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UI in the News

January, 2004

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Gurnett Cited In Universe Sound Story (New York Times, Jan. 30)
A story about sound and pitch in the universe mentions Sun Rings, a musical composition based on space sounds recorded by DON GURNETT, UI professor of physics and astronomy.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/30/arts/music/30REVE.html

Standardized Tests Not So Standard (Pittsburgh Post Gazette, Jan. 30)
Students are taking more and more tests, but the results are far from standardized. Even within the same test, the standard of proficiency varies widely from grade to grade, according to H.D. HOOVER, a University of Iowa professor and director of the Iowa Basic Skills Testing Program, who studied NAEP and three major standardized tests -- the Iowa, Stanford and California achievement tests. He gave this example from one of the tests: A second-grader scores in the 60th percentile in reading -- better than 60 percent of the kids who took the test -- and is deemed proficient. In third grade, the same student ranks in the 80th percentile -- even higher -- but is labeled not proficient. What happened? Different committees helped set the cutoff scores for "proficient" in those two grades, he said. Hoover thinks that's wrong. "The kid had a great year. If you read better than 80 percent of the kids, you're a good reader,'' he said.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04030/267342.stm

Dean Below Expectations In Johnson County (New York Times, Jan. 30)
Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts enters the seven presidential nominating contests on Feb. 3 as the candidate to beat -- not least because he has exhibited a broad base of support among Democratic voters. Of New Hampshire's 10 counties, Kerry won seven. Dean carried three -- all on the state's border with Vermont. Dean did well in some academic communities in New Hampshire, including Hanover (Dartmouth College) and Durham (University of New Hampshire), but did not overwhelm the field. And Dean performed well below expectations in Iowa's academic centers, including Story County, home to Iowa State University at Ames, and Johnson County, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at Iowa City.
http://www.nytimes.com/cq/politics/news-989451.html

Sorokin Comments On Jewish Identity (Jewish Ledger, Jan. 30)
Since 2000, Birthright, or Taglit in Hebrew -- the word means "discovery" -- has brought nearly 60,000 Jews between 18 and 26 to Israel. What is unique about the educational trips is their cost: they are free to the participants with no strings attached. But what's even more impressive, say birthright advocates, is that they have become one of the most successful ventures ever created to deepen Israel-Diaspora relationships as well as strength connections to Judaism for many young Jews who had all but forgotten their heritage. For many young Jews, says Gerald L. Sorokin, Hillel director at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, there's the "geek factor." They never joined their synagogue youth group or went to Jewish camp or day school and they don't associate being Jewish with being cool. And yet once here, many participants find something that deeply moves them in a way that a trip to the Caribbean, for example, would not.
http://www.jewishledger.com/display/inn_news/news04.txt

Eko Discusses BBC Apology (BBC radio, Jan. 29)
University of Iowa journalism professor LYOMBE EKO was a guest on an hour-long call-in show discussing the BBC's apology to British Prime Minister Tony Blair after a senior judge, said in a 740-page report that the BBC had been guilty of careless reporting and poor editorial oversight in a radio broadcast last May 29. In the broadcast, Andrew Gilligan, a BBC military affairs reporter, said that the government used an intelligence dossier it "probably knew" was wrong in September 2002 to bolster its case for war with Iraq. David Kelly, a government weapons expert, killed himself after being exposed as the source of Mr. Gilligan's report. Among other things, Eko shared the perspectives of his students, with whom he had discussed the issue in class.

UI Drinking Study Cited (Health24)
Perceptions about friends' drinking habits affect students more than marketing campaigns that encourage them to abstain or use alcohol responsibly. That's the conclusion of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study in the latest issue of Health Communication. Health24 is based in Zambia.
http://www.health24.co.za/news/Addiction_Substance_abuse/1-887,26096.asp

Jones Discusses Online Voting (KATE Radio, Jan. 29)
DOUGLAS JONES, associate professor of computer science, discussed electronic voting machines and electronic voting technology on a radio program. KATE radio is based in Austin, MN. The story is not available online.

UI International Student Numbers Down (Journal Star, Jan. 29)
The holiday break refuses to end for two University of Nebraska-Lincoln students from China. As the spring semester enters its third week, the unrelated pair are waiting in their home country, delayed by a visa renewal process that's gotten markedly more complicated since Sept. 11, 2001. The possibility of months in visa limbo is one of many headaches facing UNL's international students and administrators as they adapt to the Patriot Act and stricter enforcement of immigration laws. UNL isn't alone. The Associated Press reported Tuesday that 10 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students are stuck in their home countries, including nine in China, delayed by expired visas and lengthy visa reviews. As of Jan. 22, applications for foreign enrollment were down 37 percent from the year before, University of Iowa officials said. The paper is based in Lincoln, Neb.
http://www.journalstar.com/local.php?story_id=118211

Kutcher Was Student At UI (Daily Astorian, Jan. 29)
A story about actor Ashton Kutcher's latest movie, "The Butterfly Effect," ends with some trivia about the actor, including the fact that in 1997, Kutcher was a biochemical engineering student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Astoria, Ore.
http://www.dailyastorian.info/main.asp?FromHome=1&TypeID=1&SectionID=15&ArticleID=13458&SubSectionID=790

UI Considers Tuition Options (KETV, Jan. 29)
Task forces at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University will recommend the schools be allowed to charge higher tuition to upperclassmen. The task forces were set up by the universities to re-examine tuition policies that haven't been updated since 1997. They will present their findings to the state Board of Regents at the regents' meeting next month in Iowa City. Pat Cain, Iowa's interim provost and task force chairwoman, says increasing tuition for upper-class courses makes sense because the classes, which generally are smaller, are more expensive to provide. KETV is based in Omaha.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/iowabureau/2799680/detail.html

UI Student's Mother Appointed To Company (Philadelphia Daily News, Jan. 29)
Astrid Garcia, a veteran newspaper executive with broad experience in business matters, has been appointed senior vice president of human resources, labor and operations for Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., publisher of the Daily News and the Inquirer. Garcia, a native of Puerto Rico, and her husband, Bob Gillespie, have two sons, Robert, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sophomore, and Richard, a high school sophomore.
http://www.philly.com/mld/dailynews/7822322.htm

Family Injured In Explosion Treated At UI (Peoria Journal Star, Jan. 28)
Todd and Christina O'Halleran and their children are living with Todd's mother in Crystal Lake while they recuperate and look for a new home in Abingdon. On Oct. 11, an explosion ripped through the O'Halleran home at 601 S. Main St., severely injuring Todd and Christina and their children, Keianna, 9, Cody, 7, and Kailei, then 23 months. Tanner O'Halleran, born Aug. 16, was pronounced dead at the scene. Officials believe the explosion was caused by a natural gas leak. Christina's sister-in-law Vicky Johnson, who is organizing a benefit for the family, said the family was released Jan. 17 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS, where they had been treated since the accident. Johnson said Christina, Todd and Cody seem to be doing all right, but Kailei still has a breathing tube and Keianna is walking with a walker and has back and leg braces.
http://www.pjstar.com/news/regional/b211eq9h050.html

UI Virtual Hospital Cited (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Jan. 28)
An article about pain management for infants includes a link to the Virtual Children's Hospital at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, encouraging readers to go there for more information. Versions of this story also appeared Jan. 28 on the web sites of the DAYTON (Ohio) DAILY NEWS and the PALM BEACH (Fla.) POST.
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/pain/516055.html

UI Considers Tuition Options (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 28)
Task forces at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University will recommend the schools be allowed to charge higher tuition to upperclassmen. The task forces were set up by the universities to re-examine tuition policies that haven't been updated since 1997. They will present their findings to the state Board of Regents at the regents' meeting next month in Iowa City. Pat Cain, Iowa's interim provost and task force chairwoman, says increasing tuition for upper-class courses makes sense because the classes, which generally are smaller, are more expensive to provide.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=987605

U.S. Security Delays UI International Students (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 28)
National security regulations have kept 10 University of Iowa international students who went home for winter break from returning to campus. Officials say such delays, blamed on expired visas and visa reviews for students studying sensitive topics, have contributed to a decline in international students who attend Iowa and other universities across the country. With the 10 graduate students not being able to teach, attend classes or assist faculty with research, school departments have shifted the work. "They're all Ph.D. students, so the little blip in progress in classes isn't as important as the delay in their research," said JAMES CREMER, chairman of the computer science department. Officials at the University of Northern Iowa and Iowa State University said Tuesday that they were not aware of international students being delayed re-entry. SANDRA BARKAN, assistant dean for the Iowa graduate college, said the delays are part of a nationwide trend. As of Jan. 22, the total of 2,240 international graduate students who applied for fall 2004 at Iowa was down 37 percent from the same time last year.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=987601

UI Alumnus Is Sports Steroid Expert (Sedalia Democrat, Jan. 28)
In last week's State of the Union address, President Bush left many Americans perplexed for his noting the illicit use of anabolic steroids in pro sports. Critics complained the president should have better used the time and remarked on the nation's real problems. Dr. Charles E. "Chuck" Yesalis knows better. Probably more so, in fact, than any other person on earth. An epidemiologist at The Pennsylvania State University, Yesalis is America's foremost scientist on the epidemic of performance-enhancing substances in sports. And he's convinced the issue is indeed among the most serious we face as a culture. For 25 years, Yesalis, 57, has been a primary researcher of doping in sports. He helped pioneer the gathering of hard evidence, beginning in his days at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. The newspaper is based in Missouri.
http://www.sedaliademocrat.com/Sports/289148739741609.htm

Former UI Student Pleads Guilty (Casa Grande Valley Newspapers, Jan. 28)
An article about court proceedings in the case of Kobe Bryant, the Los Angeles Lakers star accused of felony sexual assault, notes that John Roche Jr., a 22-year-old former student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, pleaded guilty Friday in federal court in Denver to leaving a profanity-laced death threat on answering machine of Bryant's accuser last July. The newspaper is based in Arizona.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1817&dept_id=68555&newsid=10861842&PAG=461&rfi=9

Academics Boycott OSHA Symposium (Grand Forks Herald, Jan. 28)
The Occupational Health and Safety Administration is taking flak from both sides over a symposium, which began Tuesday, to study whether repetitive motions in the workplace cause injuries. A group of 11 researchers who study workplace injuries, a field known as ergonomics, is boycotting the event, saying the conference is unnecessary. The scientists, including academics from the University of California, the University of Michigan, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Ohio State University, University of Massachusetts, and Colorado State University, cited similar conferences and reviews of literature completed in 1997, 1998 and 2001. The newspaper is based in North Dakota.
http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforksherald/7812671.htm

UI Alumnus Is Grambling Presidential Candidate (Shreveport Times, Jan. 27)
A fifth candidate has emerged for the presidency at Grambling State University. Lewis L. Jones, vice president of academic affairs at David N. Myers University in Cleveland, Ohio, received his doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa City, in education policy development and higher education administration. The Times is based in Shreveport, La.
http://www.shreveporttimes.com/html/39FB0BE8-1A8F-40F0-9C0E-6F4173B5BACD.shtml

ESPN Executive Enrolled At UI (Sports Business News, Jan. 27)
Mark Shapiro is an executive charged with leading ESPN into a new era as the seminal sports channel competes for viewers in an ever-expanding cable universe. As a teenager, he announced games for his high school's closed-circuit television station, then enrolled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for its broadcast curriculum. "I knew what I wanted to do and I wasn't shy about it," he says.
http://www.sportsbusinessnews.com/index.asp?story_id=32896

Academics Boycott OSHA Symposium (Washington Post, Jan. 27)
The Occupational Health and Safety Administration is taking flak from both sides over a symposium, scheduled to begin today, to study whether repetitive motions in the workplace cause injuries. A group of 11 researchers who study workplace injuries, a field known as ergonomics, is boycotting the event, saying the conference is unnecessary. The scientists, including academics from the University of California, the University of Michigan, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Ohio State University, University of Massachusetts and Colorado State University, cited similar conferences and reviews of literature completed in 1997, 1998 and 2001.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A50516-2004Jan26.html

Columnist Writes Of Visit To UI During Caucuses (The Pilot, Jan. 27)
A columnist writes that he and several others from Raleigh, N.C. joined up with some of the Democratic presidential candidate campaigns in Iowa City the Friday before the Iowa Caucuses. "When we arrived in Iowa City late Saturday afternoon, we found (Sen. John) Edwards' office on the second floor of a semi-occupied mall on the edge of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus," the columnist writes. "(Sen. John) Kerry and (former Vermont Gov. Howard) Dean had offices there as well." The columnist says his contact in Iowa City was UI student Andy Zabel. The paper covers Pinehurst, N.C. and surrounding areas.
http://www.thepilot.com/opinion/012804Iowa.html

Squire Comments On Gephardt Campaign (National Review, Jan. 26)
It's the loneliest time to be campaigning for president in Iowa, but Richard Gephardt is up and at it. Two days after Christmas, with the press corps nowhere to be found and many people still in a holiday blur, Gephardt rolls across the north central part of the state, going from small town to small town, meeting voters. Gephardt's hope is that his older, unionized supporters will come through in a way that Howard Dean's younger, more upscale fans won't. Gephardt's people can be counted on to vote for him, while Dean's supporters, many of them first-time participants in politics, are not such sure bets. "I think Gephardt has a lot of loyalty," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "I'm not sure he has a lot of passion, but the trick is to make sure they show up on caucus night. Maybe Gephardt doesn't have to lean on passion as much as Dean."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a4ce9805c6432b63df249f51da7f01bb&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVb&_md5=3fc04c073227cb54d1fe93959d81a781

Jones Quoted On Computer Voting (Computerworld, Jan. 26)
The politically paranoid got even more nervous last year when researchers at Johns Hopkins University analyzed the code inside AccuVote-TS machines built by Diebold Inc. and found it flawed. A Diebold spokesman says that the researchers ignored local election certification processes that help secure the systems. DOUGLAS JONES, a professor who studies election technology at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, says those processes are neither rigorous nor well enforced, especially when it comes to certifying technology. He points to a study of Diebold systems in California that found that every county that used the systems ignored the proper procedures for certifying and registering the machines. Both Avi Rubin, technical director for the Johns Hopkins' Information Security Institute in Baltimore, and Jones say the best way to ensure secure and accurate automated voting is with a paper audit trail.
http://www.computerworld.com/managementtopics/management/story/0,10801,89293,00.html

Provost Candidate Earned Doctorate At UI (Oswego Daily News, Jan. 26)
Five finalist candidates for the position of provost and vice president for academic affairs at SUNY Oswego are visiting campus for interviews this month and next. Candidate Susan Coultrap-McQuin, dean of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Minnesota State University, earned a doctorate in American studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper serves Oswego, N.Y.
http://www.oswegodailynews.com/homearticle.asp?id=38937&section=home&network=oswego

Nancy Drew Author Was UI Alumna (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Jan. 26)
An article about Ohio trivia notes that the Nancy Drew mysteries were written by longtime Toledo Blade reporter Millie Benson under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene. Benson, who was the first person to receive a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, died in Toledo in 2002.
http://www.cleveland.com/news/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/news/1075121723165250.xml

UI Alumnus Recalls UI Experience (Rapid City Journal, Jan. 26)
Columnist Walter Higbee writes about his tendency to procrastinate while he was an undergraduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Rapid City Journal is based in South Dakota.
http://www.rapidcityjournal.com/articles/2004/01/26/news/columns/769higbee.txt

Students Save Money Walking, Using Cambus (CNBC Online, Jan. 26)
A story that suggests ways people can reduce the cost of commuting to and from work suggests walking. It says that Angela Balcita, a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, will save $80 this semester by walking 20 minutes to school instead of buying a bus pass at the student-discount rate. And Laura Crossette, a recent graduate, takes advantage of the university's free Cambus service, which transports passengers around the downtown area. Similar free shuttles are available in many college towns and tourist areas.
http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/SavingandDebt/P66201.asp

UI Student Threat Case Cited (WSVN-TV, Jan. 26)

An update on the Kobe Bryant rape case says the case has prompted at least two threats against Bryant's accuser. John Roche Jr., a 22-year-old former student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, pleaded guilty Friday in federal court in Denver to leaving a profanity-laced death threat on the woman's answering machine last July. Roche faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine for making a threatening telephone call across state lines. The Fox-affiliate station is based in Miami, Fla. A version of the story also ran Jan. 24 on the website of KTTV-TV FOX 11 in Los Angeles, the DAILY HERALD in Illinois, the MISSOULA MISSOULIAN in Montana, the WINCHESTER SUN in Kentucky, the CANTON REPOSITORY in Ohio, the ONTARIO INLAND VALLEY BULLETIN in California, the LUFKIN DAILY NEWS in Texas and many other media outlets.
http://www.wsvn.com/news/articles/national/C34470

Former UI Student Roche Pleads Guilty (Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Jan. 26)
An Iowa man nervously clutched his trousers as he pleaded guilty Friday to leaving a profanity-laced death threat on the answering machine of NBA star Kobe Bryant's accuser. John Roche Jr., 22, told U.S. District Judge Walker Miller that he made the call, threatening to assault the 19-year-old woman with a coat hangar and repeatedly vowing to kill her. While Roche was in U.S. District Court, Bryant attended a motions hearing in his case in Eagle County District Court, about 100 miles west of Denver. Roche pleaded guilty to making a threatening telephone call across state lines. He faces a sentence ranging from probation to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Miller set sentencing June 4. Roche was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at the time of the threat but withdrew and moved to his parents' home in Davenport. A friend said earlier that Roche is a sports fanatic who had been drinking all day at a golf tournament before the call. The paper is based in Ontario, Calif. A version of the article also ran Jan. 23 on the website of the SACRAMENTO (Calif.) BEE.
http://www.dailybulletin.com/Stories/0,1413,203~26127~1911216,00.html

Goins Offers Explanation For Dry Eyes (Pak Tribune, Jan. 26)
Dr. KENNETH GOINS, an associate professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the University of Iowa, explains the causes of dry eyes and ways to manage the condition. "Many different factors can affect the tear film quality and amount, which leads to secondary changes in the eye and loss of vision," Goins says. The amount of lubricating tears produced by the eyes may vary, depending on whether the eyes are at rest or under stress, such as when you're reading. Pain, redness, decreased vision and the sensation of foreign objects in the eyes are among the complaints cited by people with severe dry eyes. The paper is based in Islamabad, Pakistan. A version of the story also ran Jan. 24 on YAHOO! HEALTH and on FORBES.COM.
http://www.paktribune.com/news/index.php?id=52778

UI Medicine Alumnus Joins Heart Center (Topeka Capital-Journal, Jan. 25)
Brian M. Beard, MD, has become part of the medical staff at Cotton O'Neil Heart Center in Kansas. Beard and his family are relocating from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he was on the cardiology staff at Cardiology P.C. Before that, he served on the cardiology staff at Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio. Beard was a U.S. Air Force flight officer. Beard received his medical degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, Iowa City, in 1992. The paper is based in Kansas.
http://cjonline.com/stories/012504/bus_iyb.shtml

Collinson Comments On Kerouac's 'On The Road' (Register-Guard, Jan. 25)
Like the trip that inspired it, the first draft of author Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" is a wandering narrative, told in a continuous block of text. Yellowed with age, smudged with editing marks and the author's own ink-covered fingerprints, the scroll rolls over nearly 120 feet of paper. Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay bought the scroll two years ago for $2.43 million. Now that it has been displayed in Indianapolis, Irsay plans to send what may be the Beat Generation's quintessential text back to the road where it came from. Beginning this week at the Orange County History Center in Orlando, Fla., and ending with a three-month stay at the New York Public Library in 2007, Kerouac's "On the Road" scroll will make a 13-stop, four-year national tour of museums and libraries. While some -- including The New York Times -- praised its publication, others dismissed it. "It's the way that it was written that, in many ways, is more important than what it really is," said HOWARD COLLINSON, director of the University of Iowa Museum of Art, which will show the entire scroll in 2005. "That it kind of just spewed out of him is what it's all about." The Register-Guard is based in Eugene, Ore.
http://www.registerguard.com/news/2004/01/25/ar.kerouacscroll.0125.html

UI Alumnus Joins South University Faculty (Savannah Morning News, Jan. 25)
South University has announced several additions to the faculty and staff. Dudley R. Koontz and Randolph F. Roddenberry have joined the faculty of the General Studies department. Koontz was president of a graphics company, executive vice president of a marketing firm in Iowa and holds a bachelor's and master's degree in political science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Georgia.
http://www.savannahnow.com/stories/012504/LOC_collegebriefs.shtml

Alumna Is Community Columnist For Paper (Pioneer-Press, Jan. 25)
Rosita Severin, a 1994 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW and a 1992 graduate of Purdue University, was introduced by the paper as one of its new community columnists. "I am now enjoying a maternity leave from my position as an assistant Ramsey County attorney," Severin writes. "I am proud to be, at least temporarily, a stay-at-home mom. I am blessed and honored to enjoy a challenging and rewarding prosecution career and the wonderful joys of motherhood." The Pioneer-Press is based in St. Paul, Minn.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/7782458.htm

Poet Hofer Studied At UI (Los Angeles Times, Jan. 25)
In our wireless-broadband-text messaging era of instant gratification, the manual typewriter would seem about as relevant as the Pony Express. But for Jen Hofer, poet, typewriter collector and escritorio publico, the imperfection of pre-digital technology is the stuff of romance. "I like that you have to write a little bit more slowly than you do on the computer," says Hofer, a Spanish speaker who owns 21 manual typewriters and honors the Mexican street tradition of letter-writing-for-hire by setting up her own booth on busy Los Angeles thoroughfares. "I like the sound. I like the way the letters bite into the paper. I like that they're uneven. I like that you can feel there is a human being involved in doing it. I like the whole manual mess of it." If all of this seems a bit seems a bit lyrical, perhaps it's the poet in Hofer coming out. She studied writing at Brown University and translation and poetry at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Hofer, whose father is Argentine, refreshed her childhood Spanish when she went to Mexico City to work on an anthology of Mexican poetry. Today, the Cypress Park resident works as a translator of Spanish language poems, fiction and nonfiction.
http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/magazine/la-tm-fxtypewriters04jan25,1,7070192.story?coll=la-headlines-magazine

