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Hunnicutt Comments On Six-Hour Workday (Battle Creek Enquirer, Feb. 28)
Working just six hours a day was a reality for hundreds of Kellogg Co. factory workers from 1930 to 1985, although by today's standards, it's hard to imagine 30 hours as full-time work. The phenomenon known as the six-hour shift was remembered this week in Battle Creek when some retired Kellogg factory workers and Kellogg management were interviewed by British Broadcasting Co. Radio 4. The BBC team was accompanied to the Cereal City by University of Iowa Professor BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, who in 1996 published the book "Kellogg's Six-Hour Day." The interviews were conducted for a story that is part of a series examining "time poverty," the idea that people work so hard they have little time for anything else in their lives. The stories will air in March, and the one on Kellogg's six-hour shift is expected to air March 18 on the BBC Radio 4 program "You and Yours." Hunnicutt said Americans used to have enough time but not enough money. "Now we're going the other way -- a whole lot more money but not enough time," he said. The Enquirer serves Battle Creek, Mich.
http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com/news/stories/20040228/localnews/51813.html

Fisher Comments On Public Subsidies (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Feb. 28)
Many public subsidies to private enterprise carry more costs than benefits, according to a majority of speakers at a forum Friday at the University of Minnesota's Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs. However, a few voices were raised in favor of government aid to business, albeit under different rules and limits that are now in place. Grants, low-interest loans, tax-increment financing, tax abatements and other devices in government's economic development tool bag create taxpayer liabilities that rarely are measured, said PETER FISHER, a University of Iowa economist. Two factors often ignored, he said, are: 1. When a subsidized company moves away or goes out of business before it starts paying taxes. Many property tax subsidies keep companies off the tax rolls for 10, 20 or 25 years. 2. Subsidies to companies that would have made the same location choices without aid. Fisher estimated in a recent study that state and local governments lose $8,700 to $33,500 annually for every job they generate through subsidies.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/4634602.html

Story Recommends UI Site For Accutane Information (WFIE-TV, Feb. 27)
An advisory committee on Friday recommended that the federal government establish a national registry to help prevent pregnancy among women who are using the acne drug Accutane. Even small doses of Accutane and its generic equivalent, isotretinoin, are known to cause birth defects, including brain and heart damage, mental retardation and other abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate. The risk is still present for about a month after discontinuing use of the drug. Among the resources listed for readers at the end of the story is the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA (http://www.lib.uiowa.edu), which has more information on Accutane. The station is based in Indiana.
http://www.14wfie.com/Global/story.asp?S=1675553

Former UI Student Faces Prison, Hefty Fine (Monterey Herald, Feb. 27)
A man was charged with repeatedly threatening to kill Kobe Bryant's accuser and the prosecutor in the sexual assault case. Cedric Vaughn Augustine was arrested by police and federal agents Thursday, and was held without bail in the city jail, police Sgt. Paul LeBaron said. Augustine, 37, was charged Wednesday in a Denver federal grand jury indictment with 26 counts of attempted extortion, making interstate threats, making a threat using the U.S. mail and threats to use fire or explosives, FBI spokesman Matt McLaughlin said. John Roche Jr., a former student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, pleaded guilty to leaving a profanity-laced death threat in July on the accuser's answering machine. Roche faces up to five years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine. The paper is based in California. A version of the story also ran on the website of the WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, the PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL, SEATTLE (Wash.) POST-INTELLIGENCER, NORTH COUNTY (N.C.) TIMES, CNN, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE and many other media outlets.
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/sports/8056777.htm

Convicted UI Hacker Again In Court (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Feb. 27)
A federal judge in Madison denied a request Friday to keep secret testimony related to techniques possibly used to jam Madison police radio signals and replace them with the sounds of sex acts. Motorola Inc., which makes the radio communications equipment for the Madison Police Department, asked that U.S. Magistrate Judge John C. Shabaz close the courtroom and seal the transcripts for any testimony from Motorola witnesses and from Rajib K. Mitra, the former University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student charged with two counts of transmitting communications to a protected police computer. Mitra, 25, a graduate of Brookfield East High School, faces up to 20 years in prison and a $500,000 fine if convicted. His trial begins Monday. This case is not the first time Rajib Mitra has been accused of computer crimes. In 1998, he was convicted of hacking into the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's computer systems while on probation for the same thing at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/state/feb04/210889.asp

UI To Remove Smelly Gingkos (Arizona Republic, Feb. 27)
Say goodbye to the smelly trees. The University of Iowa is removing four Ginkgo trees that have caused an offensive stench every fall at the center of campus. The university said the trees' malodorous and messy fruit was a consideration, but not the principle factor, in the decision. BOB BROOKS, a campus architect, said two trees already were removed as part of a major utility project that began last summer. The other two will be removed this spring because of other maintenance concerns, he said. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the PORTLAND (Maine) PRESS HERALD and the CONYERS/COVINGTON (Ga.) CITIZEN.
http://www.azcentral.com/offbeat/articles/0226gingko-removal-ON.html

Wasserman Cited In Pigeon Story (Tower Timberjay News, Feb. 27)
Rock doves, sometimes known derisively as "pigeons," range across the continental United States, including the northland. They are common residents of large cities, but also frequent smaller towns and rural areas, where some view them with contempt. Perhaps because they share our cities with us, we don't give them as much respect as we afford ovenbirds or great gray owls. But in the northwoods, a rock dove is just another community bird. Dr. EDWARD WASSERMAN of the University of Iowa reports that pigeons can commit new images to memory at lightning speed, faster than a computer, and the bird's brain organizes these images in much the same way that human brains do. So maybe pigeons are more like us that we realize. The Timberjay News is located in Tower, Minn.
http://www.timberjay.com/current.php?article=752

Alumnus Named Superintendent In Illinois (The Lombardian, Feb. 27)
James Blanche, who has a doctorate in educational administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has been selected as the new superintendent of schools for the Lombard Elementary School District in Illinois.
http://members.aol.com/lombardian/news0408b.html

Man Charged With Threatening To Kill Bryant Accuser (CNN/SI.com, Feb. 27)
A California man has been charged with repeatedly threatening to kill Kobe Bryant's accuser and the prosecutor in the sexual assault case. He is the second person arrested and charged with the threatening the woman. Earlier this year, John Roche Jr., a former student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, pleaded guilty to leaving a profanity-laced death threat in July on the accuser's answering machine. Roche faces up to five years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine. This story also appeared on the Web sites of the OMAHA WORLD HERALD, TULSA (Okla.) WORLD, ARIZONA REPUBLIC, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGERAM, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD TRIBUNE, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, CBS Sportsline, ESPN.com, TSN.ca, and numerous other news sites.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/basketball/nba/02/27/bc.bkn.bryantcase.threa.ap/

Brooks, Horton Comment On Ginkgo Removal (USA Today, Feb. 26)
The University of Iowa is removing four Ginkgo trees that have caused an offensive stench every fall at the center of campus. The university said the trees' malodorous and messy fruit was a consideration, but not the principle factor, in the decision. BOB BROOKS, a campus architect, said two trees already were removed as part of a major utility project that began last summer. The other two will be removed this spring because of other maintenance concerns, he said. Dropped mushy fruit from the 50-year-old trees, located in a courtyard known as the Pentacrest, forced some students to find creative routes to class. But when a student leader asked campus planners to get rid of the trees in the fall of 2002, biology professors pleaded for tolerance. "I don't understand getting rid of wonderful, fascinating trees," said biologist DIANA HORTON, who said Ginkgo biloba trees can live up to 1,500 years and are "living fossils." This Associated Press article also appeared Feb. 26 on the web sites of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE and the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/offbeat/2004-02-26-iowa-trees_x.htm

Turek Advises Czech Writer (Prague Post, Feb. 26)
A writer describes his correspondence with professor Lubomir Turek -- a Prague-born pathologist who heads the molecular and tumor virology program in the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center of Carver College of Medicine at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- who provided "a conduit of clear information" as the writer moved from diagnosis to treatment options for his liver cancer. He writes that Turek is "so well-connected here that the senior pathologists at both university hospitals, Roman Kodet at Motol and Ivana Vitkova at Karlovo namesti, with my consent were sharing their findings and exchanging insights with him almost as fast as they were informing my local physicians."
http://www.praguepost.com/P03/2004/Art/0226/pprofile.php

Budd Contributes To Coral Study (National Geographic News, Feb. 25)
Until now, all Atlantic coral families were believed to be close relatives to distinct coral families in the Pacific Ocean. But a new study for the first time identifies a family of corals found only in the Atlantic. According to the study, at least one third of the corals that thrive in the Atlantic Ocean are free of any family ties to corals in the Pacific Ocean. The study could transform how the marine organisms are viewed, classified and conserved. "The standard taxonomy has been established for a hundred years, and this turns it on its head," said Nancy Knowlton, a marine biologist with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Knowlton, who is a member of the National Geographic Society's Committee for Research and Exploration, directed the study, which will be published in tomorrow's issue of the science journal Nature. In future work Knowlton and study co-author ANN BUDD of the University of Iowa in Iowa City will re-analyze the morphology of coral colonies to determine what characters to use to classify the marine organisms. These wall-building differences may be the key.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/02/0225_040225_coralfamily.html

UI Alumnus Seeks DA Post (Odessa American, Feb. 25)
R.C. "Eric" Augesen, Republican candidate for district attorney is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a bachelor of science degree in psychology. He has a law degree from Texas Tech. The newspaper is based in Texas.
http://www.oaoa.com/news/nw022504d.htm

Walz Comments On Home Health Care (Smart Money, Feb. 25)
In a world of rising medical costs and low unemployment, home health care has drawbacks the agency brochures mostly fail to mention. The key is to go into it with your eyes wide open. Given all the horror stories about nursing homes, most people figure that while home health care is expensive, you're definitely getting better quality service. Well, it doesn't always work out that way. THOMAS WALZ, a gerontologist and social-work professor at the University of Iowa, says there's a bias in the care-giving industry against working with the elderly. That means the real talent is stretched thin, forcing many agencies to scrape up who they can and give them minimal training. While there are exceptions, what you're usually getting is a paraprofessional at best. "You are operating with temps from the Manpower pools," says Walz. "[The agencies] are putting someone in a white shirt, but they don't know that much."
http://www.smartmoney.com/consumer/index.cfm?Story=200101191

UI Police Investigate Transplant Unit Drug Case (Newsday, Feb. 25)
Police are investigating reports that nurses at the University of Iowa Hospitals illegally reused prescription drugs and gave them to patients in the transplant unit. "It's a preliminary investigation right now," said CHUCK GREEN, director of University of Iowa Public Safety. "We'll have to see what we have. Our investigator contacted the hospital today, and I'm not sure what all he has found, but we're definitely conducting an investigation," Green said Monday. The nurses in the hospital's renal unit allegedly reused prescription drugs from patients who died or got switched to other medications, giving the drugs to those transplant patients who could not afford them. No patients were harmed, according to hospital officials. Two nurse managers have been fired, and three nurses have been disciplined in connection with the case, according to officials with the hospital and union representing the nurses. Hospital spokesman Tom Moore has declined to provide additional details of the investigation, citing a confidentiality agreement prohibiting the hospital from discussing it with individuals within or outside the university. University President DAVID SKORTON is withholding comment until police finish their investigation, a spokesman said Monday. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR-TELEGRAM, the PALM BEACH (Fla.) POST, the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, The OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, the SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, the WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM, the TUSCALOOSA (Ala.) NEWS, the KANSAS CITY STAR and other media outlets.
http://www.nynewsday.com/news/health/wire/sns-ap-nurses-fired,0,5329490.story?coll=sns-ap-health-headlines

Brooks: Ginkgos To Be Replaced On Campus (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 25)
The University of Iowa is removing four stinky ginkgo trees in the center of campus, despite a protest from biology professors and others who lobbied to keep the 50-year-old trees. The university said the stench of the trees' berries was a consideration but not the principal factor in the decision. BOB BROOKS, a campus architect, said two of the trees already have been removed from the Pentacrest. A consultant recommended removing the other two, which posed maintenance problems, to maintain the visual continuity in the courtyard, Brooks said. They will be removed this spring. "The new trees will not be as large as the mature specimens in place now, but we are working with local nurseries to find replacement trees of significant caliber and height," he said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1015917

UI Alumnus Is Community College President Finalist (Hillsboro Argus, Feb. 24)
James Middleton, one of three finalists for president of Portland Community College, holds a doctorate of arts in English language and literature from the University of Michigan, master's degrees in English from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Leeds, England, and a bachelor's degree in European literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Oregon.
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/argus/index.ssf?/base/news/1077721655316750.xml

Rubright Helped Fund 'Sun Rings' (Charleston Post Courier, Feb. 24)
A venture capitalist from California, a dentist in Iowa and the widow of a Massachusetts computer expert have put their own money into commissioning new music, an updated take on the patron system that once sustained composers like Bach, Mozart and Beethoven. Using such groups as the New York-based nonprofit group Meet The Composer, regular people are riding a small, but growing wave of custom-ordered works being performed around the country. WILLIAM RUBRIGHT, a professor of dentistry at the University of Iowa, is enamored of the cosmos. He helped fund "Sun Rings," a work for strings with visual special effects by composer Terry Riley. The dentist's $10,000 contribution, administered through the university's arts center, covered some of Riley's five-figure fee, with funding from NASA and other institutions completing the commission. Versions of the story also ran on the website of the
http://www.charleston.net/stories/022404/wor_24music.shtml (subscription required)

Jones Speaks On Voting (Late Night Talk With Tom O'Brannagin, Feb. 24)
University of Iowa professor computer science professor DOUG JONES was interviewed for the Dublin, Ireland-based talk show on the topic of computerized voting. The issue is especially salient in Ireland because nationwide elections there are being done a new computerized voting system. The station's website is
http://www.98fm.ie/.

