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University of Iowa News Release

June 11, 2004

UI College Of Education Honors Top Students

The University of Iowa's College of Education presented a variety of scholarships to some of its top student during its annual Student Awards Ceremony April 23.

The awards and scholarships are given annually to some of the top students in the UI College of Education and are based on academic achievement and potential for success in a particular field within education, among other criteria.

EDITOR'S NOTE: Recipients for whom hometown information was available are listed first, starting with Iowa students, followed by all other recipients in alphabetical order.

ANAMOSA

Brooke Watters, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education who will complete her student teaching experience in the area of elementary education during the fall 2004 semester, is a recipient of the Charlotte and Ruby Junge Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to an undergraduate student in the area of social studies or elementary education. Funding for this scholarship was established with a gift from Dr. Charlotte Junge (M.A. 1939; Ph.D. 1944) in memory of her sister, Dr. Ruby Junge (Ph.D. 1946).

BURLINGTON

Ronald W. Teater, currently enrolled in the Ph.D. program in educational administration in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a recipient of the Harvey H. Davis Award. This award honors the lifetime career in education of Dr. Harvey H. Davis and is presented to an outstanding student in educational administration or higher education, particularly a student interested in the financing of education. In December 2003 Teater received his endorsement in secondary administration. He received his master of business administration from St. Ambrose University in 1993 and his bachelor of general studies degree in history, anthropology, religion, economics, government and sociology from the UI in 1977. His math endorsement was earned in 1995. For the past nine years, Teater has served the West Burlington School District in various administrative capacities including curriculum director, coordinator for the at-risk and gifted/talented programs, school improvement coordinator and an associate administrator. He has also worked as an instructor at Southeastern Community College in West Burlington, and as a classroom teacher at West Burlington Arnold High School, Harding Junior High and Kennedy High Schools in Cedar Rapids. An active volunteer for Boy Scouts of America, Teater was instrumental in starting Troop 214 in West Burlington in 1998, serving as scoutmaster until 2002. Since 2001 he has chaired the Mississippi Valley Council 2005 National Jamboree Committee and was the Assistant Scoutmaster at the World Jamboree in Thailand in 2003. He has organized and led international trips for students to Russia and other European countries. In 2002 he received the Silver Beaver Award from the Mississippi Valley Council and in 1964 he was awarded the Eagle Scout. Teater was inducted into Pi Lambda Theta in 2003 and his other professional memberships include National Education Association and the Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development.

CEDAR RAPIDS

Sherrie Mauren, who received her master of arts degree in teaching in English education from the University of Iowa College of Education this May, is a recipient of the Betty Piercy Award. This award is made annually to a student in reading who will benefit the field in some direct way. Mauren received her bachelor of arts degree (honors and high distinction) with a major in English and minor in Spanish from the UI in 1998. She holds an endorsement in English/language arts 7-12 and will complete the Reading 7-12 endorsement by August 2004. Mauren is currently working as a long-term substitute teacher in Cedar Rapids. She has worked as an instructor/assistant activity director for Coe College's Upward Bound Program and as a graduate assistant/writing fellow in the College of Business Administration. Mauren has been a regular volunteer for the America Reads and African American Read-In programs and is currently a Big Sister in the Big Brothers/Big Sisters program. This summer she will tutor an elementary school student in reading. She is a member of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) and her honors include being named the recipient of a Seidler Family Student Teaching Scholarship, a Pi Lambda Theta master's Award and winning first place in the New York Scholastic Writing Awards for the full-length play, "Stand Tall".

CEDAR RAPIDS

Sherrie Mauren, who will receive her master of arts degree in teaching, English education from the University of Iowa College of Education in May 2004, is a master's recipient of a Pi Lambda Theta Award. The Pi Lambda Theta Awards are presented annually by Theta Chapter at UI to outstanding doctoral, master's and bachelor's students who show promise in the areas of research, teaching or writing, and to a worthy senior who shows promise in the field of education. These students also possess high scholarship and outstanding personal qualities. Pi Lambda Theta is a national honorary professional association in education. Mauren received her bachelor of arts (with honors and high distinction) with a major in English and minor in Spanish from the UI in 1998. Sherrie was the first place winner of the New York Scholastic Writing Awards for full-length play, Stand Tall. She is a member of the National Council of Teachers of English.