Former UI Student Pleads Guilty In Bryant Case (Denver Post, Jan. 25)
The former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student accused of leaving a threatening phone message at the Eagle County home of Kobe Bryant's accuser pleaded guilty Friday to a felony charge of making a threatening call across state lines. According to his plea agreement, John Roche, 22, and two friends made the July 27 call from a bar in Dubuque, Iowa. His friends directed profane comments to the woman, who has accused the Los Angeles Lakers star of sexual assault. Roche spoke last, reciting the lyrics of a rap song containing threatening language, according to court records.
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~28682~1911386,00.html

Newman Singers To Perform In New Orleans (Times-Picayune, Jan. 25)
The Newman Singers visited SSA on Jan. 12 to participate in our Mass and give a concert later that afternoon. The Newman Singers is a liturgical and concert group from the Newman Catholic Student Center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. The group performs all over the country, following its founder and director Joe Mattingly, and has been visiting SSA for the past few years. The paper is based in New Orleans.
http://www.nola.com/picayunes/t-p/covingtonpicayune/index.ssf?/base/news-5/1075014943225010.xml

UI Hospital Treats Shooting Victims (KTVO-TV, Jan. 25)
The TV station reports that one person is dead and two others have been injured in a shooting at a plastics plant in Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. The shooting happened Saturday afternoon outside the Lamont Moldings Plant. Authorities say police responding to a call about a shooting found one man dead outside the plant. Another man and a woman were wounded. The injured were taken to Henry County Health Center, then later transported to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL in Iowa City. No names have been released. Authorities have not released any other details. Mt. Pleasant police say they are still investigating. The station is based in Missouri.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/Global/story.asp?S=1615962&nav=1LFsKPGD

UI Alumna Named Museum Director (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 25)
Deborah-Eve Lombard has been named director of the University of Nebraska at Omaha Art Gallery. She holds a master of arts in American studies and a master of arts in African-American world studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she is currently a Ph.D. candidate in American studies.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1465&u_sid=982490

Kerry Leads IEM (The Economist, Jan. 24)
Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts romped home to a famous victory in the Iowa Caucuses, with 38 percent of the vote, followed by Senator John Edwards of North Carolina, with 32 percent. In the informal futures market in presidential shares (the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS) arranged by the University of Iowa, Mr. Kerry has now swept past Mr. Dean
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7934f881291808e6315e1aae2c5ef458&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVb&_md5=5360de3f340b0015dd0a5fff588bbf45

Goins Offers Explanation For Dry Eyes (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Jan. 24)
Dr. KENNETH GOINS, an associate professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the University of Iowa, explains the causes of dry eyes and ways to manage the condition. "Many different factors can affect the tear film quality and amount, which leads to secondary changes in the eye and loss of vision," Goins says. The amount of lubricating tears produced by the eyes may vary, depending on whether the eyes are at rest or under stress, such as when you're reading. Pain, redness, decreased vision and the sensation of foreign objects in the eyes are among the complaints cited by people with severe dry eyes.
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/drug/516974.html

Kerry Earned Veterans' Support (San Diego Union Tribune, Jan. 24)
John Kerry's support among veterans was considered an essential ingredient to his upset victory in Iowa over rivals thought to be better organized. Kerry got a dramatic late boost in Iowa by the appearance of Jim Rassmann, a former Green Beret from Oregon who credits Kerry with saving his life and had not seen him in the 35 years since. "National security issues are central to most voters this year, and having the endorsement of veterans is one way to signal you're strong in that area," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/politics/20040124-9999_1n24vets.html

Bechara Comments On Body Awareness Study (WTVH-TV, Jan. 24)

People who are highly sensitive to their heartbeat and other internal "body states" tend to experience more anxiety and other negative emotions on a daily basis. So says a new British study in the February issue of Nature Neuroscience. Another expert in the field finds the new research important and "surprising," and offers the following perspective: "The idea that the subjective experience of emotion reflects awareness of internal body states is not new," says ANTOINE BECHARA, an assistant professor of neurology at the University of Iowa. The idea was suggested more than a hundred years ago. But it has been controversial within neuroscience circles, Bechara says, and some experts did not believe it. The new study, he says, provides hard evidence that the theory is true. "The evidence is based not only on functional neuroimaging, but also on measuring the size of a specific brain region, the anterior insular cortex." WTVH-TV is based in Syracuse, N.Y. Versions of the story also ran on the website of KPOM-TV NBC 24/KFAA-TV 51 Fort Smith, Ark.; KLKN-TV 8 Lincoln/Hastings/Kearney, Neb.; WLOX-TV ABC 13, Miss.; WGCL-TV CBS 46 Atlanta, Ga.; WRIC-TV ABC 8 Richmond, Va.; WGCL-TV CBS 46 Atlanta. Ga.; WTOL-TV CBS 11 Toledo, Ohio; and many other media outlets.
http://wtvh-tvhealth.ip2m.com/index.cfm?pt=itemDetail&Item_ID=109909&site_cat_id=1

UI Alumna Named Real Estate Sales Associate (Naples Daily News, Jan. 24)
Sara DeVilder has been named a sales associate in VIP Realty Group Inc.'s Bonita Springs, Fla. office. She is responsible for assisting customers and clients in residential sales in the Bonita Springs, south Lee County and North Naples areas. Originally from Cary, Ill., she has a bachelor's degree in physical education, German, and education from Cornell College in Mt. Vernon, Iowa and a master's degree in exercise science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Iowa. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.naplesnews.com/npdn/re_sales/article/0,2071,NPDN_14969_2600156,00.html

Hogan Named New UI Provost (Omaha World-Herald, Jan. 24)
The executive dean of the Colleges of Arts and Science at Ohio State University will be the University of Iowa's next chief academic officer. MICHAEL J. HOGAN, also a history professor at OSU, will be Iowa's next provost, President DAVID SKORTON announced Friday. In addition to serving as provost, Hogan will have an appointment as a tenured full history professor. Pending approval of his appointment by the Board of Regents, he will assume his new duties July 1. "I invite the entire campus to join me in warmly welcoming one of our own graduates back to our campus in this most significant position of responsibility and authority," Skorton said. The provost has oversight of all 11 colleges, continuing education, international programs, the libraries, and Iowa's museums. Hogan's master's and doctoral degrees in history are from the University of Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=984256

Author Attended UI (Scarborough Leader, Jan. 24)
A story about author James Sullivan, whose memoir "Over the Moat: Love Among the Ruins of Imperial Vietnam" describes how he met his wife halfway around the world, says Sullivan grew up in Quincy, Mass. After attending Colby College and receiving an English degree, he went on to graduate school for fiction writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Maine.
http://www.scarboroughleader.com/Pages/Edit1.html

Kutcher UI Ties Cited (Lexington Herald-Leader, Jan. 24)
A story about actor Ashton Kutcher says he began acting in junior high school in the population-100 town of Homestead, Iowa. When he was approached to enter a modeling contest while at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Kutcher signed up because the scout assured him it would be a good step toward an acting career. A version of the story also ran Jan. 25 on the website of the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/7785772.htm

Math Alumna Runs For California Assembly (La Prensa San Diego, Jan. 23)
On March 2, the Primary Elections will include five candidates running for State Assembly District 78, which includes a variety of areas across San Diego County, many of which have been added in 2002. Among the Democratic candidates is Maxine Sherard, elected chair of the Martin Luther King Democratic Club and an outspoken advocate against the war on Iraq. The story says Sherard earned a bachelor's degree from South Carolina State College, a master's degree from Michigan State University, and a Ph.D. in mathematics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. La Prensa San Diego is a weekly, bilingual (English/Spanish) newspaper of general circulation in San Diego, California.
http://www.laprensa-sandiego.org/current/78thrace.htm

Playwright Smith Attended UI Workshop (Chicago Sun-Times, Jan. 23)
A story about playwright Charles Smith says his newest work is "Free Man of Color," a commission by Ohio University, where he heads the Professional Playwriting Program. The story says Smith applied to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, home of the formidable IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. He was accepted and earned his bachelor's and master of arts degrees. "I had the right teacher pushing me at the right time," reflected Smith.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/theater/wkp-news-stage23.html

Grant Comments On Athletics (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 23)
For once, the action at the National Collegiate Athletic Association was not about big-time college sports. At the association's 98th annual meeting in Nashville, which drew almost 1,800 delegates, the NCAA's leadership and the national news media focused their attention on the concerns of the 420-odd colleges belonging to Division III. During a session on the future of "nonrevenue" sports -- those other than football and men's basketball -- the U.S. Olympic Committee's acting chief executive officer, Jim Scherr, called for the formation of a joint USOC-NCAA task force to find ways to keep colleges from dropping teams, especially in men's sports, that are training grounds for American Olympic teams. The NCAA and its members have not acted on the proposal. CHRISTINE H.B. GRANT, former women's athletics director at the University of Iowa, noted that colleges in Divisions II and III have actually added more men's teams than they have dropped, but that many Division I members, especially those with Division I-A football teams, have dropped some men's sports programs.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i20/20a03701.htm

State Cuts Could Endanger Indigent Care Program (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 23)
Officials overseeing a health care program for the poor say further state budget cuts could seriously alter, if not destroy, the 89-year-old program. After three years of funding cuts, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Indigent Patient Care Program already operates on the same amount of money -- $27.9 million -- as it did 12 years ago. A $700,000 reduction last fall led to the elimination of some free services, such as prosthetics, eyeglasses and other take-home medical supplies. Funding could be scaled back even further as lawmakers look to save an additional $208 million.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=983050

Ashton Kutcher Not Really A Goofball (Miami Herald, Jan. 23)
A profile of Ashton Kutcher says the actor is not like his public tabloid personae of a dimwitted goofball. Following high school in Cedar Rapids, he enrolled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as a biochemical engineering major, but he dropped out after one year when he won a modeling contest in a shopping mall. First prize was a trip to New York City, where he signed with an agent. "That's my story," Kutcher says with a laugh, "and I'm sticking to it." Several other stories about Kutcher referring to his year as a UI student also appeared in the TORONTO STAR, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL and numerous other newspaper Web sites.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/entertainment/movies/7770692.htm

UI Alumnus Play To Premiere In Chicago (Chicago Sun Times, Jan. 23)
Playwright Charles Smith has a knack for delving into topics that uncover and heighten interesting chapters of African-American history. Research and digging have become an elemental ingredient of his creative process. In 1996's epic-scale drama "Black Star Line," he illuminated the life and beliefs of Marcus Garvey, a controversial figure who promoted racial separatism. The 2000 drama "Knock Me a Kiss" focused on W.E.B. Du Bois, his relationship with his daughter Yolande and how he put his work above the personal happiness of his family. Smith's newest work is "Free Man of Color," a commission by Ohio University, where he heads the Professional Playwriting Program. The drama, which will have its world premier at Victory Gardens Theater, brings light to another hazy chapter in African-American history. Smith has a B.A. and M.A. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the UI WRITER'S WORKSHOP.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/theater/wkp-news-stage23.html

UI Study Examines College Student Drinking (WFIE-TV, Jan. 23)
Perceptions about friends' drinking habits affect college students more than marketing campaigns that encourage them to abstain or use alcohol responsibly. That's the conclusion of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study in the latest issue of Health Communication. "Social-norms" ads and poster campaigns use facts or statistics to correct student misconceptions about the drinking habits of their fellow students. The message is that most students are moderate drinkers or non-drinkers. WFIE is in Evansville, Ind.
http://www.14wfie.com/Global/story.asp?S=1612770

Whitmore Brings UI Program To Texas Tech (Amarillo Globe News, Jan. 22)
Texas Tech President Jon Whitmore announced Thursday a plan to help students graduate in four years and battle the escalating cost of higher education. Tech will allow fall freshmen to sign a contract stating that if they meet a set of requirements, they will not pay for more than four years of college tuition. Whitmore said he believes the four-year graduation contract is the first of its kind in Texas. A similar one is offered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he was provost before taking the Tech job in August.
http://www.amarillonet.com/stories/012304/tex_techprogram.shtml

Edwards Moves Into Second Place On IEM (CBS Marketwatch, Jan. 22)
The Iowa Electronics Market at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA gives John Kerry about a 46 percent chance of winning the Democratic nomination. The rest of the field, including Edwards, has a 23 percent chance of winning, followed by Clark at 16 percent and Dean at 15 percent. Edwards futures will begin trading on Friday at noon, the Iowa market said. The same story appeared on DRKOOP.COM and YAHOO! News
http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?siteid=mktw&dist=mktwmore&guid=%7B5DBFEDC3%2D0A68%2D45B6%2D9D39%2DE52B3DE40236%7D

Jones Discusses Voting Machine Technology (KNOX Radio, Jan. 22)
DOUGLAS JONES
, associate professor of computer science, was interviewed in a story about voting machine technology and electronic voting technology on the program "The Voice of Dakota." KNOX is in Grand Forks, N.D. This story does not appear online.

Adams Always In Motion (Tuscon Weekly, Jan 22)
The poetry of physics is something choreographer CHARLOTTE ADAMS knows quite a bit about. Atom-like, she routinely zips along a trajectory between four divergent points on the globe. A self-confessed "Tucson girl," known for co-pioneering the now-defunct company 10th Street Danceworks, she still owns a house in town. But her full-time job is in the Midwest, where she's assistant professor of dance at the University of Iowa. Twice in recent years, she's taken her new company, Charlotte Adams and Dancers, to New York City to perform at the prestigious Joyce Soho.
http://www.tucsonweekly.com/gbase/Arts/Content?oid=oid:52944

UI Alumnus Named Principal (Rolling Meadows, Jan. 22)
A profile of Charles Johns, the new principal of Rolling Meadows High School, notes that he has a bachelor degree in English and psychology and a master's degree in English from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He received his doctorate in educational leadership and policy studies from Loyola University of Chicago.
http://www.journal-topics.com/mp/04/mp040121.4.html

Segura Comments On Labor Influence (Waterbury Republican-American, Jan. 22)
The results of Monday's Iowa caucuses may have muddled the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, but left little doubt that Big Labor's political clout is declining. The two candidates most favored by unions, former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean and Rep. Richard Gephardt of Missouri, were also-rans, together mustering only 29 percent of the vote in a state that hasn't backed a Republican in a presidential election in 20 years. With Rep. Gephardt out of the race and Gov. Dean's fortunes falling, it will be interesting to see to which candidate Big Labor will hitch its wagon. "The Democratic nominee is going to need organized labor in a big way to be even remotely competitive with President Bush," said GARY SEGURA, a University of Iowa political scientist.
http://www.rep-am.com/editorials/7hx2.htm

Squire Comments On Kerry Victory (South China Morning Post Jan. 21)
Iowa caucuses expert PEVERILL SQUIRE said Senator Kerry's victory in the Iowa Caucuses did not guarantee him Democratic nomination to challenge George Bush. The professor of political science at the University of Iowa and author of Iowa Caucuses and the Presidential Nominating Process, said the vote had been critical simply because it was first on the schedule. It had provided the voters' initial assessment of the candidates. "Those who did well here, usually considered to be the top three finishers in a crowded field like this one, have got a boost," Professor Squire said from Iowa City. "Those lagging behind will find it hard to sustain their campaigns. Winning Iowa does not guarantee the nomination, but doing poorly makes it very difficult to continue in the race."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=c65fc0b8d9ef99528a56c20c674987fe&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=b24521f50b4c8397b292a61181c101ed

Dean Rally Held At UI (Wall Street Journal, Jan. 21)
All the Democratic candidates for President agree on expanding availability for health insurance and have plans to make college more affordable. For his part, Howard Dean also will point to his time as a governor and a successful record of fiscal discipline at a time when all the candidates are attacking George Bush for record budget deficits. The surprising new appeal of that argument among Democrats was evident at a Dean rally at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Sunday night, where rocker Joan Jett, traveling with the campaign, warmed up the crowd. For her, she said, Dean's antiwar stance was just "icing on the cake." The main reason she was drawn to the Vermonter, she said, was "he balanced the budget 11 times in 11 years." The crowd of students roared.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB107464827269507197-search,00.html?collection=autowire%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

Author Harrison Attended Workshop (Newsday, Jan. 21)
A story about author Colin Harrison, whose books include 1993's "Bodies Electric," 1996's "Manhattan Nocturne," and the latest novel "The Havana Room," says he majored in English at Haverford College, a Quaker institution near Philadelphia, before immersing himself in the fiction writing regimen at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP. There he met his future wife.
http://www.nynewsday.com/entertainment/ny-p2cover3633709jan21,0,6002934.story?coll=nyc-ent-short-navigation

UI Alumna A Leader In Indie Film Industry (Village Voice, Jan. 21)
A story about the ailing independent film industry says that in the last year, two young distribution executives, Wellspring Media's Marie Therese Guirgis and Palm Pictures' Ryan Werner, have carried the mantle of art cinema with daring vigor. Guirgis, who took the reins of Wellspring's acquisitions in March, most recently picked up Tsai Ming-liang's "Goodbye Dragon Inn," voted Best Undistributed Film in last month's Voice critics' poll. The purchase continues the company's commitment to auteur cinema. Wellspring opened Jafar Panahi's Crimson Gold last week (following their release of the Iranian director's The Circle in 2001) and has distributed all of the works of Bruno Dumont, even partially financing his latest Twentynine Palms (due out this March), and had a banner year with Alexander Sokurov's Russian Ark, one of the top-grossing foreign releases of 2003. "I would be lying if I said we knew it would be a hit," admits Guirgis. "I like to think of it as karma." Guirgis, who did post-grad work in film studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has ratcheted up her share of good karma releasing the kind of "new classics," as she calls them, that the studio art-house divisions have since abandoned.
http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0403/kaufman.php

Squire: Remember Gephardt Contributions (Kansas City Star, Jan. 21)
Rep. Richard Gephardt, who bowed out of the presidential race this week after faring poorly in the Iowa caucuses, will probably remain best known for his failures: his two presidential campaigns, and his persistent failure as Democratic leader to win back the House after the 1994 Republican takeover. "But it's probably unfair," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political scientist. "He had his fingerprints on a lot of legislation in the past two decades, mostly programs that provide benefits" to poor and working-class families. Versions of the story also ran Jan. 21 on the websites of the BILLINGS (Mont.) GAZETTE and the KANSAS CITY STAR.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/local/7756851.htm

Dean, Joan Jett Visited UI Campus (Portsmouth Herald, Jan. 21)
A story about the stances of the Democratic presidential candidates on various issues says all of them agree on expanding availability for health insurance and have plans to make college more affordable. For his part, former Vermont Gov. Dean also will point to his time as a governor and a successful record of fiscal discipline at a time when all the candidates are attacking Bush for record budget deficits. The surprising new appeal of that argument among Democrats was evident at a Dean rally at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Sunday night, where rocker Joan Jett, traveling with the campaign, warmed up the crowd. For her, she said, Dean's anti-war stance was just "icing on the cake." The main reason she was drawn to the Vermonter, she said, was "he balanced the budget 11 times in 11 years." The Herald is based in New Hampshire.
http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/01212004/news/71534.htm

Squire: Iowa Reshuffled Political Deck (Christian Science Monitor, Jan. 21)
In two short hours, caucus-goers in Iowa meeting around kitchen tables and in high school gymnasiums have ripped up the conventional political wisdom of the past six months -- delivering one of the biggest turnabouts in modern electoral history. By handing a stunning victory to Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts, Iowa's Democrats have -- overnight -- anointed a new frontrunner in the race for the Democratic nomination and seriously imperiled the candidacy of former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean. Dr. Dean, for months the heavy favorite in the race, came in a distant third, behind Senator Kerry and a strong second-place showing by North Carolina Sen. John Edwards. Missouri Rep. Richard Gephardt, who staked his candidacy on a win in Iowa, made clear he would withdraw from the race after a weak fourth-place showing. "It certainly shuffles the deck," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "[Kerry and Edwards] will probably shoot to the top of the pack. And it puts Dean in a very precarious position. He's really going to have a make or break event in New Hampshire."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0121/p25s02-uspo.html

Squire: War Less An Issue In Campaign (Christian Science Monitor, Jan. 21)
One of the most important matters for Democratic presidential candidates may be the decreasing importance of the war in Iraq as a campaign issue. Although the conflict dominated the campaign for months, boosting former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean and creating problems for opponents like Sen. John Kerry, it has receded -- and even begun to work against Dean -- in the wake of Saddam Hussein's capture. Strikingly, entrance polls in Iowa showed that Kerry, not Dean, won among Democrats who opposed the Iraq war. The top priority all along for Iowa Democrats has been to nominate the candidate who would be the strongest opponent against President Bush, notes PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. And Hussein's capture -- along with the questions being raised about Dean's temperament and overall electability -- may have tipped the balance toward Kerry and Sen. John Edwards. "What happened for both Senators Kerry and Edwards was that in just the last week and a half, people really became much more comfortable with their candidacies. They began to look like the sort of people you could see running in November," he says, whereas "a lot of people were really worried about Governor Dean's ability to be a viable candidate against Bush."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0121/p01s02-uspo.html

UI Among Universities Aiding National Arts Programs (UPI, Jan. 21)
The nation's arts programs are finding universities increasingly helpful in funding new projects at a time when federal and state grants and philanthropic giving are failing to respond to the general economic recovery. Universities that have been active in commissioning artists to create new works are the University of California, Ohio State University, Miami-Dade Community College in Florida, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and the University of Michigan, which collaborated with Columbia University in New York in staging Salman Rushdie's dramatization of his novel "Midnight's Children" last spring. The University of Iowa put up $500,000 in production costs for the Joffrey Ballet's version of "The Nutcracker," about a third of the total cost, and for that it got performances of the work on campus and visits by the dancers with university students and other interested groups in the community.
http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20040121-021821-6265r