UI Alumnus To Help Design New U.S. Coins (Green Bay Press-Gazette, Feb. 24)
Richard Masters said it still doesn't seem real to him that he was one of 24 artists from across the country chosen to submit designs for a new nickel. Masters, an illustrator and associate professor at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, will work on a new nickel honoring the Lewis and Clark expedition, the first assignment for a pool of American artists who have been selected to help plan U.S. coins. Masters has a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and first learned about the mint's "Artistic Fusion Program" from coin magazines in early December. The newspaper serves Green Bay, Wis. The article also appeared in the APPELTON (Wis.) POST CRESCENT.
http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/news/archive/local_14867377.shtml

Wynes Comments On Part-Time Faculty (Christian Science Monitor, Feb. 24)
As universities drift away from the traditional model of the full-time professor, a cheaper alternative is taking their place -- part-timers who often teach at several institutions. At the University of Iowa, part-time faculty make up about 46 percent of the total, sometimes supplementing regular faculty in ways that the school says strengthen curriculum. "We use our part-time faculty to fill particular niches," says KATHRYN WYNES, faculty human resources specialist at the school. "We may use them for overflow in a very popular course area. We may have part-time faculty that have a very distinct expertise in an area that we like to make use of."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0224/p11s02-legn.html

Kinsey Comments On Early Western Artists (U.S. News & World Report, Feb. 23)
The motley crew that set out with Lewis and Clark in 1804 to explore the American West included geologists, trappers, carpenters, blacksmiths, interpreters and even a dog. But although some of them could sketch a crude picture, the team lacked a real artist. Lewis often bemoaned this oversight as he tried to capture the unexpected grandeur of the West. Later expeditions to the uncharted lands west of the Mississippi remedied the error, and the artists who went along played a key role in shaping how people back home perceived the wild frontier. As romantic landscape paintings became more popular in the mid-19th century, the West's canyons and mountains became the inspiration for huge, lush canvases. Artists including Albert Bierstadt and Thomas Moran came back from their travels with sketches, photos and quick watercolors, which they converted to lavish oils in their studios. These artists relied in part on their imaginations -- Bierstadt, influenced by his beloved Alps, painted mountains so craggy that critics scoffed. Moran, aware of those criticisms, tried to stay more true to nature, says art historian JONI KINSEY of the University Of Iowa, though he wasn't above inserting an Italian pine tree or other foreign elements to balance a composition.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/040223/misc/23photo.htm

Rubright Helped Fund 'Sun Rings' (New York Times, Feb. 23)
A venture capitalist from California, a dentist in Iowa and the widow of a Massachusetts computer expert have put their own money into commissioning new music, an updated take on the patron system that once sustained composers like Bach, Mozart and Beethoven. Using such groups as the New York-based nonprofit group Meet The Composer, regular people are riding a small, but growing wave of custom-ordered works being performed around the country. WILLIAM RUBRIGHT, a professor of dentistry at the University of Iowa, is enamored of the cosmos. He helped fund ``Sun Rings,'' a work for strings with visual special effects by composer Terry Riley. The dentist's $10,000 contribution, administered through the university's arts center, covered some of Riley's five-figure fee, with funding from NASA and other institutions completing the commission. Versions of the story also ran on the website of the NEWS JOURNAL in Texas, the DAYTON (Ohio) DAILY NEWS, PHILLYBURBS.COM, IN-FORUM in North Dakota, the ROCKY MOUNT (N.C.) TELEGRAM, THE GUARDIAN in the United Kingdom, ATLANTA (Ga.) JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, NEW YORK NEWSDAY, the BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS-DEMOCRAT, the WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, the WILKES BARRE (Pa.) WEEKENDER, the FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, the MIAMI HERALD, the FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM and many other media outlets.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Custom-Compositions.html

Moore Comments On Actions In Drug Case (Omaha World-Herald, Feb. 23)
Two nurse managers at University Hospitals' organ transplant program were fired and three nurses were disciplined for allegedly giving unused prescription drugs to patients within the program, a union representative said. The employees provided expensive drugs to patients who need but can't afford them, said Anne Gentil-Archer, a representative for the Service Employees International Union. Hospital officials said no patients were harmed but declined to discuss the matter, citing a confidentiality agreement. Dr. YOU MIN WU, director of the transplant program for more than five years, resigned Jan. 30, effective immediately, hospital spokesman TOM MOORE said. Wu resigned to focus on his duties as a consultant to the Chinese government in respect to the global transplant community, Moore said. The decision, he said, was not related to what a hospital statement called "irregularities concerning the handling of prescription medications within the transplant program."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=1013898

Bowlsby Comments On Athletics Funding (Omaha World-Herald, Feb. 23)
The growth of athletic spending at Iowa's three public universities has outpaced overall spending at each school, according to an analysis by the Des Moines Sunday Register. While most of the nation's universities with big, Division I sports programs are enduring lean times, many athletic departments - including those at the University of Iowa and Iowa State University - have avoided similar budget squeezes. An analysis of the most recent available data shows that after accounting for inflation, at the University of Iowa, athletic spending increased 63 percent from 1994-95 to 2000-01 while the university's total spending increased 11 percent. Iowa Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY said elimination of state support at Iowa would force program reductions. "I would think that five or six programs would be in very serious jeopardy," Bowlsby said, adding that men's so-called Olympic programs would be the first targets. "I believe there is value in all of our programs for our student-athletes, and we should protect them."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=1013942

Hormone Replacement Therapy Reconsidered (Sunday Mail, Feb. 22)
Hundreds of thousands of women who stopped taking hormone replacement therapy after safety fears would be better off going back on the drug, it was claimed this week. Up to a third of women who were taking the hormone replacement therapy stopped abruptly 18 months ago after an influential study warned it increased the risk of breast cancer, heart attack and stroke. But one of the US doctors behind the study said it was the wrong choice for many struggling with menopausal symptoms. For women plagued with hot flushes, mood swings, night sweats and fatigue, the "tiny" increased risk to health was outweighed by the benefits of the drug. Professor SUSAN JOHNSON, a gynecologist at the University of Iowa, said: "There are many for whom HRT continues to be an excellent choice. "We are talking about a huge benefit for hot flushes and other symptoms -- 80 per cent benefit from taking it -- versus a really tiny risk." The Sunday Mail is based in Queensland, Australia.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=570936d0948eb6c55ddee43f96966c7f&_docnum=18&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=ff33ae40389f124de1e3a4e1a564c67e

UI Speaker Comments On Cuba (Axis of Logic, Feb. 22)
An article criticizing apparent behind-the-scenes efforts by the Bush administration to unseat Fidel Castro argues that there is nothing in international law, in the Charter of the United Nations or in the Charter of the OAS, that would give the U.S. the right to change the government in Cuba. Quite the contrary. But the Bush Administration goes even further; it insists that "neither would it accept a successor regime." As Adolofo Franco, the USAID official who would be responsible for providing assistance to Cuba in the supposed post-Castro period, put it at a recent conference at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA: "The President has said that we will not accept a successor regime. It is the law. It is embodied in the Helms-Burton Act." The article later cites the source of Franco's comment as a Feb. 6 luncheon address at the Symposium "Whither Goes Cuba? Prospects for Economic and Social Development" at the University of Iowa. According to the site's "About" page, it is "comprised of an all-volunteer group of writers and editors who are committed to publishing news and commentary that is often not presented in the major news outlets."
http://www.axisoflogic.com/artman/publish/article_5259.shtml

Workshop Alumnus Reviews Fisher Book (Baltimore Sun, Feb. 22)
Michael Harris, who according to a biographical note at the end of the story is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, reviews "The Best Awful", by Carrie Fisher.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/bal-bk.tribcf22feb22,0,6849035.story?coll=bal-artslife-extra

Playwright Attended UI (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 22)
A story about playwright Charles Smith, whose latest play, "Free Man of Color", is onstage in Chicago at Victory Gardens Theater, says he attended graduate school in playwrighting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Then he moved back to Chicago, intending to settle on the North Side to teach and write.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/arts/chi-0402210182feb22,1,1747441.story?coll=chi-leisurearts-hed

Decker, Horton Comment On Herbarium (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 20)
The University of Iowa Herbarium is about to be uprooted. University officials are proceeding with plans to merge the collection of dried and pressed plants into the herbarium at Iowa State University. The cost-cutting move could take effect as early as March, despite a two-year campaign of petitions, opinion articles and exhortations by the University of Iowa Herbarium curator DIANA HORTON and others, who have urged the institution to keep the 250,000 specimens in Iowa City. The herbarium became vulnerable after the university decided to renovate the building in which it has been housed and to devote the structure to the chemistry department. Bowing to financial pressure, university leaders decided against re-establishing the herbarium on its own campus. The university's refusal to find a place on campus for the herbarium reflects misplaced priorities, Horton says. The closure reflects a trend in biology away from the study of whole organisms and toward the study of genetics. WILLIAM DECKER, interim vice president for research at Iowa, acknowledges the shift in the department's focus. Even if university administrators believed that keeping the herbarium should be a priority, he says, they should respect the department's wishes if it doesn't place a high priority on keeping the herbarium.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i24/24a02501.htm

Bell Maintains Tiny Baby Registry (Houston Chronicle, Feb. 20)
The combined weight of Dodie and Vaughn Walpole's twin girls, born Feb. 11 about two months prematurely, was less than 4 pounds. Dodie Walpole, 29, gave birth by Caesarean section to Trinity and Kylie. Trinity weighed 2.8 pounds at birth, and Kylie was 12 ounces, making her one of the tiniest babies ever delivered. "She will fit in the palm of your hand -- my husband's wedding ring fits over her arm and her leg," Dodie Walpole said of Kylie. "She's a fighter. It's amazing." According to Dr. EDWARD BELL, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa, an infant's chance of survival increases with age, which is far more important than birth weight. Bell keeps track of births and development of the world's smallest surviving babies born less than 14 ounces. His comprehensive registry listed on the university's Web site includes information about tiny infants based on information from media reports and medical journals. The Web site notes that gestational age is more important "in determining the prognosis of an extremely premature baby."
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/health/2411790

Regents Want Later Tuition Date (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 20)
The Iowa Board of Regents would have more time and better financial data to set tuition rates at the state's three public universities under a plan approved Thursday. The board is required by state law to set tuition and fees in November, nine months before the new rates take effect and long before a state budget is in place. The proposal was supported by presidents of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1011023

Skorton Outlines More Budget Cuts (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 20)
The Iowa Board of Regents on Thursday approved nearly $19 million in midyear budget cuts at Iowa's three public universities. Administrators at the University of Iowa have made cut spending in all corners of the university to make up $8.5 million. DAVID SKORTON, University of Iowa president, said the target was reached by canceling or postponing searches to fill 36 faculty positions and eliminating 48 staff jobs and at least one academic department.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1011051

WSUI/KSUI Could Lose State Funding (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 20)
Iowa's public radio stations, operated by the three state universities, could lose nearly $1.4 million per year in state funding, the stations have been told. Station officials were told at the Iowa Board of Regents meeting Wednesday that they will thrive only through increased cooperation and a greater emphasis on private funding sources. The radio stations are the University of Northern Iowa's KUNI-KHKE, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's WSUI-KSUI and Iowa State University's WOI Group.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1011052

College Pal Defends Kutcher's Age (San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 20)
A former college pal of Hollywood star Ashton Kutcher has laughed off reports the actor is lying about his age -- because she once refused to serve him alcohol. Julie Udesky was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at the same time Kutcher began a degree in Biochemical Engineering. The star later dropped out of his course to pursue a modeling career. And Udesky, who also worked in a bar during her college years, knows Kutcher isn't 30 as a National Enquirer article suggested earlier this week. Udesky says, "I went to school with him at the University of Iowa. The kid is 26. No question. I carded him once and wouldn't serve him because he was underage."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/gate/archive/2004/02/20/ddish.DTL

Schechter Death Noted (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 19)
SUSAN SCHECHTER
, 57, whose books on domestic violence spurred assistance for battered women, died Feb. 3 at her home in Iowa City, Iowa, of endometrial cancer. She was the author of the groundbreaking 1982 book "Women and Male Violence: The Visions and Struggles of the Battered Women's Movement." With other authors, she subsequently wrote the 1992 "When Love Goes Wrong," a resource for abused women, and in 1999 wrote a set of guidelines for use by professionals in civil courts, child welfare services and domestic violence programs. Since 1993, Schechter had been a clinical professor of social work at the University of Iowa.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/california/la-me-passings19.3feb19,1,7885303.story

Summer Writing Festival Cited (MSNBC, Feb. 19)
Remember them? Those wondrous years? You lived in a dorm, next door to a dining hall. Your days stretched on without limit, it seemed, and there was time for everything: discussions lasting hour after hour, a movie at night, the stillness of library and lab, your mind pulsing with new ideas and challenging thoughts. "Bright college years"-through a wise use of vacation time, you can touch them again, feel the glow, recharge the spirit. At scattered colleges and universities, a number of short-term summer programs enable adults of all ages to briefly re-experience "the shortest, gladdest years of life." Among them is the UI SUMMER WRITING FESTIVAL, held over 10 one-week and weekend sessions throughout June and July, offering 130 workshops in a wide variety of genres.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/3081100/

UI Students Compete in Business Plan Competition (Miami Herald, Feb. 19)
A national collegiate business plan competition will take place this weekend in Santa Barbara, Calif. Eight national semifinalists are vying for cash prizes in the 2004 Spirit of Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Development (SEED) competition, including Flexon Solutions, a group of students from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This story also appeared in the SANTA BARBARA (Calif.) NEWS-PRESS.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/national/7992358.htm