CORALVILLE

Becki Elkins Nesheim, a Ph.D. candidate in the University of Iowa College of Education's Department of Counseling, Rehabilitation and Student Development, is a recipient of the Albert Hood Promising Scholar Award. The award is presented to a graduate student in the Division of Counseling, Rehabilitation and Student Development who is a doctoral candidate with an approved prospectus and a faculty recommendation submitted by Oct. 1. It is based on academic performance, quality of the research proposal, the likely impact of the research on the field, and the student's service to the program and the university. Nesheim received her bachelor of science degree in journalism with a major in public relations from the University of Kansas in 1990. She received her master of science in education with a higher education major from Iowa State University in 1994. Her dissertation topic is "College students and safety: Effects on cognitive outcomes, learning orientations, and educational aspirations in the first year of college". Her project will look at college student safety and impact of concerns about safety on a variety of college experiences and outcomes. As a topic that has received a lot of attention but very little research, Nesheim's work has the potential to make a substantial contribution to knowledge, policy and practice. In her letter of nomination, Professor Elizabeth Whitt writes, "...Becki shows extraordinary promise as a scholar, and her research skills and commitment bode well for a long and productive scholarly career." Since her arrival at the UI, Nesheim has been consistently involved in research activities with faculty and other students. She has made numerous presentations at national conferences. The results of two studies she participated in have been published in the Journal of College Student Development, one of the most rigorous of the refereed journals in the field of higher education. Her memberships include the American College Personnel Association, American Educational Research Association, Association for the Study of Higher Education and National Association of Student Personnel Administrators.

DAVENPORT

Samantha DeVilbiss, a junior with a double major in history and anthropology at the University of Iowa, is a co-recipient (with Allison Aubert) of the John E. Quinn Memorial Scholarship. This award is presented to full-time undergraduate liberal arts students from Eastern Iowa who have been admitted to the teacher education program and pursuing secondary school teaching licensure in history. DeVilbiss, who is also pursuing a certificate in museum studies and licensure to teach social studies in the areas of American history, world history and anthropology, plans to graduate with honors in May 2005. DeVilbiss's volunteer activities include working with MidCoast Fine arts, a Quad-City arts organization; Our Lady of Victory Parish; the Iowa Children's Museum and the Domestic Violence Intervention Program. Her honors include being named to the Dean's List and induction into the Honors Program. She is an active participant in honor societies including Phi Sigma Theta, Phi Eta Sigma (of which she was elected Chapter Historian), Golden Key International Honor Society, Phi Beta Kappa, and the National Society of Collegiate Scholars (of which she was elected Chapter President).

DAVENPORT

Bradley Thiessen, who is completing his first year as a Ph.D. student in educational measurement and statistics in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a recipient of the Blommers-Hieronymus-Feldt Fellowship. This is a yearly award to an outstanding doctoral student in educational measurement and statistics. Thiessen received his master of arts degree in educational measurement and statistics from the UI in 2001. In 1999 he graduated summa cum laude from St. Ambrose University with a bachelor of science degree in secondary mathematics education. After receiving his master's degree, Thiessen worked as a consultant for the Iowa Department of Education, where he gathered and presented student achievement data required under the No Child Left Behind legislation. He then worked for two years as the coordinator of data collection, research, and assessment for the Clinton Community School District, where he helped develop district assessments and analyzed classroom-level student achievement data. In 2003 he was appointed to the position of assessment coordinator and instructor in the Mathematics Department at St. Ambrose University, where his responsibilities include teaching statistics courses, developing the University Assessment Plan and analyzing student achievement data. He continues to assist local school districts and teachers to create assessments and analyze data specifically to meet No Child Left Behind requirements. During his master's program, Thiessen worked as a research assistant with Professor Ansley and was involved in several test development projects, displaying great creativity. As a doctoral student he continues to demonstrate his outstanding skills and is described by the faculty in the program as a student with unlimited potential in the discipline.