Squire: Ads Hurt Dean, Gephardt (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Jan. 21)
Nice beat negative in political ads in Iowa. North Carolina Sen. John Edwards used TV spots featuring sunshine and optimism to rise from obscurity to a strong second-place finish in Monday's caucuses. Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry won with commercials that were a tad edgier, stressing his foreign policy experience and heroism in the Vietnam War and, by implication at least, his opponents' lack of such attributes. But the two candidates with the most combative ads, former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean and Missouri Rep. Dick Gephardt, suffered surprising defeats. "Gephardt and Dean managed to raise questions about both of their candidacies with their advertising strategies," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Kerry and Edwards managed to stay above the fray and both of them came out looking more presidential than the others. With electability weighing heavily on the minds of most Iowa Democrats, Kerry and Edwards looked like stronger candidates for the fall."
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5627734c0dc2887f08fa635891d752c2&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=cb6b0f47016e7ea0115555676c1fd751

Squire: Dean Scream Not Presidential (Burlington Free Press, Jan. 21)
So much for grace under pressure. Among Vermonters impressed with Howard Dean's remarkable quest for the 2004 Democratic presidential nomination, the former governor's behavior following his third-place finish in the Iowa caucuses Monday had to be -- oh, how should this be put -- embarrassing. Is this the man, who won 10 straight elections in Vermont and governed the state effectively for 11 years, the same person who stunned the nation with a performance that can only be described as bizarre? The scene has been replayed constantly on cable television.
The more you see it, the more you cringe. To put it mildly, Dean's demeanor was hardly presidential. "What he may have done in the end was reaffirm some of the concerns that people have had with him," University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE told The Des Moines Register. "People don't expect a real president to do that."
http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/bfpnews/editorial/wednesday/2000h.htm

Kerry Surges In IEM (Myrtle Beach Sun News, Jan. 21)
Sen. John Kerry has taken the lead for the Democratic presidential nomination away from former Gov. Howard Dean, according to two markets that allow investors to trade on candidates' futures. On the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's political market, the odds of a Dean nomination peaked at about 75 percent in early December. On Tuesday, the odds that Dean would win the nomination fell to just 24 percent from more than 50 percent on Saturday.
http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/7759285.htm

Squire Says Democrats Think Kerry Is Better Candidate (Liberation, Jan. 21)
Massachusetts Senator John Kerry won a surprising 38 percent of the Democratic delegates of Iowa, more than double the vote for Howard Dean, who was the leader until 10 days before the caucuses. What happened? "As the date of the caucus approached, people paid closer attention to the candidates. They ended up figuring that Dean would not be solid enough against Bush, "says PEVERILL SQUIRE, political scientist at the University of Iowa. (The article is in French.)
http://www.liberation.com/page.php?Article=172605

Group Sells Shirts For UI Student (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 21)
The Mid-Day Optimists Club of Council Bluffs is selling T-shirts to raise money for 18-year-old Tim Reedy, who is awaiting a heart transplant. Reedy, a 2003 graduate of Lewis Central High School, enrolled this fall at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He was stricken Sept. 20 with a heart ailment similar to one that caused the death of his brother Kevin in 2001. Tim Reedy remains at UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS in Iowa City. He is taking classes over the Internet.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1636&u_sid=980741

Dean Raised Roof At UI (Irish Times, Jan. 20)
It was more like a rock concert than a political rally. It was in fact a gig of sorts, as candidate Howard Dean was preceded on stage by Joan Jet, the "original bad girl" of rock and roll. Dressed in leather pants and black top, she had over 1,000 young people stomping and screaming as she sang, "Just around the corner is the light of day". She got the standing-only crowd so worked up that when the former Vermont governor appeared in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA auditorium, they lifted the roof off. Witnessing the excitement of the grand finale to Dean's Iowa campaign, one would have thought he was the hottest ticket in the state, except that similar scenes of near-frenzy were being played out at rallies across Iowa for rival candidates, Senator John Kerry (who had Senator Edward Kennedy whipping up the fans), Senator John Edwards and Congressman Dick Gephardt.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5627734c0dc2887f08fa635891d752c2&_docnum=8&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVA&_md5=d63ce70092e103ab45e0dee79fd88494

Squire Calls Kerry Win A 'Terrific Boost' (Los Angeles Times, Jan. 20)
John F. Kerry sat in a 10th-floor suite at the Hotel Fort Des Moines on Monday night, surrounded by his family, grinning. Howard Dean had called to offer congratulations. He'd called Dick Gephardt himself. He and John Edwards had played phone tag but finally connected. The first-in-the-nation Iowa caucus results were in, and he was the winner. The win gives Kerry a "terrific boost" going into New Hampshire, a state where he is trailing badly, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "That will cause a lot of people in New Hampshire to reassess their current views. For Kerry coming out of here in first place would certainly give him a good shot at pulling out an upset there too." This story also appeared Jan. 20 on the web site of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-na-kerry20jan20,1,5639649.story?coll=la-home-politics

Squire: Caucus Results Will 'Reshuffle' Race (Hartford Courant, Jan. 20)
John Kerry and John Edwards crushed their Democratic rivals in Monday's Iowa caucuses, instantly establishing themselves as strong front-runners and staggering the campaigns of one-time favorites Howard Dean and Dick Gephardt. Monday's outcome will "reshuffle the race," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, political analyst at the University of Iowa.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/politics/hc-iowa0120.artjan20,1,4195591.story?coll=hc-headlines-politics

Covington Comments On Caucus Media (Washington Times, Jan. 20)
The Iowa caucuses were transformed from a heartland curiosity story to a major showcase for political trends and media mettle this year. An indefatigable press chronicled each vignette of Democrats eager to pass muster in Davenport or Council Bluffs - the pancake breakfasts, the farm visits, the poll surges. "There were only so many hours in a day for the public to take in caucus coverage," noted University of Iowa political analyst CARY COVINGTON yesterday. "There was not more coverage per se, just more reporters doing it." He doesn't think Iowans were fazed by any of it. "They paid more attention to the candidate's public contacts. Four or five election cycles ago, TV ads were all that was needed. Not any more. The hopefuls had to get out there," Mr. Covington said.
http://washingtontimes.com/national/20040119-113833-5984r.htm

Squire Comments On Kerry, Edwards (San Diego Union-Tribune, Jan. 20)
Sen. John Kerry scored an improbable come-from-behind victory in the Iowa Democratic caucuses last night with Sen. John Edwards running a strong second, dealing a major blow to fallen front-runner Howard Dean. Missouri Rep. Dick Gephardt finished a distant fourth and suggested he will drop out of the race. He has decided to head home to St. Louis rather than travel on to New Hampshire for the nation's first primary next Tuesday. Kerry's Iowa win is expected to put him back into contention in New Hampshire and Edward's finish here may make him a factor in the nation's first primary election. "I think they both benefit enormously," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "I think this puts Kerry back into front-runner status and will put him back in strong contention in New Hampshire. For Edwards, it will give him the money he needs to be competitive through South Carolina and beyond."
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/politics/20040120-9999_1n20iowa.html

Squire Comments On Dean, Gephardt (Kansas City Star, Jan. 20)
Sen. John Kerry and Sen. John Edwards grabbed the top two spots in Iowa's caucuses Monday night, rocking Howard Dean and shoving Missouri's Richard Gephardt out of the race. The results represented a stunning reversal of a race that just two weeks ago appeared to be a battle between Dean and Gephardt for first place. "Both Dean and Gephardt ran into the same problem," said University of Iowa political scientist PEVERILL SQUIRE. "Voters began to give them a second look, and there were some serious concerns about whether they could win in November."
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/nation/7749859.htm

Redlawsk Calls Dean Collapse 'Incredible' (The Australian, Jan. 20)
Vietnam War veteran John Kerry has won a stunning upset victory in the opening battle of the Democrat presidential race, exploiting his strong military experience to rout former frontrunner Howard Dean. The other big winner was dashing southern lawyer John Edwards, 50, who also surged from negligible levels of support to win 32 per cent of the vote thanks to a relentlessly positive campaign to build a "new America." Political analyst DAVID REDLAWSK, of the University of Iowa, said Dr Dean's collapse was "incredible".
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,8448387%255E2703,00.html

Redlawsk, Squire Comment On Spending (The Guardian, Jan. 20)
By the time the campaign juggernaut rolls out of Iowa today, the Democratic contenders will have spent at least $12 million (6.7 million pounds) to win over caucus-goers, setting new records for the first battle of the election season. According to DAVID REDLAWSK of the University of Iowa, the biggest spender was Howard Dean. He says Mr. Dean spent an estimated $7m on his Iowa campaign, including advertising, organization, staff and direct mail. More than any of his opponents, the former Vermont governor can afford it. He raised more than $40m last year, and $2m this month. "When all the money is totaled up this will be the most ever spent here," says PEVERILL SQUIRE of the University of Iowa. "The last month and a half has been a constant barrage of TV ads and mailings." The newspaper is based in the U.K.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uselections2004/story/0,13918,1126843,00.html

Nelson Bides Time At Caucus (San Jose Mercury News, Jan. 20)
The bigger-than-expected turnout at one precinct caucus on Iowa City's Democratic-leaning west side delayed the start by about 20 minutes. Inside the jammed cafeteria festooned with campaign signs, rookie precinct chairman Dale Shultz got the meeting underway 15 minutes late, announcing that 304 people had shown up at a meeting expected to draw 200. The overflowing crowd and delay didn't seem to bother Theresa Strabala, 73, a former precinct chairwoman in the 1960s. She said it was the biggest caucus crowd she had ever seen as she knitted a green, blue and white afghan. She wasn't the only one to bring something to occupy their time during the slow moments of the caucus. JOHN NELSON, a University of Iowa professor, knocked off 35 pages of Umberto Eco's "The Name of the Rose." At a nearby cafeteria table, a young woman played solitaire while others munched on cookies, peach and raspberry coffee cake and sipped bottled water while Shultz and others tallied the second of three votes that would help determine which candidates would secure the precinct's nine delegates. Versions of this Associated Press story also appeared Jan. 20 on the web sites of the LOS ANGELES TIMES, CHARLESTON (W.V.) GAZETTE, PENN LIVE in Pennsylvania, NEWSDAY, MLIVE in Michigan, the GUARDIAN (U.K.), BALTIMORE SUN, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, WLS-TV in Illinois, KATV in Arkansas, WCIV-TV in South Carolina, WJLA-TV in Washington, D.C., ABC NEWS.com, and OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/politics/7750957.htm

Squire Calls Dean Position 'Precarious' (Christian Science Monitor, Jan. 20)
In two short hours, caucus-goers in Iowa meeting around kitchen tables and in high school gymnasiums have ripped up the conventional political wisdom of the past six months - delivering one of the biggest turnabouts in modern electoral history. By handing a stunning victory to Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts, Iowa's Democrats have - overnight - anointed a new frontrunner in the race for the Democratic nomination and seriously imperiled the candidacy of former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean. Dr. Dean, for months the heavy favorite in the race, came in a distant third, behind Senator Kerry and a strong second-place showing by North Carolina Sen. John Edwards. Missouri Rep. Richard Gephardt, who staked his candidacy on a win in Iowa, made clear he would withdraw from the race after a weak fourth-place showing. "It certainly shuffles the deck," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "[Kerry and Edwards] will probably shoot to the top of the pack. And it puts Dean in a very precarious position. He's really going to have a make or break event in New Hampshire."
http://www.csmonitor.com/earlyed/early_usa0119.htm

Marner Says Parents Look For Role On Campus (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 20)
Parents are taking an increasingly activist role on campuses across the country. One non-profit group, College Parents of America, is in the early stages of a membership campaign aimed at mimicking the lobbying success of AARP. Many parents figure that if they're spending thousands of dollars on their child's education, they ought to have a voice, experts say. Many administrators are comfortable with the trend. "If our parents are well informed about policies and where to refer their children in certain situations, they can be our partners rather than our adversaries," says BELINDA MARNER, assistant vice president for student services at the University of Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=979410

Squire: Iowa Win Benefited Edwards, Kerry (Peoria Journal Star, Jan. 20)
Sen. John Kerry pulled off a stunning come-from-behind victory in the Iowa Democratic caucuses Monday, with Sen. John Edwards running a strong second, dealing a major blow to onetime front-runner Howard Dean. Kerry's Iowa win was expected to put him back into contention in New Hampshire, the nation's first primary election, and perhaps make Edwards a factor there, as well. "I think they both benefit enormously," PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political expert at the University of Iowa, said. "I think this puts Kerry back into front-runner status and will put him back in strong contention in New Hampshire. For Edwards, it will give him the money he needs to be competitive through South Carolina and beyond."
http://www.pjstar.com/news/topnews/b1ukkg4j046.html

Jones Comments On Voting Machines (New Scientist, Jan. 20)
Computer scientists are concerned that new electronic voting machines -- already bought by several U.S. states -- have been designed to have the capability to transmit vote tallies wirelessly. Critics of e-voting have previously cited uncertified software upgrades or bugs in the programs as problems, but they say the new touchscreen machines' wireless potential poses a novel security threat. The makers of the new machines, Diebold Electronic Voting Systems in Canton, Ohio, point out that none of the AccuVote-TSx machines currently contain the matchbox-sized card required to make a wireless network connection. But, unlike their predecessors, they do have a slot for the card, called a PCMCIA slot. And Diebold spokesperson Mark Radke told New Scientist that wireless capability could be implemented "if required by the jurisdiction" simply by inserting a card and configuring the machine. Proponents of e-voting argue it makes elections faster and fairer, avoiding the clerical errors that can occur with traditional paper votes. "The benefits to election officials would be huge," admits DOUG JONES, a computer scientist at the University of Iowa. But for Jones and other computer scientists contacted by New Scientist, the potential risks outweigh the benefits.
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99994584

UI Restricts Drug Company Sponsorships (New York Times, Jan. 20)
An opinion piece about interactions between medical residents and pharmaceutical sales people notes that in 1999, in response to growing concern in academic medicine, most pharmaceutical companies voluntarily adopted American Medical Association policies restricting lavish gift-giving to doctors. Some training programs went further, developing strict policies that limit access to medical students and residents. Policies adopted by the University of Michigan, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, among others, have restricted pharmaceutical sponsorship of educational activities, have limited or completely eliminated their representatives' contact with trainees and have restricted gifts and where they can be displayed.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/20/health/policy/20COMM.html?ex=1075179600&en=7fa0a3545d908a0d&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

UI Press Book Is Finalist For Award (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Jan. 20)
One of the nominees for the 2004 Minnesota Book Award in the anthology and collections category is "Visiting Walt: Poems Inspired by the Life & Work of Walt Whitman" edited by Sheila Coghill and Thom Toammaro, published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/4327815.html

Nowak Advises Weaning At 12 Months (American Baby, Jan. 20)
Any parent who has witnessed the love affair between baby and bottle knows security is a bottle's main appeal. But most pediatricians recommend that parents start weaning their child off the bottle at around 12 months, for a host of reasons. One of them is that prolonged bottle drinking can damage baby teeth. Mobile toddlers tend to tote their bottles around, drinking on the go, as opposed to infants, who are usually fed in a parent's arms, with the bottle being removed as soon as the feeding session is over. If the bottle contains anything other than water, what you have is an acidic solution that is washing over the teeth and decalcifying them, which can lead to cavities, says ART NOWAK, MD, a professor in the departments of pediatric dentistry and pediatrics at the University of Iowa.
http://www.americanbaby.com/ab/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/ab/story/data/1259.xml

Andrejevic Comments On Proposed Show (Philadelphia Inquirer, Jan. 20)
On UPN's proposed reality series, with the working title Amish in the City, five Amish young adults will be uprooted from their simple life and placed with five "mainstream" Americans in a yet-to-be-disclosed city. Will people watch a show about uprooted Amish? Almost certainly, said MARK ANDREJEVIC, author of Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched. "Reality TV seems to be fashioning itself into an Animal Planet for humans," said Andrejevic, an assistant professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa. "It's like a laboratory experiment: Take people who wouldn't otherwise spend time together, put them in jar, and see what happens. The Amish are a group that lends itself to that kind of approach because lots of people who aren't exposed to them find them to be a novelty." Versions of the story also ran Jan. 20 on the websites of the DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, the ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS, the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, THE SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, the WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, the KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, and the GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/local/7749534.htm

Kutcher Attended UI (Globe and Mail, Jan. 20)
A story about actor Ashton Kutcher notes that he left his biochemical engineering studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to pursue a career in modeling.
http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20040120.wkutcher0120/BNStory/Entertainment/

Former UI Patient Recovering (Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, Jan. 20)
A profile of a girl recovering from anorexia nervosa notes that she was diagnosed with the disease in 1999 and has been hospitalized four times since then. After her last hospital stay at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 2002, she started the Maudsley method, which may have saved her life. The Maudsley method, named for the London hospital where it first was used 20 years ago, has drawn a lot of attention in the past few years for its unorthodox approach. Instead of placing blame on the parents and preventing them from being involved in any food-related decisions, it has parents take over food supervision. The goal is to make sure that the patient eats enough to gain weight before gradually giving control back.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/7752229.htm

Bloom Comments On Immigration (Arizona Republic, Jan. 19)
America's heartland is becoming a Latin American heartland, too, but in the eyes of many Iowans whose caucuses today will help shape the national political agenda, neither President Bush nor the Democrats who want to displace him are dealing with that reality. Ironically, restiveness in the Midwest about immigration could be a blessing for Arizona and other border states, according to one view, because it casts the issue in national, not just regional, terms. Undocumented immigration is "America's dirty little secret," says author and University of Iowa associate journalism Professor STEPHEN G. BLOOM. "It's getting people to work long hours for low pay with no benefits, and those people, by and large, are grateful for that opportunity." Until something goes wrong. "The question hasn't been answered yet: Who is going to take care of these people?" Bloom says.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/news/articles/0119Iowa-immigration19.html

Talbott: Dean Needed Undecided Vote (News8Austin, Jan. 19)
It's a dramatic switch. For months, Missouri Congressman Richard Gephardt and former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean took turns leading in the polls in Iowa, but now the momentum belongs to Sens. John Kerry and John Edwards. Their surge is the talk of the Hawkeye State as the presidential primary season kicks off with the Iowa caucuses Monday. It's going to take more than just popularity in Iowa; the candidates must turn out their vote. "Now you'd have to be a fool to make a prediction," University of Iowa Professor BASIL TALBOTT said. He said the excitement over Dean may be over after months of attacks by his opponents. "Dean himself, as a candidate, has stumbled in the last few weeks," Talbott said. "There were quite a few people in Iowa who were undecided, and they have been looking around, and Dean has not been picking up that vote. Other candidates have."
http://www.news8austin.com/content/headlines/?ArID=95523&SecID=2

Squire Sees Gephardt Swan Song (Newsday, Jan. 19)
It has the feel of a last stand: Dick Gephardt exhorting aging union members to get Iowans out to the caucuses for him tonight, to win one for the old faithful political stalwart who's been with them for years. With his political career on the line, and the race in Iowa tick-tight, Gephardt is counting on his old-line supporters to rally one more time. Political analysts say that if Gephardt loses here, he will not have the wherewithal to continue. "My guess is that for better or worse, this is the last we'll see of Dick Gephardt on the national scene," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor. "If he wins here, it will be by such a small margin he won't get the movement he needs. If he doesn't win here, there's no way to make a case to continue his campaign. This is a last desperate effort by his supporters to try to pull out a miracle finish."
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/nation/ny-usgeph193632061jan19,0,3221732.story?coll=ny-nationalnews-headlines

Squire Took Part In Internet Discussion (Washington Post, Jan. 19)
PEVERILL SQUIRE
, University of Iowa political science professor and author of "The Iowa Caucuses and the Presidential Nominating Process," participated in a live discussion on the newspaper's web site.
http://discuss.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/zforum/04/sp_politics_peverill011904.htm

Dean Rallies At UI (Washington Post, Jan. 19)
A "special guest," promised the campaign of Howard Dean, would be making an appearance with the candidate in Iowa in the last full day of campaigning before Monday's caucus vote. The tease worked; speculation took flight. Perhaps another appearance by Al Gore? Maybe a visit by a movie or rock star? It was Judy Dean, the candidate's wife, a famously private figure who has not appeared on the campaign trail and whose distance from her husband's political pursuits has become a subject of commentary. Her appearance was the highlight of Dean's day here, which was shortened because he spent most of the daylight portion of Sunday in Georgia, meeting and going to church with former president Jimmy Carter. He was finishing with a sprint of rallies at a school here; in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he acknowledged that his own tracking polls have him one point behind; and culminating with a rally at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A28100-2004Jan18.html

Squire: Kerry Waited For Dean Stumble (Boston Globe, Jan. 19)
Polls are of limited value in predicting the horse-trading that will take place at tonight's Iowa caucuses. Any of the four leaders -- Sen. John Kerry, Gov. Howard Dean, Sen. John Edwards, and Rep. Dick Gephardt -- could come out on top, and the others could walk away with delegates as well. But there is no denying that Kerry had staged a stunning comeback in public opinion in the closing days of the fight for the Hawkeye State. The timing and trajectory of Kerry's surge -- in which he has wooed voters from other campaigns and won first-place status in recent polls -- cannot be tied to any one transformative moment, Kerry's advisers and political analysts say, although there were times along the way that portended an upswing. Edwards, by contrast, enjoyed one clear jolt: The Des Moines Register's Jan. 11 endorsement of his ardently optimistic candidacy as "a cut above the others," which within days had translated into larger crowds and greater popularity in voter surveys. "Kerry was always sort of lurking behind and waiting for Dean to stumble, and Dean managed to do it," said PEREVILL SQUIRE, a political analyst at the University of Iowa. "Kerry wasn't really a new face like Edwards. He just was a solid alternative to Dean. And he had built the field staff across Iowa that could pounce once Dean was in trouble."
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2004/01/19/kerry_camp_was_sure_of_upswing_ahead/

Squire Says Gephardt Faces Difficulty (Hartford Courant, Jan. 19)
The closest Iowa caucus race in memory roars to a tough-to-predict finish tonight, a finish that could give someone in the crowded Democratic field an edge, but could very well add to the uncertainty that has characterized the nomination race. Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry, North Carolina Sen. John Edwards and Missouri Rep. Dick Gephardt are locked in a virtual tie. Each is depending on turnout, passion and last-minute decisions by a big pool of undecided voters to give him a victory in the year's first significant presidential votes. For Gephardt, a decisive loss could mean the end of his presidential quest. He won the caucuses in 1988 and retains a loyal following here, but polls suggest he has been unable to build beyond that core, and he's now "in a pretty difficult circumstance," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, University of Iowa political analyst.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/politics/hc-iowa0119.artjan19,1,1831710.story?coll=hc-headlines-politics