Jones Doubts Touch-Screen Voting Machines (Miami Herald, Feb. 19)
It is "extremely unlikely" that Florida voters in November will be able to check their machine-vote ballots against a paper printout before leaving the polls, the head of the state's election process told the Legislature on Wednesday. But the official, Secretary of State Glenda Hood, insisted that voters have every reason to remain confident in electronic voting machines, despite rising worries across the nation that such machines are susceptible to computer hackers who could possibly alter the outcome of an election. Critics of touch-screen voting say the machines, in their current incarnation, remain less than perfect. University of Iowa Associate Professor DOUGLAS JONES, former chairman of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems, told The Herald in a phone interview Wednesday that touch-screen machines destroy all proof of original voter intent. "The best you can view them as is hearsay," Jones said. "The machine says what the vote was." Still, Jones advised against a hasty switch-over to untested printout technology for the November election, saying that such a change should be more of a long-term goal.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/politics/7984548.htm

Warner Comments On Merit Aid (Omaha World-Herald, Feb. 19)
The Iowa Board of Regents today will consider requiring the three state universities to grant half their scholarship money to students who need the money rather than to high-achieving students. Last year, more than half of the scholarship money at Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa was merit-based. The University of Iowa gave about 30 percent of aid to high-achieving students. University officials argue that too many restrictions on the money's use would make it more difficult to recruit high-achieving and diverse students. Officials say needy students get money from many other sources, including state and federal grants. MARK WARNER, the University of Iowa's director of student financial aid, said the universities need flexibility to use the financial aid that comes from tuition money for enrollment needs. "As we try to optimize our enrollment in terms of providing the most access, having the most culturally diverse student population, as well as ensuring our student population is the best quality we can possibly attract we have to have the use of these discretionary funds," he said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1009966

Bowlsby Says Ticket Prices Will Rise (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 19)
University of Iowa Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY says rising tuition likely will likely mean an increase in the price Hawkeye fans pay for football tickets. "It's a practical reality we're going to have to raise ticket prices some," Bowlsby said Monday. "Inflationary things as they are, I don't think we'll have a choice." Details of the price hike have not been determined, Bowlsby said. He said the adjustment is necessary to generate more revenue the athletic department uses to pay the university for athletic scholarships. As tuition rises, so do ticket prices, he said. "We don't have many places to go and get that money," Bowlsby said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=1009937

Cooper Comments On Bathroom Policy (Modesto Bee, Feb. 18)
Under a new policy at the Lawrence Middle School, seventh-graders and eighth-graders are allowed to leave class for the bathroom a maximum of 15 times a month. As a result, some are afraid to use up their bathroom passes too quickly and end up with a full bladder and nowhere to go. School officials defend the policy as a way to ensure safety, security and order. But some parents say the system goes too far. The right to go to the bathroom, they say, is a health and civil rights issue and as taxpayers, they think it is a freedom they pay for. Urologists say the practice can lead to infections and incontinence. "Common sense tells you the policy doesn't make any sense," said Dr. CHRISTOPHER S. COOPER, an associate professor of urology at the University of Iowa who specializes in pediatric urology. "When children need to go, they should be allowed to go. It isn't good to hold it in or drink less fluids. It could have long-term effects on a child's health." The newspaper is based in California. The Associated Press article also appeared on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, WJLA-TV in D.C., FREDERICKSBURG.com in Virginia, KATV in Arkansas, ROCKY MOUNT (N.C.) TELEGRAM, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS, MLIVE in Michigan, TIMES PICAYUNE in Louisiana, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, PENN LIVE in Pennsylvania, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS-DEMOCRAT, KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, MIAMI HERALD, WILKES BARRE (Pa.) WEEKENDER, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, and BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD.
http://www.modbee.com/24hour/weird/story/1151681p-8025545c.html

Student/Teacher Relationships Examined (AZcentral.com, Feb. 18)
Virginia Lee Stamler, an Iowa City psychologist who co-wrote the book "Faculty-Student Sexual Involvement," says all the justifying theories about consensual relationships between students and professors don't take into account the reality of most relationships. When she worked as a counselor at schools like the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Boston University, Dr. Stamler remembers, "these students would come in, and would have these problems, they'd be depressed. Then I'd find out they'd been involved with a professor, they'd felt they were special, and then it would be dissolved and they'd be extremely distraught." AZcentral.com is the web site for the Arizona Republic.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0218professorstudent-ON.html

UI Cited In School Cost Analysis (Hartford Courant, Feb. 18)
Public colleges in Connecticut cost more to run than similar schools in most other states, chalking up one of the highest per-student costs in the nation, says a state report to be issued today. UConn's per-student cost declined between 2001 and 2002 but still was about $2,000 more than the average at nine other schools identified as similar research universities, including schools such as Rutgers University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Louisiana State University.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/local/hc-colreport0218.artfeb18,1,3990999.story?coll=hc-headlines-local

Hunnicutt Comments On Sports In South (The Hill, Feb. 18)
The South, always an enigma for Northeastern politicians, is probably more puzzling to presidential candidate Sen. John Kerry than any of the top Democrats. After religion, of course, there are sports, the second religion of the South. University of Iowa Professor BENJAMIN K. HUNNICUTT once wrote worriedly of the region's "blood sports and militaristic games." The old veteran Kerry may not be so squeamish, but he will still miss the importance of sports down South. The Hill, based in Washington D.C., covers Congress.
http://www.thehill.com/david_hill/021804.aspx

UI Anthropology Study Noted (MSNBC, Feb. 16)
In his "Countdown" report, Keith Olbermann said that "anthropologists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA believe that having a hard head is, or at least was, the key to human survival. They have found evidence of that as part of the process by which they tried to impress females. Male members of our ancestor species, Homo erectus, regularly clubbed each other over the head. "
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=774c849d198300c85a46cb453e2fee46&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=336a1847348d80bbe94ebaff9fac0dd5

Jones Comments On Voting Machine Issues (Radio America Network, Feb. 16)
On the network's "News Beat" program, DOUGLAS JONES, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, talked about the availability and security of voting machines. Jones has been closely involved with the investigation, examination and recommendations concerning electronic voting machines and systems. The News Beat program is carried by about 60 radio stations around the country.

Suspicious Powder Tested At Hygienic Lab (Washington Post, Feb. 17)
A plant that processes bills and magazine subscriptions sent workers home Monday after a suspicious white powder fell out of an envelope, authorities said. Tests were being conducted on the powder at the Communications Data Services site in central Iowa, but Jim Saunders of the Iowa Department of Public Safety said no injuries were reported and that "there appears to be no threat" to employees or the public. The powder was being tested by a mobile National Guard laboratory assisting the state Division of Criminal Investigation's crime lab. Samples also were being sent to the UNIVERSITY HYGIENIC LABORATORY at the University of Iowa in Iowa City.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A46434-2004Feb16.html

Cooper Comments On Bathroom Policy (Vineland Daily Journal, Feb. 17)
Under a new policy at the Lawrence Middle School, seventh- and eighth-graders are allowed to leave class for the bathroom a maximum of 15 times a month. As a result, some are afraid to use up their bathroom passes too quickly and end up with a full bladder and nowhere to go. School officials defend the policy as a way to ensure safety, security and order. But some parents say the system goes too far. The right to go to the bathroom, they say, is a health and civil rights issue and as taxpayers, they think it is a freedom they pay for. Urologists say the practice can lead to infections and incontinence. "Common sense tells you the policy doesn't make any sense," said Dr. CHRISTOPHER S. COOPER, an associate professor of urology at the University of Iowa who specializes in pediatric urology. "When children need to go, they should be allowed to go. It isn't good to hold it in or drink less fluids. It could have long-term effects on a child's health." The Daily Journal is based in Vineland, N.J. The Associated Press article also appeared on the websites of the HOMELAND NEWS TRIBUNE in New Jersey, WCCO-TV in Minnesota, GLOBE AND MAIL in Canada, NBC 10 in Pennsylvania, and NEWSDAY, WCBS-TV and WNBC-TV in New York.
http://www.thedailyjournal.com/news/stories/20040217/localnews/425919.html

Student/Teacher Relationships Examined (Christian Science Monitor, Feb. 17)
VIRGINIA LEE STAMLER
, an Iowa City psychologist who co-wrote the book "Faculty-Student Sexual Involvement," says all the justifying theories about consensual relationships between students and professors don't take into account the reality of most relationships. When she worked as a counselor at schools like the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Boston University, Dr. Stamler remembers, "these students would come in, and would have these problems, they'd be depressed. Then I'd find out they'd been involved with a professor, they'd felt they were special, and then it would be dissolved and they'd be extremely distraught."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0217/p11s02-legn.html

UI Students Push For Education Funding (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 17)
Student leaders from Iowa's three public universities gathered at the State Capitol on Monday to ask lawmakers to provide more funding for education. "The biggest travesty of them all is that we are turning students away who truly want to come and be educated ... and they're not able to because of the financial needs," said NATE GREEN, University of Iowa student body vice president. Green said he knows many students who have had to take a semester off or quit school because they can't afford tuition at the state's public universities -- Iowa State University, the University of Iowa and the University of Northern Iowa. "I'm deeply worried about access for Iowans," Green told dozens of students at a press conference Monday.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1007995

Hormone Replacement Therapy Reconsidered (Syndey Daily Telegraph, Feb. 17)
Women who stopped taking HRT after safety fears would be better off going back on the drug, it has now been claimed. Tens of thousands of women around the world who were taking the hormone replacement therapy stopped abruptly 18 months ago after an influential study warned that it increased the risk of breast cancer, heart attack and stroke. One of the American doctors behind the study said that was the wrong choice for many struggling with menopausal symptoms. These women were now missing out on an effective treatment. For women plagued with hot flushes, mood swings, night sweats and fatigue, the "tiny" increased risk to health is outweighed by the benefits of the drug, according to Professor SUSAN JOHNSON. Professor Johnson, a gynecologist at the University of Iowa, said: "There are many women for whom HRT continues to be an excellent choice for the treatment of menopause-related symptoms." The Daily Telegraph is based in Sydney, Australia.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ce2422a4c7d831ba6b1cbea88c648c2a&_docnum=8&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=2d5ee2cd3ebe6b5cdb4240ee4bfc2a37

Johnson Speaks About Hormone Replacement Therapy (London Guardian, Feb. 17)
When the researchers on a major American study into the effects of hormone replacement therapy abandoned part of their trial because of fears of its link to cancer, heart attacks and stroke, it made headlines around the world. Now, a year and a half after those alarming statistics emerged, they received a fresh shock when one of the same researchers told them that they had probably done so unnecessarily. SUSAN JOHNSON, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa, said that women had abandoned HRT "prematurely" because of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study. "There are many women for whom HRT continues to be an excellent choice for the treatment of menopause-related symptoms," she told a conference of American scientists on Sunday. "In my clinical practice, I'm putting a lot of women back on HRT."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ce2422a4c7d831ba6b1cbea88c648c2a&_docnum=11&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=9267d5ecb9ac49fedbd1ce450f85234e

Schechter Death Noted (New York Times, Feb. 16)
SUSAN SCHECHTER
, whose books about domestic violence helped to unify the movement to assist battered women and to bridge the gap between programs addressing domestic abuse and those for children's welfare, died Feb. 3 at her home in Iowa City. She was 57. The cause was endometrial cancer, said her husband, Allen Steinberg. Mrs. Schecter's 1982 book, "Women and Male Violence: The Visions and Struggles of the Battered Women's Movement," a history and analysis of early efforts against domestic violence, is considered a groundbreaking work. She had been a clinical professor of social work at the University of Iowa since 1993. The obituary also appeared on the website of the CHICAGO TIMES via the New York Times News Service and in the MONTREAL (Quebec) GAZETTE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/02/16/national/16SCHE.html

Smoking Endangers Cardiovascular Health (Knoxville News Express, Feb. 16)
According to the Center for Disease Control, more than 61 million Americans have some form of cardiovascular disease, including high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure and other conditions. Each day more than 2,600 Americans die of cardiovascular disease. "The number one cause of heart disease is cigarette smoking," Marylin Smith of Community Health Services said. "I just encourage everyone to quit smoking for their heart and lungs." "Smoking increases blood pressure, decreases exercise tolerance and increases the tendency for blood to clot, directly leading to heart attacks and strokes," said Dr. CATHERINE PESEK-BIRD a cardiovascular disease specialist at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. The News Express serves Knoxville, Tenn.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=10974848&BRD=1463&PAG=461&dept_id=180222&rfi=6

UI Alumnus Named Dean At Dakota State (Madison Daily Leader, Feb. 16)
Tom Halverson, the new Dean of the College of Business and Information Systems at Dakota State University, received his bachelor's degree in computer science from the University of Minnesota-Morris and his master's and Ph.D in computer science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in South Dakota.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=10976947&BRD=1302&PAG=461&dept_id=181979&rfi=6

Johnson Supports Hormone Replacement Therapy (The Australian, Feb. 16)
Many women who abandoned hormone replacement therapy after a high-profile clinical trial in the US was stopped early because of cancer fears should consider resuming HRT to control their severe menopausal symptoms, claims one of the study's lead scientists. As many as 30 per cent of women who quit the controversial therapy might have given it up too soon, said SUSAN JOHNSON, a University of Iowa gynecologist. "In my clinical practice, I'm putting a lot of women back on HRT," said Professor Johnson, who chaired the HRT arm of the Women's Health Initiative trial of "combined" HRT.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ce2422a4c7d831ba6b1cbea88c648c2a&_docnum=15&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=2f36afda50665f1ed3cb2c8ce9f73c6fTherapy for