DAVENPORT

Joelle Khairallah, who is pursuing a bachelor of science degree in science education in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a recipient of the Daniel G. Loetscher Memorial Science Education Scholarship. The award assists students in advancing their knowledge and study of science. Khairallah has taken coursework at Augustana College and Scott Community College. She originally set her sights on becoming a doctor but chose instead to become a teacher. She has worked as a math/chemistry tutor at Scott Community College. At Augustana College she was an active participant in the Student Affiliate of American Chemical Society and the Biology Club. At the UI she participates in the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and Iowa State Education Association Student Affiliate groups. In May of this year she was scheduled to take part in a geological field trip to Colorado and Utah. Her volunteer activities are numerous and include working at the Iowa Children's Museum, completing an internship with the Adults Connecting with Children and Teens program, working with the West Liberty After School Program, and serving as a judge at Invent Iowa. During the summers of 2000 and 2004 she participated in a camp in Zeitoun, Lebanon, where she directed English language study with fourth-grade Lebanese students. Khairallah's honors include being named to the Dean's/Presidential Academic List at the UI and Augustana College. She is a member of Omicron Delta Kappa Honor and Leadership Society. In February 2004 she attended a leadership convention in Norfolk, Va., sponsored by Omicron Delta Kappa. After graduation Khairallah hopes to return to her hometown of Davenport where she will secure a teaching position.

DES MOINES (1513 Cummins Parkway)

Juli Smith, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education who will receive her bachelor of arts degree in elementary education with specializations in reading and early childhood with special education in December 2004, is a senior recipient of a Pi Lambda Theta Award. The Pi Lambda Theta Awards are presented annually by Theta Chapter at UI to outstanding doctoral, master's, and bachelor's students who show promise in the areas of research, teaching or writing, and to a worthy senior who shows promise in the field of education. These students also possess high scholarship and outstanding personal qualities. Pi Lambda Theta is a national honorary professional association in education. Smith is currently completing her early childhood student teaching at Head Start in Coralville, Iowa. Her honors include membership in Phi Sigma Theta and acceptance into the College of Education's Honors Opportunity Program.

INDIANOLA

Allison Aubert, a junior at the University of Iowa pursuing her bachelor of arts degree (honors) with a major in history and minors in political science and geography and licensure to teach social studies at the secondary level, is a co-recipient (with Samantha DeVilbiss) of the John E. Quinn Memorial Scholarship. This award is presented to full-time undergraduate liberal arts students from Eastern Iowa who have been admitted to the teacher education program and pursuing secondary school teaching licensure in history. Aubert plans to graduate in May 2005. Her volunteer activities include working in the West Liberty, Indianola and Iowa City school districts; with the West Liberty After School Reading Program; and participating in the Hawkeye Hometown Visit Program. Her honors include being named to the Dean's List and inducted into the UI Honors Program. As a participant in the College's Honors Opportunity Program Aubert will complete an Honors Project during the fall 2004 semester. After graduation Aubert wants to remain in Iowa, where she would like to teach in a rural high school.

IOWA CITY

Matanyah Mills, at student in the University of Iowa College of Education who will complete her student teaching experience in the area of elementary education during the spring 2005 semester, is a recipient of the Kyle and Eula Jones Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate students in elementary or secondary education.

IOWA CITY

Seonghoon Kim, a student in the Ph.D. program in educational measurement and statistics at the University of Iowa College of Education who expected to graduate this past May, is a recipient of the T. Anne Cleary Psychological Research Scholarship. A maximum of two awards may be made annually to outstanding doctoral students in the UI College of Education's Department of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations. One award is to be presented to an international student and one to a permanent resident of the United States. Kim, an international student from Korea, completed his bachelor of arts degree in education in 1997 and his master of education degree in educational measurement and evaluation in 1999 at Seoul National University. He has completed a summer internship working at American College Testing and as a graduate student has been a research assistant where he developed computer software programs. He has made conference presentations at a number of national meetings and has published materials related to vocational interest inventories.

