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December, 2004 See UI in the New Archive Index

Former UI Opera Director Helps Stage Maine Opera (Bangor Daily News, Dec. 30)
Beaumont Glass, former director of opera at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is helping to stage a performance of Die Fledermaus at the Maine Grand Opera in Camden, Maine.
http://www.bangornews.com/news/templates/?a=105863&z=14

ISU Increases Security after Seashore Break-ins (WQAD, Dec. 29)
Two break-ins at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA labs have led Iowa State University officials to increase security measures at the Ames campus.

The new measures include the use of updated equipment and additional patrols in key research areas. That's according to I-S-U's Public Safety Director Jerry Stewart. He wouldn't elaborate on the new measures, citing security concerns. The changes are the result of two incidents at UI's Seashore Hall. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2743181

Hunnicutt Discusses Work Obsession, Consumerism (Utne Reader, Jan./Feb. 2005)
Aristotle's famous view that "we work in order to have leisure" held up well into the 20th century, according to BEN HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa. For more than a century prior to the 1930s, American workers successfully lobbied for higher wages and shorter hours, most notably the eight-hour workday and five-day workweek, and there was a widespread expectation that leisure would increasingly come to dominate our lives. Back then, Hunnicutt says, "the American Dream consisted of two things: more wealth and more time to live." And it wasn't just put-upon workers who defined progress as having more leisure time. "Liberation capitalists" like W.K. Kellogg and Lord Leverhulme (one of the Lever Brothers) viewed the coming age of leisure as the finest possible accomplishment of industrial capitalism. Kellogg even put his money where his mouth was and, in 1930, instituted a six-hour workday in his Battle Creek, Michigan, cereal factories. The result? Not surprisingly, workers spent more time with their kids and in their communities, strengthening both family and civic ties. So why didn't this utopian experiment spread across the country? The answer is complicated, Hunnicutt says.
http://www.utne.com/pub/2005_127/promo/11504-3.html

Olshansky: Take Control Of Your Health (WPTZ TV, Dec. 31)
Many doctors will tell you that Americans are making themselves sick. Obesity has become an epidemic, and although we know how harmful cigarettes are, many continue to smoke. At least one doctor is trying to help his heart patients before they get sick. Cardiac electrophysiologist BRIAN OLSHANSKY uses technology to open blocked arteries, but he says that technology often trivializes the disease. "They are expecting the medical profession to take care of the problems, and they want to continue to go on in the same way," he told Ivanhoe. Olshansky, of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, wants patients to take control of their health. "There are some data now that meditation will reduce your risk for sudden death and can cause lowering in blood pressure," Olshansky said. WPTZ is based in Plattsburgh, NY.
http://www.thechamplainchannel.com/health/3954916/detail.html

Student Pleads Guilty to Software Piracy (Information Week, Dec. 29)
A 26-year-old college student faces 15 years in prison as the first person convicted of software piracy stemming from April's international raids dubbed "Operation Fastlink." Jathan Desir, 26, who is registered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, pleaded guilty December 22 in U.S. District Court in Des Moines. A story on the same topic appeared on the Web sites of WEB PRO NEWS, PLOYER, INTERNET WEEK, CIO NEWS, TECH WEB and numerous other organizations.
http://www.informationweek.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=56200691

Andrejevic Comments on Critical Dislike of Reality TV (The Day, Dec. 28)
In a story about the changing world or reality TV, MARK ANDREJEVIC, a University of Iowa communications professor and author of "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched" half-jokes that he expects to see a call for papers soon for a reality-TV conference. Andrejevic's research centers on why people allow what he sees as their own exploitation, providing cheap labor in order to take part in a privileged parallel universe he calls "the media world." "It just struck me as interesting that in the post-Cold War era, Big Brother no longer loomed as a kind of oppressive specter, but as, "Hey! It's fun!' " he says. But he's also fascinated by what seems to be a longtime national hope among TV critics and TV writers, if not the nation at large - that this is just a passing fad. "After 9/11, I had people calling me and saying, "Well, reality TV's dead now, right? Because we have reality,' " he says. "Why do people want to pronounce it dead so often? We know there's something not quite right, and we want it to go away." The Day is based in New London, Conn.
http://www.theday.com/eng/web/news/re.aspx?re=47531114-20F4-4B7F-B88C-C4CDF2B999CF