Menopause Reconsidered (London Daily Mail, Feb. 16)
Hundreds of thousands of women who stopped taking HRT after safety fears would be better off going back on the drug, it was claimed yesterday. Up to a third of women who were taking the hormone replacement therapy stopped abruptly 18 months ago after an influential study warned that it increased the risk of breast cancer, heart attack and stroke. But one of the doctors behind the study said that was the wrong choice for many struggling with menopausal symptoms. These women were now missing out on an effective treatment. For women plagued with hot flushes, mood swings, night sweats and fatigue, the 'tiny' increased risk to health is outweighed by the benefits of the drug, according to Professor SUSAN JOHNSON. Professor Johnson, a gynecologist at the University of Iowa, said: "There are many women for whom HRT continues to be an excellent choice for the treatment of menopause-related symptoms. We are talking about a huge benefit for hot flushes and other symptoms - in excess of 80 per cent benefit from taking it - versus a really tiny risk."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ce2422a4c7d831ba6b1cbea88c648c2a&_docnum=17&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=916970f5f3bc8589afb4ce1ee8a21545

Johnson Speaks About Menopause Therapy (The Irish Times, Feb. 16)
Hormone replacement therapy remains a valuable option for some women despite health scares associated with its use, the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Seattle has been told. Although there is a slightly increased risk of cancer and heart disease linked to the therapy, the benefits outweigh the risks, the meeting heard yesterday. A key element of debate was the controversial findings on HRT from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial started by the US National Institutes of Health in 1991. The findings and the unexpected termination of the trial was a bombshell, leaving women concerned about their health and doctors confused about whether to continue recommending HRT, said Prof. SUSAN JOHNSON, professor of gynecology at the University of Iowa. "To say that gynecologists were surprised by the results of the WHI is an understatement," she said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ce2422a4c7d831ba6b1cbea88c648c2a&_docnum=24&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=6a9fa0da59a345439d9efc1a8ea6230a

Therapy Risks Misunderstood (London Times, Feb. 16)
Hundreds of thousands of women are needlessly abandoning hormone replacement therapy because they misunderstand the risks of the treatment. One of the leading researchers behind a study that raised widespread fears over the links between HRT and cancer, said that the benefits for women suffering severe menopausal symptoms far outweighed the risks. SUSAN JOHNSON's comments were yesterday backed by other experts who said that up to one third of the 340,000 British women who abandoned HRT since the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) trial was published in July 2002 had done so unnecessarily. The study found that HRT increased the risk of heart attacks, breast cancer and stroke but that the chances of contracting such diseases were tiny. Dr. Johnson, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Iowa and a WHI investigator, told the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference that the study had turned many women who would benefit against HRT.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=38596dd49399da09a992462aa112bc14&_docnum=34&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=ea550d6a6cca5d799b878cbc11b33f89

Las Vegas Dentist Honored (Las Vegas Review-Journal, Feb. 16)
Dee Deevers, a dentist, was awarded the Senatorial Recognition Certificate and the Distinguished Service Award. The Filipino American Club of Las Vegas presented him the awards Dec. 7 at the Chinatown Pavilion. Deevers, 38, was nominated for his humanitarian efforts by a homeless Filipino woman, whom he had fitted with a set of dentures without charge. Deevers graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1988 and Creighton University School of Dentistry in 1992. The Review-Journal is based in Las Vegas, Nev.
http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2004/Feb-16-Mon-2004/living/23193911.html

Johnson: HRT May Be OK To Fight Hot Flashes (Glasgow Evening Times, Feb. 16)
Almost a third of women who have abandoned hormone replacement therapy on health grounds may have made the wrong choice, a leading scientist who helped alert the world about the dangers said today. SUSAN JOHNSON, University of Iowa professor of gynecology, took part in the American Women's Health Initiative trial that was halted in July 2002 after linking HRT to greater risk of breast cancer, heart attacks, strokes and blood clots. She still stands by her belief that, used long-term to protect against osteoporosis and heart disease, the risks associated with combined HRT treatments outweigh the benefits. But she says the balance is different for the many women who take HRT over short periods to control debilitating hot flashes -- one of the main symptoms of the menopause. The Evening Times is based in Glasgow, Scotland. Similar stories appeared on the Web sits of ITV.Com, FINANCIAL TIMES, THE GUARDIAN, THE SUN, THE TIMES OF LONDON, THE AUSTRALIAN, GOOD HOUSEKEEPING, THE SCOTSMAN and numerous others.
http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5023675.html

Cooper Says N.J. Bathroom Policy Makes No Sense (Trenton Times, Feb. 16)
Under a new policy at the Lawrence Middle School, the seventh- and eighth-graders are allowed to leave class for the bathroom a maximum of 15 times a month. The pass system, referred to by some parents as "the pee-pee policy," was instituted last month as a way to monitor the school restrooms and stop students from skipping class. "Common sense tells you the policy doesn't make any sense," said Dr. CHRISTOPHER S. COOPER, an associate professor of urology at the University of Iowa who specializes in pediatric urology. "When children need to go, they should be allowed to go. It isn't good to hold it in or drink less fluids. It could have long-term effects on a child's health." Cooper, the leader of a landmark study that looked at the problems tied to limiting bathroom access for children in elementary schools, says between 7 and 15 percent of 7-year-olds have bladder problems. As children age, their bladders develop and they can control them better, but older children can still have trouble that can be exacerbated by limiting bathroom access. "I see lots of junior high kids every day who have problems with urinary tract infections from not voiding frequently enough," he said. "There is also an epidemic of constipation because kids are not consuming enough fluids."
http://www.nj.com/news/times/index.ssf?/base/news-1/1076927729255190.xml

Robinson Wonders If Raising HDL Saves Lives (Philadelphia Inquirer, Feb. 16)
Heart researchers may be closing in at last on a long-fantasized goal -- treatments that flush out the nasty globs of gunk that clog the heart's plumbing. This idea goes beyond merely preventing new coronary-artery disease. The intention is to clear away what's already there, to clean up the source of heart attacks before they happen. Ideally, the human body already does this on its own, and the new medicines are intended to enhance the natural artery-cleansing process. If testing goes as scientists hope, the strategy could prove as important for preventing heart disease as the cholesterol-lowering statin drugs introduced in the late 1980s. Until recently, the only pills that raised HDL even modestly were generic or over the counter. The best of them, niacin, is a vitamin. Without exclusive rights, drug companies have no incentive to prove that such compounds work. "We know lowering LDL saves lives. We need to know if raising HDL adds to that," said JENNIFER ROBINSON, a University of Iowa epidemiologist.
http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/living/health/7963132.htm

Students Push For Online Evaluations (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 16)
Student leaders at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA want the school to start a Web site for online evaluations of courses and instructors to aid others when they're choosing classes. "The idea is we want to make it available for students, especially for freshman and sophomore students, who may be unsure about what classes are good and what classes are bad," said Nate Green, student government president at the university. "It also promotes better teaching and instruction because the teacher knows they are going to be evaluated."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1007217

Andrejevic Says Reality TV Makes Big Brother 'Hip' (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 15)
One of the reasons Americans -- young Americans in particular -- enjoy non-scripted TV shows has to do with the interactive and non-private culture today's young adults have grown up in, said MARK ANDREJEVIC, a University of Iowa communications professor and author of last November's "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched." "One of the things reality TV does is kind of rehabilitate our image of Big Brother," Andrejevic said, referring to the Orwellian concept rather than the CBS reality show. "He's no longer a totalitarian, oppressive force. He's now kind of fun, hip -- a game-show host." In a culture where "we find ourselves leaving trails of information wherever we go," he said, we can fight it or we can, through reality TV, "embrace disclosure as a means of self-expression." This story also appeared in the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/arts/chi-0402150272feb15,1,3779062.story

UI Participates In Diesel Fuel Study (Medical News Today, Feb. 15)
Diesel fuel is now at the center of a delicate balancing act between smog production and global warming. Some lawmakers and car manufacturers advocate widespread diesel use in passenger vehicles as a strategy for reducing the production of so-called 'greenhouse gases' thought to cause global warming. But according to a new study conducted in part by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, replacing gasoline vehicles in the United States with diesel vehicles -- equipped even with the most modern pollution controls -- may increase smog production over most of the country. Medical News Today is based in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/index.php?newsid=5917

More Donors, Fewer Dollars For UI Foundation (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 15)
More than 62,000 contributors pledged a total of $62.4 million to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 2003 -- the highest number of donors in the foundation's 48-year history. But the amount of money fell short of the previous year, when the foundation raised a record $67.5 million. The foundation, which is the school's private fund-raising entity, said it received 105,173 gifts from 62,025 contributors.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1006095

Lower Enrollment Means More Budget Ills At UI (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 14)
Lower-than-expected enrollment at the University of Iowa accounts for $4 million of a projected additional $5 million budget gap, President DAVID SKORTON is telling the State Board of Regents. And one dean says that gap could mean future students may not graduate in four years. LINDA MAXSON, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said an additional $5 million in cuts would mean the end of the four-year graduation plan for her college.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1005304

Tennessee Williams Symposium Held In St. Louis (Baltimore Sun, Feb. 13)
Washington University in St. Louis held a symposium last weekend about the work and life of Tennessee Williams, the first to be held in the city where he grew up so unhappily. Williams enrolled at the UNIVERISTY OF IOWA. The same story appeared in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/custom/wire/sns-ap-tennessee-williams,1,1142285.story

Blanck Comments On Wheelchair Athletics (Chronicle, Feb. 13)
A story about efforts to have wheelchair athletics, such as wheelchair basketball, treated as a varsity sport says lawyers disagree on whether wheelchair athletes would have a case if they went to court. PETER BLANCK, director of the University of Iowa's Law, Health Policy, and Disability Center, doesn't think so. Under the 14th Amendment to the Constitution, he says, colleges and other entities have a special responsibility to make sure that they do not discriminate against "suspect classes" -- that is, women and members of minority groups -- because of the long history of discrimination endured by people in those categories. Individuals with disabilities, by contrast, are not considered a "suspect class," he says.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i23/23a03501.htm

Ciochon: Humans Were Once Even Thicker Headed (CNN, Feb. 13)
Get it through your once-thick skull. Scientists say the bulky craniums of the human ancestor, Homo erectus, may have helped the species survive some aggressive mating rituals. After studying fossils in a region called Dragon Bone Hill in China, anthropologist RUSSELL CIOCHON of the University of Iowa concluded males of the species were clubbing one another over the head, probably to win females. Those with thicker skulls who survived these bloody confrontations would pass that trait to offspring, Ciochon said. "The evidence shows there may have been ritualized violence taking place," he said.
http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/science/02/12/coolsc.thickskulls/

Kutcher Developing TV Show Based on His UI Days (Megastar UK, Feb. 13)
Ashton Kutcher is currently working on the show that will centre on his days in college. The young chap is already claiming it will be the best project he's worked on, if narrow-sighted TV bosses give it the go-ahead. "It's in development. It's so cool. It's based on my life experiences in a way," he blabbed. "It's about the guy who doesn't belong. It's about the guy who walks into the mansion but feels like the butler." But the show can't be longer than one episode, as Kutcher dropped out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1997 to pursue a modeling career. Megastar UK is a British publication.
http://www.megastar.co.uk/ents/news/2004/02/12/sMEG01MTA3NjU5OTY0MzU.html

Alumnus Hamilton Loses Weight In Off-Season (Port Arthur News, Feb. 12)
A lot 'less' of Milo Hamilton will be hanging around the Houston Astros in 2004. If his health permits, the 76-year-old Hall of Fame broadcaster plans as busy an agenda as ever in his 20th season as the voice of the Astros. There's just not as much of the play-by-play announcer as there has been. The Fairfield, IA, native and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumnus said Wednesday that he had dropped 40 pounds since last April thanks to a vigorous daily walking regimen. The News is based in Port Arthur, Texas.
http://www.panews.com/articles/2004/02/12/sports/news01.txt

Squire: Dean Lacks Discipline (Globe & Mail, Feb. 12)
Like an injured prizefighter desperately trying to avoid a knockout punch, Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean swung out wildly Wednesday at front-runner John Kerry, accusing him of being part of "the corrupt political culture in Washington." The former Vermont governor, whose campaign for the Democratic nomination has been in a tailspin since its disastrous showing in Iowa last month, accused supporters of Mr. Kerry and other leadership rivals of providing funds to a group that ran television ads attacking the Dean campaign, attempting to sabotage his campaign while he led the pack in December. By lashing out so angrily at Mr. Kerry, who has won in 12 of the 14 states that have voted in the nomination race thus far, Mr. Dean seemed intent on confirming the critics who say he has a problem with self-control or is simply a poor loser. "He seems to lack the discipline you need to run for president," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at University of Iowa. "I think he's having a very hard time letting go of the campaign and I don't think he's figured out a way of disengaging."
http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20040212.wdean0212/BNStory/International/

Ceilley Warns On 'Baking In Midday Sun' (Louisville Courier Journal, Feb. 12)
Many children and adults aren't getting enough vitamin D, and it could have serious health consequences. The body can make its own vitamin D with the help of the sun, but production is stymied by poor sunlight in winter, and many people limit their sun exposure - as well as their kids' - the rest of the year to protect themselves against skin cancer. Because it is it's difficult to get enough vitamin D from food, some doctors advocate "casual" sun exposure in spring, summer and fall to arms and legs or hands, face and arms, but this recommendation does not sit well with dermatologists. "It's not a healthy way of getting vitamin D," said Dr. ROGER CEILLEY, past president of the American Academy of Dermatology and a clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa. "You can get it in other ways, certainly not going out and baking yourself in the midday sun, promoting skin cancer and suppressing your immune system." Ceilley conceded that five to 10 minutes of sun exposure is not equivalent to "baking" but said damage could result from cumulative sun exposure. He urged people to avoid unnecessary sun, especially at midday, and to use appropriate clothing or sunscreen to protect their skin.
http://www.courier-journal.com/features/health/2004/02/hf-front-vitamin0212-11146.html