IOWA CITY

Hyun Sook Yi, a Ph.D. student in the University of Iowa College of Education's educational measurement and statistics program, is a recipient of the Melvin R. Novick Award in Educational Measurement and Statistics. The award is presented annually to a doctoral student who has shown outstanding academic performance and promise of the highest level of achievement in research in the field of educational measurement and research. Originally from South Korea, Yi received her master of education degree in science education in 2000 and her bachelor of science in Earth science education in 1996 from Seoul National University. By the end of this semester Yi was to have completed all coursework and will begin working on her dissertation in the fall 2004 semester. Her current research project focuses on classification consistency for two equated forms using an item response theory model. She wants to expand this idea by applying classical test theory and generalizability theory as well as the item response theory. In Korea Yi worked as a junior and senior high school teacher, and as a teaching and research assistant as well as test developer and program coordinator at Seoul National University. At Iowa she has taught the course "Teaching Technology in the Classroom", has consulted with several College of Education units on website development, and worked as a research assistant in the Iowa Testing Programs. Following graduation Yi's goal is to become a professor and researcher in the field of educational measurement.

IOWA CITY

Rossina Liu, who is currently enrolled in the University of Iowa College of Education's master of arts in teaching, English education program, is a recipient of the UI College of Education Minority Student Award. The award is presented to an outstanding undergraduate or graduate student of color who is active in working with equity issues in the college and has contributed in a positive manner to the life of the college. Liu received her bachelor of arts degree in history and U.S./East Asian diplomatic relations from the University of Maryland College Park in 1998. Her contributions toward addressing issues of equity are significant and extensive. She has served for the past year as the graduate assistant to the UI College of Education's Diversity Committee. In that role she is responsible for much work behind the scenes in the various events sponsored by the committee. She is currently chairing a subcommittee that will address a celebration of Asian American Month, calling attention to the many contributions by Asian Americans as well as speaking out against racism and stereotypes. Liu provided key leadership in organizing and carrying out the campus-wide Stop Hate Rally held on the UI's Pentacrest, where faculty, staff and students rallied against recent hate crimes on the UI campus. She worked with others to organize this critically important event in an attempt to generate awareness, galvanize action and calm fear around what seemed to be an alarming trend toward incidents of hate against those who are different because of race, creed, or national origin. She organized the College of Education's Diversity Committee to sponsor an event passing out ribbons and pins to create awareness. Liu's resume represents years of activism and commitment to social justice from her enrollment as an undergraduate student to her recent volunteer experience working in the Iowa City Public Schools with students who speak English as a second language. She is described as one whose commitment to fairness is not something of passing fancy; rather, she lives her life around principles of social justice and equity.

IOWA CITY

Gillian J. H. Fox, a graduate student in the University of Iowa College of Education's Rehabilitation Counseling program, is a recipient of the Leonard A. Miller Memorial Scholarship. The award is given to a first year M.A. student in rehabilitation counseling. It is based on performance and the potential to become an outstanding rehabilitation counselor practitioner. Fox, LBSW, is a lifetime resident of Iowa City. In 1989, after receiving her bachelor's degree in secondary special education from the UI College of Education, she founded and became the executive director of LIFE Skills, Inc., a United Way of Johnson County agency. LIFE Skills, Inc., provides in-home and community based counseling and supportive services to individuals who have disabilities. She has also worked as an instructor at the State of Iowa Medical and Classification Center (Oakdale) and for the Johnson County Department of Human Services. Fox is a member of the American Counseling Association, The University of Iowa Association of Rehabilitation Counseling Association (UI-ARCA) and is an active participant in local community decision-making. Her committee memberships include the Mental Health and Developmental Disability Planning Council, the Mental Health Task Force and the Citizens Review Panel for the United Way of Johnson County.

LAMONI

Linda Armstrong, who will receive her Ph.D. in elementary education from the University of Iowa College of Education in May 2004, is a doctoral recipient of a Pi Lambda Theta Award. The Pi Lambda Theta Awards are presented annually by Theta Chapter at UI to outstanding doctoral, master's, and bachelor's students who show promise in the areas of research, teaching or writing, and to a worthy senior who shows promise in the field of education. These students also possess high scholarship and outstanding personal qualities. Pi Lambda Theta is a national honorary professional association in education. Armstrong received her master of science degree in elementary education with a minor emphasis in early childhood education from Emporia State University in 1988 and her bachelor of science degree in elementary education with a minor in sociology from Baker University in 1973. She is currently on the faculty of the School of Education, Graceland University. She holds membership in a number of professional associations.

