in graduate admissions," he says. Many offer little insight beyond saying that the applicant was "a good student, works hard and did good work," Mr. Sims says. The forms allow graduate schools to elicit more-detailed information, he says. Mr. Sims says, however, that it is probably unwise for graduate schools to use web technology to force professors to provide those answers. "That sort of feeds the resistance of faculty," he says. Graduate schools should use a softer touch, by warning faculty members that omitting the answers will hamper the admissions committee's efforts in considering the student, he says.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i39/39a02301.htm

UI Wouldn't Play Bradley Braves (National Review, June 3)
A columnist writes that there are a great many people who think that everything they like about America is the real America, and everything they dislike, a false America. That which is "conservative" about this country is authentic; that which is other than conservative is alien. We should not be so pat. We should not read those elements of American life we find distasteful out of American life altogether. Political correctness? Speech codes and all the rest? All very American. The other day, I noted that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA refused to play Bradley University in baseball, because Bradley's nickname is the Braves. That is very American -- very American now. And, yes, we are a stupid country, in many respects.
http://www.nationalreview.com/impromptus/impromptus200406030844.asp

IEM More Accurate Than Polls (Tech Central Station, June 3)
At this point, presidential polls are volatile and meaningless. There's another way to predict the winner, and, while it's not foolproof, it's proven far better that polling. Don't ask individual Americans for whom they'll vote if the election were today. Instead, ask traders on a specialized exchange -- similar to a stock market -- for whom America will vote on Nov. 2. One such exchange is called the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, founded in 1988 by the University of Iowa College of Business. Anyone can trade by betting money (up to $500) to predict the outcomes of events like governor's races and Federal Reserve policy. Results have been uncannily accurate. Academic papers have found that the IEM, on average, has whipped the polls soundly. For presidential elections, the IEM's margin of error on the brink of the vote was just 1.5 percent, compared with 2.1 percent for Gallup. Three-fourths of the time, the IEM has been more accurate than the average pollster.
http://www.techcentralstation.com/060304D.html

Adams Piece Reprised In Summer Show (Tuscon Weekly, June 3)
CHARLOTTE ADAMS reprises "The Poetry of Physics" this summer, following a successful outing in the NEW ART January concert. Riffing on French bedroom comedies, the comical work has 10 dancers, dressed in red in assorted boxer shorts and slips, cavorting around a set adorned with bedroom doors. Adams, now a dance professor at the University of Iowa, is another former Tucsonan; once upon a time, she was co-artistic director of 10th Street Danceworks, late of this city.
http://www.tucsonweekly.com/gbase/Arts/Content?oid=oid:57162

IEM Predicts Election Outcomes (Union Leader, June 2)
At this point, presidential polls are volatile and meaningless. There's another way to predict the winner, and, while it's not foolproof, it's proven far better that polling. Ask traders on a specialized exchange -- similar to a stock market -- for whom America will vote on Nov. 2. One such exchange is called the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, founded in 1988 by the University of Iowa Tippie College of Business (http://www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem). Anyone can trade by betting up to $500 to predict the outcomes of events like governors' races and Federal Reserve policy. Results have been uncannily accurate. Academic papers have found that the IEM, on average, has whipped the polls soundly. For presidential elections, the IEM's margin of error on the brink of the vote was just 1.5 percent, compared with 2.1 percent for Gallup. Three-fourths of the time, the IEM has been more accurate than the average pollster. The paper is based in New Hampshire.
http://www.theunionleader.com/articles_showa.html?article=38517

Semken, Brenzel Dig Sloth Bones (Omaha World-Herald, June 2)
When a bone from a giant sloth is found, people, especially scientists, go nuts -- with good reason. As HOLMES SEMKEN will tell you, such a find is uncommon. "It is a huge deal," said the University of Iowa emeritus professor of geoscience. "These things are rare." Semken has been leading digs since September near Shenandoah, Iowa, where more than 40 of the enormous bones have been found. He and DAVID BRENZEL, coordinator of the university's Museum of Natural History, are hoping that more digs this summer will lead to a complete skeleton of the sloth. The Shenandoah find is one of a few in North America and a first-of-its-kind in Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1111323