UI Alumnus Is Dean Candidate At Kansas (Lawrence Journal World, Feb. 12)
Will Norton Jr., dean of journalism at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is the sole candidate for the deanship at Kansas University's school of journalism. Norton has been dean at Nebraska since 1990. From 1974 to 1990, he was on the journalism faculty at the University of Mississippi. He has a doctorate in mass communications from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a master's in journalism from Indiana University and a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Wheaton College in Illinois. The newspaper is based in Kansas.
http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/story/160996

Alumnus Named Village Manager (Palatine Countryside, Feb. 12)
The Palatine Village Council formally appointed Deputy Village Manager Reid Ottesen to the village manager position after accepting the resignation of Village Manager Michael Cassady, who has started his own consulting firm. Ottesen worked for the city of Peoria for eight years in a variety of positions before coming to Palatine in 1998. He holds a degree in political science as well as a master's degree in public administration and a master's degree in urban and regional planning from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/pa/02-12-04-223882.html

Forthcoming UI Press Poetry Book Cited (The Gulf Herald, Feb. 11)
University of West Florida professor Reginald Shepherd, a renowned and widely published poet, recently edited and introduced "The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries," which will be published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS in either fall 2004 or spring 2005. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.gulfherald.com/news/article.asp?newsid=3258

Writer Mentions Iowa Writers' Workshop (Common Dreams, Feb. 11)
Writer Gary Corseri mourns today's writers, painters, sculptors and composers, whom he says fail to live up to the grandeur of the artists in the early part of the 20th century. "Back in my day (I'm an old-timer now), there were a handful of schools with Creative Writing programs," he writes. "The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Stanford had the best of them. As often as not, writers were invited to universities by student unions. These student unions were full of young writers and writers manque, and the writers they invited were fire-breathers."
http://www.commondreams.org/views04/0210-03.htm

UI Alumna's Pastels Part Of Exhibit (New Bedford Standard, Feb. 11)
ArtWorks! tomorrow evening will celebrate the opening of three new exhibits in their downtown New Bedford galleries during AHA! night, beginning at 5 p.m. A reception for Roger Kizik and Joyce Utting Schutter, featured in the first floor galleries, along with the music of Elena Zoubareva and The Classical Crossover Ensemble will highlight the evening. Ms. Schutter's pastel drawings allow the viewer to follow her creative process from subject to object and to understand this evolving relationship. She earned her MFA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she also taught. The paper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.southcoasttoday.com/daily/02-04/02-11-04/b01li298.htm

Dyer Says Nancy Drew Still 'Culturally Significant' (Globe & Mail, Feb. 11)
It's the Case of the Mysteriously Enduring Appeal of Girl Detectives. Seventy-four years after she collared her first criminal, 18-year-old amateur sleuth Nancy Drew and her friends Bess and George, and boyfriend Ned Nickerson, are back on the trail in the small yet amazingly crime-filled town of River Heights in a whole new series of books, coming out in March from a Simon & Schuster imprint. The original stories are still in print -- albeit slightly revised to remove some of the politically incorrect overtones -- and Publishers Weekly recently reported that The Secret of the Old Clock sold 150,000 copies in 2002. Today, kids can even play Nancy Drew computer games while wearing togs from the Nancy Drew clothing line, which includes T-shirts, yoga pants and handbags (perfect accessories to crime reading). "One of the reasons she's still culturally significant is that, however the stories change, most of them managed to retain the sense of adventure and autonomy that Nancy has," says Prof. CAROLYN DYER, the co-editor of Rediscovering Nancy Drew. Dyer teaches at the School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Iowa where she led a Nancy Drew conference in 1993 to honor one of their most famous alumni: Mildred Wirt Benson, who earned a master's degree in journalism from the school in 1927 -- the first person, male or female, to do so.
http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20040211/DETECTIVE11//?query=%22nancy+drew%22

UI Team Studies Depression-Heart Problem Link (Medical News Today, Feb. 9)
A team of University of Iowa researchers set out to ascertain whether an increased susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias in depressed patients influences the risk of morbidity and mortality in coronary artery disease. The findings of their research are reported in 'Increased Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias in a Rodent Model of Experimental Depression,' authored by ANGELA J. GRIPPO, CLAUDIA M. SANTOS, RALPH F. JOHNSON, TERRY G. BELTZ, JAMES B. MARTINS, ROBERT B. FELDER, and ALAN KIM JOHNSON, all from the University of Iowa. Their findings appeared in the February 2004 edition of the American Journal of Physiology--Heart and Circulatory Physiology. The website is based in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/index.php?newsid=5792

Cole: Retirees Make Good Workers (Arizona Business Gazette, Feb. 9)
Baby boomers reaching retirement age are returning to the workplace in growing numbers despite officially ending their careers. Some are bored; some feel they have more to contribute. Many continue to work during their golden years to supplement Social Security income or to get benefits, like health insurance. And while seniors are finding full- and part-time jobs a fulfilling way to spend their retirement years, companies also are benefiting from their experience, dependability and work ethic. "Retirees make wonderful workers," said CATHY COLE, chairwoman of the marketing department at the University of Iowa. "They are reliable, have good values and often are only looking for part-time jobs."
http://www.azcentral.com/business/articles/0209oldworkers09.html

Alumnus To Be Honored In Omaha (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 9)
The Omaha Jaycees' Ten Outstanding Young Omahans of 2003 will receive their awards at a ceremony Wednesday at the Doubletree Hotel in downtown Omaha. One of the recipients is Jon Blumenthal, partner in the Baird Holm law firm who earned his bachelor of arts in political science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=46&u_sid=999526

Patriot Act Is A Mixed Bag, Says Yin (Cincinnati Enquirer, Feb. 8)
Americans hold numerous misconceptions about the provisions of the PATRIOT Act, in part because the quickly drafted law is confusing, according to TUNG YIN, University of Iowa professor of law. "It's indecipherable," he said. "The haste with which it was drafted caused problems. Some aspects make sense. Some are just not useful. And some not only don't enhance security but also harm liberties." One of the most publicized aspects is the so-called "librarian provision," which allows government in some cases to search your library, financial, travel, phone, medical and church records without your knowledge. There's little evidence it has or will be used often, Yin said, because government has other, more effective ways to get that information. "It really gets people up in arms, but it's strange they'd get so upset," Yin said. "The idea that customers should be absolutely shielded seems to me an extreme position. On the one hand, people don't want government running roughshod. On the other hand, if people are trying to learn how to make ricin, you'd sure want the government to be concerned about it."
http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2004/02/08/editorial_ed1a.html

Bechara, Naqvi Comment On Emotion Study (Dallas Morning News, Feb. 8)
New studies are beginning to show just how the brain translates the body's reactions to emotionally charged situations into a conscious emotion. It appears that a key part of the brain for this process is the insular cortex, or insula - specifically the front part of the insula on the right side of the brain. The insula is a region of cells found beneath the groove separating the brain's front and side lobes. It seems to be the brain's main "ear" for listening to the messages the body is sending, neuroscientists at University College in London and a collaborator from Sweden have shown. "Our findings suggest that insula mediates attention to, and ... mediates explicit awareness of, internal bodily processes," Hugo Critchley and colleagues report in the current issue of Nature Neuroscience. "These findings provide important validation of the theoretical view ... that neural systems supporting the perception of body states are a fundamental ingredient in the subjective experience of emotions," University of Iowa neurologists ANTOINE BECHARA and NASIR NAQVI wrote in a Nature Neuroscience commentary. But Drs. Bechara and Naqvi note that the results do not establish that awareness of bodily sensation is the same thing as feeling an emotion. The heartbeat experiment omitted a key component of real emotions - the object that elicits them. Shown an emotional stimulus instead of tones - a picture of a funeral, say - people may engage other parts of their brain in processing the emotion.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/healthscience/columnists/tsiegfried/stories/020904dnlivtomcol.2194f.html (Registration Required)

Robinson Presents At N.D. Writer's Conference (Grand Forks Herald, Feb. 8)
Among the scheduled presenters at the 2004 University of North Dakota Writer's Conference will be MARILYNNE ROBINSON, whose novel "Housekeeping" (1981) became a major film and a contemporary classic. She's a longtime member of University of Iowa Writer's Workshop fiction faculty.
http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/news/7903229.htm

Woman Produced Russian Music Festival At UI (Seattle Times, Feb. 8)
Nobody was surprised when the Seattle Chamber Players received a national award for adventuresome programming earlier this month, from Chamber Music America. Now they're poised for one of their most adventuresome efforts: an ambitious three-day Icebreaker II Festival, which opens Friday with a big schedule of performances and educational events. Among the highlights: works by composers from nine countries surrounding the Baltic Sea (Germany, Denmark, Russia, Estonia, Latvia, Finland, Lithuania, Poland and Sweden), and symposia by composers and musicologists from these countries. Elena Dubinets, co-director of Icebreaking, earlier produced festivals of Russian music at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and has spent nearly two years making contacts for Icebreaker II, including a trip to the annual Gaida Festival of Vilnius, Lithuania in October 2002.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/artsentertainment/2001852978_icebreaker08.html

Jones Weighs In On Electronic Voting (Science Friday, Feb. 6)
DOUGLAS JONES, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, was one of several guests on the National Public Radio program exploring the issue of electronic voting. On the question of possible voting machine over-counts or under-counts, Jones said that if poll officials counted the number of people entering a polling place and the number casting ballots, and added up the total numbers of ballots cast for the candidates, then the failure rates would be public and officials could compare different voting technologies.
http://www.sciencefriday.com/pages/2004/Feb/hour1_020604.html

Squire: Budget Will Be Focus Of Elections (Stateline.org, Feb. 6)
The 2004 gubernatorial races don't include any movie stars, but voters may have a chance to put a retired pro baseball player, the husband of a former governor and a former top White House aide into governors' mansions. All the candidates in this year's 11 governors' races will have to fight for voters' attention because the presidential race will soak up most of the "media oxygen" and public's attention. Budgets, jobs and education likely will dominate all the races while many states are still recovering from the nation's economic recession, experts said. "The issue this year, I suspect, will be money, money, money," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa who specializes in state issues. "Everything is going to revolve around questions about the budget." Stateline.org is a non-partisan, non-profit online news publication that reports each weekday on state government.
http://www.stateline.org/stateline/?pa=story&sa=showStoryInfo&id=348917

UI Student Rallying For Dean (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Feb. 6)
After his loss in the Iowa Caucuses last month and much publicized "yell speech," former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean worked to recover from the incident and his loss in Iowa, and his die-hard supporters also rallied. Russell Lawrence, 24, a recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA political science graduate who was active in the campaign, said many of the estimated 3,000 volunteers there blamed themselves for the Iowa loss, not Dean. "We felt bad, like we had let Howard down," he said. "Last week a buddy and I drove nine hours through a snowstorm to volunteer here in Michigan. The campaign found a lady who is letting us sleep in her attic."
http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0204/07dean.html

Robinson Discusses LDL, HDL (The Australian, Feb. 6)
Heart researchers may be closing in at last on a long-fantasised goal - treatments that flush out the nasty globs of gunk that clog the heart's plumbing. This idea goes beyond merely preventing new coronary artery disease. The intention is to actually clear away what's already there, to clean up the source of heart attacks before they happen. The new drugs boost high-density lipoproteins (HDL). These are the friendly half of cholesterol's yin and yang, often outgunned by their evil counterparts, low-density lipoproteins (LDL). The interest in HDL is a big shift in attention for the field of heart-disease prevention. Ever since the arrival of statins, the main preoccupation has been reducing LDL, which carries in the cholesterol that clogs the arteries. The statins' benefits have been impressive, even though cardiovascular disease remains the world's biggest killer. "We know lowering LDL saves lives. Now we need to know if raising HDL adds to that," says JENNIFER ROBINSON, a University of Iowa epidemiologist.
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,8595434%255E23289,00.html

Vonnegut Reads In Cleveland (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Feb. 6)
Novelist Kurt Vonnegut has not grown shy with age. He lingers over topics - sex, religion, politics, science fiction - that make others quake in fear. Sometimes he hits two at once, as on Wednesday, when during a performance at Severance Hall, the unreconstructed liberal found an oblique angle from which to fire arrows at the current occupants of the White House. A onetime teacher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's famous Writers Workshop, Vonnegut wrote an essay a few years ago to accompany an anthology by Iowa grads. He expressed a belief that writing can be taught and is worthwhile to learn. "The primary benefit of practicing any art, whether well or badly, is that it enables one's soul to grow," he wrote.
http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/1076063533150440.xml

Kirchoff Discusses Parasite Risk (Washington Times, Feb. 6)
The rising migration of Latin people to the United States increases the potential number of cases of a deadly parasitic infectious disease, common in the Southern Hemisphere, that is spread by blood transfusions. Seven persons are known to have been infected with the largely incurable illness, known as Chagas disease, through blood transfusions in the United States and Canada since 1986, five of them in this country. The American Red Cross estimates that, nationally, the risk of a blood donor having antibodies to Chagas or being infected with the disease is 1 in 25,000. The same risk is 1 in 5,400 in Los Angeles and 1 in 9,000 in Miami. Dr. LOUIS V. KIRCHOFF, a professor at the University of Iowa's medical school, and a Chagas specialist, said the risk of contracting the disease is growing fast because of immigration. He noted that U.S. Census data show that net immigration from Mexico alone is about 1,000 people a day, and that as many as 10 percent are probably infected.
http://washingtontimes.com/national/20040205-115036-7708r.htm