MEDIAPOLIS

Mika Thomas, who plans to pursue a master's degree in early childhood education in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a recipient of the Debra Clausen Memorial Fellowship. The fellowship is awarded to a student in the College of Education with first preference given to students who will be spending time at the University Hospital School (now known as the Center for Disabilities and Development) evaluating and developing learning programs for students with mental disabilities, including Down Syndrome. Thomas is from Mediapolis and received her bachelor of arts degree with a major in anthropology and a minor in English from the UI in 1998. As an undergraduate, Thomas was named to the Dean's List numerous times. She is enrolled to receive her licensure in early childhood and special education with endorsements in reading and social studies. She plans to pursue a master's degree in early childhood education. At the Center for Disabilities and Development, Thomas works with the educational consultants in conducting a wide variety of educational assessments and attends Augmentive Communication counseling sessions. She works one-on-one in the hospital classroom and as a tutor for inpatients. For the past five years, Thomas has worked part-time as a job coach and counselor for Systems Unlimited, a non-profit agency that provides residential and vocational services to individuals with disabilities. She has also worked as a special education instructional para-educator in Seattle, Wash., and at Robert Lucas Elementary School in Iowa City.

OSCEOLA

Amy Lowe, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education who will complete her student teaching in the area of mathematics education during the fall 2004 semester, is a recipient of the Margaret A. Sloan Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate or graduate students in the teacher education program.

TRIPOLI

Kristen Rickey, who is pursuing a Ph.D. in educational administration and plans to complete the program at the University of Iowa College of Education in May 2005, is a recipient of the Perry Eugene McClenahan Award. The award is given annually to an outstanding candidate for an advanced degree in educational administration at the UI. Rickey received her master of arts degree in special education in 1993 and her bachelor of science in psychology in 1987, both awarded by the UI. During the spring 2002 semester she completed a Leadership Development Internship in the Cedar Rapids Community School District. Rickey is currently the principal at Tripoli Middle/High School in Tripoli, Iowa. She began her career as a special education teacher in Cedar Rapids. After several years of teaching in that area she became the facilitator of a program for students considered to be at risk for school failure. As a graduate student at Iowa, Rickey taught "Human Relations for the Classroom Teacher" and she is also the instructor for "The Exceptional Learner" at Cornell College in Mount Vernon. She has been an active participant of numerous committees in the Cedar Rapids Community Schools, Grant Wood Area Education Agency, Cornell College, and the UI. Rickey has made presentations at local, regional and national conferences and has had two articles published. In 2002 Rickey was selected to participate in the David L. Clark National Graduate Student Research Seminar sponsored by the University Council for Educational Administration. Her other honors include being named the recipient of a Kyle and Eula Jones Scholarship in Educational Administration and Outstanding Honoree in the category of Mentor/Development for the YWCA Tribute to Women of Achievement.

VAN METER

Melissa Cooper, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education who will complete her student teaching experience in the area of elementary education during the fall 2004 semester, is a recipient of the Sheila E. McFarland Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to an undergraduate student in the area of elementary education with preference given to an Iowa resident.

WATERLOO

TeNille Carey, who will complete her student teaching experience in the area of foreign language education in the University of Iowa College of Education during the fall 2004 semester, is a recipient of the Gladys and Margaret Harvey Education Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to students who have returned to receive teacher certification following a bachelor's degree.

WEST DES MOINES (1119 Belle Mar Drive)

Kairsten Jack, who is pursuing a degree in elementary education with a specialization in special education (strategist 1) at the University of Iowa College of Education, is a recipient of the Jack Bagford Elementary Education Award. The award is presented annually to a student in elementary education, either graduate or undergraduate, who will be student teaching during the school year following the award. The recipient must be a resident of Iowa, have a good academic record, and show promise in the field of education. Jack is a graduate of Valley High School in West Des Moines, where she was on the Distinguished Honor Roll all four years and received a Varsity Letter in track and cheerleading. She works at University Hospital on the Inpatient Child Psychiatry Unit as a teaching assistant for children who range in age from 4 to 18 years old. Along with her other responsibilities she tutors some of the older students in advanced math and science; in fact, they request her help knowing that she will help them understand their assignments. She is an active volunteer for a number of organizations including the Special Olympics, Church Charity Organization, Big Brothers Big Sisters and the Crisis Center Food Bank.