Lutgendorf Study Shows Churchgoers Live Longer (ChurchCentral.com, Dec. 28)
Those who made their once-yearly trip to church on Christmas may want to think again. Research shows that regular churchgoers live longer. A 12-year study tracking mortality rates of more than 550 subjects older than 65 found that those who attended services at least once a week were 35 percent more likely to live longer than those who never attended church.  The research also found that going to church boosted seniors' immune systems and made them less likely to suffer clogged arteries or high blood pressure. "There's something involved in the act of religious attendance, whether it's the group interaction, the worldview or just the exercise to get out of the house. There's something that seems to be beneficial," said University of Iowa psychology professor SUSAN LUTGENDORF, who carried out the study.
http://www.churchcentral.com/nw/s/id/21771/template/Article.html

Lutgendorf Study Shows Churchgoers Live Longer (Sydney Morning Herald, Dec. 27)
Those who made their annual trip to church at the weekend will have to think again. Research shows that regular churchgoers live longer than non-believers. A 12-year study tracking the mortality rates of more than 550 adults over the age of 65 found that those who attended services at least once a week were 35 per cent more likely to live longer than those who never attended church. It also found that going to church boosted elderly people's immune systems and made them less likely to suffer clogged arteries or high blood pressure. SUSAN LUTGENDORF, a psychologist at the University of Iowa who did the study, said: "There's something involved in the act of religious attendance, whether it's the group interaction, the world view or just the exercise to get out of the house. There's something that seems to be beneficial." The Morning Herald is based in Australia. The same story appeared on the Web site of the WASHINGTON TIMES, THE TELEGEAPH (UK), HINDUSTAN TIMES (INDIA), WEBINDIA 123 (INDIA) and NEW KERALA (INDIA).
http://www.smh.com.au/news/Health/Life-yet-in-oldtime-religion/2004/12/27/1103996499880.html?oneclick=true

Damasio Comments on Value of Robotics (Technology Review, Dec. 27)
In a story about how robotics experts are studying how the brain operates to design a socially interactive robot, ANTONIO DAMASIO, head of neurology at the University of Iowa, said that as a tool for understanding the mind, robots are "extremely valuable." "Robots can implement and test how processes like movement can occur," he said. By extending these models to develop a broader theory of the mind, Damasio adds, "we'll know more and more about what it takes for, say, human consciousness to operate."
http://www.technologyreview.com/articles/05/01/issue/huang0105.asp

UI Student Builds Frisbee Golf Course (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 26)
Collin Glancy, a junior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, built his own Frisbee golf course in his hometown of Warren Township, Ill.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0412260263dec26,1,5019738.story?coll=chi-newslocalchicago-hed

Alumnus to Lead Band at Bush Inaugural (Aberdeen American News, Dec. 26)
The Northern State University Marching Wolves band will perform at next month's Inaugural Parade in Washington, D.C. The band is under the direction of Boyd Perkins, who earned his master of arts degree and a doctorate of musical arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/living/10502076.htm

Hamilton Praises The Iowa Review (Vanguard Nigeria, Dec. 26)
DAVID HAMILTON
, professor of English and editor of the Iowa Review, says his journal is "the only magazine that I find absolutely necessary to read cover to cover.  Twice at least ... what has been my greatest challenge since editing this journal is learning, year by year, what I admire most in American writing by being exposed to, and reacting to, a cross section of it".
http://www.vanguardngr.com/articles/2002/features/fe526122004.html

Editorial Cites UI Cost of Providing Extra Benefits (Wisconsin State Journal, Dec. 24)
An editorial urges the University of Wisconsin to offer benefits to the gay and lesbian partners of UW employees. Such an offer won't be a budget breaker, the editorial says, pointing out that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA spent $100,000, which amounted to 0.2 percent extra, to cover 63 partners of gay and lesbian employees in 2002. The State Journal is based in Madison.
http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/opinion/index.php?ntid=22363&ntpid=1

Redlawsk: Kerik Failure Won't Hurt Giuliani in Iowa (Newsday, Dec. 23)
Until two weeks ago, Rudolph Giuliani was having a great year. The former mayor and Sept. 11 icon starred in prime time at the Republican National Convention, polished his image as a successful business leader and maneuvered himself into the lineup of early contenders for the White House in 2008. Then, the spectacular flameout of a top deputy singed Giuliani's bright political future. The failed federal nomination of Bernard Kerik, who quit Giuliani's firm Wednesday, has left many wondering whether Kerik's mess will stick to Giuliani. But political science professor DAVID REDLAWSK of the University of Iowa said the Kerik problems may not matter in Iowa because many GOP voters in the state dislike Giuliani's support for abortion rights, gun control and gay rights. "His positions on Republican issues are far from most Iowa Republicans. He doesn't fit what's mainstream for the Republican Party in Iowa. I think the Kerik thing is relatively unimportant for exactly that reason," said Redlawsk. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the BERGEN (NJ) RECORD and WNBC-TV.
http://www.nynewsday.com/news/local/state/ny-bc-ny--giuliani-afterker1223dec23,0,6387115.story?coll=ny-region-apnewyork