Alumna Packer Profiled (Portland Oregonian, Feb. 6)
" There are two types of book people," ZZ Packer says, "the type who treat books like they're complete treasures and the type who buy paperbacks and write in them." She pauses for a second. "I'm the second type. I treat the ideas in books like they're treasures, but I love the idea that you can always buy another book." Packer is on the phone from her home in Pacifica, Calif., a coastal town just south of San Francisco. She's going on tour for her short-story collection "Drinking Coffee Elsewhere", one of the most acclaimed fiction debuts of 2003. Packer, 31, was delighted to be able to buy a house with the advance from "Drinking Coffee Elsewhere," after years of attending college (at Yale, Johns Hopkins, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA) and teaching (at a high school in Baltimore and at Stanford).
http://www.oregonlive.com/entertainment/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/10758131988680.xml

Bell Says Tiny Babies Can Have Normal Childhoods (Kansas City Star, Feb. 5)
Zoe weighed just 10.8 ounces when she was born Jan. 6 and was about the size of a small can of tomato paste. She is believed to be the third-smallest baby ever delivered in the United States. Her birth and first month of life are a testament to the advances in neonatal medicine and the expansion of highly specialized medicine to community hospitals such as Naperville's Edward Hospital. It's too early to say whether Zoe will suffer serious medical problems later in life. Cerebral palsy and mental retardation are possibilities, but so is a relatively normal childhood, said Dr. EDWARD BELL, professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa and director of neonatology at the university's medical center in Iowa City. It is wrong to assume that a premature baby will suffer serious physical or mental disabilities, Bell said. "She is probably going to have to wear glasses. There's a good chance she will be the smallest kid in her class picture," Bell said. But that might be it. Bell tracks the births and development of babies born weighing less than 14 ounces. On a Web site he created in 1999, there are 54 such births. Almost all the surviving babies are girls. Even in the womb, girls mature faster than boys, Bell said. This story also appeared in the BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD and CENTRE DAILY TIMES (Penn.)
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/nation/7884388.htm

IEM Cited (CNN Money, Feb. 5)
What sort of odds are people laying on this November's elections? It depends on who's doing the betting. Over the past few elections, politicos and Wall Streeters trying to get a bead on who's on top in the race for the White House have come to carefully watch the Iowa Electronic Markets Presidential Vote Share Market, run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which got its start in the 1988 election.
http://money.cnn.com/2004/02/05/commentary/bidask/election_bidask/

Instructor Comments On Job Prospects (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 5)
While the number of faculty job openings in foreign languages remained steady for the past two academic years, this year there has been a slight decline, according to the Modern Language Association, and that does not bode well for job seekers. Some departments are cutting corners, trying to do more with less. At the same time, to attract more students, especially those not majoring in a language, many departments are expanding their course offerings to include cross-disciplinary subjects such as cultural, film and gender studies, as well as language classes designed for students majoring in business, law and medicine. NINA BOSCH NAMASTE, a visiting instructor of Spanish at the University of Iowa, says that sometimes it seems like the job ads are asking for "superhuman" professors. "I've seen a number of jobs that combine linguistics and literature," she says. "Who does that? You're either linguistics or literature." Ms. Namaste declined two tenure-track job offers from liberal-arts colleges last year because she feared their heavy teaching demands would make completing her dissertation impossible. Now, with her defense only a short time away, she hopes to land a tenure-track appointment at a midsize state institution or liberal arts college this year.
http://chronicle.com/jobs/2004/02/2004020501c.htm

Bell Says Tiny Babies Can Have Normal Childhoods (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 5)
Zoe weighed just 10.8 ounces when she was born Jan. 6 and was about the size of a small can of tomato paste. She is believed to be the third-smallest baby ever delivered in the United States. Her birth and first month of life are a testament to the advances in neonatal medicine and the expansion of highly specialized medicine to community hospitals such as Naperville's Edward Hospital. It's too early to say whether Zoe will suffer serious medical problems later in life. Cerebral palsy and mental retardation are possibilities, but so is a relatively normal childhood, said Dr. EDWARD BELL, professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa and director of neonatology at the university's medical center in Iowa City. It is wrong to assume that a premature baby will suffer serious physical or mental disabilities, Bell said. "She is probably going to have to wear glasses. There's a good chance she will be the smallest kid in her class picture," Bell said. But that might be it. Bell tracks the births and development of babies born weighing less than 14 ounces. On a Web site he created in 1999, there are 54 such births. Almost all the surviving babies are girls. Even in the womb, girls mature faster than boys, Bell said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0402050099feb05,1,7168424.story?coll=chi-news-hed

UI Tiny Baby Registry Cited (Chicago Daily Herald, Feb. 5)
Zoe Koz may be tiny, but she's feisty. Born three months premature, Zoe weighed less than a can of pop when she was born Jan. 6. She's still shorter than a Barbie doll. But doctors at Edward Hospital in Naperville are optimistic Zoe will thrive, even though she's one of the smallest babies ever born. At 10.8 ounces and 9.5 inches long, Zoe was the third-smallest baby ever born in the United States and the ninth-smallest in the world, according to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA database that tracks births of underweight infants.
http://www.dailyherald.com/news_story.asp?intid=38022314

Bell: Tiniest Babies Face Long Hospital Stays (Chicago Sun Times, Feb. 5)
Zoe Koz weighed no more than a can of soup when she was born, and was so small she fit in the palm of her doctor's hand. But the tiny newborn was strong enough to surprise the physicians who delivered her by Caesarean section Jan. 6. She's already showing flashes of a strong, prickly personality, her dad said proudly, but it's not clear when Zoe might be able to go home. Dr. EDWARD BELL, a neonatologist at the University of Iowa, said the tiniest preemies typically are hospitalized for three to eight months, with medical costs generally running into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. The babies who survive generally remain smaller than other children their age. So few babies born weighing less than a pound survive that it's difficult to offer a prediction, experts said, although at least two other Chicago area children born under that benchmark weight have survived and are doing well, according to a University of Iowa registry of the world's tiniest babies.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-tinybaby05.html

UI Doctor Comments On Prague Hospital Conditions (Prague Post, Feb. 5)
A writer describes the primitive conditions of the first Prague hospital in which he was treated for possible liver cancer. I came prepared for primitive, he writes. There was nary a napkin, let alone a tissue. Bring your own soap, of course. And I'm aware that even in posher hospitals around the world, the same mistakes can be made that happened here: Being left alone in a darkened X-ray waiting room for an hour because the wheelchair attendant forgot to fetch me. Or having my bed-pitcher (only girls get bedpans) go unemptied for three days. And I was fed butter, creamy cheese and a spicy meat spread on the "intestinal diet." Worst of all: Every day I was told to drink a lot of water and was graded on how much I reported drinking. To purge me for my colonoscopy, I was given a foul-tasting laxative and told to wash it down with two liters of water in the next two hours. But I was never given any water. You have to bring your own water. Drinking tap water is forbidden, for good reason. A Czech pathologist at the University of Iowa, LUBOMIR TUREK, who is consulting in my case, knows this landscape well. He attributes the situation to a "lack of money, lack of staff and the old attitude."
http://www.praguepost.com/P03/2004/Art/0205/pprofile.php

Former UI Wrestler Hopes To Return To Class (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 5)
Recovery is a bit slower than expected for Ryan Heim, a former Iowa wrestler still fighting his way back from a serious car accident that left him in a month-long coma just two years ago. And with that realization comes a new perspective. "It makes you realize how much stuff you did take for granted," said Heim, 22, who hopes to study full-time next semester at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Heim suffered a severe head injury after the van he was driving collided with a semi on Interstate 80 near Tipton on Jan. 21, 2002.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=996187

Faculty Panel Seeks To Reduce Student Arrests (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 5)
A task force at the University of Iowa has recommended that the school figure out ways to arrest fewer students for minor alcohol and drug offenses. "This (arrest) is a serious liability for students," said professor JEFFREY COX, a member of the task force. "It follows them for the rest of their lives." The university should explore greater use of internal disciplinary procedures and referrals as alternatives to criminal proceedings in cases involving underage possession of alcohol, public intoxication and possession of small amounts of marijuana, the report says. The task force was made up of three students and three faculty members.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=995865

Former Hawkeye Nominated For U.S. Attorney Slot (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 5)
President Bush has tapped a former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football player as the new U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Iowa. Matt Whitaker, a former tight end and academic all-American, is now a lawyer in private practice in Des Moines. The U.S. attorney is the top federal prosecutor in the southern portion of Iowa. Whitaker's nomination must be approved by the Senate.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=996407

Alumna Named Manager (The Star, Feb. 5)
DHL Worldwide Express has appointed Rodzita Zainal as the company's new national customer service manager. Rodzita, a business administration graduate from UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has vast experience in customer service. Prior to joining DHL, she was the branch and customer services head for Citibank, where she was in charge for three years. In her new role, she will be responsible for designing and developing DHL's customer service initiatives and strategies in line with the company's global policy to ensure the delivery of first class services. The newspaper is based in Malaysia.
http://biz.thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2004/2/5/business/7238579&sec=business

UI Alumna Directs Dance Production (North County Times, Feb. 5)
Dancers, singers and musicians will come together onstage at Palomar College this weekend in "Mostly Modern," a unique performing arts collaboration organized by dance instructor Molly Faulkner. The Vista choreographer, who joined Palomar's teaching staff about a year-and-a-half ago, conceived the idea for the multidiscipline dance concert as a way to celebrate the innate joy of Antonio Vivaldi's choral cantata "Gloria." Faulkner grew up in Tucson, Ariz., earned a degree in dance from the University of Arizona and her master's in dance, choreography, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She's now finishing her Ph.D. in dance history at Texas Women's University. The newspaper is based in California.
http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2004/02/04/entertainment/theater/2_4_0414_17_36.txt

UI Alumnus Pursues Video Dream (Wakefield Observer, Feb. 5)
One thing Stacy Pietrafitta, John Graziano and Stephen Thomson have always had in common is a fascination with video. Now they're using their passion for electronic media to produce music videos for a rock band that frequently appears on the pop music cable channel MTV. The three friends have known each other since fifth grade at the middle school. Pietrafitta graduated from Franklin Pierce College in New Hampshire, where she studied communications. Thomson attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the communication department, where he studied film and video production and took theory classes. Graziano pursued film and video studies at Mass Communication College in Boston. The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.townonline.com/wakefield/news/local_regional/wak_newwkexittmp02042004.htm

Approach May Not Be Working (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 5)
A popular approach to discouraging drinking on college campuses may not be working, according to a team of researchers led by SHELLY CAMPO, an assistant professor of health communication at the University of Iowa. Social-norms campaigns try to correct students' misperceptions of how much typical college students drink. The idea is that if students realize they have been overestimating how much others drink, they will drink less themselves. A study by Ms. Campo's team found that students' drinking behavior is influenced not by how much they think typical college students drink, but by how much they think their friends drink, particularly their male friends.
http://chronicle.com/prm/daily/2004/02/2004020501j.htm

Alumna Is County Poet Laureate (Sayre Evening Times, Feb. 4)
A story about Kathryn Howd Machan, Tompkins County Poet Laureate, notes that she studied creative writing and literature at the College of Saint Rose and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.eveningtimes.com/articles/2004/02/04/news/news8.txt

Garfinkel Insider Trading Study Noted (Wall Street Journal, Feb. 4)
Information on trades by company insiders appears to leak out to specialist firms on the New York Stock Exchange before that information becomes available to the public, according to a study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. As a result, the study suggests, transaction costs may be higher on days when insiders are trading. The study, published in a professional journal last fall, compares the in-person deal-making of the NYSE with the more anonymous, computer-driven trading of the Nasdaq Stock Market. Interaction with brokers apparently gives the NYSE's specialist firms a hint that an informed trader may be making a trade, according to JON A. GARFINKEL, a co-author of the study. When an insider is trading, the study found, NYSE specialists -- the floor-trading firms assigned to facilitate the trading of specific stocks -- are inclined to widen the effective spreads on transactions. They do this either by raising the price at which they are willing to sell stock (when an insider is buying) or by lowering the price at which they are willing to buy (when an insider is selling). In effect, NYSE specialists charge more to protect themselves from the possibility that they are trading against an insider, Mr. Garfinkel said.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB107584690813619680-search,00.html?collection=autowire%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

UI Alumnus Is Hair Stylist To Stars (Port Huron Times Herald, Feb. 4)
A story about Dean Banowetz, otherwise known as the Hollywood Hair Guy because he handles the hairstyles of anyone who goes onstage at "American Idol," says Banowetz grew up the 13th of 15 children on a farm in DeWitt, Iowa. He realized a passion for hair styling in high school, but joined the active duty Army after graduation. He also earned an art degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before attending cosmetology school. Hollywood came calling after Banowetz visited Santa Monica, Calif., for a workshop on celebrity styling. The workshop was run by Susan Lipson who soon convinced him to audition for a styling job with the television show "Extra." In February 2000, he became the stylist for the show. He left behind 10 years of service and a salon in Bettendorf, Iowa, to make the move to Hollywood. Today, he is the man behind the hair and makeup for Leeza Gibbons, Ryan Seacrest and the contestants on "Idol". Perhaps, one of Banowetz's most talked-about transformations is with last year's "Idol" runner-up, Clay Aiken. The paper is based in Michigan.
http://www.thetimesherald.com/news/stories/20040204/localnews/347883.html

Author Boyle Attended UI (Daily News, Feb. 4)
Author T.C. Boyle, whose book "The Tortilla Curtain" was the first selection for the Galveston Reads program, spoke in Galveston recently. Boyle earned a bachelor's in English and history from State University of New York at Potsdam, and a Masters of fine arts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa City. He earned a doctorate in British Literature in 1977. The paper is based in Galveston, Texas.
http://www.galvnews.com/story.lasso?wcd=17469