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ARIZONA

TUCSON

Lisa D. Maurer, who is enrolled in the University of Iowa College of Education's educational psychology master of arts program, was a recipient of the Barry Bratton Award for Achievement in Design of Instructional Processes. This award is presented annually to an outstanding graduate student who displays commitment to the systematic design and improvement of instructional processes and materials. Maurer received her bachelor of science degree in sociology in 1996 and has completed coursework to achieve post-baccalaureate teaching certification as well as reading endorsement for elementary certification. Prior to coming to the UI, Maurer was a student in Arizona State University's Educational Technology master of arts program. She worked for four years as an elementary school teacher in Arizona. Utilizing her creativity in lesson development to bring the curriculum to life for her students inspired her to pursue a career in instructional design. She has also worked as an instructional designer for private industry and as a graduate teaching assistant at both Arizona State and the UI. Her honors include memberships in the Golden Key National Honor Society, Alpha Kappa Delta Honor Society and being named to the Dean's List, 1993-96. She is a member of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology. In March 2003 she presented two papers at the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education meeting in Albuquerque, N.M.

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CALIFORNIA

ANAHEIM HILLS

Michelle Muratori, who received her Ph.D. in counselor education from the University of Iowa College of Education in December 2003, was awarded the Howard R. Jones Achievement Award. The award is presented annually to a student in a graduate program in the College of Education who has made a noteworthy scholarly presentation at a national professional conference or who has published a significant scholarly article in a reputable professional journal or other substantial printed work. Muratori received her bachelor of science degree (with honors) with a major in human services and minor in psychology from California State University Fullerton in 1995. And she received her master of arts degree in counseling psychology from Northwestern University in 1997. She is currently working as a senior counselor/researcher at the Center for Talented Youth, Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore, Md. where she provides academic counseling and support to highly gifted students who participate in the Study of Exceptional Talent (SET). She also conducts SET research and coordinates the Davidson/Stanley Merit Scholarship Program. As a graduate student Muratori worked as a graduate assistant/NAASE advisor in the Belin-Blank Center. She has also worked as an individual, couples, family and group counselor for a variety of agencies. Her nomination for this award was based on her academic presentations at national and international conferences during the last academic year. In August 2003, she chaired a conference symposium and was invited to participate in a panel presentation at the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children in Adelaide, Australia. In November 2003, she presented "The Short-term Adjustment of Early Entrance Students" at the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Annual Convention in Indianapolis, Ind. In addition to the conference presentations for which Muratori was nominated, she was the lead author and primary investigator in a study that resulted in the publication of the article entitled "Early-Entrance Students: Impressions of Their First Semester of College" that was published in Summer 2003 in Gifted Child Quarterly, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed journals in the field of gifted education.

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ILLINOIS

GRAYSLAKE

Katie Titus, an honors student in the University of Iowa College of Education majoring in science education with a specialization in biology and a minor in environmental science, is a recipient of the Guy and Gladys Peterson Award. This merit-based award is presented to an outstanding undergraduate student who has been admitted to and completed at least 12 semester hours of coursework in the teacher education program. Selection of the recipient is based on the student's academic record, promise in the field and commitment to the profession of teaching. Laurie Croft, Ph.D., writes in her letter of nomination for Titus, "Katie's academic record is excellent! She has a cumulative GPA of 3.75 and yet she has stayed involved in varied activities at the University as an active member of the Iowa Environmental Coalition, the Tippie Optimist Club, and Dance Marathon. In addition to participating in the Honors Opportunity Program, Katie strives to enhance her academic growth as a member of Phi Theta Kappa Honors Society, the Golden Key International Honor Society, and the National College Dean's List. As well, Katie serves as a volunteer at the annual Invent Iowa inventions competition for grades 2-12 and serves as a tutor for at risk students with the Salvation Army. Katie has had six years of experience working with children from Kindergarten to high school. As a camp counselor for four years with Grayslake Park District, Katie implemented lesson plans for the entire camp, taught reading and motor-skill activities to preschoolers and kindergarteners. Katie also led an environmental education program at Liberty Prairie Conservancy for two years. Her experiences working with children through the UI include teaching scientific concepts to a kindergarten class, teaching a unit on groundwater to an eighth-grade science class, and creating mini-lessons for a 10th-grade biology class." During the spring 2005 semester Titus will student teach in New Zealand. Having the opportunity to teach in a different culture will bring new perspectives to Titus's own instructional methods that will contribute to her own desire to "create a classroom community that fosters learning by creating confident students that respect one another."