Clark Study Shows Bone Loss in Depo-Provera Users (ABCNews.com, Dec. 23)
The results of a new study confirm that using the contraceptive Depo-Provera is associated with bone loss. Depo-Provera, also known as DMPA, is a long-lasting contraceptive hormone that is injected every three months. Dr. M. KATHLEEN CLARK and colleagues at the University of Iowa compared changes in bone mineral density in 178 women starting on Depo-Provera for the first time and 145 women not using hormonal contraception. Average bone density at the hip fell 2.8 percent one year after starting Depo-Provera and 5.8 percent after two years. Loss of bone density in the spine was similar. In contrast, average bone loss at the hip and spine was less than 0.9 percent among the comparison group of women, the team reports in the medical journal Fertility and Sterility. "We clearly show that bone density is lost with DMPA use," Clark told Reuters Health. She also noted that in mid-November, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a black box warning on Depo-Provera stating, in essence, that bone density is lost and may not be regained, particularly when it is used for more than two years.  "Without information on the magnitude of bone mineral density loss, clinicians cannot weigh the potential benefits of a highly effective method of contraception to the potential problems associated with bone loss. Our study provides this information," Clark said. The same story appeared on the Web site of NEW KERALA (INDIA).
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory?id=355576

Anderson Studies Therapy for Eating Disordered (Psychology Today, Dec. 23)
Many people with eating disorders don't recognize that they have a problem and never seek help. But a study appearing recently in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggests that more sufferers should be checked into hospitals, even against their will. Lead author ARNOLD E. ANDERSON, Ph.D., a psychiatry professor at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, examined 397 eating disordered patients, 66 of whom were admitted involuntarily. Surprisingly, his results showed that those patients admitted against their will responded to treatment as well as those admitted voluntarily.
http://cms.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20010301-000022.html

Gurnett Comments On Saturn's Lightning (Townsville Bulletin, Dec. 22)
New data from the Cassini spacecraft shows that lightning on the ringed planet is a million times stronger than on Earth. Even terrestrial lightning can deliver between 100 million and one billion volts of electricity. Scientists compared the strengths of Earth and Saturnian lightning by detecting its radio signals. Cassini, the NASA probe currently orbiting Saturn, picked up radio signals from Earth lightning as far out as 89,200 kilometers. But as the spacecraft approached Saturn last July, it started detecting lightning signals at a point about 161 million kilometers from the planet. DON GURNETT, a space physicist from the University of Iowa, said: "This means that radio signals from Saturn's lightning are on the order of one million times stronger than Earth's lightning. That's just astonishing to me." The newspaper is based in Australia.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=9afc0c4308d9ea7f8a98ed2a7724ccc3&_docnum=41&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=fe89ec9591cee6ba95ffad4c16bf7aff

Poet Wins NEA Grant (Oakland Tribune, Dec. 21)
Alameda poet John Isles has won a National Endowment for the Arts grant. Isles was awarded $20,000 from the NEA for a series of poems in his first book of poetry, "Ark," which was published in 2003 by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The slim volume of poems is thick with images of Long Island, where Isles grew up in a working-class background with parents who, he said, valued hard work over the dreamy purview of poetry. The newspaper is based in California. The article also appeared in the ALAMEDA (Calif.) TIMES-STAR.
http://www.oaklandtribune.com/Stories/0,1413,82~1726~2610662,00.html

Gurnett Reports Cassini Findings (Space Flight Now, Dec. 21)
As NASA's Cassini spacecraft approached Saturn last July, it found evidence that lightning on the planet is roughly one million times stronger than lightning on Earth. That's just one of several Cassini findings that University of Iowa Space Physicist DON GURNETT will present in a paper published in Science Express, an online version of the journal Science, and in a talk delivered at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco. Other findings include: Cassini impacted dust particles as it traversed Saturn's rings; Saturn's radio rotation rate varies. A story on the same topic appeared on the Web site of UNIVERSE TODAY, INNOVATIONS REPORT and the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/cassini/041220lightning.html

UI Outpaces 'Huskers in Research Dollars (Lincoln Journal Star, Dec. 21)
A story about the current condition of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln points out that the university spent $60 million in federal funds in 2002-2003, but still trails most of its peer universities, some of whom nab three times the federal research money UNL receives. The university lags far behind neighboring schools such as the University of Colorado and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA despite nearly doubling the amount of federal research money it receives during the past seven years.
http://www.journalstar.com/articles/2004/12/21/local/doc41c79e1cae97f031674080.txt