Redlawsk: Newcomers Could Be Decisive (New York Times, Jan. 19)
In a four-way caucus race that has squeezed so tight in its final hours that the gaps in polls among the candidates have essentially disappeared, the turnout of a few thousand caucus novices might well spell the difference in many of the 1,993 neighborhood gatherings on Monday night. While Howard Dean's campaign has been especially aggressive about rounding up newcomers, aiming specifically at young people, Hispanics and independents, others have joined the hunt. Sen. John Kerry's campaign has been actively recruiting among veterans; Rep. Richard A. Gephardt's campaign has sought union workers. Sen. John Edwards is trying to capitalize on polls showing him making a last-minute surge in the race by reaching out to independents and others attracted by his campaign's upbeat tone. The key, for all of the candidates, will be whether the newcomers actually show up. "Usually, we have a small percentage of newcomers," said DAVID REDLAWSK, an assistant professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "But if we see a large number this year, it could be decisive." Versions of this article also appeared Jan. 19 on the web sites of the OCALA (Fla.) STAR BANNER, THE LEDGER in Florida,
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/19/politics/campaigns/19VOTE.html

Squire Says Iowa Democrats Same As Nation (New York Times, Jan. 19)
For those whose image of Iowa is a red barn at the edge of a sprawling cornfield, welcome to the real heart of the Democratic Party in western Iowa. In the 17th Precinct on the southwest side of Council Bluffs, with the towers of downtown Omaha just visible on the western horizon, is a struggling working-class community of factory workers, casino employees and railroad people. And for generations, it has been among the most active Democratic precincts in Iowa. "The Democrats in Iowa are generally found in the places where you find them everywhere else in the country," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "They're in the larger cities, in the suburbs and in the college towns. And they tend to be employed in the same types of occupations as they would be in other parts of the country, the service sector and the manufacturing sector."
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/19/politics/campaigns/19PREC.html

Segura Says Caucuses Depend On Organization (Newsday, Jan. 19)
Iowa Democrats gather in neighborhood caucuses tonight to begin the long process of picking their party's presidential nominee after a frantic four-way campaign that has tightened dramatically in the final week. The major contenders careened across the state in frigid weather yesterday making final appeals to supporters and undecided voters, trading last-minute barbs and looking ahead to upcoming contests. Late polls indicate that the Iowa race has become highly unpredictable, with four candidates -- Howard Dean, John Edwards, Dick Gephardt and John Kerry -- bunched together, and a sizable number still uncommitted. Several analysts said the contest had become a battle between momentum and organization. Kerry and Edwards, who have both risen in the polls over the past week, were hoping to ride a rising tide to victory. Dean and Gephardt, who have been slipping in the surveys, were relying on their superior field organizations to turn out enough supporters to win. "Caucuses are different than elections," said University of Iowa political scientist GARY SEGURA. "You actually have to show up, and show up at a specific time. A lot will depend on organizational support."
http://www.nynewsday.com/news/ny-usiowa0119,0,5947266.story?coll=nyc-topnews-short-navigation

Dean Rallies At UI (Sacramento Bee, Jan. 19)
Counting the hours before Iowans kick off the closest caucus race here in years for the Democratic nomination for president, candidates on Monday urged their supporters to ignore freezing temperatures and join what was expected to be a huge turnout. The four candidates locked in a statistical tie at the top of the polls _ John Kerry, John Edwards, Howard Dean and Dick Gephardt _ planned one more day of intense campaigning before moving on to New Hampshire and its opening primary next week. Typical of a caucus-day candidate, Dean spent part of the morning shaking hands and posing for photos with supporters. At the Hamburg Inn, a tiny restaurant just off the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in Iowa City, one employee told him, "You're going all the way, buddy." Dean replied, "I think so, too." Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared Jan. 19 on the web sites of the CARLISLE (Pa.) SENTINEL, RALEIGH (N.C.) NEWS, PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORDER, ORLANDO SENTINEL, WLS-TV in Chicago, HELENA (Mont.) INDEPENDENT RECORD, CHEBOYGAN (Mich.) TRIBUNE, THE MISSOULIAN in Montana, DUNN COUNTY (Wis.) NEWS, DAILY AMERICAN in Pennsylvania, ORANGEBURG (S.C.) TIMES DEMOCRAT, SANTA MARIA (Calif.) TIMES, RAPID CITY (S.D. ) JOURNAL, KABC-TV in California, LODI (Calif.) NEWS-SENTINEL, ALBANY (Ore.) DEMOCRAT HERALD, KFMB-TV in California, ELKO (Nev.) DAILY FREE PRESS, LEAVENWORTH (Kan.) TIMES, NORTH COUNTY TIMES in California, MUNSTER (Ind.) TIMES, IDAHO STATE JOURNAL, CORVALLIS (Ore.) GAZETTE TIMES, ABC NEWS, THE GUARDIAN (U.K.), PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL, MIAMI HERALD, FRANKFORT (Ind.) TIMES, MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Pa.) RECORD, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR and the RECORD-JOURNAL in Connecticut.
http://www.sacbee.com/24hour/front/story/1124388p-7820762c.html

Kucinich Rallies At UI (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Jan. 19)
Gamely, like a backup quarterback vying for more playing time, Rep. Dennis Kucinich campaigned across central Iowa Sunday, fighting for a respectable finish in tonight's Democratic caucuses, the first major test of the presidential campaign. Enthusiastic crowds ranging from 80 to 175 greeted him on a frigid day. In Iowa City with the temperature in the single digits, students welcomed him outside a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA hangout, chanting, "Go Dennis go!" Once inside the Hamburg Inn, he promised to establish a universal, single-payer health care system, cancel the North American Free Trade Agreement on his first day in office, and trim the Defense Department budget by 15 percent.
http://www.cleveland.com/news/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/news/1074513357241030.xml

UI Students Active In Politics (Chicago Daily Herald, Jan. 19)
Not that he's name-dropping, but over the past year, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sophomore Brendan Fitzgibbons has volunteered for Democratic presidential hopefuls Wesley Clark, John Kerry, Dick Gephardt and Dennis Kucinich. "The candidates offer us a kind of exposure to their own lives that I know I couldn't get in Illinois," said Fitzgibbons, 20, a Palatine High School graduate. "I think part of the reason why Iowans are really into their politics is because it's so accessible." Iowa's first-in-the-nation caucuses, which take place Monday, offered suburban students a rare opportunity to become actively involved in presidential campaigns. "It has been the most amazing few months of my life," said Karen Emmerson, 19, an Iowa sophomore from Wheaton, who was a motorcade driver when Sen. Ted Kennedy campaigned for fellow Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry last fall. The candidates' intense focus on Iowa can be a bit of a culture shock for teens who thought of politics as a broadcast sport. "Students from large population states such as Illinois generally think of campaigns as being a series of television commercials," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Seeing candidates meeting people in their living rooms for coffee does come as something of a shock."
http://www.dailyherald.com/dupage/main_story.asp?intID=3800422

Caucus Covered From UI (ABC News, Jan. 19)
Charles Gibson from ABC's Good Morning America broadcast from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus as part of the network's coverage of the Iowa Caucuses.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b15809c0a9b500326124ece0347344f8&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVA&_md5=eb2fe6fdaab739409246625cb8af50b8

UI Law Journal Article Cited (Business Week, Jan. 19)
When New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer settled abusive-trading charges with Alliance Capital Management last month, he insisted that Alliance cut its management fee 20 percent for five years. Now, Spitzer is warning other scandal-tarred mutual-fund companies that they may have to do the same -- and he has chastised the Securities & Exchange Commission for not forcing funds to lower fees, too. After all, the gung ho prosecutor claims, funds have been overcharging investors for years. His proof? An obscure 2001 study in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA JOURNAL OF CORPORATION LAW. It concludes that investment advisory firms charge mutual funds -- which are often their own in-house funds -- twice what they charge outside pension funds for stock-picking services. If true, it means mutual-fund shareholders are forking out an extra $10 billion a year. The Iowa study is now at the center of a wrestling match between Spitzer and the Investment Company Institute (ICI), the trade group for mutual-fund companies.
http://www.businessweek.com/print/magazine/content/04_03/b3866041.htm?mz

IEM Shows Dean Leading (New York Times, Jan. 18)
Some tracking polls show the presidential contest in Iowa as too close to call, but the invisible hand of the market is pointing to the favorite. Howard Dean is the choice of two political futures markets, where thousands of speculators, unlike journalists, put their money where their punditry is. They buy and sell contracts that pay off if a candidate wins. Dr. Dean remained the favorite to be the eventual nominee on another exchange, the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS. Traders yesterday gave him a 51 percent chance to win, putting him well ahead of Gen. Wesley K. Clark (21 percent) and Mr. Kerry (13 percent). This exchange has been run since 1988 by the University of Iowa's business school, which says its futures market has usually been more accurate than public opinion polls at predicting election results.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/18/politics/campaigns/18POIN.html?ex=1075006800&en=b10c4493cc33437a&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Redlawsk Comments On Polls (The Australian, Jan. 18)
Democratic presidential frontrunner Howard Dean had slumped to third place in the key state of Iowa in the wake of the surging campaigns of Sens. John Kerry and John Edwards, an influential poll has found on the eve of the first crucial vote in the US election campaign. As the Midwestern state prepares to kick off the race for the White House, the Des Moines Register poll gave Senator Kerry, a war hero from Massachusetts, 26 per cent of the likely vote, with Dr Dean dropping to 20 per cent. Senator Edwards, a 50-year-old millionaire lawyer from North Carolina, leapt into second place with 23 per cent on the back of strong showings in televised debates and an unfailingly positive message that lashes only Republicans, not his fellow Democrats. The most immediate loser - if the poll numbers translate into votes at the caucuses on Monday night (Tuesday morning, Australian time) - would be Richard Gephardt, 62, a congressman from neighboring Missouri who had been expected to win Iowa, but is polling just 18 per cent. "If they hold on Monday night, Gephardt would be finished," University of Iowa political scientist DAVID REDLAWSK told Worldwide. "And everyone is going to ask: what happened to Howard Dean?" This story also appeared Jan. 19 on the web sites of the MELBOURNE HERALD SUN, SOUTH AUSTRALIA ADVERTISER, and NEWS.com Australia.
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,8426620%255E401,00.html

Talbott Says Polls Could Hurt Kerry (Straits Times, Jan. 18)
The first stage of the United States presidential election is due to start in the Midwestern state of Iowa today. The focus is on expectations and electability. After a campaign that began more than a year ago, the performance of the candidates seeking the Democratic nomination has generated public perceptions of how well or how badly they are expected to do. These perceptions have been reinforced by daily opinion polls and by the constant attention of the US media. Senator Kerry began way behind Dr. Dean and Mr. Gephardt. So the expectation was that he was really running for a third place slot that would set him up for a good showing in his neighboring state of New Hampshire, which will hold its contest a week after Iowa. But support for Mr. Kerry has suddenly soared and some polls now put him out in front in Iowa. The late surge, however, has raised expectations for Senator Kerry. Now, a third place finish would no longer be acceptable; it would be seen as a major blow for him. Said Mr. BASIL TALBOTT, a political analyst who teaches journalism at the University of Iowa: "The polls have not been doing Kerry a favor. They have now made him the frontrunner, so that if he still finishes third, all this apparent strong support in the polls will seem phony."
http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/world/story/0,4386,230821,00.html

Segura: Caucuses A Battle Between Old And New (Newsday, Jan. 18)
The battle for Iowa, which is hurtling toward its conclusion with four candidates in hot pursuit of victory, has come down to a clash between old and new: Old and new voters, old and new methods of organizing them, old and new themes. The Iowa outcome will determine more than who moves on to next week's New Hampshire primary with momentum and who falls by the wayside. It is to some degree a rough referendum on which style of politics will define the Democratic Party in the upcoming battle against President George W. Bush and the Republicans. "You're talking about old-line labor versus the Internet generation," says GARY SEGURA, a University of Iowa political scientist.
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/nation/ny-iowa0118,0,217509.story?coll=ny-nationalnews-headlines

Political Opinions Abound At UI (Voice of America, Jan. 18)
The Midwestern state of Iowa has become the focus of political discussion in recent days ahead of the state's caucus. Several candidates for the Democratic nomination are running neck-and-neck according to the latest polls, and those who do well in Iowa could gain valuable momentum for the primaries ahead. It is not hard to find political opinions here in Iowa City. It is home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and is considered a strong liberal Democratic enclave in this mostly rural, farm-oriented state.
http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=0FD7F523-E26E-488F-89A06D1A2F8F2588

Redlawsk Comments On Health Care As Issue (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 18)
Wearing purple T-shirts reading, "I am a health care voter" in bright gold letters, the more than 50,000 citizens who have aligned with the group New Hampshire for Health Care do not simply constitute a vocal and committed voting bloc. Rather, during a caucus and primary season that largely has been devoid of major issues for Democrats--other than who can hit President Bush the hardest--these health-care advocates might signal the early stages of an effort by voters to establish a new political agenda. Increasingly, voter support in Iowa and New Hampshire seems profoundly influenced by a candidate's stance on health care, and virtually every candidate has adjusted his message accordingly. "Usually Iowa and New Hampshire voters are interested in very different things," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "About this time in the campaign cycle, you'd normally be hearing a lot of talk about hog lots and [agriculture] policies in an Iowa stump speech. But with health care being such a topic of every candidate's campaign, I'm not sure that the two states are terribly different this year." He continued: "At this point, I'd be surprised if the issue goes away," Redlawsk said. "It's now become so much a part of the campaign literature and so much a part of the stump speeches, that I think it's here for good. It's basically going to become a `Which came first?' kind of thing. Do voters care about health care because they've heard about it so many times from the candidates? Or do the candidates care about health care because they hear about it so much from the voters? We'll probably never really be able to unravel that."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0401180358jan18,1,3362752.story?coll=chi-news-hed

Kieffer Says Iowans Take Politics Seriously (Chicago Sun Times, Jan. 18)
Some argue that the narrowing process in the Iowa caucuses gives Iowa, a relatively small state of about 3 million people that is not a microcosm of America, too much influence in presidential politics. BEN KIEFFER has heard the criticism. He is the host of "Talk of Iowa," a radio show produced by a National Public Radio affiliate at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and broadcast statewide. "We're the second-oldest state [in residents' average age], the fifth whitest," he said. "Why should 3 million people have so much say? But, you know, if you are going to pick a way to choose a president, this is not that bad a way. You have people from the heartland who take politics seriously and debate the issues. What could be more heartening to people who believe in the democratic spirit than neighbors and friends getting together in living rooms, gymnasiums and high schools for serious political discussion? Polls, spin-meisters and sound bites make people feel like politics is out of their hands. Let me tell you, being in a caucus makes you feel like something is in your hands."
http://www.suntimes.com/output/elect/cst-nws-iowa18.html

Squire Doubts 'Caucus Crashing' Tactic (Newsday, Jan. 18)
Participants in the Iowa caucuses not only have to declare which candidate they favor, they have to do it in front of their closest neighbors. The process looks more like an old New England town meeting than a regular election. Those who take part in the Iowa Democratic caucuses tomorrow will gather in a neighbor's house, nearby school, fire hall, or other meeting place and play a key part in the first step toward choosing their delegates to the county and state conventions. And, by the way, they will participate in the first test of real voters in the Democratic presidential nominating process. Some supporters of Gephardt have accused Dean's camp of planning to have out-of-state residents "crash" the caucuses in order to raise Dean's totals. University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE says that would be difficult because there are about 2,000 precincts across the state and everybody basically knows everyone else in each precinct. "If you have a large group of people who don't look familiar, it would raise questions," he said. "People who are not sort of regulars in the neighborhood would be looked at with suspicion."
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/nation/ny-uscauc183631036jan18,0,1456852.story?coll=ny-nationalnews-headlines

Singer Calls Caucuses 'Real Democracy' (Providence Journal, Jan. 18)
The Iowa caucuses and the Jan. 27 New Hampshire primary officially kick off the 2004 presidential campaign, a campaign that so far has drawn eight Democrats to the battle for the right to take on Mr. Bush, who faces no opposition from his own party. The caucuses are as down-home and as grassroots a political institution as survives in the 21st century -- more New England Town Meeting than media-driven election. "This is real democracy, this is the real thing," says JANE SINGER, a University of Iowa journalism professor who studies and votes in the caucuses. "It seems like you are really doing something that matters."
http://www.projo.com/extra/election/content/projo_20040118_smprocess.fbefd.html

Squire Comments On Caucus System (Neue Zurcher Zeitung Jan. 18)
PEVERILL SQUIRE
, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, commented on the Iowa Caucuses to this newspaper based in Zurich, Switzerland. Iowans keep the caucus tradition firm; nevertheless, caucuses are "a system of the past," said Squire. The article (in German) is at: http://www.nzz.ch/2004/01/18/al/page-article9CK09.html

Redlawsk Says Race 'Wide Open' (Newsday, Jan.17)
The race for victory in the Iowa caucuses has become a battle between momentum and organization. Senators John Kerry and John Edwards have the momentum, Howard Dean and Dick Gephardt have the organization. Iowa governor Tom Vilsack said: "Anybody who tells you how this is going to turn out - they're crazy." DAVID REDLAWSK, professor of political science at the University of Iowa, said: "This race is wide open, with a lot of people rethinking. If enough people just get a sense of 'wow, something big is going on' then momentum can override organization. Organization is historically everything in the caucuses, but I get the sense that all bets are off this year. We could be seeing huge numbers of new people coming into the system." This Associated Press article also appeared Jan. 17 and 18 on the web sites of THE SCOTSMAN in Scotland, PENN LIVE, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, THE GUARDIAN (U.K.), MLIVE in Michigan, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, and CAPTIOL HILL BLUE.
http://www.newsday.com/news/politics/wire/sns-ap-caucus-dynamics,0,1579122.story?coll=sns-ap-politics-headlines

Squire Quoted On Technology (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Jan. 17)
A caucus is a gathering of neighbors who talk and then vote on precinct delegates to county political conventions. These county delegates later get together to elect delegates to district and state conventions, where the delegates to the national Democratic and Republican conventions are elected. A candidate who doesn't get at least 15 percent of this initial standing vote is not "viable." His or her backers often shift to another favorite, said Keith Kuper, a Democratic activist who plans to "stand for" Ohio Rep. Dennis Kucinich, at least at the start. The process is public and supporters of "viable" candidates try to win over backers of those who are not "viable." This has led to speculation that cell phones and Blackberries can be used between caucuses to manipulate vote totals. "I am highly skeptical that it could ever happen for two reasons," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "First, it would require an enormous amount of coordination. There are almost 2,000 caucuses occurring simultaneously. I doubt any candidate has an organization in place that could attempt to direct traffic across them. Second, I doubt many followers would feel compelled to follow directions from the campaign if any were issued. Caucus attenders whose candidates do not attain viability in their precincts are apt to splinter, many going off to their second choice, others becoming uncommitted, and a few going home." The newspaper is based in California. This story also appeared Jan. 18 on the web site of the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE in Utah and the MARIN INDEPENDENT JOURNAL in California.
http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0104/18iowaside.html

Talbott Says Campaigns Are 'Worlds Apart' (Toronto Star, Jan. 17)
Dean is slipping in Iowa - if polls are to be believed here. He has fallen behind the newest Comeback Kid in the making, Massachusetts Senator John Kerry, and is bunched with Missouri Congressman Dick Gephardt and North Carolina Senator John Edwards. This four-way showdown Monday is being called the closest race in Iowa - the first-in-the-nation test every four years - since 1988, possibly the tightest since the primary process gained popularity in 1972. In this arcane caucus process, it is all about getting your supporters out to a series of meetings Monday and Dean and Gephardt have the best organization on the ground. Most experts believe the fluid poll numbers should be gauged against the grassroots muscle of the two men. In many ways, says University of Iowa professor BASIL TALBOTT, the two campaigns are worlds apart. "The Dean organization is made up of new, young Internet-based activists who came together at meet-ups and other methods being used for the first time," he said. "It's very much a movement. Gephardt has an old-fashioned, hierarchical political organization of which the unions are the backbone."
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1074294906856&call_pageid=968332188854&col=968350060724

Squire Says Dean Wounds Are Self-Inflicted (Deseret News, Jan. 17)
A late surge by Democratic presidential candidates John Kerry and John Edwards has pushed them slightly ahead of long-standing front-runners Howard Dean and Dick Gephardt in the race to win Monday's Iowa caucuses, a new Des Moines Register poll shows. Support for Dean dropped by 7 points, to 16 percent on Thursday and Friday. "He's had just a terrible two weeks, part of which has to do with the fact his opponents have been hammering him pretty good. And part of it is self-inflicted wounds with some misstatements," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor. In addition, "some Iowans are beginning to have reservations about whether he can win in November, and I think the undecideds are breaking to other candidates," Squire said.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,590036888,00.html

Squire: Finishing First Not Essential (Investor's Business Daily, Jan. 17)
In the final days, the Iowa caucuses were looking more and more like a horse race. The odds were even on the four strongest ponies. But let the bettor beware: Monday's caucuses are just the starting gate, and anything can happen down the track - no matter who takes the lead out of Iowa. Whoever does come out ahead in Iowa won't have much time to enjoy his lead. He could easily lose it at the first turn in the New Hampshire primary Jan. 27. Or another week later on Feb. 3, when Democrats in six more states will make their choice. His Iowa edge won't last long. "Winning the caucuses is certainly no guarantee of winning the nomination, and indeed on that score the caucuses don't predict well," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "The real trick in the caucuses is to do well. You have to finish in the top three to get the nomination. But finishing first isn't required. Iowa's real role is to sort things out more than it is to determine who's going to win."
http://www.investors.com/editorial/feature.asp?v=1/17