INDIANHEAD PARK

Amy Sass, who completed her teaching certification program in secondary English education at the University of Iowa College of Education in December 2003, is a senior recipient of a Pi Lambda Theta Award. The Pi Lambda Theta Awards are presented annually by Theta Chapter at UI to outstanding doctoral, master's, and bachelor's students who show promise in the areas of research, teaching or writing, and to a worthy senior who shows promise in the field of education. These students also possess high scholarship and outstanding personal qualities. Pi Lambda Theta is a national honorary professional association in education. Sass completed her student teaching at Lisle Senior High School in Lisle, Ill. She has worked as a child care provider in Iowa City and as a photographer/video instructor at a summer camp in Brant Lake, N.Y. For one summer she participated in the Walt Disney World College Program. Her honors include being named to the Dean's List for several semesters.

MUNDELEIN
Kelly Dolan, who plans to graduate in May 2005 with a bachelor of arts degree in elementary education with a social studies specialization at the University of Iowa College of Education, is a recipient of the Lloyd Smith Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded to an outstanding student in the area of elementary social studies. Dolan, originally from Mundelein, Ill., is a private tutor working with second- through fourth-graders who recently immigrated to the United States and need assistance learning English. She especially enjoys helping one of these students with social studies because of the reading comprehension involved. She is able to create lesson plans and use a variety of materials to help this student. Dolan's interest in social studies was sparked when she volunteered at a local elementary school in her hometown where the entire third grade was working on a pioneer unit. Her own interest in environmental education has also contributed to her selection of social studies as an area of specialization. And, she takes seriously her responsibility to be an informed and active citizen. Dolan sees teaching social studies as an opportunity to instill the values of tolerance and understanding that are essential to a peaceful world. Her honors include induction into the Golden Key International Honor Society and Pi Lambda Theta. In high school she was a member of the National Honor Society and at the UI she is an active member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars.

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MISSOURI

SPRINGFIELD

Dawn Bramer, a third-year doctoral student in the University of Iowa College of Education's School Psychology Program, is a doctoral recipient of a Pi Lambda Theta Award. The Pi Lambda Theta Awards are presented annually by Theta Chapter at UI to outstanding doctoral, master's, and bachelor's students who show promise in the areas of research, teaching or writing, and to a worthy senior who shows promise in the field of education. These students also possess high scholarship and outstanding personal qualities. Pi Lambda Theta is a national honorary professional association in education. Bramer received her master of education degree in gifted education and secondary education from Drury College in 1997. She received a Special Graduate Assistantship from the Iowa Testing Program and currently serves as co-president of the Student Organization of the School Psychology Program. She has presented her research at national, regional, and state conferences.

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NEBRASKA

OMAHA

Nicholas C. Larma, a Ph.D. student in the University of Iowa College of Education's counseling psychology program, is a recipient of the T. Anne Cleary Psychological Research Scholarship. A maximum of two awards may be made annually to outstanding doctoral students in the UI College of Education's Department of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations. One award is to be presented to an international student and one to a permanent resident of the United States. Larma received his bachelor of arts degree in psychology with a concentration in gender and women's studies from Grinnell College in 1999. He participated in a study abroad program at the University of Stirling, Scotland. In 2003 he completed a specialty practicum in men and masculinity at University Counseling Service. Larma's other clinical work includes working at the Veterans Administration Hospital; Iowa Medical and Classification Center, Oakdale Prison; and Foundation 2 as a depression and anxiety group co-facilitator. His professional memberships include American Psychological Association and the Iowa Student Personnel Association. He has made presentations at numerous local, state and national association meetings.