UI Whipworm Study Cited (Channel News Asia, Dec. 21)
There was the Scarsdale Diet, the Atkins Diet and now the Diet of Pig Whipworms. The parasite known as Trichuris suis has been given the OK in an unconventional experiment to tackle inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), an ailment that is on the rise in Western countries. Twenty-nine people with a mild form of Crohn's disease, a potentially disabling IBD, were asked to swallow 2,500 pig whipworm eggs every three weeks for six months. The eggs were mixed in a soft drink to disguise the taste. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers noted that the rise in IBD over the past 50 years in rich countries has coincided with a plunge in infections by classic intestinal parasites, such as roundworm and human whipworms, driven out by better hygiene. In developing countries, though, these parasites are common but IBD is rare.
http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/health/view/123324/1/.html

UI Cited In Wisconsin Benefits Story (Wisconsin State Journal, Dec. 21)
The University of Wisconsin is now the only university in the Big 10 that does not provide insurance benefits to the domestic partners of employees. The story points out that in January 2002, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA spent $100,000 annually to cover 63 partners of gay and lesbian employees, an increase of .2 percent and well below its estimate of over 3 percent.
http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/local/index.php?ntid=21849&ntpid=3

Alumnus To Be Honored With Hall Enshrinement (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 21)
Longtime Big Ten commissioner Wayne Duke will be enshrined Dec. 31 in the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in Pasadena, Calif. "Not bad for a paper-shuffler and a broken-down sportswriter," said Duke with his aw-shucks, self-deprecating humor. He grew up in Burlington, Iowa, and earned a journalism degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before writing for several Midwest newspapers. Duke served as Big 10 commissioner from 1971 to 1989. A story on the same topic appeared on the Web site of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.
http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/printedition/cs-0412210228dec21,1,6627217.story?coll=cs-sports-print

Blanck Comments on Jobs for Disabled (Asbury Park Press, Dec. 20)
Twelve years after the Americans with Disabilities Act declared employment discrimination against the disabled illegal, a Harris poll found the percentage of disabled adults with jobs stuck at about 35 percent. Experts on the disabled say they've seen positive employment gains, many of them among young adults. "Young people who have severe disabilities who want to work, who are capable of being accommodated, their employment rate has risen dramatically," said PETER BLANCK, director of the Law, Health Policy and Disability Center at the University of Iowa College of Law. The newspaper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.app.com/app/story/0,21625,1148773,00.html

Olshansky Stresses Prevention (WPTZ-TV, Dec. 20)
Many doctors will tell you Americans are making themselves sick. Obesity has become an epidemic, and although we know how harmful cigarettes are, many continue to smoke. At least one doctor is trying to help his heart patients before they get sick. Cardiac electrophysiologist BRIAN OLSHANSKY, M.D., uses technology to open blocked arteries, but he says that technology often trivializes the disease. "They are expecting the medical profession to take care of the problems, and they want to continue to go on in the same way," he told Ivanhoe News. Olshansky, of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, wants patients to take control of their health. "There are some data now that meditation will reduce your risk for sudden death and can cause lowering in blood pressure," Olshansky said. WPTZ is based in Plattsburgh, N.Y.
http://www.thechamplainchannel.com/health/3954916/detail.html

Jones Comments on Vote Recount (Wired, Dec. 20)
As a statewide election recount got underway in Ohio last week, a Democratic congressman called on the FBI to impound vote-tabulating computers in at least one county and investigate suspicions of election tampering in the state. Rep. John Conyers (D-Michigan), ranking Democrat of the House Judiciary Committee, sought the investigation after an Ohio election official disclosed in an affidavit that an employee of Triad Governmental Systems, the company that wrote voting software used with punch-card machines in 41 of Ohio's 88 counties, dismantled Hocking County's tabulation computer days before the recount and "put a patch on it." DOUG JONES, Iowa's chief examiner of voting equipment and a computer scientist at the University of Iowa who has been a leading critic of electronic voting machines, said the matter was less likely a case of election tampering than poor election procedures and oversight. But he added that even if no one tampered with votes, the fact that someone had unsupervised access to tabulating equipment before the recount was a breach of security procedures and might even violate Ohio election law. "The tabulating room should be viewed as a secure computer systems site where nobody goes in there unsupervised, but the affidavit suggests there was no supervision in the tabulating room," Jones said. http://www.wired.com/news/evote/0,2645,66072,00.html?tw=wn_tophead_3