Noted Engineering Alumnus Profiled (Hawaii Business, June 2)
If Hollywood made a movie about John P. Craven's life, no one would believe it. Think Master and Commander meets A Beautiful Mind meets The Hunt for Red October. Craven grew up during the Depression on the mean streets of Brooklyn, the son of a conservative naval officer, who came from a long line of Navy men that reached back to the English navy in the 1600s. His mother hailed from a family of left-wing union activists. The volatile mix made for some thought-provoking family conversations. Craven would disgrace his tradition-bound father several times before he got his sea legs. First, he failed to get an appointment to the Naval Academy. Second, the young Craven joined the Navy as an enlisted man, serving on the battleship USS New Mexico. Then, indignity of indignities, he was thrown in the brig for fighting with another sailor. But Craven, one of the New Mexico's helmsmen, would serve bravely during the furious sea battles of the Pacific Theater's island-hopping campaign. Later, in what he calls the "luckiest break of my life," Craven was selected for an elite Navy college training program, which sent him to Cornell University, Cal Tech and, finally, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he got his Ph.D. in ocean engineering.
http://www.hawaiibusiness.cc/hb62004/default.cfm?articleid=15

Jones Says 'Auditability' Key In Elections (CIO.com, June 1)
As Election Day 2004 approaches, the rhetoric surrounding e-voting and its main points of contention will only increase. At the heart of the matter is ensuring that each voter's intentions are accurately captured, tallied and preserved. "The big issue in any election is auditability," says DOUG JONES, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. As he describes it, an auditable election is one in which the results are verifiable both to independent observers and any other interested party. The problem with e-voting is that there's no tangible evidence that votes were recorded as voters intended. CIO.com is the website for CIO Magazine for information executives.
http://www.cio.com/archive/060104/evote.html

IEM Pioneered Markets' Use For Political Races (Newhouse News Service, June 1)
A story about the use of futures markets to predict the outcome of the U.S. presidential election says the idea of applying futures trading to politics was pioneered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1988. Over the years the Iowa Electronic Markets has been more reliable in predicting presidential voting than most polls, particularly in the last weeks of races. Though designed as a not-for-profit research tool for students and professors, that program operates with the blessing of the CFTC using real money, with a maximum wager of $500.
http://www.newhousenews.com/archive/orr060104.html

Blanck Discusses ADA On Internet Radio Program (VoiceAmerica, June 1)
PETER BLANCK, University of Iowa professor of law and director of the Iowa Law, Health Policy and Disability Center, was interviewed on the program "Disability Matters with Joyce Bender" on the Internet radio network VoiceAmerica. They discussed the Americans with Disabilities Act, the recent Tennessee v. Lane decision by the U.S. Supreme Court, and the LHPDC. A recording of the program can be found at VoiceAmerica's archive.
http://voiceamerica.com/

Jones Comments On Election Technology (Chicago Tribune, June 1)
Officials are preparing to hold the first presidential balloting since hanging, pregnant and dimpled chads put the 2000 election in the hands of the Supreme Court. Computer scientists, politicians and grass-roots activists are pushing an effort to require manufacturers of electronic voting machines to equip them with printers to generate a voter-verified paper trail. Just as with consumers who buy the first plasma televisions or DVD burners, the "early adopters" of election technology often have paid more for less refined equipment. "This is a classic problem with rushing to get the newest technology without taking the time to really understand the technology," said DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa computer science professor who has consulted nationally on voting machine technology. "Elections are important enough that we should view technological change in elections with extreme suspicion," he added.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0406010201jun01,1,1068988.story?coll=chi-news-hed

Teen Saves Life, Takes ACT Test (Rockford Register Star, June 1)
Megan Austin had a hard time concentrating on the ACT exam in front of her. An hour before, the 18-year-old had performed CPR on a heart-attack victim. "I kept seeing his face," recalled the Harlem senior. "I would start taking the test, but my mind would wander to what his face looked like." She was taking the test at Illinois State University in Normal, Ill. The man later died at a local hospital. In the end, Megan's attempt to save a life reached the highest echelon of the university's administration. An ISU spokesman said the university took those efforts into account, along with her other activities, when it invited her to enroll. Last week, Megan decided to attend ISU over the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.rrstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040601/NEWS0105/406010304/1004