Lasansky's Father Was UI Alumnus, Printmaker (Arizona Republic, Feb. 4)
A story about painter Tomas Lasansky says that as a child the Iowa native developed a profound admiration and empathy for Native Americans. Lasansky, 46, found a way to combine his passions 13 years ago when he began painting a series of portraits of Native Americans, both historical and imaginary figures. "Reflections: Pride and Dignity of the Native American, the mixed media works of Tomas Lasansky," are on display at the West Valley Art Museum in Surprise. Lasansky was born into a family of artists, most notably his father, Mauricio, a renowned print maker, who also spent many years as a professor of art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/southwestvalley/articles/0204wvspotlight0131Z5.html

Covington Comments On New Mexico Caucus (Albuquerque Journal, Feb. 4)
It was a nagging question for many New Mexicans as they planned to vote Tuesday: What exactly is a caucus, anyway? Ask a Democrat or Republican in Iowa and the person may explain that it's an intimate experience where neighbors cluster in the corners of church basements or middle-school libraries. A caucus to a Michigan Democrat means a paper -- but not secret -- ballot with the presidential preference marked and a signature guaranteeing the voter is a Democrat, at least for the day. In New Mexico, the Democratic Party is running it like a primary, with paper ballots to be cast secretly at polling sites statewide. CARY COVINGTON, a University of Iowa political science professor who's an expert in presidential politics, said he's never heard of a caucus quite like New Mexico's. The paper is based in New Mexico.
http://www.abqjournal.com/elex/140552elex02-04-04.htm

UI Studied City Fees For Emergency Services (Union Leader, Feb. 4)
A story about a town's consideration of charging people for emergency services provided by the fire department says the idea is not new. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA published a report on Iowa's exploration into fees for service in 1999. The paper is based in New Hampshire. A version of the story also ran Feb. 3 on the website of FOSTER'S DAILY DEMOCRAT in New Hampshire.
http://www.theunionleader.com/articles_showa.html?article=32817

Keynote Speaker Is UI Education Alumnus (Beaufort Gazette, Feb. 4)
The Technical College of the Lowcountry will host the annual Mather School alumni luncheon at noon Friday in MacLean Hall to honor Mather graduates. The keynote address will be delivered by George S. Chenault, who represents Beaufort County on the TCL Commission. Chenault holds a doctorate in education administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, as well as a master's degree in education and bachelor's degree in biological sciences from South Carolina State College. He has over 40 years experience in education as a teacher and administrator at Broad River Elementary School and in Beaufort and Fairfield counties' school districts. The Gazette is based in South Carolina.
http://www.beaufortgazette.com/local_news/briefs/story/3301341p-2946654c.html

UI Cited In Story On Mock Trial (Lexington Herald-Leader, Feb. 4)
Eastern Kentucky University's mock-trial team finished ninth out of 20 teams in the Blues City Challenge in Memphis Jan. 17-19. Eastern outlasted teams from UCLA, the University of Texas, St. Louis University, New York University and defending national champion UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, among others. The paper is based in Kentucky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/living/community/7847720.htm

Allied Insurance Donates $1.5 Million To UI (Omaha World-Herald, Feb. 4)
Allied Insurance, one of the nation's biggest insurance and financial service companies, will donate $1.5 million to support a new faculty position with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's business college. The gift from the Des Moines-based company will ultimately endow a chair with the new Institute of Risk and Insurance at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business, university officials announced Tuesday. The gift makes Allied the first corporate donor in the campaign, which hopes to raise $6 million in private money to support the institute.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=994867

Sanford Comments On New Image Checker CT (WBAY-TV, Feb. 3)
A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel on Tuesday started reviewing a device that could make it easier to detect cancer. It's called the Image Checker CT. It could keep radiologists from making a mistake. Lung nodules are overlooked in up to 20 percent of CT cases, and they can be lung cancer. In clinical trials, doctors say the computer automated and digital methods had documented results. They compare it to a spellchecker. "You have the ability to know that your radiologist, your CT study, has been evaluated by a medical professional and then in addition to that there has been technology which has added to that ability to be sure that nothing is there -- and so you have an added sense of security," Dr. WILLIAM SANFORD of the University of Iowa said. The station is based in Green Bay, Wisc.
http://www.wbay.com/Global/story.asp?S=1628941&nav=DqT0Kb11

Robinson Comments On HDL Impact On Heart Disease (Canada.com, Feb. 3)
Heart researchers may be closing in at last on a long-fantasized goal -- treatments that flush out the nasty globs of gunk that clog the heart's plumbing. This idea goes beyond merely preventing new coronary artery disease. The intention is to actually clear away what's already there, to clean up the source of heart attacks before they happen. The new drugs boost high-density lipoproteins, the friendly half of cholesterol's yin and yang, often outgunned by its evil twin, low-density lipoproteins. Until recently, the only pills that raised HDL even modestly were generic or over-the-counter. The best of them, niacin, is a vitamin. Without exclusive rights, drug companies have no incentive to prove such compounds work. "We know lowering LDL saves lives. Now we need to know if raising HDL adds to that," Dr. JENNIFER ROBINSON, a University of Iowa epidemiologist. A version of the story also ran Feb. 3 on the website of WOIO-TV CBS 19 Cleveland, Ohio.
http://www.canada.com/health/story.html?id=2E2B69F3-5A89-45D5-B11C-90A6E16D135C

Miller: Taxpayers Wondering Why Funds Spent On Iraq (Reuters, Feb. 3)
President George W. Bush is going through a rocky patch at home and abroad, leading some pundits to question earlier assumptions that he is a shoo-in for re-election in November. Bush is now suffering the lowest job approval rating of his presidency as measured by the Gallup poll at 49 percent. Optimism about the economy is fading, as is support for the war in Iraq. In mid-December, just after the capture of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, Bush's approval stood at 63 percent. "The Iraq issue ties directly to the deficit. People are asking, why are we spending so much on Iraq when there were no weapons of mass destruction there in the first place and when we don't have enough jobs, health care and good schools right here at home," said ARTHUR MILLER, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. A version of the story also ran Feb. 3 on the website of MSN's Money Central website and on CNBC, and the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N03390891.htm

Head Trauma Increases Risk Of Mental Illness (Detroit Free Press, Feb. 3)
People who suffer a blow to the brain have a greater risk of mental illness, new research shows. One study, published in January's Archives of General Psychiatry, examined how 91 patients fared after sustaining a traumatic brain injury. Thirty-three percent had major depression during the first year after the injury, compared with about seven percent of a group of patients who'd had multiple traumatic injuries, but not to the brain or spinal cord. More than three-quarters of the brain-injured patients with depression also suffered from anxiety, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists reported.
http://www.freep.com/news/health/newx3_20040203.htm

Teen Awaits Heart Transplant (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 3)
It's been a little more than four months since Tim Reedy of Council Bluffs was admitted to UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS AND CLINICS in Iowa City with an unknown ailment that left his 18-year-old heart virtually useless. The 2003 Lewis Central High School graduate is on a list awaiting a heart transplant. He doesn't know how long the wait will be, but he is the only one at the hospital who needs a Type B match. He can't go home, however, because the machine that pushes blood through his body hasn't yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use outside the hospital. With the first critical days of his illness past, the challenge is to keep his spirits up over the long term. The Mid-Day Optimists in Council Bluffs purchased a laptop computer for Tim. He can keep in touch with people via e-mail, and he is enrolled in Internet classes at the University of Iowa in creative writing, fiction writing, health for living and American popular music.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=993741

Demand For School Med Services Rises (Charleston Post and Courier, Feb. 3)
School health professionals say the increased demand for medical treatment at schools highlights a concern they've had for years: whether there are enough medically trained people in schools to handle the load. About 97 percent of schools let staff administer prescription drugs, and at least one study reveals that delegation doesn't always work. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researcher found medication errors were three times more likely when nursing duties were delegated to staff. The Post and Courier is based in Charleston, S.C.
http://www.charleston.net/stories/020304/sch_03nurse.shtml

Covington Comments On New Mexico Caucus (Santa Fe New Mexican, Feb. 3)
It's been a nagging question for many New Mexicans planning to vote today: What exactly is a caucus, anyway? In New Mexico, the Democratic Party is running it like a primary, with paper ballots to be cast secretly at polling sites statewide. CARY COVINGTON, a University of Iowa political-science professor who's an expert in presidential politics, said he's never heard of a caucus quite like New Mexico's.
http://www.santafenewmexican.com/main.asp?FromHome=1&TypeID=1&ArticleID=39773&SectionID=2&SubSectionID=7

Crews Dig For Bones Of Sloth (KETV, Feb. 3)
Crews are continuing to search for the remains of a giant sloth that died on the banks of a southeast Iowa creek thousands of years ago. A retired UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor is leading the search at a site near Shenandoah. He said some 70 percent of the animal's bones remain to be found. Volunteers are cleaning, identifying and repairing the bones at the Museum of Natural History, where the remains will be displayed. KETV serves Omaha, Neb.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/education/2812408/detail.html

Children's Antidepressant Use Debated (ABCNews.com, Feb. 2)
Renewed concerns about the safety of the antidepressants have prompted the Food and Drug Administration to convene hearings today to determine whether antidepressants like Paxil and Zoloft are unsafe for use in children under 18. For parents whose children have had terrible experiences while taking antidepressants, the FDA hearing is long overdue. But doctors who have seen the drugs work "miracles" in children worry one of their best weapons for treating depression in kids might be taken away without any hard science to support a ban. "The British decision [to ban all SSRIs but Prozac for use in children] was not based on science," says adolescent psychiatrist CHRIS OKIISHI of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "These are the only effective medications we have for children." The story also appeared on the website of WTOP radio in Washington, D.C.
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/Living/Living/antidepressants_suicide_040202-1.html

Writer Relates Story About First Arrest (National Public Radio, Feb. 2)
On the "Day to Day" program, novelist Marcos McPeek Villatoro told about his first arrest saying it "was memorable, not least because it was my only arrest. In 1985, the anti-apartheid movement was at its height, and students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA decided to storm the administration buildings and not leave until the university agreed to stop investing in companies involved with South Africa."
He continues, "I literally bumped into the protestors gathered in a big circle around the main administration building, about a hundred of them. I asked one young guy: 'What are you all doing?' 'We're protesting apartheid, man,' he said, filling me in on the plan of protest they'd been working on for over a week. 'OK,' I said, and I jumped right in there with them. I managed to demand justice in Johannesburg for about five minutes before I got arrested."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=9501e4b9a45e3d51f62d0b47a045878c&_docnum=25&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=abe1b4689c9841f14bfae80dec96add8

Jones Comments On Electronic Voting (The Australian, Feb. 2)
Thousands of Americans who go to the polls on Tuesday will vote using computers instead of casting paper ballots, but experts warn the high-tech systems could cause more problems than they solve. After the botched 2000 presidential election, when confusing ballots in Florida and legal wrangling left the nation in political limbo for 36 days, the US federal government set aside billions of dollars to buy modern voting machines. But experts say the computers - which leave no paper record of ballots - have gaping holes in their security that would allow hackers to tamper with or alter the vote count. Forbes magazine called paperless voting a "worst technology" of 2003 and three bills are before Congress to stop it. "The machines are in use with what I consider extremely serious security flaws," University of Iowa computer professor DOUGLAS JONES said. He said he told the machines' manufacturer, Diebold, about the security problems five years ago but nothing has been done to fix it. "It's very clear that, despite a public scolding, the company had never repaired the security flaw and the company was continuing to sell the machine with that flaw and many other flaws," he said. Version of this story appeared Feb. 2 on NEWS.COM AUSTRALIA and the web site of AL-JAZEERA
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,8560712%255E15306,00.html

UI Health Information Cited (Globe and Mail, Feb. 2)
The newborn baby who was smuggled from the hospital in a duffle bag just hours after his birth was handed over to police about 12 hours later following a province-wide Amber Alert. The bizarre tale, which dominated the news in Ontario over the weekend and caused a broad police and citizen search, began on Saturday at 6 a.m. when the baby was born in Windsor. At that time, the infant was in generally good health, weighing 3.33 kilograms (7 pounds, 5 ounces). After he was born, however, the baby began to develop tremors, which sometimes signal that an infant has been exposed to illegal drugs in its mother's womb. Hospital staff began to investigate this and to monitor the baby's health. Drug-addicted newborns can exhibit a range of medical problems, depending on the kind and quantity of drug the mother used. A pressing concern is that a baby, cut off from the drug, can go into withdrawal soon after birth, according to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's health information sheet on this topic. The newspaper is based in Toronto.
http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20040202.wubaby02/BNStory/Front/

Poremba Reports Brain Findings (Medical News Today.com, Feb. 2)
Scans have pinpointed circuits in the monkey brain that could be precursors of those in humans for speech and language. As in humans, an area specialized for processing species-specific vocalizations is on the left side of the brain, reports a team of researchers including AMY POREMBA, University of Iowa. An area near the left temple responded significantly more than the same area on the right only to monkey calls, not to other animal calls, human voices or various other sounds. The researchers published their findings in the January 29, 2004 Nature. A version of this article appeared Feb. 2 on the web site of INNOVATIONS REPORT, which is based in Germany.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/index.php?newsid=5639

Hines Plans May Retirement (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 2)
The University of Iowa College of Law's longtime dean says he will retire in May. N. WILLIAM HINES, 67, headed the college for 28 years. He said he will return to teaching. Hines was charged with overseeing faculty, curriculum, research and fund-raising at the college. He said the job has gotten tougher as state appropriations shrink and as donors are needed to pay for projects such as rewiring classrooms with Internet capabilities. Hines has been the longest-serving law school dean in the United States in recent decades.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=992873