Gurnett Study on Saturn Published (Scientific American, Dec. 20)
The Cassini spacecraft continues to send intriguing insights from up close to Saturn back to astronomers on Earth. The latest results from the mission, published online Friday by the journal Science, provide new clues into the icy nature of the planet's rings and how the planet has changed in recent years. DONALD A. GURNETT of the University of Iowa and his collaborators report that the gas giant has not stayed static over the past two decades since the flyby of space probe Voyager 1. Indeed, plasma and radio-wave instruments on Cassini detected lighting storms that were between 10 and 30 times more intense than those recorded 24 years ago. In addition, the team discovered that Saturn is slowing down: its current rotation period of 10 hours and 45 minutes is six minutes longer than the rotation Voyager measured.
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa007&articleID=000A1B3E-5004-11C3-900483414B7FFE9F

Anderson's Hoarding Study Noted (BBC News, Dec. 20)
People who hoard apparently useless items may be able to blame an area of their brain, say U.S. researchers. The University of Iowa team pinpointed a region in the frontal lobe that appeared to control this behaviour. To gain a better understanding of the cause of obsessive collecting behaviour, DR. STEVEN ANDERSON and his team studied 13 people who had developed a hoarding compulsion after sustaining a brain injury. Hoarding was defined as abnormal if it was extensive, the squirreled items were not useful or aesthetic and the individual was unwilling to discard any of their collection.  They scanned the patients and compared their brain scans with those taken from other 73 brain injured patients who displayed no abnormal collecting behaviour. The scans showed up an obvious difference. Dr Anderson said: "A pretty clear finding jumped out at us. "Damage to a part of the frontal lobes of the cortex, particularly on the right side, was shared by the individuals with abnormal behaviour.  "Patients with OCD and some other disorders, such as schizophrenia, Tourette's syndrome and certain dementias, can have similar pathological collecting behaviour but we don't have a pointer to located where in the brain the problem is occurring. Our hope is that our findings with these brain lesion studies will lead to insights in these conditions as well."
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4101931.stm

Robinson's "Gilead" Reviewed (Providence Journal, Dec. 19)
Now teaching at the prestigious University of Iowa Writers' Workshop and having written two books of nonfiction (Mother Country and The Death of Adam), MARILYNNE ROBINSON creates in her long-awaited second novel, "Gilead" a spiritual and historical tale of Gilead, Iowa. The town is "just a cluster of houses strung along a few roads," with a grain elevator, water tower, post office, school and an old train station "pretty well gone to weeds now." The newspaper is based in Rhode Island.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=874298dede4cd98b6b6c155de0e3fdf2&_docnum=87&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=815b61566fc04b0dfd38a7c2a1317696

Bloom Comments on Packing Plant Complaint (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 19)
After the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals animal-rights group released an undercover video that it claims represents inhumane killing practices at the Agriprocessors slaughterhouse, Postville found itself at the center of an international squall involving religion, grass-roots politics, the news media and the humble cow. Agriprocessors has launched a public-relations campaign against what plant manager Sholom Rubashkin calls an "extreme political group" that "will do whatever it can for publicity" and "wants to turn you into a vegetarian." Rubashkin's claim that PETA is using the plant as a symbol in a broader attack against all kosher slaughter doesn't surprise writer STEPHEN BLOOM, a University of Iowa journalism professor who spent five years researching his 2000 book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." "The Lubavitchers in Postville look at the world in terms of Jewish and not Jewish," said Bloom, a Reform Jew.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0412190502dec19,1,7103113.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Kelch Profiled (Ann Arbor News, Dec. 19)
Robert Kelch, University Of Michigan executive vice president for medical affairs, and CEO of the UM Health System, went to medical school at UM and spent most of his career here before accepting a job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1994. He returned in 2003. His current office belonged, back when he was a student, to the dean of the medical school.  "I had a very warm feeling when I stepped into Dean (William) Hubbard's office," Kelch says. "I'd come here as a student, and to be on the other side of the desk now is a wonderful feeling."  The newspaper is based in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/aanews/index.ssf?/base/features-0/1103454740326291.xml

Writer Relates Experiences (Vanguard, Dec. 19)
Sunny Ayewanu, poet, writer and undoubtedly one of the best essayists of the new generation of Nigerian writers, contributed an account of his American tour in this publication. He notes that his short story "My Bible is Bigger than Yours" was read in a religious studies class in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He also says that audiences enjoyed his reading at Prairie Lights Bookstore, and participated several panel discussions through the International Writing Program at the UI, and other groups. The publication is based in Nigeria.
http://www.vanguardngr.com/articles/2002/features/fe119122004.html