IEM Predicts Election Outcomes (Naples Daily News, June 1)
At this point, presidential polls are volatile and meaningless. There's another way to predict the winner, and, while it's not foolproof, it's proven far better that polling. Ask traders on a specialized exchange -- similar to a stock market -- for whom America will vote on Nov. 2. One such exchange is called the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, founded in 1988 by the University of Iowa Tippie College of Business (http://www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem). Anyone can trade by betting up to $500 to predict the outcomes of events like governors' races and Federal Reserve policy. Results have been uncannily accurate. Academic papers have found that the IEM, on average, has whipped the polls soundly. For presidential elections, the IEM's margin of error on the brink of the vote was just 1.5 percent, compared with 2.1 percent for Gallup. Three-fourths of the time, the IEM has been more accurate than the average pollster. The SCRIPPS-HOWARD NEWS SERVICE also carried this commentary. The Daily News is based in Naples, Fla.
http://www.naplesnews.com/npdn/pe_columnists/article/0,2071,NPDN_14960_2928031,00.html

Eye Surgeon Had UI Fellowship (Muncie Star Press, June 1)
Lynnette Watkins saw an opportunity to get back to her Midwestern roots and do what she loved most when she accepted a newly formed position at the Muncie Eye Center. A St. Louis, Mo., native, Watkins had been an instructor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School and an Ophthalmology resident at Harvard Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston. A fellowship in Oculoplastics at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is also on her resume.
http://www.thestarpress.com/articles/5/020446-6415-004.html

IEM Pioneered Elections Futures Markets (Newark Star-Ledger, June 1)
An online market run by the University of Iowa since 1988 pioneered the idea of applying futures trading to politics. The not-for-profit IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, designed as a research tool for students and professors, has been more reliable at predicting presidential voting then most polls, particularly in the final weeks. The maximum trade on the Iowa market is $500. The Star-Ledger is based in Newark, N.J.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-15/108606681344480.xml

Band Teacher Honored (Dallas Morning News, May 29)
David Stone has been helping set the musical tone in the Carroll School District for 17 years. This year, he was named the district's Teacher of the Year. A trumpeter by trade, Mr. Stone, 42, said his goal at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was to become the principal trumpet player for the Chicago Symphony. But spending hours on end in the practice room didn't appeal to him. So he dedicated himself to learning as much as he could about teaching music.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/city/denton/stories/053004dndenteacher.9c32.html

Veteran Recalls Pearl Harbor (Polk County News Chief, May 31)
In his first year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Ted Johnson left school to accept an appointment to the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. Sworn in July 1941, he was looking forward to hitting the books and earning a college education. He also had dreams of becoming an aviator. But that Dec. 7, Japanese planes descended on Pearl Harbor and launched an attack that drew America into World War II. "I remember the upperclassmen running up and down the hall cheering 'we're at war,'" said Johnson, 81, of Winter Haven, Fla. "I thought they were crazy. I thought, 'You guys, this is a pretty serious thing.'" The publication serves Polk County, Fla.
http://www.polkonline.com/stories/053104/loc_polkvets.shtml

Breast Cancer Test Advised (Northwest Indiana Times, May 31)
Older women may be misjudging the value of regular breast cancer screenings. Six years after Medicare began paying for an annual mammogram for women over 40, only 51.8 percent of the eligible women over 50 had at least one mammogram in 2001 or 2002, according to the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Two mammograms within 10 months in 1994 cleared Lorna Johns of breast cancer so she decided to skip the X-ray the following year. "That was wrong," she said. "That was the one I shouldn't have skipped." She was 68 when her doctor discovered a lump during a 1996 exam. A lumpectomy soon followed, then radiation therapy to help rid Johns of one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in women. Johns was part of a women's health study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1994 and had two mammograms -- one by the university, the other ordered by her doctor.
http://www.thetimesonline.com/articles/2004/05/31/features/seniors/a4a8ca139aeb078486256ea1001bc2b0.txt