Fisher: No Zoning Makes Rural Bookstores Popular (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 2)
X-rated businesses like the Lion's Den Adult Superstore in Abilene, Kan., are increasingly common on the nation's rural Interstate highways, where they find relatively cheap land, few zoning restrictions and a steady stream of potential customers. PETER FISHER, professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa, said the rural sites offer more anonymity for customers, who have less chance of being spotted by acquaintances. And Fisher said the owners of adult businesses realize: "Look, here's no zoning, and we can get some Interstate traffic, too."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=991905

Cole Says Retirees Make Wonderful Workers (Courier & Post, Feb. 2)
Baby boomers reaching retirement age are returning to the workplace in growing numbers despite officially ending their careers. Some are bored; some feel they have more to contribute. Many continue to work during their golden years to supplement Social Security income or to get benefits, like health insurance. And while seniors are finding full- and part-time jobs a fulfilling way to spend their retirement years, companies also are benefiting from their experience, dependability and work ethic. "Retirees make wonderful workers," said CATHY COLE, chairwoman of the marketing department at the University of Iowa. "They are reliable, have good values and often are only looking for part-time jobs." The newspaper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.courierpostonline.com/news/business/b020204b.htm

Family Treated At UI Following Explosion (Peoria Journal-Star, Feb. 2)
When Kate Rockhill says "Abingdon rocks," she's talking about the town she's seen in action since Oct. 11, 2003, the day the house of Todd and Christina O'Halleran exploded with them and their four children inside. The explosion critically injured the couple and three of their children and killed their infant son, Tanner. The couple and their surviving children, Kailei, Keianna and Cody, are staying with Todd's mother in Crystal Lake as they look for a new home in Abingdon. Last month, they left UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Hospitals in Iowa City, Iowa, where all had been hospitalized or undergoing rehabilitation.
http://www.pjstar.com/news/regional/b225t6h1036.html

UI Alumna Leads Celebration (Maine Today.com, Feb. 2)
An article about a local school's celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year notes that the woman leading the celebration, Lihua Lei, is a sculptor by training, who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a Master in Fine Arts in 1998. Maine Today.com is the web site for three Maine newspapers.
http://www.centralmaine.com/news/local/364032.shtml

UI Alumnus Directs Concordia Band (Hibbing Tribune, Feb. 2)
An article about the Concordia College band notes that its interim director is Dr. J. Robert Hanson, a graduate of Concordia College. His graduate study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA includes the completion of a M.A. in music education, a M.F.A. in trumpet performance and a Ph.D. in composition. He taught at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee before joining the music faculty at Concordia in 1966. He conducted the Concordia College Band for eight years and was the founder and conductor of the Concordia College Orchestra from 1967 until his retirement in 1995. The newspaper is based in Minnesota.
http://www.hibbingmn.com/placed/index.php?sect_rank=3&story_id=163717

Fisher: Enterprise Zones Don't Work (Philadelphia Inquirer, Feb. 1)
In the beginning, there were enterprise zones. Republicans promoted them as an alternative to the Democratic urban revitalization schemes of the 1960s and '70s. The idea was, instead of handing federal aid to governors and mayors to spend on urban-renewal in depressed areas, the government would allow tax breaks for businesses in special areas. Early versions contained fairly strict requirements. You couldn't just move into a zone and stop paying taxes; a business had to make various commitments regarding hiring, wages or capital improvements to a site. But over time, as legislators and lobbyists got to tinkering with the rules, they gradually became more flexible. Instead of a last chance for neighborhoods where nothing else seemed to work, the "zone" has become a tool for planners and politicians trying to create development somewhere, quickly. Meanwhile, lost in the debate, at least so far, is the question of whether zones - enterprise, empowerment, opportunity or otherwise - actually work. Someone who's thought about that is PETER FISHER, a professor at the University of Iowa and co-author of a book titled State Enterprise Zone Programs - Have They Worked? His short answer: Not very well. The grab-bag of incentives that zones offer businesses "appear to constitute a chaotic and unplanned industrial policy," he writes in a summary chapter to the book. Pennsylvania's latest opportunity zones are certainly a long way from the original concept, Fisher said. "They started out very focused, with a small number of zones in impoverished neighborhoods," he said. "But over time, the politics of it are such that everyone wants to get in on it."
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/7844232.htm

Segura Sees Democratic Surge In Arizona (Arizona Republic, Feb. 1)
Near the eve of the Arizona's Democratic Primary, Democrats have been invigorated by a more effective state party machine and galvanized by the quest to unseat President Bush. The national spotlight and a pack of presidential hopefuls also will find an Arizona Democrat emboldened by the state's rapidly changing demographics. A burgeoning Hispanic population and the growing clout of Native Americans - with casino revenue to spend in campaigns - could be a tremendous boost for Democrats, if the party can get them to the polls. A main reason for Democratic optimism is simply population growth. The state's Hispanic population jumped nearly 90 percent between the 1990 and 2000 censuses. Hispanics made up about 25 percent of the population in 2000. Arizona's Native American population is a factor, too. On the Navajo Nation, nine of 10 who vote are registered Democrats. "In 10 or 15 years, it will be a Democratic state," said GARY SEGURA, a professor of American politics at the University of Iowa. More than 86 percent of the nation's Latinos under age 18 are U.S. citizens. "As a practical matter, what this means is that the number of Latinos eligible to vote in the U.S. will double over the next 18 years, even without a single additional person crossing the border or naturalizing," Segura said. He expects Arizona to become increasingly competitive as the Latino population grows. "The election of a Democratic governor is one marker of this shift. In theory, that should raise the importance of Arizona as a swing state, in that highly competitive states solicit greater attention from the parties and candidates than states reliably in one camp or the other," Segura said.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/viewpoints/articles/0201azdemocrats.html

Robinson Comments On Cholesterol Drugs (Dayton Daily News, Feb. 1)
Heart researchers may be closing in at last on a long-fantasized goal - treatments that flush out the nasty globs of gunk that clog the heart's plumbing. This idea goes beyond merely preventing new coronary artery disease. The intention is to clear away what's already there, to clean up the source of heart attacks before they happen. Ideally, the human body already does this on its own, and the new medicines are intended to enhance the natural artery-cleansing process. If testing goes as scientists hope, the strategy could prove to be as important for preventing heart disease as the cholesterol-lowering statin drugs introduced in the late 1980s are. The new drugs boost high-density lipoproteins - HDL. This is the friendly half of cholesterol's yin and yang, often outgunned by its evil counterpart, LDL. The interest in HDL is a big shift in attention for the field of heart-disease prevention. Ever since the arrival of statins, its main preoccupation has been reducing LDL, which carries in the cholesterol that clogs the arteries. "We know lowering LDL saves lives. Now we need to know if raising HDL adds to that," said Dr. JENNIFER ROBINSON, a University of Iowa epidemiologist. Versions of this Associated Press article appeared Jan 31 and Feb. 1 on the web sites of the DOW JONES NEWSWIRE, EVANSVILLE (Ind.) COURIER & PRESS, NEWSMAX.com, PAKTRIBUNE.com (Pakistan), CANADA.com, GO ERIE.com (Pa.), WOAI-TV (Texas), LOCAL6.com (Fla.), KATV (Ark.), WCIV-TV (S.C.), FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, NORTH COUNTY (Calif.) TIMES, FREDERICKSBURG.com (Va.), RAPID CITY (S.D.) JOURNAL, WJLA-TV (D.C.), SANTA MARIA (Calif.) TIMES, WILKES BARRE (Pa.) WEEKENDER, WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, TUSCALOOSA (Ala.) NEWS, ELKO (Nev.) DAILY FREE PRESS, NEWSDAY, ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, THE LEDGER (Fla.), ABC NEWS, CENTRE DAILY TIMES (Pa.), AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, FORTH WORTH (Tex) STAR TELEGRAM, MIAMI HERALD, KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS-DEMOCRAT, ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS, and OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.daytondailynews.com/life/content/life/daily/0202heartfuture.html

UI Graduate Runs Record Label (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Feb. 1)
Rock star David Bowie, asked by Vanity Fair magazine to name his 25 all-time favorite records, chose one on the Innova label. Maybe it's a sign that the small, independent, nonprofit record label based in St. Paul has hit the bull's-eye. Innova, a branch of the American (formerly Minnesota) Composers Forum, has been around since 1975, but it was only in the mid-1990s that the label switched into high gear, expanding its distribution, updating its technology to include Internet audio streaming, and increasing its output to two dozen CDs a year. It's now one of the most active Twin Cities labels in terms of titles released annually. Two years ago, Innova received a grant of $1 million from the McKnight Foundation to use as a perpetual endowment fund. The label was struggling in the mid-1990s when Philip Blackburn, an Englishman with a doctorate in composition from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who describes himself as an experimental sound artist, took the reins. He has turned things around with some innovative ideas and his far-flung musical interests.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/457/4342977.html

Field Comments On Radon Danger (Capital News9, Feb. 1)
Radon is a colorless, odorless radioactive gas that travels from soil into homes through openings in the foundation. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor Bill Field said, "As radon decays, it produces little solid particles, and some are just the precise size that can be easily inhaled and deposited in the lungs." Those particles can cause lung cancer. In fact, the EPA estimates that radon kills 21,000 people a year. A new public service campaign from the Environmental Protection Agency encourages people to test their homes for radon. Test kits are available at many hardware stores and through local health departments. The television news station is based in New York.
http://www.capitalnews9.com/content/health_team_9/?ArID=57647&SecID=17

Tachau Comments On Big-Time Sports (Salem Statesman-Journal, Feb. 1)
Faculty members at the University of Oregon started the Coalition on Intercollegiate Athletics in 2000, when professors were infuriated by news that the university planned a multimillion-dollar expansion of its football stadium, even as academics budgets were being slashed. Their crusade spread to other Pac-10 universities, and then beyond, growing from an e-mail network to a group with faculty leaders from the country's major athletics conferences. Its members are now asking faculty senates at all Division I-A schools to vote on a proposal that calls for an end to out-of-control spending on college stadiums and arenas and a brake on what they call "creeping collegiate commercialism," as well as more focus on athlete-student welfare. "I have no problem with most of our sports," KATHERINE TACHAU, a history professor at the University of Iowa, said after that school's vote in September. "But the big-time sports belong in a marketplace, and that's not what a university is."
http://news.statesmanjournal.com/article.cfm?i=74730

Nixon Suggests Method To Keep Roads Clear (Raleigh News & Observer, Feb. 1)
Businesses and schools closed for several days in a row last week following an ice storm. WILFRID A. NIXON, a professor of engineering at theUniversity of Iowa and a national authority on snow and ice removal, said that even a Southern city with few snowplows need not be shut down for days by a storm. The remedy, he said, is cheap and low-tech: Spray a concentrated solution of salt and water on all roads before a storm and in its beginning stages. The salt-water approach, widely used in the Midwest, prevents ice and snow from bonding with a road surface, Nixon said. Instead of getting packed down into a slick sheet by passing vehicles, the snow and ice get turned into slush by the traffic and melt much faster. Nixon and others said the salt-water spray works best at temperatures above 20 degrees but still helps even when it's colder. The cost for the solution is about 10 cents a gallon, and a mile of two-lane roadway needs about 50 to 100 gallons. To cover all of Raleigh, the solution would cost about $10,000, not including the equipment and manpower to spread it. "You do need equipment to do it," Nixon said. "Taxpayers can get a little upset in August when they look and see [equipment] and wonder why the city has all of this equipment that doesn't get used much."
http://newsobserver.com/news/story/3294010p-2941160c.html

Dancer Had Surgery At UI (Boulder Daily Camera, Feb. 1)
Every day, Theresa Venturini lives - no, dances - is a miracle. In November 2002, following an accident in a dance rehearsal, an alert doctor discovered a congenital abnormality, called Arnold-Chiari Malformation, at the base of Venturini's brain. A section of her cerebellum was protruding down into her spinal column, pressing against the spinal cord. Finally, she understood the cause of her lifelong headaches, the occasional blurred vision and balance problems. By all rights, Venturini should have been a quadriplegic. Instead, she'd been performing most of her life. And today, despite tremendous odds, she is still dancing. Venturini, a dedicated student, graduate teaching assistant and performer, has managed the truly impressive: Over the past year she underwent and recovered from a seven-hour brain surgery, returned to her studies and a part-time job as assistant technical director for the Dance Department at the University of Colorado, and choreographed and produced her master's of fine arts thesis concert. Because Venturini's surgery and post-operative checkups were done at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL in Iowa City, she and her boyfriend Chris Anton made the trip by car several times between March and September 2003.
http://www.bouldernews.com/bdc/lifestyles/article/0,1713,BDC_2520_2614359,00.html

Noted UI Anthropology Professor Dies (AAANET, February 2004)
JUNE HELM, 79, Professor Emerita of Anthropology at the University of Iowa, died in Iowa City Feb. 5. Helm spent 50 years conducting research on the culture and ethnohistory of the Mackenzie-drainage Dene in the Canadian north. Her studies of Dene ecology, kinship, and demography are important contributions to our knowledge of hunter-gatherers. AAANET is the website of the American Anthropological Association.
http://www.aaanet.org/helms_june.htm

'Extreme Makeover' Artist Attended UI (ABC, 2004)
An undated story about ABC's reality show "Extreme Makeover" says the show's stylist, Sam Saboura, was born in Chicago and attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Iowa where he double majored in theater arts and communications. He acted in back to back college productions and then went to New York City several times to workshop various off-Broadway productions with Tony Kushner, the Pulitzer Prize winning playwright of Angels in America ."
http://abc.go.com/primetime/extrememakeover/bios/sam_saboura.html

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