Anderson Studies Hoarding Behavior (WebMD.com, Dec. 17)
Abnormal hoarding behavior following brain injury was recently studied at the University of Iowa's medical school by researchers including STEVEN ANDERSON, PhD. All 86 participants had brain lesions. Most cases occurred in adulthood. Despite their brain lesions, participants had normal brain function with normal scores on intelligence, reasoning, and memory tests. Participants were interviewed about their collecting behavior. To ensure accuracy, the researchers also talked to a close relative of each subject (usually a spouse). A total of 13 people were classified as "abnormal collectors." They had excessive collections of useless items that began after the brain injury occurred, and they resisted changing their hoarding habits. The abnormal collectors had something else in common. "A pretty clear finding jumped out at us," says Anderson, in a news release. "Damage to a part of the frontal lobes of the [brain's] cortex, particularly on the right side, was shared by the individuals with abnormal behavior."
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/98/104865.htm

Damasio Comments on Robots (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 17)
Mitsuo Kawato, director of the ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories in Kyoto, Japan Loves robots not because they are cool, but because he believes they can teach him how the human brain works. As a tool for understanding the mind, robots are "extremely valuable," says ANTONIO DAMASIO, head of neurology at the University  of  Iowa  and the author of three books on the brain that have popularized the notion of "embodied intelligence." "Robots can implement and test how processes like movement can occur," he says. By extending these models to develop a broader theory of the mind, Mr. Damasio adds, "we'll know more and more about what it takes for, say, human consciousness to operate."
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB110331039070903464-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

Saturn Discoveries Noted (RedNova.com, Dec. 17)
As NASA's Cassini spacecraft approached Saturn last July, it found evidence that lightning on Saturn is roughly one million times stronger than lightning on Earth. That's just one of several Cassini findings that University of Iowa Space Physicist DON GURNETT will present in a paper to be published Thursday, Dec. 16 in Science Express, an online version of the journal Science, and in a talk to be delivered Friday, Dec. 17 at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco. As Cassini approached Saturn, it started detecting radio signals from lightning about 161 million kilometers from the planet. "This means that radio signals from Saturn's lightning are on the order of one million times stronger than Earth's lightning. That's just astonishing to me!" says Gurnett, who notes that some radio signals have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Similar versions of the story appeared in the LOS ANGELES TIMES, EDINBURGH EVENING NEWS, ASTROBIOLOGY NEWS, XINGHUA (China), and INNOVATIONS REPORT
http://www.rednova.com/news/display/?id=112046

Damasio Studies Pleasure-Seeking Behavior (Salon.com, Dec 17)
Scientists are trying to figure out why, when we already have it all, we risk everything for more excitement. At the University of Iowa, a team lead by neuroscientist HANNA DAMASIO has been studying people with lesions in a region of the cortex associated with pleasure. They found that although the patients had no intellectual impairment, in a simple gambling test they made hopeless decisions. "They are oblivious to the consequences of their actions," the team noted in a paper published in the journal Brain.
http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/2004/12/17/pleasure_seeking/

UI Study Finds Worms Relieve Bowel Disorder (Star of Mysore, Dec. 17)
It's not a treatment for the faint-hearted or squeamish but scientists said on Tuesday that worms could be a new treatment for a bowel disease. In a small study, researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the United States found that parasitic worms, or helminths, relieved the symptoms of patients suffering from Crohn's disease which causes inflammation, abdominal pain and weight loss. The scientists tested the impact of a species of worm called Trichuris suis, which is commonly found in pigs, on 29 patients with Crohn's disease. The paper is based in India.
http://www.starofmysore.com/main.asp?type=sparklers&item=2084

Bibas Comments On Plea Bargain Bans (Philadelphia Inquirer, Dec. 17)
Philadelphia State Attorney General Peter C. Harvey called yesterday for a ban on plea bargains for armed offenders in Camden and said no more state troopers would be sent to the city, which is nearing a record homicide rate. Harvey's comments surprised and, in some cases, angered law enforcement officials from the statehouse to officers on the street in Camden. The attorney general, who is expected to release a report on crime in the state's poorest city next week, said prosecutors generally should not enter into plea negotiations with felons who commit an offense with a gun. STEPHANOS BIBAS, a law professor at the University of Iowa and former U.S. Supreme Court clerk who has closely studied the issue, said jurisdictions that have experimented with plea-bargain bans have had success in the short term. Bibas said plea bargains serve another purpose -- getting the guilty off the streets when the evidence is flimsy. "Rape cases have very high acquittal rates, for example, because it's often he-said, she-said. And so in those cases, prosecutors want to protect the victim and avoid an embarrassing acquittal," Bibas said.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/local/states/new_jersey/10437529.htm