Mobily Comments On Senior Fitness (Los Angeles Times, May 31)
The goal is not necessarily to become a magazine model for senior fitness like Bob Delmonteque, an 82-year-old senior fitness expert. For many seniors, the object is more basic: to be able to open a jar, lift a bag of groceries onto the counter, walk up a flight of stairs or avoid a fall, says KEN MOBILY, a professor of exercise science at the Center of Aging at the University of Iowa. In short, fitness will increase the likelihood that a senior will be able to live independently for a longer period of life, he added. "We talk about a rectangular life," says Mobily. "Instead of succumbing to a slow, gradual death with an ever-deteriorating quality, you live a healthy and fitful life."
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-bodybuilder31may31,1,3899149.story?coll=la-home-health

IEM Noted As First Prediction Market (San Jose Mercury News, May 30)
One of the best-known prediction markets is the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, started in 1988 by the University of Iowa. Leading up to the 1996 election, for example, the market offered a "gamble" on whether Colin Powell would be the Republican nominee. Given a $1 payoff per contract, someone who paid 25 cents was expressing the belief that Powell had at least a 25 percent chance of making it. (Powell's perceived chances rose when he kicked off his book tour, but dropped temporarily after the O.J. Simpson verdict, possibly because people anticipated widespread racial discord.) Now after experience with many elections, the Iowa market at www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem claims that its predictions are statistically better than the polls. The Iowa market is regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and limits total bets per individual to $500. It is run by the University of Iowa's business-school faculty as part of its research and teaching.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/editorial/8797944.htm?1c

Damasio Book Reviewed (South China Morning Post, May 30)
A quote from "Looking for Spinoza" by ANTONIO DAMASIO is included in this review. "Feelings of pain or pleasure or some quality in between are the bedrock of our minds," writes University of Iowa professor of neurology Antonio Damasio. "Advanced societies cultivate feelings shamelessly and dedicate so many resources and efforts to manipulating those feelings with alcohol, drugs of abuse, medical drugs, food, real sex, virtual sex, all manner of feel-good consumption, and feel-good social and religious practices."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=330bd602a83266ce493e6bdf96f7d064&_docnum=23&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVb&_md5=41212c45626c653d2efc6bb665eda626

Kutcher Enrolled At UI (Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, May 30)
Ashton Kutcher got bitten by the acting bug when he appeared in school plays, but changed his mind when his twin brother, Michael, who was born with a septal heart defect, almost died from an attack of cardiomyopathy. Kutcher was so stunned that, in 1997, he enrolled in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to study biochemical engineering. The newspaper is based in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/entertainment/news/celebrity/sfl-30namedropmay30,0,6506920.story?coll=sfla-entertainment-headlines

Soldier Sent Popular Iraq Email (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, May 29)
Sgt. 1st Class Ray Reynolds of Denison, Iowa, sent a widely circulated email about the positive work being done by the United States in rebuilding Iraq. Reynolds' office is a shrine to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football. As a reserve deputy sheriff years ago, Reynolds won an assignment providing security for former Coach Hayden Fry during games, and he has an autographed picture of the coach and a football signed by members of last year's team. In Baghdad, Reynolds gave Hawkeye T-shirts to Iraqis who cleaned the former Saddam palace that was the Iowa Guard unit's base, and he taught one Iraqi child to shout "Go Hawks!" "My wife's reward to me for coming home alive was season tickets," he said, beaming.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/4801829.html

Kraft Says Flood-Damaged Items Can Be Saved (Omaha World-Herald, May 28)
Cherished books, old photos and clothing covered in dark, greasy mud -- soiled by flood damage -- shouldn't automatically be tossed to the curb. Preservation experts say most paper products can be salvaged if they are worked on within 72 hours of being damaged. "You're so overwhelmed that you just want to get rid of it," said NANCY E. KRAFT, head of the University of Iowa Library's preservation department. "I hate to see people throw out their wedding dress, or their baby blanket or old photos. They might be able to save them. There is no guarantee, but it's worth a shot." The Iowa Preservation and Conservation Consortium has published an online guide to help flood victims save items that are waterlogged, mud-caked or otherwise damaged by floodwaters.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1107874

 

 

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