UI Voter Registration Surging (Washington Post, Jan. 17)
The four Democratic presidential candidates with hopes of winning in Iowa put aside personal attacks Friday and focused on what all consider the two keys to victory: organizing supporters and winning over undecided Iowans doing last-minute shopping for the best candidate to defeat President Bush. Iowa Democrats are predicting near-record turnout, perhaps 125,000 Democrats, or twice as many who voted in 2000. With the candidates spending record-setting amounts on television ads and get-out-the-vote efforts, it is not clear who stands to benefit most from the new faces, though the Des Moines Register noted Friday morning that registration in Johnson County, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is up 300 percent over the past six months compared with four years ago. This could be good news for Dean, a favorite of college-age students, who has brought about 3,500 out-of-state volunteers to Iowa to get those voters to the polls. A version of this article also appeared Jan. 17 on the web sites of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, DETROIT NEWS, and ARIZONA REPUBLIC.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A23667-2004Jan16.html

Squire: Iowans Looking For Someone To Beat Bush (Los Angeles Times, Jan 17)
On a dreary, chilled day across Iowa, the four prominent Democrats competing here for their party's presidential nomination scoured the state for support in Monday's caucuses, each seeking to project sunny optimism while voters searched for the candidate they feel can defeat President Bush. As the campaign neared its final 48 hours, no candidate - not Howard Dean, not John Edwards, not Dick Gephardt, not John F. Kerry - stood out as the clear front-runner. "Among Iowa Democrats, and I suspect nationally as well, there's a strong desire to identify the candidate who really does have the best chance in November," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa politics professor. "I think there is a passion to try to defeat President Bush and I don't think Democrats have yet figured out who their best candidate might be."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A23667-2004Jan16.html

Everson Uses Technology To Teach Chinese (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 17)
The Chinese language requires knowledge of 2,000 characters for limited literacy and 3,500 for functional literacy, says MICHAEL EVERSON, a professor of foreign language education at the University of Iowa. And the highly respected Chinese language education expert doesn't have them all memorized. "The Chinese language is not an alphabet. There's no way for people to look at a character and be able to pronounce it," Everson said. "You just have to do brute-force memorization to learn the language." So Everson and his students turn to computer software that has revolutionized the way language is taught. "We're no longer emphasizing drilling and textbook-based grammar exercises in language education," he said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/technology/chi-0401170295jan17,1,2057822.story?coll=chi-techtopheds-hed

Pierce Firestorm Has Died (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 17)
There still are Iowans who don't think Pierre Pierce should be representing the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on the basketball court. But if they are in the majority at the Hawkeyes' home games, they are strangely silent. When Pierce is introduced in Carver-Hawkeye Arena, the fans cheer him heartily, the same way they do all of the other players in Iowa's starting lineup. As memory fades of sexual assault charges leveled at him for what happened on the night of Sept. 7, 2002, the firestorm of controversy surrounding the former Westmont High star has become an ember. http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/college/mensbasketball/cs-0401170179jan17,1,1523459.story?coll=cs-college-print

Student On Team Finding Dinosaur Remains (Chicago Daily Herald, Jan. 17)
That Nathan Smith drew dinosaurs as a child is not so unusual. That he recently drew the remains of these extinct creatures from the icy ground in Antarctica is -- especially since he did so at the ripe old age of 23. But what makes the Crystal Lake native's experience unique is the bones, which seem to be from a creature scientists never have seen before. "We're speculating it's some kind of primitive sauropod," said renowned paleontologist William Hammer, who in December led his former student Smith and three others on an expedition into a remote area of Antarctica. The discovery occurred on the team's first full day on the job -- a job that typically started each day at the crack of dawn with a 25-minute helicopter ride to the peak of Mount Kirkpatrick. Smith barely took a break after his journey to the southernmost reaches of the earth, stopping briefly at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- where he's a graduate student -- before traveling to the University of California at Berkley to make sense of the bones he helped find.
http://www.dailyherald.com/search/main_story.asp?intid=3800369

Andrejevic Calls Reality TV 'Ponzi Scheme' (New York Times, Jan. 17)
For 50 years, Big Brother was an unambiguous symbol of malignant state power, totalitarianism's all-seeing eye. Then Big Brother became a hip reality television show, in which 10 cohabiting strangers submitted to round-the-clock camera monitoring in return for the chance to compete for $500,000. That transformation is telling, says MARK ANDREJEVIC, a professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa at Iowa City. Today, more than twice as many young people apply to MTV's "Real World" show than to Harvard, he says. Clearly, to a post-cold-war generation of Americans, the prospect of living under surveillance is no longer scary but cool. In Mr. Andrejevic's view reality television is essentially a scam: propaganda for a new business model that only pretends to give consumers more control while in fact subjecting them to increasingly sophisticated forms of monitoring and manipulation. As he put it in a telephone interview: "The promise out there is that everybody can have their own TV show. But of course, that ends up being a kind of Ponzi scheme. You can't have everybody watching everybody else's TV show. And since that's not possible, in economic terms, the way it's going to work is according to this model of a few people monitoring what the rest of us do."
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/17/arts/17REAL.html

Segura Comments On Black-Latino Alliances (New York Times, Jan. 17)
The Web site for Black Entertainment Television put the question bluntly: "Does it bother you that Hispanics now outnumber African-Americans in the U.S.?" The BET.com message board is only one forum, but it has evoked some of the emotions, worries, hopes and even awkwardness that have been felt nationwide over a singular moment in American demographics. Last summer, the Census Bureau announced that Latinos had surpassed blacks as the country's largest minority, with blacks making up 13.1 percent of the population in 2002, and Hispanics 13.4 percent. Does the ascendance of Hispanics mean a decline in the influence of blacks? Does it doom, or encourage, alliances between the two groups? Does the old formula for those alliances - shared grievances -- have much meaning given the diversity of income and status even within each group? Pulling together or staying apart sometimes depends on whether the black and Latino populations in an area have comparable status and see their fates as linked, said GARY M. SEGURA, a political science professor at the University of Iowa who has written about "black-brown" coalitions. In New York, for instance, the 2001 mayoral race brought together blacks and Latinos in a political alliance to back the candidacy of Fernando Ferrer, who lost the Democratic primary. But that same year in Los Angeles, Latinos overwhelmingly supported Antonio Villaraigosa, the Latino former speaker of the State Assembly, while blacks threw their support behind James K. Hahn, the white city attorney who won the race. Mr. Segura said one factor in black support for Mr. Hahn was the tension between the groups there. "In New York there's a Latino community, but the Latino community is not perceived as marginalizing the African-American community as it does in L.A." he said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/17/nyregion/17RACE.html

Squire Says Iowa Will Test Dean's Strength (Frankfurter Rundschau, Jan. 16)
In an article about the Iowa Caucuses, PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa, said Iowa is the "first test of how strong Dean's grass roots movement really is. If he wins decisively in Iowa and one week later also in New Hampshire, then he cannot be stopped. The question is: who can stop Dean?" He continued: "Most Democrats are looking for the candidate who has the best chance of actually winning the White House. The difficulty is just that they don't know who that is." The newspaper is based in Germany.
http://www.fr-aktuell.de/fr_home/startseite/?cnt=372338

Squire: Iowa Democrats Looking To November (Bloomberg News, Jan. 16)
Sen. John Kerry has vaulted into the lead in a poll of Iowa Democrats as former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean's numbers slipped there and in New Hampshire, site of the first two presidential contests. Kerry has the backing of 24 percent of likely voters in Iowa's Monday caucuses voters, 9 percentage points higher than he had a week ago in Zogby International polls for MSNBC and Reuters news service. Dean and Missouri Rep. Richard Gephardt tied for second at 19 percent, with North Carolina Sen. John Edwards fourth at 17 percent. The survey has a margin of error of 4.5 percentage points. Iowa Democrats may be shifting allegiance to Kerry and Edwards because they fear that Dean can't beat President George W. Bush in the November election, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Every Iowa Democrat wants to nominate a candidate who can win in November," Squire said. "Kerry has his war experience and national security credentials to play and that makes him attractive to some Democrats," while Edwards has run an optimistic campaign and is a Southerner, he said.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=email&refer=politics&sid=aWVd2_l7llHE

Squire: Timing Key For Caucuses (Washington Times, Jan. 16)
It's a quadrennial rite of winter and it makes one of the smallest states in the nation one of the most attention-grabbing -- at least for a week -- but the results could reverberate through the White House for the next four years. Iowa, a state of less than 3 million people, plays a key role for both Democratic and Republican parties in their presidential nomination process. The decisions made by gatherings of a few dozens Iowans often change the political options that larger parts of the country are left with. University of Iowa Professor PEVERILL SQUIRE said the state is so important in the presidential election because of its primacy in the political calendar, a positioning that leads to a lot of time and effort expended by the candidates in the Iowa caucuses.
http://www.washtimes.com/upi-breaking/20040116-123911-3243r.htm

Squire Comments On Undecided Voters (CBS News, Jan. 16)
For months, Iowa City native Janet Lindstrom has been getting at least five calls a day from the Democratic presidential campaigns. Every day, she is invited to a breakfast or lunch or public speech. Every day, a pollster calls her. She is one of those faceless Iowans whose opinions are doggedly tracked. In the last two weeks, by her estimate, more than 30 pieces of campaign literature have been mailed to her home. Howard Dean has campaigned in her city 17 times; John Kerry has been there 12 times; John Edwards, four times. But Lindstrom cannot make up her mind. And she is the wife of one of Iowa's political gurus, PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa professor and expert on all things caucus. "I'm so undecided," she says with a sigh, overwhelmed by the white noise of calls, mailings and stump speeches. Lindstrom is not alone. About 10 percent of likely Iowa caucusgoers have still not decided who will get their vote. "Given how tight this race is, the undecided vote is absolutely critical because if the undecided votes splits between two candidates that could make a lot of the difference on who wins the caucus. It could make the difference," says Squire, who has been married to Lindstrom for 22 years and teaches several courses on American politics. "Turnout is also going to be critical and the candidates have known that from the beginning, and the Dean people have a lot riding because they don't have people that have been through the process like Gephardt's and Kerry's. But if we see a high turnout, which is what I suspect, it should be good for Dean," Squire says.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/01/17/politics/main593853.shtml

UI Student Works For Energy Group (Los Angeles Times, Jan. 16)
Those fresh-faced youths sporting orange astronaut flight suits aren't hopefuls for Bush's next mission to Mars. Storming campaign events around Des Moines, these young activists are trying to raise awareness for the Apollo Alliance, a loose coalition working toward energy independence. The group's name comes from John F. Kennedy's plan to put a man on the moon with the Apollo mission; the organization hopes to establish energy independence in a generation through job creation and investment. "We have groups everywhere right now," said orange-clad volunteer Nisha Swinton, 20, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from Waterloo. "We're heavily hitting [events for] every candidate," she said.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/politics/la-na-trailmix16jan16,1,1148977.story?coll=la-news-politics-national

Segura Says Labor Key For Democrats (Knight-Ridder, Jan. 16)
The consensus is that Missouri congressman Dick Gephardt must win Iowa to have a chance at winning the Democratic presidential nomination. He's not the only one with a lot at stake: Big labor's industrial unions have promised to carry their longtime ally over the finish line. If they don't, shrinking traditional blue-collar unions could take another hit to their influence. Twenty-one international unions, with 95,000 members and retirees in Iowa, have endorsed Gephardt. If Gephardt loses in Iowa and fades from prominence, labor probably will unite behind the Democratic nominee, so it still will be an important part of the Democratic constituency - just not a king maker. "No candidate is going to hold a grudge against labor," said GARY SEGURA, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "The Democratic nominee is going to need organized labor in a big way to be even remotely competitive with President Bush."
http://www.realcities.com/mld/krwashington/7729416.htm

Marshall Comments On Online Journals (Chronicle, Jan. 16)
Not long ago, the leaders of the American Anthropological Association saw some writing on the wall. Here and there, cash-starved college libraries were canceling subscriptions, and the costs of printing and postage were skyrocketing. It became clear that by about 2007, the association's publications program, which comprises 29 scholarly journals, would no longer be financially viable. "This was one of those incremental things that began to show its face two or three years ago," says MAC MARSHALL, a professor of anthropology at the University of Iowa, who helped to sound the alarm. "I was editing one of the triple-A journals, and we were sustainable, but others were hemorrhaging badly." Soon, every member of the association will be given electronic access to all of its 29 journals as a regular benefit of membership. Libraries will be offered the electronic package at a price that, according to one early estimate, will be less than the current cost of print subscriptions to the association's five leading journals, which now cost approximately $125 each. It is too soon to say whether any of the association's journals will give up their print incarnations and become all-electronic. "I can't imagine that any of us are ready to take that leap just yet," says Iowa's Mr. Marshall. "How much the California press will push in that direction, I don't know. It will probably have to do with how the journals go financially."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v50/i19/19a01601.htm

Redlawsk Comments On Edwards' Rural Strategy (Baltimore Sun, Jan. 16)
Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards' strategy of running strong in rural areas may work. "It can be a very effective strategy," said DAVID P. REDLAWSK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City and co-chair of the Johnson County Democratic Party. "The numbers you have to get out aren't as great." Redlawsk, who remains undecided, said his precinct in Iowa City could draw as many as 300 people on caucus night, while "in the outlying areas where the Edwards people are focusing, you have precincts with 20 people." The same story appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/politics/wire/la-na-edwards16jan16,0,5259356.story

Squire Says Caucuses Winnow Candidates (NPR Morning Edition, Jan. 16)
UI political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE says the winner of Iowa's caucuses rarely wins the party's nomination, but a good finish is vital if a candidate wants to remain viable in the New Hampshire primary and beyond. This story is an audio file.
http://www.npr.org/rundowns/segment.php?wfId=1600701

Gay Stay-At-Home Dads Face Less Stigma (Sydney Morning Herald, Jan. 16)
Demographers say there is an emerging population of gay men who are not only raising children, but also committed to the idea that one parent should leave the workplace to do it. In part, that may be because they may also not fear stigmatisation in these new roles, said ELLEN LEWIN, chairwoman of the women's studies department at the University of Iowa. Professor Lewin, author of Lesbian Mothers, is working on a study of gay fathers. The Herald is based in Sydney, Australia.
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/01/16/1073878033760.html

Squire Says Edwards Campaign Has Stayed Positive (Boston Globe, Jan. 16)
For months, as his rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination have locked horns in daily sniping contests, John Edwards has stayed above that fray. The strategy left him out of the daily news dispatches, reducing his much-needed visibility as he remained a distant fourth in Iowa polls. But slowly, the North Carolina senator's bright smile and upbeat message has garnered good will among Democrats in Iowa. "Edwards has, to his credit, been relentlessly optimistic," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "He's finally just now started to get his rhythm. For somebody's who's been stuck in neutral for this long, it's impressive."
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2004/01/16/edwards_message_striking_a_chord/

Squire Says Rough Two Weeks for Dean (Kansas City Star, Jan. 16)
New polls show that Howard Dean has endured a rough period. Last weekend, rival candidate Al Sharpton forced him to admit in a candidate forum that he never had a black member of his gubernatorial cabinet in Vermont. In another development, Dean was on the defensive after reporters uncovered comments Dean made in which he questioned the legitimacy of Iowa's caucuses. The caucuses, Dean said, were controlled by special interests. "Dean's had a bad two weeks," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political scientist.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/politics/7721739.htm

Squire: Edwards Campaign Finally Out Of Neutral (Kansas City Star, Jan. 16)
After spending months in the middle of the pack, Mr. Edwards' candidacy is catching on here. Suddenly, big crowds are turning out in small towns. The state's largest newspaper, The Des Moines Register, has endorsed the senator. And his poll numbers are rising. What has long been portrayed as a three-horse race in Iowa is giving way to a four-way free-for-all. Polls released Thursday show Mr. Edwards has narrowed the gap between him and front-runners Howard Dean, Dick Gephardt and John Kerry. "He was stuck in neutral for so long," University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE said of Mr. Edwards. "To finally get some traction near the end of the process is quite remarkable."
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dallas/washington/topstory/stories/011604dnpoledwards.e9ac.html

Damasio Book Cited (Orangeburg, S.C., Times Democrat, Jan. 16)
No soul can be found coupled with the human body. Neuroscience, the study of the brain and body and how they affect each other, and neurophysiologists committed to finding an answer have agreed to stop battling. They've argued, believed in, denied or ignored, taught, even warred over "the soul's" existence. In investigating the brain, the nervous system and the relationships between them, neurologists -- physician or researcher -- now study the parts and how they communicate. They've turned away from religion and theology and their different distinct positions in human culture. Much exists that it's important to measure and observe, declares humanist Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO, Van Allen distinguished professor and University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics department of neurology head, also a professor at other universities in the United States and in Europe. He wrote of this in the book "Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow and the Feeling Brain," the most startling of his neurology and philosophy trilogy, which also includes "Descartes' Error" and "The Feeling of What Happens."
http://www.timesanddemocrat.com/articles/2004/01/16/opinion/opinion1.txt

Student Campaigns For Environment (Baltimore Sun, Jan. 16)
Those fresh-faced youths sporting orange astronaut flight suits aren't hopefuls for Bush's next mission to Mars. Storming campaign events around Des Moines, these young activists are trying to raise awareness for the Apollo Alliance, a loose coalition working toward energy independence. "We have groups everywhere right now," said orange-clad volunteer Nisha Swinton, 20, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from Waterloo. "We're heavily hitting [events for] every candidate," she said. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/politics/wire/la-na-trailmix16jan16,0,3054152.story

Collinson Comments On Kerouac's 'On The Road' (The Ledger, Jan .16)
Like the trip that inspired it, the first draft of author Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" is a wandering narrative, told in a continuous block of text. Yellowed with age, smudged with editing marks and the author's own ink-covered fingerprints, the scroll rolls over nearly 120 feet of paper. Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay bought the scroll two years ago for $2.43 million. Now that it has been displayed in Indianapolis, Irsay plans to send what may be the Beat Generation's quintessential text back to the road where it came from. Beginning this week at the Orange County History Center in Orlando, Fla., and ending with a three-month stay at the New York Public Library in 2007, Kerouac's "On the Road" scroll will make a 13-stop, four-year national tour of museums and libraries. While some -- including The New York Times -- praised its publication, others dismissed it. "It's the way that it was written that, in many ways, is more important than what it really is," said HOWARD COLLINSON, director of the University of Iowa Museum of Art, which will show the entire scroll in 2005. "That it kind of just spewed out of him is what it's all about." The Ledger is based in Lakeland, Fla. The same story appeared on the Web Site of CNN.com and CNN INTERNATIONAL.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040116/NEWS/401160312/1021

UI Students Save Money By Walking (MSN Money, Jan. 16)
A story that provides suggestions on ways to save money on commuting to work points out the cheapest way is to walk. Angela Balcita, a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, will save $80 this semester by walking 20 minutes to school instead of buying a bus pass at the student-discount rate. And Laura Crossette, a recent graduate, takes advantage of the University's free Cambus service, which transports passengers around the downtown area. Similar free shuttles are available in many college towns and tourist areas.
http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/SavingandDebt/P66201.asp

Hearing Set For Former UI Student Roche (Casper, WY, Star Tribune, Jan. 15)
A plea hearing has been scheduled for the man accused of leaving a profanity-laced death threat on the answering machine of Kobe Bryant's accuser. John Roche, 22, is scheduled to appear in U.S. District Court in Denver on Jan. 23. He was expected to plead guilty Nov. 24, but the judge in the case was out sick. Roche was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at the time of the alleged threat but has since withdrawn.
http://www.trib.com/AP/wire_detail.php?wire_num=55274

Squire Says Candidates Play Down Iowa Expectations (Reuters, Jan. 15)
For the Democratic presidential contenders in Iowa, it's not whether you win or lose, it's how you play the expectations game. The winner of Iowa's hotly contested presidential caucuses on Monday might not be the winner at all, and the biggest loser might be a candidate who finishes well ahead of most of the field. Having seen the game in action, politicians work hard to keep a lid on expectations. "Part of their job is to keep expectations low," said PEVERILL SQUIRE of the University of Iowa.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=politicsNews&storyID=4135514

Forsythe Gives Pre-Caucus Update on the IEM (NPR, Jan. 15)
ROBERT FORSYTHE
, professor of economics at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, was interviewed on "Talk of the Nation" about the Iowa Electronic Market, where traders can buy and sell futures of the Democratic presidential candidates. Forsythe explained how the market works and gave an update on prices for the Democratic candidates. "People open up accounts with us and they can invest between $5 and $500, and will get their own account, which they can log in to and trade away. And if you think Dean is undervalued at 52 cents currently, you can be buying up contracts in Dean. If think he's overvalued, you can be selling them off," Forsythe said.
http://www.npr.org/rundowns/rundown.php?prgDate=15-Jan-2004&prgId=5

Squire Comments On Edwards' Gain In Polls (Dallas Morning News, Jan. 15)
What has long been portrayed as a three-horse race in Iowa Caucuses is giving way to a four-way free-for-all. Polls released Thursday show John Edwards has narrowed the gap between him and front-runners Howard Dean, Dick Gephardt and John Kerry. "He was stuck in neutral for so long," University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE said of Mr. Edwards. "To finally get some traction near the end of the process is quite remarkable."
http://www.dallasnews.com/dmn/news/stories/011604dnpoledwards.e9ac.html

Squire: Rules Making Campaign Ads Less Negative (USA Today, Jan. 15)
Democratic candidates in the nation's first presidential nominating contest have spent a record amount on television advertising that has been mostly positive because of a new campaign-finance law. But with the race tightening, the tone turned negative this week, echoing direct-mail pitches that regularly attack rival candidates. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political scientist, said Monday that candidates go negative to mobilize their bases of support and "dissuade the other guy's from showing up." Until now, the candidates had attacked each other only vaguely. Campaign observers credit the year-old McCain-Feingold campaign law for tamping down attacks. The law requires candidates to identify themselves in an ad and say they approved that commercial's content. Ads "are relatively tame," Squire said. He said the rules make candidates "leery from going too negative. It's kept things on TV more focused on records."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/nation/primariescaucus/2004-01-15-negative-ads_x.htm