Top College Athletics Stories List Includes Grant Study (Chronicle, Dec. 17)
In 2004, college sports did not sink to the same depths as it did in 2003. No coaches were fired for consorting with strippers, and no universities sued any others for changing conferences. And no players were jailed on murder charges. But the year still presented plenty of challenges for administrators and coaches. Among the notable news for 2004 is cited the release by CHRISTINE H.B. GRANT, emeritus women's athletics director at the University of Iowa, of a study at the National Collegiate Athletic Association annual convention finding that while Division I institutions have dropped 174 teams since 1998, colleges in Divisions II and III have added 235.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i17/17a04301.htm

Former UI Student Wins Verdict In Bar Stunt Case (WLS-TV, Dec. 16)
A jury has returned a verdict in a lawsuit over a fiery bar stunt in Iowa City two years ago. A former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, 23-year-old Deanine Busche of Schaumburg, Ill., sued the bar and the bartender over a stunt that involved igniting high-proof alcohol poured in a bar well. Busche was one of seven people injured in the 2002 fire at Et Cetera. A Johnson County jury awarded Busche yesterday more than $1.3 million dollars in damages. The bartender, Troy Kline, pleaded guilty to reckless use of fire and was sentenced to probation and community service. The bar, now under new ownership, was fined $500 for violating city fire codes. Lawsuits filed by two others were settled. Another lawsuit is pending. The ABC affiliate is based in Chicago.
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/news/121604_ap_ns_barstunt.html

Anderson Identifies Finds Cause of Hoarding (Medical News, Dec. 16)
By studying patients who developed abnormal hoarding behavior following brain injury, neurology researchers in the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A Carver College of Medicine have identified an area in the prefrontal cortex that appears to control collecting behavior. The findings suggest that damage to the right mesial prefrontal cortex causes abnormal hoarding behavior by releasing the primitive hoarding urge from its normal restraints. The study was published online in the Nov. 17 Advance Access issue of the journal Brain. Hoarding behavior is common among animals; around 70 species hoard and mostly they hoard food, which makes sense from a survival standpoint. Studies of hoarding behavior in rodents have shown that collecting is driven by certain primitive structures deep in the brain and most mammals, including humans, share these subcortical regions. "But human collecting goes beyond items that are solely useful for survival," said STEVEN ANDERSON, Ph.D., UI associate professor of neurology and lead author of the study. "People often collect art or stamps or pretty much anything. Clearly there is some higher structure in humans that modulates the collecting drive and that's what we think we have tapped into." The same story appeared on the Web site of PLEBIUS PRESS, NEW KERALA (INDIA) and WEBINDIA 123.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=17861

Graber Uses Diagnostic Software (CBS News, Dec. 16)
A 4-year-old boy showed up at an Iowa hospital with a fever, swollen lymph glands and various visible clues: a diffuse rash, cracked lips and peeling skin around his fingernails. Dr. MARK GRABER, an emergency room veteran, quickly suspected Kawasaki's syndrome, a rare heart condition that can lead to fatal aneurysms. The boy had already visited several doctors and Ers "and the diagnosis was missed," Graber said. To ensure he was on the right path, Graber typed his observations into a visual-diagnosis software program designed to swiftly pinpoint and treat illnesses that appear on the skin, from chicken pox or Lyme disease to AIDS complications or even anthrax exposure.  Graber teaches family and emergency medicine at the University of Iowa and uses the software most days at the campus hospital in Iowa City. "The beauty of having multiple pictures is you can compare them and say, yeah, this makes sense, let's go from there," he said.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/12/15/health/main661308.shtml

UI Study Shows Benefits of Drinking Worm Eggs (Daily Times, Dec. 16)
The parasite known as Trichuris suis has been given the okay in an unconventional experiment to tackle inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), an ailment that is on the rise in Western countries. Twenty-nine people with a mild form of Crohn's disease, a potentially disabling IBD, were asked to swallow 2,500 worm eggs every three weeks for six months. The eggs were mixed up in a soft drink to disguise the taste. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers note that the rise in IBD over the past 50 years in rich countries has coincided with a plunge in infections by classic intestinal parasites such as roundworm and human whipworms, driven out by better hygiene. In developing countries, though, these parasites are common but IBD is very rare. The Daily Times is based in Pakistan. The same story appeared on the Web sites of HEALTHCENTRAL.COM and KERALANEXT (INDIA).
http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_16-12-2004_pg9_3

Former Student Wins Bar Stunt Damages (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 16)
A jury in Iowa awarded more than $1.3 million in damages Wednesday to a former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from Schaumburg who was burned when a fiery bar stunt flamed out of control. The Johnson County jury also awarded Deanine Busche, 23, $275,000 in punitive damages for injuries she suffered in the April 2002 fire at Et Cetera, a downtown club popular among college students. A story on the same topic appeared in the DAILY HERALD (suburban Chicago).
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0412160169dec16,1,6002781.story?coll=chi-newslocalchicago-hed