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TEXAS

MCALLEN

Sandra Cortina, who is pursing a Ph.D. in counseling psychology with a specialization in pediatric psychology in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a recipient of the James and Coretta Stroud Fellowship. The award is presented annually to an outstanding doctoral student in educational psychology or an allied field who is entering the dissertation phase of the program. In 2000, Cortina graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from Trinity University. She has participated in clinical experiences at the University Hospital's Pediatric Specialty Clinics and University Counseling Service. She has conducted workshops for New Dimensions in Learning, the College of Nursing and University Hospital's Division of Child Psychiatry. She has made presentations at national conferences and has published three articles. Cortina has established a firm research base in positive child psychology and has contributed in several ways to the pediatric psychology literature. Areas she has conducted research in include psychologists' occupational burnout, psychosocial outcomes of school bullying, teacher training for chronic illness and social information processing of children with depressive symptoms. Her dissertation will investigate the role of family optimism and coping style in children's adherence to diabetic treatment regimes. Her honors include being awarded a University of Iowa Graduate Merit Fellowship, Graduate Incentive Fellowship and NIH Predoctoral Minority Fellowship.

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VIRGINIA

FAIRFAX

Alisa Pappas, who will receive her master of arts degree in educational measurement and statistics from the University of Iowa College of Education in May 2004, is a master's recipient of a Pi Lambda Theta Award. The Pi Lambda Theta Awards are presented annually by Theta Chapter at UI to outstanding doctoral, master's, and bachelor's students who show promise in the areas of research, teaching or writing, and to a worthy senior who shows promise in the field of education. These students also possess high scholarship and outstanding personal qualities. Pi Lambda Theta is a national honorary professional association in education. Pappas received her bachelor of arts in elementary education/history from the College of William and Mary in 1994. Her memberships include the Kappa Delta Pi Education Honor Society, National Council on Measurement in Education, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development and Phi Delta Kappa Education Association.

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SOUTH KOREA

SEOUL

Jeong-il Cho, a Ph.D. student in special education (emotional/behavioral disorders) in the University of Iowa College of Education's Department of Curriculum and Instruction, is a recipient of the Erwin and Louise Wasta International Scholarship. This award is presented annually to a full time international student enrolled in a program in the College of Education. It is based on promise in the student's chosen field and documented need. Cho received her bachelor of arts degree with a major in history and minor in education from Kwan-Dong University, Korea, in 1996. She received her master of education degree in special education (cross-categorical emphasis) from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, in 1999. Her research interests are friendships between adolescents with and without disabilities, social skills training, and the effective/practical use of assistive technology in the classroom. Her dissertation topic is middle school students with emotional/behavioral disorders: Identifying bully, victim, bully/victim, and non-bully/non-victim. Cho has worked as a substitute teacher in the New York City Schools, and as a Korean language teacher and mathematics tutor in Greensboro, N.C. As a graduate student at Iowa she has worked as an electronic portfolio consultant, research assistant, teaching assistant, and as a guest lecturer. She has collaborated with Professor Jo Hendrickson on research projects and they have made presentations together on investigations related to friendship development between peers with and without disabilities. She is a member of the International Association for Special Education (IASE), Council for Exceptional Children, Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders and Council for Children with learning Disabilities. After graduation she plans to work to implement effective social skills training programs in schools for students with and without disabilities, prepare special educators at the university level, and one day direct an inclusive school.

OTHER STUDENTS

Jacob Cummer, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Kelly Frazier, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Regina Graafsma, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Abbey Kramer, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Sera Lee, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Jennifer Littig, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Kristine Lumb, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Sherrie Mauren, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Jean McNamee, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Laura Mendralla, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Melissa Mulert, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Erik Sheker, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Sarah Snydacker, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Kelly Swain, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Christina Weitz, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Betsy Zude, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, was a fall 2003 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Kristen Andreoni, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Suzanne Butz, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Todd Crites, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Matthew Hamill, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Amy Holzwarth, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Jennifer Knaack, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Michele Mack, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Jenna Madden, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Meghan McKevitt, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Patrick O'Harra, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Mary Pawasarat, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Jennifer Potter, a student in the University of Iowa College of Education, is a spring 2004 recipient of a Seidler Family Scholarship. This scholarship is presented to undergraduate and graduate students in the teacher education program. Funding for this scholarship was established by the Seidler Family Foundation to memorialize Evelyn Seidler, a teacher who taught high school English for many years in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

STORY SOURCE: University of Iowa News Services, 300 Plaza Centre One, Suite 371, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-2500.

MEDIA CONTACT: Stephen Pradarelli, 319-384-0007, stephen-pradarelli@uiowa.edu.