Antczak Comments On Positive/Negative Appeals (New York Times, Jan. 15)
Five days before the Iowa caucuses, the campaigns are struggling to balance positive and negative messages. Iowa has a reputation for rewarding candidates who stick to a positive, hopeful message but that theory has its limits. Upbeat appeals work on undecided Democrats -- and polls show a large number of them left in Iowa -- but Democratic candidates Dick Gephardt and Howard Dean seem to have determined that most of the fence-sitters will remain undecided, thus they've shifted tactics to energize their core supporters. "The positive stuff is how you win the voters," said FRED ANTCZAK, a University of Iowa professor specializing in campaign rhetoric and voter reaction. "The negative stuff makes sure your voters are motivated to come out." Versions of this Associated Press story appeared Jan. 15 on the web sites of the NASHUA (N.H.) TELEGRAPH, CLEVELAND (Ohio) PLAIN DEALER, OAKLAND (Calif.) TRIBUNE, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL, SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, WCIV-TV (S.C.), WJLA-TV (D.C.), SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, KATV (Ark.), GUARDIAN (U.K.), NEWSDAY, MLIVE.com (Mich.), PENN LIVE (Pa.), ABC NEWS.com, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, UNION LEADER (N.H.), NEWSMAX.com, FREDERICKSBURG.com (Va.), FOX NEWS, SANTA MARIA (Calif.) TIMES, NORTH COUNTY (Calif.) TIMES, ALBANY (N.Y.) TIMES UNION, and many other news outlets.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Back-to-Basics.html

Redlawsk: Personal Gestures Can Warm Voters (San Diego Union Tribune, Jan. 15)
Birthday greetings, spontaneous house calls and hand-signed anniversary cards are a few of the personal wrinkles candidates have used over the years in the battle to win over Iowa voters. And the campaign for Monday's precinct caucuses is no different. Personal gestures are more frequent early in the caucus season, when a candidate's schedule is less demanding, said DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political science professor. Moreover, campaigns tend to follow two schools of thought when it comes to reaching out in personal ways, Redlawsk and others say. Most often, candidates and their aides carefully target individuals who may be key donors, community leaders or party activists. But there are benefits to be gained from pure spontaneity, too, experts say. "The more spontaneous stuff is harder to come by," Redlawsk said. "But it can really have an effect of getting people talking about" it. Versions of this Associated Press article appeared Jan. 15 on the web sites of the PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL, the SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, the GUARDIAN (U.K.), NEWSDAY, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, and CAPITOL HILL BLUE.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/politics/20040115-0118-caucuses-candidatecalls.html

Redlawsk Comments On Candidate Couture (Rocky Mountain News, Jan. 15)
Despite their differences, most of the Democratic candidates have styled themselves in accordance with the customary code of presidential primary dress. For example, Rep. Richard A. Gephardt has availed himself of the working man's cloth and the golfer's pullover. He might turn up in a union jacket if he's addressing members of the International Association of Machinists or speaking at a V.F.W. hall. And he might opt for a sweater and khakis in intimate settings. "Clearly he's got to expand the base beyond unions to middle class voters so this makes sense," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "I think there's a real Middle America thing to the V-neck sweater," he added. "It's practical and it covers up a wrinkled shirt."
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/fashion/article/0,1299,DRMN_62_2574721,00.html

Squire: TV Unlikely To Be Decisive Factor In Race (Orlando Sentinel, Jan. 15)
Democratic candidates for president have plowed so much money into television ads here that they have spent nearly $90 for each Iowa caucus-goer. A crowded field of candidates already has invested $21 million in TV advertising nationwide, including $8.7 million here in the state that will cast the first judgment on Democrats four days from now. That amounts to $87 for each of the 100,000 Iowans who may turn out for Monday's caucuses. These are among the findings of a University of Wisconsin survey released Wednesday. The irony of so much money invested in so few voters is that experts think the ads will have little impact on the people -- fewer than one in five of all registered Democrats -- who will show up for what is basically an organizational feat. "My guess is that television will not be the deciding force this time around," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political-science professor at the University of Iowa. At 1,993 far-flung caucuses throughout this state, supporters for each candidate will rally as many followers as possible during one frigid winter evening of cajoling and head-counting, ending with allotment of delegates to a state convention. But voters are likely to arrive with more information from direct-mailings and telephone calls inundating the homes of likely caucus-goers than anything seen on TV here, Squire suggests: "I don't think any of the candidates has really been able to distinguish himself from the others on TV. I don't think voters have gained much information about the candidates from television ads." This article also appeared Jan. 15 on the web site of the South Florida SUN SENTINEL.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/nationworld/orl-asecads15011504jan15,1,7261914.story?coll=orl-home-headlines

Adams Comments On Heart Treatment (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Jan. 15)
Mayo Clinic researchers have developed improved ways to treat people with a potentially dangerous heart defect, say two studies in the January issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The studies outline the successful use of new procedures to observe and treat a heart defect called patent foramen ovale (PFO), an opening in the heart that fails to close after birth. But Dr. HAROLD ADAMS Jr., of the department of neurology at the University of Iowa's Carver College of Medicine, says in a prepared statement: "We cannot assume that all patients with patent foramen ovale and neurologic symptoms need to have the cardiac abnormality corrected." A version of this article also appeared Jan. 15 on DRKOOP.com.
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/stro/516914.html

Rice: Gephardt Can't Escape D.C. Insider Image (Star-Ledger, Jan. 15)
As a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination, Rep. Richard Gephardt likes to portray himself as a corn-fed Midwesterner who shares the moral values of voters across America's electoral heartland. But more than any other Democratic presidential contender, Gephardt has a political résumé based far to the east -- in his case, 700 miles from his St. Louis home. If any of the candidates can properly be labeled a Washington insider, it is Gephardt. With days remaining before the Iowa caucuses, the 62-year-old son of a milk truck driver is betting his political future on a strategy that draws on both his Midwestern bootstraps background and his nearly three decades of experience in Washington. The combination of the two, he maintains, gives him the best chance of ousting President Bush in November. Referring to Gephardt's Washington background, TOM RICE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said: "I don't think he can run away from it, and that's not what he should do. He is trying to make it work in his favor, and he is having some success here in Iowa. He has tried to paint Dean as inexperienced on foreign policy and big-time governing in general. He needs to play that card. He's too entrenched in Washington to run away from it." The newspaper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-0/107415100471300.xml

Van Allen Cool To Manned Missions (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Jan. 15)
In an election-year speech at NASA's headquarters near the White House, President George Bush outlined a vision of U.S. space exploration that would see astronauts return to the moon as early as 2015 and land on Mars within three decades. Some of the sharpest criticism of the proposal came from JAMES VAN ALLEN, the renowned University of Iowa physics professor who discovered bands of intensive radiation, later known as the Van Allen Belts, trapped around Earth's magnetic field. Van Allen has long been one of the nation's most vocal opponents of manned space flight. On Wednesday, he applauded Bush's focus on space exploration but said much more could be accomplished at a much lower price by sending up robotic machines. Manned spaceflight, he said, is "at best high adventure for a few people."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/312/4318958.html

UI Language/Literature Alumnus Profiled (The State, Jan. 15)
A profile of Garane Garane, the chair of the humanities department at Allen University, notes that after finishing high school in Somalia, he studied in Italy and France, earning his doctorate in Italian literature. He then moved to the United States, receiving a graduate degree in foreign languages from the University of Michigan and a doctorate in languages and literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Columbia, S.C.
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/news/local/7714057.htm

Neumann Discusses IEM On 'Crossfire' (CNN, Jan. 14)
The network broadcast live from its Election Express bus on the Anne Cleary Walkway at the University of Iowa. Two programs -- Inside Politics with Judy Woodruff and Crossfire with Paul Begala and Tucker Carlson -- were anchored from Iowa City. GEORGE NEUMANN, UI professor of economics, was a guest on Crossfire talking about the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS.
http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/01/14/elec04.bus.wednesday/

Squire Comments On Dean Chances (Ottawa Citizen, Jan. 14)
Howard Dean is heading into the Democratic presidential primaries as the undisputed champion of Internet politicking, having turned a tiny web-based campaign into a $40-million U.S. operation with an unrivalled organization. But with the Iowa presidential caucuses just days away, one of the biggest questions looming over the former Vermont governor's campaign is whether he can translate his support from cyberspace to the ballot box. "This is really the first chance voters get to do something other than answer surveys," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "For Dean, the challenge is being able to demonstrate that his campaign really can get new people to show up and participate." A similar story appeared Jan. 14 in the Montreal Gazette.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=136c6fa4e7f20c4555106d413f2417af&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVb&_md5=dd02fb5e4ef6bd234065695526130c86

Jones Interviewed About Electronic Voting (WNSV-FM, Jan. 14)
DOUGLAS JONES, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa and member and past chair of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems, was interviewed about computerized voting machines, county and state government examination processes in authorizing voting machines, Federal Election Commission standards and other related issues. WNSV is based in Nashville, Ill.

Collinson Comments On Kerouac's 'On The Road' (Baltimore Sun, Jan. 14)
Like the trip that inspired it, the first draft of author Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" is a wandering narrative, told in a continuous block of text. Yellowed with age, smudged with editing marks and the author's own ink-covered fingerprints, the scroll rolls over nearly 120 feet of paper. Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay bought the scroll two years ago for $2.43 million. Now that it has been displayed in Indianapolis, Irsay plans to send what may be the Beat Generation's quintessential text back to the road where it came from. Beginning this week at the Orange County History Center in Orlando, Fla., and ending with a three-month stay at the New York Public Library in 2007, Kerouac's "On the Road" scroll will make a 13-stop, four-year national tour of museums and libraries. While some -- including The New York Times -- praised its publication, others dismissed it. "It's the way that it was written that, in many ways, is more important than what it really is," said HOWARD COLLINSON, director of the University of Iowa Museum of Art, which will show the entire scroll in 2005. "That it kind of just spewed out of him is what it's all about." Versions of the article also ran on the websites of the ALBUQUERQUE (N.M.) JOURNAL; PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL; the TIMES PICAYUNE in New Orleans, La.; WHAS-TV in Kentucky; the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE and the MIAMI HERALD, both in Florida; the SPRINGFIELD (Ohio) NEWS SUN; the ATLANTA (Ga.) JOURNAL CONSTITUTION; ABC NEWS; FOX NEWS; the SAN FRANCISCO (Calif.) CHRONICLE; the MILWAUKEE (Wis.) JOURNAL SENTINEL; the MINNEAPOLIS (Minn.) STAR TRIBUNE and many other media outlets.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/sns-othernews-0114scroll,0,5510831.story?coll=bal-features-specials

UI Research On Brain Injury/Depression Cited (Post and Courier, Jan. 14)
A column pokes fun at research into brain surgery by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that found that people who suffer a blow to the brain are at greater risk of mental illness. Of 91 patients with traumatic brain injury, 33 percent had major depression during the first year after the brain injury, the study showed. More than three-quarters of those people also suffered from anxiety. Another study showed that many of more than 900 patients with mild to severe brain injuries had mental illness during the following year. "I don't know how much they spent on this research at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA but they can now save a bundle on other such obvious occurrences," a reader wrote in a note to the columnist. "For example, it would be safe to assume that people who have lost both thumbs have less success at hitchhiking. Those who suffer eye injury have trouble seeing depending on the extent of the injury. And how about those people with the misfortune of having a major explosion damage their hearing? They have a problem in hearing directly related to the damage caused by the big bang. Those with twin missing thumbs, eye injury and explosive concussion diminished hearing ability have a good chance of being depressed by their fate." The paper is based in Charleston, S.C.
http://www.charleston.net/stories/011404/loc_14gmlc.shtml

Squire Comments On Kerry Effort To Lure Veterans (Los Angeles Times, Jan. 14)
John F. Kerry is betting big on the veterans vote to bring him to victory -- or something like it -- in Monday's Iowa caucuses. His staff calls veterans the "cornerstone of our campaign" in the state, and announced Tuesday that more than 10,000 former soldiers and sailors plan to support Kerry on caucus night. On the one hand, it seems like a pretty good bet. But veterans are far from a unified group, spanning generations and conflicts. The younger ones lean toward the GOP, and the group as a whole is "not a particularly significant voting block here,"' said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "But Kerry doesn't have the unions or the college crowd. He has to look for somebody." Versions of the story also ran Jan. 14 on the websites of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and the BALTIMORE (Md.) SUN.
http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-na-kerry14jan14,1,6884839.story?coll=la-home-politics

Hovenkamp Surprised Of Unanimity In Verizon Ruling (Newsday, Jan. 14)
The U.S. Supreme Court yesterday unanimously rejected a Manhattan lawyer's claim that Verizon unfairly limited rival companies' access to its telecom network, a decision that narrows circumstances under which consumers can sue phone service providers. The ruling, a reversal of an appeals court decision, meant a victory for local phone companies, which could have faced further lawsuits had the justices decided otherwise. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust law professor at the University of Iowa, said the only part of the decision that was unexpected was that it was unanimous.
http://www.newsday.com/business/printedition/ny-bztel143625266jan14,0,637057.story?coll=ny-business-print

Covington: Gephardt Needs Big Iowa Win Monday (Seattle Times, Jan. 14)
Supporters packed a union hall in South Seattle yesterday for Democratic presidential candidate Dick Gephardt -- long a friend of organized labor -- cheering raucously for his promise to bring health insurance to all Americans and protect U.S. jobs. Unless the Missouri congressman wins in Tuesday's Iowa caucus and shows the grass-roots excitement and fund-raising acumen of front-runner Howard Dean, however, his swing through Washington may be little more than a farewell tour to his supporters here. "He pretty much has to win in Iowa," said CARY COVINGTON, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa who studies the presidency and campaigns.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2001836151_dickgephardt14m0.html

Squire: Dean Must Turn Internet Support Into Votes (National Post, Jan. 13)
Howard Dean is heading into the Democratic presidential primaries as the undisputed champion of Internet politicking, transforming a tiny Web-based campaign into a US $40-million operation with unrivalled organization. But with the Iowa presidential caucuses just days away, one of the biggest questions looming over the former Vermont governor is whether he can move support from cyberspace to the ballot box. "This is really the first chance voters get to do something other than answer surveys," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "For Dean, the challenge is being able to demonstrate that his campaign really can get new people to show up and participate." The National Post is a Canadian national daily newspaper based in Toronto.
http://www.canada.com/national/nationalpost/news/story.html?id=6d73a3f1-66d8-44e2-9266-59f58164092b

Hovenkamp: Verizon Ruling Reinforces Competition (Boston Globe, Jan. 13)
The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected a closely watched consumer lawsuit against regional telephone company Verizon Communications that could have exposed phone companies to triple-damage lawsuits. The unanimous decision reversed a U.S. appeals court ruling that could have let consumers sue regional phone companies for not providing competitors with enough access to their dominant phone networks. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust law professor at the University of Iowa, said the ruling reinforces the federal courts' long skepticism about claims that dominant companies should be forced to deal with competitors. "By and large, the courts have narrowed the scope of refusal-to-deal claims," Hovenkamp said. A variant of the same article ran Jan. 13 on the http://www.boston.com/business/technology/articles/2004/01/13/supreme_court_finds_for_verizon_in_antitrust_case/ website and included the following additional quote by Hovenkamp: ""I had always figured it would be a fairly lopsided decision in this direction."
http://www.boston.com/business/technology/articles/2004/01/13/supreme_court_finds_for_verizon_in_antitrust_case/

Squire Comments On Campaign Ads (Dallas Morning News, Jan. 13)
In Iowa, where grass-roots efforts usually rule the day, the crowded Democratic field is turning to television ads more than ever. In the latest sign of Iowa's importance, the air wars are expected to escalate as the candidates make late appeals to voters or try to undermine opponents. For the most part, analysts say, the politicians have stayed positive. The downside, though, is that some commercials focused on complex issues have become a bore, or voters have tuned out because of the sheer number of commercials. The upbeat messages "make watching TV more pleasant," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor. "But it's harder to come up with interesting ads about complicated issues." Squire added "No particular ads really stand out. They all look as if they've been produced by the same ad group."
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dallas/washington/topstory/stories/011304dnpoladblitz.c535.html

Squire: Iowa Caucuses Unique (International Herald-Tribune, Jan. 13)
To the uninitiated, the inner workings of the Iowa caucuses can be as mysterious as the rites of a secret society. No ballots are punched, all voting is public, politicking on-site is at the heart of the process and delegates can be won with a coin toss. Though the caucuses have an aura of days gone by, some of the home-style charm of the meetings is disappearing this year. The organizers are hoping that high interest and sentiment against President George W. Bush will bring a record turnout, showing that Iowa deserves its influential place as the first state in choosing presidential candidates. They have moved most of the gatherings out of Iowa parlors into public buildings that can hold more people. Less than 75 will be held in private residences. Party officials say the heavier emphasis on public facilities should boost participation, while increasing accessibility and adding to the transparency of the meetings. Still, for all the changes this year, the caucus system hardly seems the wave of the future. "It is a throwback system," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "It is unlike anything else we will see in the presidential process."
http://www.iht.com/articles/124787.html

Squire: Placing Second A Good Thing In Caucuses (NewsMax.com, Jan. 13)
Coming down the home stretch in the Iowa caucuses, most political watchers are focused on the competition between Gov. Howard Dean and Rep. Dick Gephardt -- with both now locked in a statistical dead heat for first place in most polls. But Congressional Quarterly political analyst Craig Crawford says that Sen. John Edwards could be among the big winners next Monday night after the votes are counted. So, how could the former trial lawyer -- who's mired in fourth place in most Iowa surveys despite the endorsement of the Des Moines Register on Sunday -- actually be doing well? "In Iowa, being a voter's second choice can matter a great deal," PEVERILL SQUIRE said. Squire, a University of Iowa political science professor, is an expert on the intricacies of Iowa's presidential caucuses. "It's not like a primary, where second place rarely matters," he explained. NewsMax.com is based in West Palm Beach, Fla.
http://www.newsmax.com/archives/ic/2004/1/13/233556.shtml

Vitamin D May Help Prevent MS, Rheumatoid Arthritis (CNN, Jan. 13)
Vitamin D -- which the body makes when exposed to sunlight -- may help prevent multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, two studies suggest. The findings may help explain why the two autoimmune diseases are more common in northern climes, where sunlight is often scarce, the researchers said. One study, published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism, showed that vitamin D may prevent rheumatoid arthritis, another autoimmune disease in which the joints are attacked and destroyed. The 11-year study of 29,368 women aged 55 to 69 involved detailed questions about eating habits, use of vitamin pills and other lifestyle choices. In this group, 152 women developed rheumatoid arthritis. The women whose diets were highest in vitamin D had the lowest occurrence of the disease, the researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA , the University of Alabama at Birmingham and elsewhere found. Again, supplements seemed to be a better source than food, they reported. A version of the story also ran Jan. 14 on the website of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/conditions/01/13/vitaminD.ms.reut/

Squire: Second Place Matters (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Jan. 13)
By accident or design -- maybe even out of necessity -- Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina seems to be pursuing an "Avis Strategy" in Iowa's Democratic caucus: be everybody's second choice for president. Such a strategy could produce a major surprise next Monday night when tens of thousands of Iowa Democrats meet in precincts around the state to promote their candidates for the party's 2004 presidential nomination. That's because in a deadlocked caucus, a candidate who is everyone's second choice can prevail -- or at least finish ahead of expectations -- when the arguing, horse-trading and voting are over. "In Iowa, being a voter's second choice can matter a great deal," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political professor and an expert on the intricacies of Iowa's presidential caucuses. "It's not like a primary, where second place rarely matters." The article also appeared on the websites of the ROCKY MOUNT (N.C.) TELEGRAM, LONGVIEW (Tex.) NEWS HERALD and the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0104/13edwards.html

Segura Comments On Minority Impact On Caucuses (New York Newsday, Jan. 13)
Democratic presidential contender Howard Dean yesterday promised to appoint a cabinet that "will look like the rest of America," one day after coming under fire for naming no minorities to senior positions while governor of Vermont. In Iowa, where the delegate selection process begins with Monday's caucuses and Dean and Gephardt are locked in a tight battle, the issue is likely to have little impact because the state's minority population is so small, according to University of Iowa political scientist GARY SEGURA. "I just can't imagine it having much traction ... even among liberal whites," he said. According to the 2000 census, 92.6 percent of Iowa's population is white. Segura said the issue would be further diluted by the fact that "there are virtually no minorities in Vermont" -- less than four percent according to the 2000 census. "Howard Dean wouldn't be able to say that publicly," Segura said, "but any reasonable person would wonder where all these minority advisers were going to come from."
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/nation/ny-usrace133624023jan13,0,5131456.story?coll=ny-nationalnews-headlines

Candidates Dress For Success (New York Times, Jan. 13)
Despite their differences, most of the Democratic candidates have styled themselves in accordance with the customary code of presidential primary dress. For example, Rep. Richard A. Gephardt has availed himself of the working man's cloth and the golfer's pullover. He might turn up in a union jacket if he's addressing members of the International Association of Machinists or speaking at a V.F.W. hall. And he might opt for a sweater and khakis in intimate settings. "Clearly he's got to expand the base beyond unions to middle class voters so this makes sense," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "I think there's a real Middle America thing to the V-neck sweater," he added. "It's practical and it covers up a wrinkled shirt." The article also appeared in the RUTLAND (Vt.) HERALD.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/13/fashion/13CAMP.html

Caucus System Changing, But Unique (New York Times, Jan. 13)
Though the caucuses have an aura of days gone by, some of the home-style charm of the meetings is disappearing this year. Democratic Party officials say the emphasis on public facilities for the Iowa should raise participation, which they want to exceed 100,000 on the Democratic side, while increasing accessibility and adding to the transparency of the meetings. The Democratic Party is also using more technology, instituting an automated call-in system intended to deliver results more smoothly and quickly. And in a bow to the media, the parties agreed to start them at 6:30 p.m. Central Standard Time to better meet deadlines for East Coast newspapers and late-night television news broadcasts. Still, for all the changes this year, the caucus system hardly seems the wave of the future. "It is a throwback system," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "It is unlike anything else we will see in the presidential process."
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/13/politics/campaigns/13CAUC.html

Gephardt Takes Break From Iowa Campaign (New York Times, Jan. 13)
Locked in a tight race with Howard Dean in the Iowa caucuses, Representative Richard A. Gephardt is spending much of the next three days outside that critical state as he raises money for his campaign in New York; Beverly Hills, Calif.; and Chicago. He is also squeezing in time with voters in Iowa, holding two campaign rallies yesterday and another tomorrow. His aides say that despite his absence he has a formidable organization to bring out the vote. Gephardt plans to spend the last four days of the campaign in Iowa. Yet some experts say he is taking a calculated risk. "I suspect he's well known enough so that a couple of days won't hurt," PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of politics at the University of Iowa, said. "But it's a gamble. There still some uncertainty about who is on top."
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/13/politics/campaigns/13GEPH.html

Van Allen Opposes Bush Space Plan (USA Today, Jan. 13)
An Iowa physicist considered to be one of the founding fathers of space exploration opposes Bush administration plans for a space station on the moon and a manned mission to Mars. JAMES VAN ALLEN, the namesake for the Van Allen Belts of intense radiation that encircle the earth, said Monday that such manned space missions have become too expensive and better results can be gained by robotic spacecraft. "I'm quite unimpressed by any arguments for it," Van Allen, 89, said in an interview from his office at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results," he said. The Associated Press article also appeared in the OMAHA WORLD HERALD and on the websites of several television stations across the United States.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/science/2004-01-13-rise-robots_x.htm

Squire Gives Caucus History (CNN, Jan. 12)
CNN's Judy Woodruff interviewed PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor, about the impact and history of the Iowa caucuses, He examined some similarities in the caucuses between this year and 1988. "This is an occasion where, like 1988, the Democrats really don't have a single dominant candidate, and they have a rather crowded field. So if you look here in Iowa, we really have four candidates who are very seriously and very vigorously contesting the caucuses. And for the voters that means they have to spend a fair amount of time and effort to try to figure out who among these candidates they would really like to support." Squire also commented on voter turnout: "...we probably will have a high turnout like we did back in 1988, about 125,000 people. And you can never be quite sure how people are going to decide to vote when they finally get the chance next week."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=1f1a0d72e7f0fdc3840a304998d00360&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=19c9a04fcf0f3b5798ed4152d192db9f

Vitamin D May Help Prevent MS, Rheumatoid Arthritis (Reuters, Jan. 12)
Vitamin D -- which the body makes when exposed to sunlight -- may help prevent multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, two studies suggest. The findings may help explain why the two autoimmune diseases are more common in northern climes, where sunlight is often scarce, the researchers said. One study, published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism, showed that vitamin D may prevent rheumatoid arthritis, another autoimmune disease in which the joints are attacked and destroyed. The 11-year study of 29,368 women aged 55 to 69 involved detailed questions about eating habits, use of vitamin pills and other lifestyle choices. In this group, 152 women developed rheumatoid arthritis. The women whose diets were highest in vitamin D had the lowest occurrence of the disease, the researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Alabama at Birmingham and elsewhere found. Again, supplements seemed to be a better source than food, they reported. The article also appeared in the SYDNEY MORNING HERALD and ABC SCIENCE ONLINE in Australia, and INDEPENDENT ONLINE in South Africa. The article appeared in YAHOO NEWS at
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20040112/hl_nm/health_vitamin_dc_1

Chang Comments On Breast Implant Ban (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Jan. 12)
The controversy over silicone breast implants took a surprising turn with the announcement that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) would not follow an advisory panel's recommendation to let the devices back on the market at this time. The FDA's move did not even stun members of the panel who had voted to let silicone implants back into the market. "I'm not surprised the FDA did this, given the degree of public outcry, given the extraordinary letter by the chair of the panel and given interested senators," said Dr. PHYLLIS CHANG, a panel member and an associate professor of plastic surgery at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. "It was a difficult decision. I mentioned that I wasn't sure how I would vote the day before."
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/wmen/516861.html

Lewin Quoted On Perceptions Of Gay Parents (New York Times, Jan. 12)
A story about gay couples who raise children reports that sociologists, gender researchers and gay parents say that because gay men are liberated from the cultural expectations and pressures that women face to balance work and family life, they may approach raising children with a greater sense of freedom and choice. They may also not fear stigmatization in these new roles, said ELLEN LEWIN, chairwoman of the women's studies department at the University of Iowa. Professor Lewin is the author of "Lesbian Mothers" (Cornell University Press, 1993) and is working on a study of gay fathers. The Star- Banner is based in Ocala, Fla. Versions of the story also ran Jan. 12 on the websites of OCALA STAR-BANNER and the LAKELAND LEDGER, both based in Florida.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/12/national/12DADS.html?ex=1074488400&en=32594adce6f984a1&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

UI Student Impressed With Gephardt (Boston Globe, Jan. 12)
A story about how Democratic presidential candidate Richard Gephardt says that in his bid to emerge as the anti-Howard Dean, Gephardt is highlighting his differences with the former Vermont governor through his folksy, homespun campaign style. "I do think coming from the Midwest, having the same kind of background that most of these people have had, sharing their values, I think it's an important thing," Gephardt told reporters after a campaign stop Saturday in Waterloo. "I really think I'm going to win here." It works with many in Iowa, who cite his residency in neighboring Missouri and his long support of farm- and labor-friendly policies as the main reasons for backing him. But with familiarity can come fatigue: Gephardt has been a known quantity in Iowa since the 1988 caucus, which he won, and some caucus-goers say they are frustrated to see him back on the campaign trail with the Democrats' national clout diminished. "He's been in leadership for 13 years, and the Democrats lost seats in that time," said Garrett Jensen, 21, a junior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who attended a Gephardt rally in Independence. "I don't know if he's capable of getting it done."
http://www.boston.com/news/politics/president/articles/2004/01/12/midwesterner_gephardt_milks_roots_familiarity/

UI Study On Brain Trauma Cited (Erie Times-News, Jan. 12)
People who suffer a blow to the brain have a greater risk of mental illness, new research shows. One study, published this month in Archives of General Psychiatry, examined how 91 patients fared after sustaining a traumatic brain injury. Thirty-three percent had major depression during the first year after the brain injury, compared with about seven percent of a group of patients who'd had multiple traumatic injuries, but not to the brain or spinal cord. More than three-quarters of the brain-injured patients with major depression also suffered from anxiety, and more than half had aggressive tendencies, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists reported.
http://goerie.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040112/LIFESTYLES07/101120232

Squire Comments On Candidate Calls (DM News, Jan. 12)
Politicians exempted themselves from compliance with the national no-call list, and they'll use that exemption to the hilt in this year's presidential primaries, political analysts said last week. The Iowa caucuses, the first test for primary candidates, are Jan. 19, followed by the New Hampshire primary Jan. 24. Seven states then hold contests Feb. 3, a date that likely will mark the end of the line for many of the nine Democratic primary candidates. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said that from personal experience he observed that in Iowa the breakdown of candidate calls has been split 50-50 between live and robo-calls. Squire said the only candidate he hasn't heard from yet is Al Sharpton. "I can just attest from my own household that we get several calls a day," he said. "All the campaigns here are very anxious to mobilize voters and are using every device they have at their disposal." DM News, based in New York, bills itself as the online newspaper of record for direct marketers.
http://www.dmnews.com/cgi-bin/artprevbot.cgi?article_id=26129

Spotlight Column Features UI Alumnus (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Jan. 12)
A column titled "Spotlight" features Steven Baird, 41, shareholder and chairman of Winthrop & Weinstine's trademark and brand management practice group, Minneapolis. The column says Baird has a bachelor of science degree in pharmacy, with distinction, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY (1986) and a juris doctor with high distinction from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW (1990).
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/4306634.html

Andrejevic On Reality TV (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Jan. 12)
Todd Santos is struggling with some life decisions: Does he need a new roommate? Should he join a band? Or maybe reconnect with his high-school sweetheart? Instead of asking friends or family for advice, Santos, a waiter in California, is turning to the viewing public. For seven weeks, fans of FX's upcoming new reality show "Todd TV" can text-message their opinions about his life and Santos will bow to the majority vote. It's the latest and perhaps craziest twist in reality television, a genre that by now was supposed to be fading from the TV landscape but instead is again picking up steam. "You can play the guy like a video game. He's a character. It's brilliant," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, assistant professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa and author of "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched." "People are clued in to the fact that reality shows are stepping stones to celebrity. Everybody understands that people on the shows are playing roles. So the quandary faced by TV programmers is: once viewers doubt the authenticity of the participants, what can the programmers do? Trick the participants."
http://www.jsonline.com/enter/tvradio/jan04/199364.asp

Squire Comments On Dean's Union Backing (San Diego Union-Tribune, Jan. 12)
As the 2004 campaign was taking shape, there was much speculation that labor would put up a united front behind Democratic presidential candidate Richard Gephardt as it did with Al Gore in 2000 and Bill Clinton in 1996. The AFL-CIO, however, declined to make a pre-primary endorsement. And then former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean captured the endorsements of the feuding AFSCME and Service Employees International Union in the same week. That coup helped undercut the stereotype of Dean as the candidate solely of northeastern liberal elites. "Going into the campaign, the expectation was that Gephardt would have all of labor locked up," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "Dean has come along and picked the lock. That comes as a shock to Gephardt because he's the candidate that has always been there for labor." The paper is based in California.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/politics/20040111-9999_1n11labor.html

Squire: Iowa Plays Key Role In Nomination (Akron Beacon-Journal, Jan. 11)
For the last few weeks, Iowa has been flooded with reporters, pundits and politicos -- all focusing on the state's upcoming caucuses, which will go a long way in helping to determine who will be on the presidential ballot this November. But it hasn't always been that way. It wasn't until 1976 that a relatively unknown former Georgia governor named Jimmy Carter made Iowa the first real test of political muscle. Months before the Democratic caucuses that year, Carter campaigned extensively throughout the state, not missing an opportunity to spread his message. The state had actually started its caucus system in 1972, but few paid attention then. Carter's victory in Iowa surprised almost everyone and gave the candidate momentum. After he won the presidency, which Carter attributed in part to his success in Iowa, subsequent presidential hopefuls jumped to mirror the Carter strategy. "Iowa matters in the nomination process simply because it is first on the schedule," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "The candidates understand that doing well here gives their candidacies a substantial boost going into New Hampshire and that doing poorly makes it difficult for them to continue in the race," said Squire, the author of "Iowa Caucuses and the Presidential Nominating Process."
http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/7683946.htm

Segura: Candidate Backers' Visits Build Support (Knight-Ridder, Jan. 11)
As the race for the Democratic presidential nomination enters the last week before the first polling in Iowa, the candidates are bringing in their star supporters in an effort to win an important early victory and the momentum that goes with it. Howard Dean campaigned on Saturday with Vice President Al Gore, John Kerry had fellow Massachusetts senator Edward Kennedy and Rep. Dick Gephardt has Kennedy's son, fellow Rep. Patrick Kennedy of Rhode Island, as well as California's Nancy Pelosi, the Democrats' leader in the House of Representatives. The cavalcade of stars is one sign that next week's Iowa caucuses may be the most hotly contested since 1988. The candidates are betting that someone else's message might win votes even if their own hasn't. Even lesser celebrities such as a former Mississippi governor and the first lady of Missouri have been working the state on Gephardt's behalf. Such visits can also be used to create the impression that a candidate has a broader base of support, said GARY SEGURA, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. For example, Rep. Jim Clyburn, an African American congressman from South Carolina, is scheduled to campaign for Gephardt to shore up minority support and demonstrate that Gephardt has a strategy beyond Iowa. But it's doubtful whether the surrogates sway many voters, Segura said. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS; the COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER; the CONTRA COSTA TIMES and the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, both in California; the GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, the MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH; the KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR; the CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania; the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL; the WICHITA (Kans.) EAGLE; the BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD; the WILKES BARRE (Penn.) WEEKENDER; the MIAMI HERALD and the BRADENTON HERALD, both in Florida; the DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, and other publications.
http://www.realcities.com/mld/krwashington/7682422.htm

Squire: Dean Comment On Iowa Caucuses May Hurt Him (National Post, Jan. 10)
A sudden surge in the polls by Democratic presidential candidate Wesley Clark has U.S. Democrats buzzing about the retired army general's potential to emerge as the most viable alternative to Howard Dean, the current front-runner. The new momentum for Mr. Clark comes as Mr. Dean, the former Vermont governor, struggles to overcome growing concerns he is too inexperienced and prone to controversial comments to survive a run against the incumbent George W. Bush. With the caucuses less than 10 days away, Dean was forced to backtrack from statements he made four years ago on a Canadian public affairs program about the Midwestern state's system for choosing a presidential nominee's. He said the Iowa caucuses, in which Democrats vote for their party's nominees at a series of town hall meetings, were "dominated by special interests" and were a waste of time. Now he must win in Iowa to demonstrate his campaign's strength and has visited each of the state's 99 counties in an attempt to nail down a victory. "In and of itself, this comment doesn't really hurt Dean. But there could be a cumulative effect," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "Undecided voters may begin to worry that maybe Dean just talks too much and gets himself into too much trouble, that down the road it will be harder for him to get himself out of." The Post is based in Canada.
http://www.canada.com/national/nationalpost/news/story.html?id=a4776aa2-d726-420b-861e-a5109ba2624a

UI Alumna To Give Recital in Seoul (Korea Times, Jan. 10)
Pipe organist Hanna Lee will present a solo recital at Youngsan Arts Hall in Yoido, Seoul, at 7:30 p.m. on Monday. A graduate of Seoul Arts High School, the Ph.D. candidate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA advanced to Yonsei University in Seoul, where she was awarded full scholarship from the Asan Foundation for the four years. While attending the graduate school of the same university, she was invited to master's classes in Haarlem, the Netherlands a few times, and gave recitals there.
http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/culture/200401/kt2004011116015111730.htm

Squire: Harkin Nod To Dean Cue For Voters (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Jan. 10)
Four-term Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin announced yesterday that he would support Democratic presidential contender Howard B. Dean, praising his "plainspoken" style and saying the former Vermont governor was the "Harry Truman of our time." The announcement was a critical boost for Dean with less than two weeks before the Jan. 19 Iowa caucuses. Roughly a quarter of Iowa voters are still undecided, and Dean has been locked in a tight race with Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt and, to a lesser extent, with Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kerry for the top spot. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor, said Harkin's nod was "an important cue for undecided voters." "Getting this series of endorsements from Gore, Bradley and certainly Harkin in Iowa really gives him the Democrats' 'Good Housekeeping' seal," Squire said. "It's a signal that the people who are active in the party are comfortable" with Dean, he said. "For people who have had their doubts, that may be reassuring."
http://www.post-gazette.com/election/20040110harkindean40elect2p2.asp

UI Education Journal Cited (Education Week, Dec. 10)
A story about the soaring popularity of online research journals in the field of education cites in a sidebar list the Journal of Research for Educational Leaders, an electronic journal published by the Institute for School Leaders at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City.
http://www.edweek.org/ew/ewstory.cfm?slug=15Electronic.h23&keywords=electronic%20journals

UI Journal Of Corporation Law Cited (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 9)
When John Freeman takes shots at regulators for being soft on the issue of mutual-fund fees that investors pay, he knows his subject. More than two decades ago, he helped shape one of the fund-fee rules he now wants changed. These days he is a professor of legal and business ethics at the University of South Carolina. His research into what shareholders pay the people running their mutual funds has supplied ammunition to those trying to bring down fund fees, including New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer and Vanguard Group founder John C. Bogle. The fund industry's main trade group, the Investment Company Institute, this week rolled out its own study to refute his research. On Tuesday, ICI President Matthew Fink blasted one study co-written by Mr. Freeman that found mutual-fund fees were high compared with those paid by pension funds, calling it "very flawed" and "irresponsible." Freeman is now working on a research paper with Stewart Brown, a finance professor at Florida State University and his collaborator on the earlier pension-fund fee study published in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA JOURNAL OF CORPORATION LAW. He expects the paper on 12b-1 fees to be published in the spring. "The rule has worked beautifully for fund sponsors and sellers who rake in rule 12b-1-generated money," Messrs. Freeman and Brown wrote in an early draft.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2004/01/09/financial0854EST0032.DTL

UI Law Journal Article Cited (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 9)
When John Freeman takes shots at regulators for being soft on the issue of mutual-fund fees that investors pay, he knows his subject. More than two decades ago, he helped shape one of the fund-fee rules he now wants changed. These days he is a professor of legal and business ethics at the University of South Carolina. His research into what shareholders pay the people running their mutual funds has supplied ammunition to those trying to bring down fund fees, including New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer and Vanguard Group founder John C. Bogle. One of those studies was published in 2001 in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW's Journal of Corporation Law.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2004/01/09/financial0854EST0032.DTL

Squire Comments On Bush Immigrant Labor Proposal (Arizona Republic, Jan. 9)
President Bush's proposal to offer temporary visas to foreign workers, including some undocumented immigrants with jobs, is reverberating well beyond the nation's Southern gateway. The issue of undocumented migrant workers has long been a fixture in Southwestern border states like Arizona and Texas, but people elsewhere in the country also have plenty to say about Bush's plan. University of Iowa political science Professor PEVERILL SQUIRE believes the issue will elicit ongoing attention across the nation. "Republicans and Democrats from the heartland will be tugged in both directions," he said. It's too early to tell how popular opinion will fall, he said, "but I don't see the president's position having an easy time getting through (Congress)."
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0109immig-mood.html

Antczak Discusses Kerry's Gravitas (Boston Globe, Jan. 9)
Iowa Democrats are reportedly taking another look at Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry as his campaign reports new momentum in the final weeks leading to the Iowa caucus. "Part of Kerry's recent success is Iowans looking for an alternative to Howard Dean, because they worry, as the caucuses arrive, that he may be unelectable," said FRED ANTCZAK, professor of rhetoric and a political observer at the University of Iowa. "Kerry seems to have the gravitas that would make him a good alternative."
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2004/01/09/kerry_is_bringing_it_on_his_staff_asserts/

Chang Cites Reasons For Breast Implant Ban (Boston Globe, Jan. 9)
A member of the advisory panel that recently rejected a request to return silicon breast implants to the market said that one of the reasons the committee voted to maintain the ban was because of pressure from committee chairman Thomas Whalen, an opponent of the implants. PHYLLIS CHANG, a plastic surgeon at UI, said that Whalen "used the weight of his chairmanship, and that undermined part of the process of fairness. Dr. Whalen's letter, public outcry, questions from senators all weighed in and had some impact on the decision," Chang said. "Because of public outcry, rightly or wrongly, the rules of the game have changed."
http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2004/01/09/us_keeps_limits_on_implants/

Stone Provides Dry Skin Cure (Indianapolis Star, Jan. 9)
Dry, scaly, blotchy, red -- there's nothing attractive about dry skin in winter. The expensive solution is to quit your job and buy an oceanfront condo at Hilton Head in South Carolina. The solution for the rest of us is a moisturizing cream, preferably one with a bit of petroleum jelly or other true ointment in it. The root cause of dry skin is the evaporation of moisture from the top layer, said MARY STONE, associate professor of dermatology and pathology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, as reported by Virtual Hospital(www.vh.org). As the skin becomes dry, it may become itchy and develop microscopic cracks, Stone said. The solution is a petroleum jelly-based cream. The reason this is preferred to water-based lotions is that the water in the lotion will soon evaporate, leaving you right where you started.
http://www.indystar.com/articles/4/109699-3384-047.html

Depression Follows Brain Injury (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Jan. 8)
Many people who suffer a traumatic brain injury experience major depression or other psychiatric illnesses within a year afterward, say two articles in the January issue of The Archives of General Psychiatry. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studied 91 patients who had experienced traumatic brain injury, evaluating their condition at three, six and 12 months after the injury. They found 33 percent of the patients suffered major depression during the first year after their injury. Researchers also found the patients who suffered from depression were more likely to have a history of mood and anxiety disorders. Of those with depression, about 76 percent also had anxiety and 56 percent exhibited aggressive behavior.
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/brai/516783.html

Andrejevic Says Reality TV Seen As Step To Celebrity (Boston Globe, Jan. 8)
Todd Santos is struggling with some life decisions: Does he need a new roommate? Should he join a band? Or maybe reconnect with his high-school sweetheart? Instead of asking friends or family for advice, Santos, a waiter in California, is turning to the viewing public. For seven weeks, fans of FX's upcoming new reality show "Todd TV" can text-message their opinions about his life and Santos will bow to the majority vote. It's the latest and perhaps craziest twist in reality television, a genre that by now was supposed to be fading from the TV landscape but instead is again picking up steam. "You can play the guy like a video game. He's a character. It's brilliant," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, assistant professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa and author of "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched." "People are clued in to the fact that reality shows are stepping stones to celebrity. Everybody understands that people on the shows are playing roles. So the quandary faced by TV programmers is: once viewers doubt the authenticity of the participants, what can the programmers do? Trick the participants."
http://www.boston.com/ae/tv/articles/2004/01/08/more_real_than_real/

Alumnus Named City Manager In Minnesota (Minnetonka Sun Sailor, Jan. 8)
The new year starts with a number of new faces at Long Lake, Minn., City Hall. The latest arrival is new City Administrator Steve Stahmer, who has his M.A. in urban planning from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This story also appeared in numerous other Twin Cities suburban newspapers.
http://www.mnsun.com/story.asp?city=Minnetonka&story=126973

Iowa Faces 'Brain Drain' (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 8)
As presidential candidates crisscross the state, Iowa's rural areas and small towns continue to struggle as waves of young people leave for greater employment and cultural opportunities in cities inside and outside the state. Among college-educated residents ages 25 to 39, Iowa lost nearly 12,000 more than it gained from 1995 to 2000, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released in November, ranking Iowa second only to North Dakota in that trend. On a walk across the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's campus in Iowa City, it doesn't take long to find a student who plans to leave the state's good schools, clean government and friendly people after graduation. "A lot of young people think it's in the middle of nowhere and they want to see the big cities," said Ashleigh Cermak, 21, a senior from the Des Moines area who is studying accounting.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0401080302jan08,1,5923470.story

UI To Request IMU Renovation (Omaha World-Herald, Jan. 8)
After a divided Board of Regents voted to renovate Kinnick Stadium, the University of Iowa may find that the regents are more willing to approve a renovation of the school's student union. Next month, the university will present the first part of a four-phase plan for $27 million in improvements to the IOWA MEMORIAL UNION. The price tag for the union project is significantly less than the $88.5 million renovation to Kinnick Stadium, which was approved by the Regents on a 5-3 vote.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=968179

UI Alumna Profiled (Sacramento Bee, Jan. 8)
A profile of local volunteer Dona Louzader notes that she is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sacbee.com/content/lifestyle/story/8062664p-8995385c.html

Research By UI Law Professor, Students Cited (Oregonian, Jan. 8)
A columnist writes about the events chronicled in Neil Miller's book, "Sex-Crime Panic: A Journey to the Paranoid Heart of the 1950s," which describes a systematic effort to round up so-called "criminal sexual psychopaths." Twenty "sexual psychos" were eventually sent to a new wing specially created at the state mental hospital in Mount Pleasant, Miller reports. When carolers arrived for Christmas 1955, their ward was the only one considered too dangerous to enter. Come spring, all 20 were considered "cured" and released. By the time Neil Miller tracked down the survivors in the late '90s, they were still so embarrassed and resentful they didn't want their real names used in his book. One of the men who was convicted of a kidnapping and murder at this time was set free after 17 years in the Iowa state pen -- his conviction overturned thanks to the efforts of a law professor named Robert Bartels and his students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's law school, detailed in Bartels' "Benefit of Law."
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/steve_duin/index.ssf?/base/news/1073566536194250.xml

Patent Donations Scrutinized (Forbes, Jan. 7)
The U.S. Internal Revenue Service started cracking down last year on companies taking excessive deductions for donating patents to universities and research centers. It has already disallowed tens of millions of dollars of deductions, although it won't name its first targets. Now, in a surprise step, the IRS says it is casting its enforcement net wider. In a Dec. 22 advisory statement, IRS Commissioner Mark Everson said that the agency intends to penalize not only companies taking improper deductions, but also promoters and appraisers who help with the deals. Criminal penalties aren't out of the question. "We're seeing an increasing number of donations that don't pass the smell test," Everson wrote. Two significant problem areas: inflated appraisals and giving only a partial interest in the patent (you have to give away the whole thing to get a deduction). One of the big patent donors in recent years was DuPont, which gave away patents it valued at $64 million to Penn State, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Virginia Tech in 1999.
http://www.forbes.com/home_europe/2004/01/07/cz_ae_0107beltway.html

UI Research Finds Brain Injury-Depression Link (WIS-TV, Jan. 7)
New research adds to the growing body of evidence that shows a severe bump to the brain can trigger depression and other mental health problems. The latest study of nearly 100 head injury patients finds a third suffered a major bout of depression during the first year after their injury. The rate of depression and other mood disorders among the brain injury group was much higher when compared to depression rates among the same number of people who hadn't been injured. Researchers say the findings underscore the importance of recognizing the signs and symptoms of depression and mood disorders in head injury patients, so they can get early treatment. The study was conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and is published in the archives of General Psychiatry.
http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S=1590734&nav=0RaPK2e8

UI Law Journal Paper Sparks Controversy (Wall Street Journal, Jan. 7)
The mutual fund industry stepped up its effort Tuesday to try to undermine the criticism from New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer that mutual fund fees are simply too high. The Investment Company Institute (ICI), the primary trade group of the fund industry, issued a report that refutes a widely quoted 2001 academic paper that maintains that mutual fund investors pay significantly higher fees to have their money managed than pension-fund participants. The paper, written by John Freeman and Stewart Brown for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's law journal, was cited by Spitzer in his November testimony to the U.S. Senate, as well as in various media reports. Spitzer is fighting to lower what he calls excessive fees in the mutual fund industry. A version of the story also ran on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE and the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB107341022168632300,00.html

UI Alumna Is CEO Of New Heart Hospital (San Antonio Express-News, Jan. 7)
As the days count down to the opening of the 120-bed Texsan Heart Hospital, construction workers install finishing touches, and nursing and technical staff run through the protocols that will govern patient care. This is a day Trudy Land, a social worker-turned-health care CEO, has worked toward for two years. Land earned her master's degree in social work from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://news.mysanantonio.com/story.cfm?xla=saen&xlb=110&xlc=1109807

UI Seeks Funds To Upgrade IMU (WQAD-TV, Jan. 7)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has another big project before the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, and this one may go a little easier. Last month, a divided board gave preliminary approval to an upgrade of Kinnick Stadium, pegged at nearly $89 million. Iowa also wants to renovate its student union. Next month, officials will present the first part of a four-phase plan for $27 million in improvements. They say the work is needed to keep Iowa on par with other schools in competing for students. The original section of the student union opened in 1925. If approved, construction could start this spring and be completed in 2007.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1590536&nav=1sW7K2UN

UI Press-Published Guide On Birds Lauded (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Jan. 7)
A column about bird feeders mentions "Birds At Your Feeder," (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, $9.95), a guide to the birds that visit Minnesota-area feeders when snow is on the ground. "Dana Gardner and Nancy Overcott, the duo who brought us the wonderful book 'At Home in the Big Woods,' have again teamed up to create something both lovely and useful," the columnist writes. "The laminated guide consists of 16 color panels that fold nicely into a handy reference that will fit in your back pocket. But while concise, the guide includes 50 species, each in a fragment of appropriate habitat, and shows males and females when plumage differs. The text is spare but efficient."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1453/4288394.html

Dean's IEM Price Noted (CNBC, Jan. 6)
In a segment on the Howard Dean campaign, the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS are noted. "At the University of Iowa, there are electronic markets where people can actually put money down and say what they think is going to happen. Right now, when you look at that today, it shows seven out of 10 are the odds that Dean will get it; you know, better than 70 percent that it's Dean. Next in line is Wes Clark at one out of 10."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=1f1a0d72e7f0fdc3840a304998d00360&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=152bc1e8a55db59e5f5e14799c23c05b

Jones Interviewed About Electronic Voting (Santa Fe Public Radio, Jan. 6)
DOUGLAS JONES
, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa
and member and past chair of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems, was interviewed about computerized voting machines, county and state government examination processes in authorizing voting machines, Federal Election Commission standards and other related issues. Santa Fe Public Radio is based in New Mexico.

Brain Injury Raises Risk Of Mental Illness (WAFF-TV, Jan. 6)
People who suffer a blow to the brain have a greater risk of mental illness, new research shows. One study, published this month in Archives of General Psychiatry, examined how 91 patients fared after sustaining a traumatic brain injury. Thirty-three percent had major depression during the first year after the brain injury, compared with about seven percent of a group of patients who'd had multiple traumatic injuries, but not to the brain or spinal cord. More than three-quarters of the brain-injured patients with major depression also suffered from anxiety, and more than half had aggressive tendencies, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists reported. WAFF covers Huntsville, Ala., and surrounding areas. Versions of this story also ran Jan. 6 on the websites of Innovations-Report in Germany and HealthandAge.com.
http://www.waff.com/Global/story.asp?S=1589163

Teacher Earned Master's Degree At UI (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 6)
A lot has happened, musically speaking, at Iowa Mennonite School in Kalona since Bradley Kauffman arrived in 1997. He has taken the school's choir to perform in community and regional events, including the regional Mennonite Secondary Education Council's festival. It was held last year in Goshen, Ind., and was led by University of Iowa music professor TIMOTHY STALTER. Stalter was Kauffman's lead teacher as he worked toward his master's degree in 2002.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=965837

UI Hospitals Have Record Year (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 6)
More patients were cared for at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS during the 2002-03 fiscal year than ever before. During the year, 41,809 patients were admitted, including 1,450 newborns. That's a 2 percent increase from the year before, when the hospital admitted 40,973 patients and assisted in 1,439 births.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=965889

Alumna Named Director (Pittsburgh Business Times, Jan. 5)
The board of Pittsburgh Cares, a nonprofit volunteer organization, named Valerie Staats executive director. She holds a master's degree in literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a Ph.D. in public and international affairs from the University of Pittsburgh.
http://pittsburgh.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/stories/2004/01/05/daily6.html

Brain Injury Raises Risk Of Mental Illness (Fort Wayne News Sentinel, Jan. 5)
People who suffer a blow to the brain have a greater risk of mental illness, new research shows. One study, published this month in Archives of General Psychiatry, examined how 91 patients fared after sustaining a traumatic brain injury. Thirty-three percent had major depression during the first year after the brain injury, compared with about seven percent of a group of patients who'd had multiple traumatic injuries, but not to the brain or spinal cord. More than three-quarters of the brain-injured patients with major depression also suffered from anxiety, and more than half had aggressive tendencies, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists reported. The News Sentinel serves Fort Wayne, Ind.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/7637660.htm

Alumnus Retires As College President (Hibbing Daily Tribune, Jan. 5)
Tony Kuznik, who received a doctorate in education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is retiring as president of Hibbing Community & Technical College. The Daily Tribune is based in Hibbing, Minn.
http://www.hibbingmn.com/placed/index.php?sect_rank=1&story_id=161168

UI Medical Alumna Retires Early (The Robesonian, Jan. 5)
After 27 years of practicing medicine in Robeson County, Carolyn McCormick has been victimized by an epidemic no pill or potion can cure. Rising malpractice insurance rates forced McCormick, 57, into early retirement Wednesday. And when she closed her Elm Street office, thousands of patients - she's not sure exactly how many - lost not only a trusted physician, but a friend as well. "I came to North Carolina and Robeson County specifically because I wanted to help American Indians," said McCormick, a native of Iowa who attended medical school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "My patients are about 30 percent white, 30 percent black and 30 percent Lumbee. That's part of the appeal of my job - working with all these diverse people." The Robesonian is based in Lumberton, N.C.
http://www.robesonian.com/articles/2004/01/05/news/news/story02.txt

UI Study Focuses On School Health Care (Bremerton Sun, Jan. 5)
School nurses and health aides are expected to do more than ever, as kids needing tube feedings and catheterizations require help along side those with the skinned knees. A mix of factors -- federal laws ensuring fair education for disabled children, medical advances, busy working parents -- has resulted in more students coming to school with chronic illnesses. School health professionals say the increased demand highlights a concern they've had for years: whether there are enough medically trained people in schools to handle the load. There are other problems when school health care is lacking or nonexistent, school nurses and their union say. Schools miss signs of broader health trends, with some sick kids ending up at the emergency room for basic care. And school workers such as secretaries and teachers -- given varying levels of training -- are asked to help provide care. About 97 percent of schools let staff administer prescription drugs, and at least one study reveals that delegation doesn't always work. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researcher found medication errors were three times more likely when nursing duties were delegated to staff. The paper is based in Washington. A version of the story also ran Jan. 2 on the website of CNN.
http://www.thesunlink.com/redesign/2004-01-05/features/health/369171.shtml

UI Student Gets Laptop (Rockford Register Star, Jan. 5)
The laptop Elise Gilbert received Friday may give her the much-needed rest she's missed during her first semester at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. No more late-night and early morning hours spent in the school's computer lab typing papers for class. Gilbert and 25 other Rockford graduates can enter their second semesters more prepared, thanks to State Farm Insurance and the Rockford Association for Minority Management. The used laptops, donated by State Farm, came in green and brown cases Friday, complete with Microsoft Office software. This is the second year RAMM and State Farm have presented the computers to RAMM scholarship recipients. Students, parents and RAMM members gathered Friday afternoon at Montague Public Library for the formal ceremony. The paper is based in Illinois.
http://www.rrstar.com/localnews/your_community/rockford/20040103-5469.shtml

UI Study Of Investor Behavior Cited (Santa Cruz Sentinel, Jan. 4)
Apparently, there are many investors for whom the thrill of victory overwhelms the agony of defeat. At a seminar on the neurological bases of investor behavior, author Jason Zweig described a study conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Test subjects were told that they would be shown a random sequence of slides. Eighty percent of the slides would have a green box. Twenty percent would have a yellow box. The subjects were asked to bet on the color of the next slide in the sequence. Most of the subjects tried to outguess the sequence rather than make the high probability decision to bet "green" every time. If this study is representative, high probability investing is not majority behavior. It requires a discipline and temperament that most investors - professional and amateur - lack. The paper is based in California.
http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/archive/2004/January/04/biz/stories/02biz.htm

Lewis-Beck Discusses Unemployment Politics (Hartford Courant, Jan. 4)
On Jan. 9, when the unemployment rate for December is announced, both Republicans and Democrats will assuredly again maneuver for advantage -- precisely because the number isn't expected to change much. "At this point, where we don't know which way it's going but it isn't likely to be going far, both sides will try to use it," says MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. In every election since 1960, the party in the White House lost when the unemployment rate deteriorated during the first half of the year. If the rate improved, the party in the White House won. That's not a coincidence, says Lewis-Beck, who has edited several volumes on how economic conditions determine elections. "People see the president as the chief executive of the economy," he says. "They punish him if things are deteriorating and reward him if things are improving." Versions of the story also ran Jan. 4 on the websites of the LOS ANGELES TIMES, where the story originated, and THE NEWS JOURNAL in Delaware.
http://www.ctnow.com/business/hc-jobsassess.artjan04,1,6665400.story?coll=hc-headlines-business

. Gronbeck: Dean Not Dukakis (Boston Globe, Jan. 4)
A story about the weekend's debate in Iowa among Democratic presidential candidates discusses the repeated attacks fellow Dems made against former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean. Dean's preference to avoid responding to his rivals' attacks recalls the tactical choice of the 1988 Democratic nominee, Michael S. Dukakis, who lost ground in his race against the first President Bush by not responding quickly to assaults. Yet one analyst said yesterday that Dean might not run the same risk as Dukakis. "He's not very good at responding to attacks, so it's not necessarily a bad tactic for him," said BRUCE GRONBECK, an expert on political communication at the University of Iowa. "Dukakis was also fighting a Republican attack. With Dean, he can look like he's playing with the idea that you have to keep party unity and that the attacks do no good for Democrats."
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2004/01/04/dean_and_his_foes_joust_anew_in_iowa/

Squire: Iowa Enjoys Caucus Attention (Albuquerque Journal, Jan. 4)
For decades, all New Mexico presidential primary voting has come in June, months after a nominee has been all but anointed in contests in Iowa, New Hampshire and other states. But this year, at the urging of Gov. Bill Richardson, the New Mexico Democratic Party changed the name of its presidential nomination procedure from "primary" to "caucus" and moved up the date of its first-round presidential voting by four months to Feb. 3. In modern presidential politics, Iowa has long held the distinction of being a small state with big influence in the early stages of the campaigns. The Iowa caucuses- scheduled for Jan. 19 this year- are the first national test for candidates hoping to win the White House. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said Iowans zealously guard the state's role as an early test of a presidential candidate's chances of making it all the way to the White House. "Iowa isn't always at the center of national attention," Squire said. "But we have become used to being the center of attention once every four years, and we enjoy it."
http://www.abqjournal.com/elex/129856elex01-04-04.htm

Emeritus Professor Establishes Scholarship (Eagle Herald, Jan. 3)
J.R. SIMON, a Marinette native who found success in the academic world, has created a scholarship fund to help Marinette High School seniors pay for college. J.R. Simon, who graduated from Marinette High in 1947, established the $100,000 scholarship fund, which will award $5,000 annually to graduating seniors who demonstrate potential for success in the sciences, engineering and humanities. Simon is an emeritus professor of business and industrial psychology at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Eagle Herald is based in Menominee, WI.
http://www.eagleherald.com/scol0129.htm

Gurnett Calculates Voyager 1 Solar System Exit (Science News, Jan. 3)
There are clues that the venerable Voyager 1 spacecraft, launched 26 years ago and now 90 times as far from the sun as Earth is, either has reached or will soon enter a turbulent region near the solar system's final frontier. Guided by strong bursts of radio waves that Voyager 1 has detected since November 2002, scientists now calculate that the edge, known as the heliopause, resides between 153 and 158 times as far as Earth does from the sun. The bursts were probably generated when clouds of solar material, hurled by the sun during an unusually stormy period in April 2001, rammed into cold interstellar ions at the edge of the solar system, says DONALD A. GURNETT of the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Radio bursts from that collision then traveled back toward the sun and were intercepted by Voyager 1. From the speed of the clouds and the time it took them to reach the heliopause, Gurnett's team calculated the distance to the edge. He reported the findings, which are consistent with his team's analysis of similar radio bursts recorded by Voyager 1 a decade ago (SN: 5/29/93, p. 343), last month at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco. Trying to find the solar system's edge, Gurnett cautions, is a search for a moving target because its location depends on how strongly the solar wind is blowing. Nonetheless, the best estimate is that Voyager 1 could reach that border around 2020, just as the aging craft is expected to run out of power.
http://www.sciencenews.org/20040103/bob8.asp

Lieberman Focuses On New Hampshire (Washington Post, Jan. 2)
Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman (D-Conn.) began the new year in the state that will occupy the most of his time and attention this month, watching football at a few local pubs and hosting a holiday party for supporters at the home his family is renting in New Hampshire's largest city. In Jillian's, a pool hall in downtown Manchester, N.H., wearing a festive red sweater, a pint of lager in hand, he talked football with voters, but politics was never far from his mind. Asked by Dave Tremblay of Hookset whether he would support the University of Southern California or Michigan in the Rose Bowl, Lieberman thought a minute before offering "I don't know . . . but Michigan has an early primary." When the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football team flashed across the screen, Lieberman, who is not campaigning in the Iowa caucuses so he can concentrate on New Hampshire, said jokingly, "I don't have to take an interest in that."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A48081-2004Jan1.html

Alumnus Fights To Protect Pensions (Wichita Eagle, Jan. 2)
It ended swiftly and decisively for Janet Krueger. In a flash, she walked away from a $120,000-a-year job at IBM Corp. in Rochester, Minn., the company where she had worked for more than two decades and her father had spent a career. Quite unexpectedly, the former computer specialist and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumnus who avoided politics has become a self-styled crusader for workers' rights and retirees' concerns. Both are at risk - she and others claim - as companies on a hunt for cost savings take aim at a social contract that once so tightly bound workers and their employers. The paper is based in Kansas. Versions of the story also ran Jan. 2 on the websites of the BRADENTON HERALD, Fla.; THE FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, Texas; THE MIAMI HERALD, Fla.; THE BILOXI SUN HERALD, Miss.; the FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Minn.; and the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL in Ohio.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/business/7619408.htm

Hygienics Lab Analyzes Deer For West Nile (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 2)
Researchers at the University of Iowa are analyzing blood samples from deer killed by sharpshooters in Iowa City as part of a national study on animal-to-human transmission of Lyme disease, West Nile and other diseases. JIM GILL, who studies the spread of disease from animals to humans for the University of Iowa Hygienic Lab, and his research team plan to use deer blood samples to analyze several organisms linked to diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=962860

Alumnus Retires As Community College President (Duluth News Tribune, Jan. 2)
Tony Kuznik - who received a doctorate in education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA - ends a lengthy career in education today when he retires as president of Hibbing Community & Technical College.
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/news/7617548.htm

Alumnus Fights To Protect Pensions (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Jan. 2)
It ended swiftly and decisively for Janet Krueger. In a flash, she walked away from a $120,000-a-year job at IBM Corp. in Rochester, Minn., the company where she had worked for more than two decades and her father had spent a career. Quite unexpectedly, the former computer specialist and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumnus who avoided politics has become a self-styled crusader for workers' rights and retirees' concerns. Both are at risk - she and others claim - as companies on a hunt for cost savings take aim at a social contract that once so tightly bound workers and their employers.
http://news.google.com/news?q=%22university+of+iowa%22&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us&scoring=d&start=10&sa=N&filter=0

Alumnus Is Superintendent Of New York School (Buffalo Business News, Jan. 2)
The board of trustees of St. Mary's School for the Deaf appointed William Page Johnson as its new superintendent, the 10th administrator in the school's 150-year history. Johnson, who is deaf and is also the son of two deaf parents, comes to Buffalo from the Iowa School for the Deaf in Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he served as superintendent since 1987. Johnson has a master's degree in deaf education and a doctorate in philosophy from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://buffalo.bizjournals.com/buffalo/stories/2003/12/29/daily24.html

UI Labor Studies Officials Cite Job Numbers (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 1)
Iowa has lost more than 24,400 manufacturing jobs since the national economic downturn began in March 2001, according to the Washington-based Economic Policy Institute. And labor studies officials at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA say NAFTA has cost the state at least 8,500 jobs. That makes trade a potent message for Democratic contenders in Iowa, including those who originally supported NAFTA under Democratic President Bill Clinton but now want to see it modified at the very least.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0401010226jan01,1,2777507.story (registration required)

Lewis-Beck Discusses Politics Of Unemployment (Contra Costa Times, Jan. 1)
On Jan. 9, when the unemployment rate for December is announced, both Republicans and Democrats will assuredly again maneuver for advantage -- precisely because the number isn't expected to change much. "At this point, where we don't know which way it's going but it isn't likely to be going far, both sides will try to use it," says MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. In every election since 1960, the party in the White House lost when the unemployment rate deteriorated during the first half of the year. If the rate improved, the party in the White House won. That's not a coincidence, says Lewis-Beck, who has edited several volumes on how economic conditions determine elections. "People see the president as the chief executive of the economy," he says. "They punish him if things are deteriorating and reward him if things are improving." The Times is based in California.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/business/7618181.htm

UI Study Cited In School Nurse Story (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 1)
School nurses and health aides are expected to do more than ever, as kids needing tube feedings and catheterizations require help along side those with the skinned knees. School health professionals say the increased demand highlights a concern they've had for years: whether there are enough medically trained people in schools to handle the load. About 97 percent of schools let staff, instead of nurses, administer prescription drugs, and at least one study reveals that delegation doesn't always work. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researcher found medication errors were three times more likely when nursing duties were delegated to staff. The same story appeared in the JACKSON (Miss.) CLARION LEDGER and HAMPTON ROADS (Va.) DAILY PRESS.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2004/01/01/national1328EST0539.DTL

 

 

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