Whipworm Treatment Described (Cape Argus, Dec. 15)
The parasite known as Trichuris suis (pig whipworms) has been given the okay in an unconventional experiment to tackle inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), an ailment that is on the rise in Western countries. Twenty-nine people with a mild form of Crohn's disease, a potentially disabling IBD, were asked to swallow 2,500 worm eggs every three weeks for six months. The eggs were mixed up in a soft drink to disguise the taste. Of the 24 who stayed in the experiment, 22 experienced a major improvement in their health after three months, and 19 of them had no symptoms at all. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers note that the rise in IBD over the past 50 years in rich countries has coincided with a plunge in infections by classic intestinal parasites such as roundworm and human whipworms, driven out by better hygiene.
http://www.capeargus.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=49&fArticleId=2346632

'Kite Runner' Used in UI Classes (New York Times, Dec. 15)
"The Kite Runner," by Khaled Hosseini, a previously unknown son of an Afghan political refugee, has captivated reading groups across the country with its rich mix of familiar morality tale and timely world history. The book has also been adopted for courses at Penn State, the University of Northern Colorado, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and James Madison University.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/15/books/15kite.html?adxnnl=1&oref=login&adxnnlx=1103125976-jhQ9zbcWcOWo9SqpK8SWBg

Grassian Studies Acid Dust (Innovations Report, Dec. 15)
A team of scientists has discovered large, new class of airborne particles unaccounted for in climate models. Dry dust reacts with air pollutants to form dewy particles whose sunlight-reflecting and cloud-altering properties are unaccounted for in atmospheric models. "Calcite-containing dust particles blow into the air and encounter gaseous nitric acid in polluted air from factories to form an entirely new particle of calcium nitrate," said Alexander Laskin, a senior research scientist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington.  "These nitrates have optical and chemical properties that are absolutely different from those of originally dry dust particles, and climate models need to be updated to reflect this chemistry." Calcite dust is ubiquitous in arid areas such as Israel, where this past winter Laskin and colleagues VICKI GRASSIAN, chemistry professor at the University of Iowa, and Yinon Rudich, professor of environmental sciences and energy research at the Weizmann Institute of Science, collected particles for analysis.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/geowissenschaften/bericht-37826.html

Graber Describes Diagnosis Software (Rochester Democrat and Chronnicle, Dec. 15)
A 4-year-old boy showed up at an Iowa hospital with a fever, swollen lymph glands and various visible clues: a diffuse rash, cracked lips and peeling skin around his fingernails. Dr. Mark Graber, an emergency room veteran, quickly suspected Kawasaki's syndrome, a rare heart condition that can lead to fatal aneurysms. The boy had already visited several doctors and ERs "and the diagnosis was missed," Graber said.  To ensure he was on the right path, Graber typed his observations into a visual-diagnosis software program designed to swiftly pinpoint and treat illnesses that appear on the skin, from chicken pox or Lyme disease to AIDS complications or even anthrax exposure. "The beauty of having multiple pictures is you can compare them and say, 'Yeah, this makes sense, let's go from there,'" said Graber, who teaches family and emergency medicine at the University of Iowa.

Within hours, his young patient underwent an echocardiogram and was put on medication. Kawasaki's can kill some patients within six months if they're not treated with an immune system substance that seems to prevent heart damage. "He did fine," Graber said.  The newspaper is based in New York.
http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041215/BUSINESS/412150314/1001

Worms Treat Crohn's Disease (BBC News, Dec. 14)
Parasitic worms may be an effective treatment for the inflammatory bowel disorder Crohn's disease, research in the U.S. suggests. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA team found most of 29 Crohn's patients who swallowed a type of parasitic worm over a 24-week period showed an improvement. It is thought that helminths, such as roundworms and threadworms, may prevent Crohn's in the developing world. In the latest study, 29 adults with moderately active Crohn's disease swallowed 2,500 whipworm eggs of the species Trichuris suis -- commonly found in pigs -- every three weeks for 24 weeks in total. Most of the patients had had their symptoms for around four years and standard treatment had not worked. Five patients dropped out, but halfway through, 22 patients had experienced a significant improvement in their symptoms, with 19 of them having no symptoms at all. By the end of the study, all but one had shown an improvement, with 21 reporting no symptoms.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4091881.stm

Stringer Featured in Documentary (The Advocate, Dec. 14)
Hilary Sio, head of story development at Partisan Pictures, was in Houston seven years ago working on a film for Discovery. She turned on the television in her hotel room and found herself watching with growing interest the NCAA women's college basketball finals. What an emotionally powerful story it would be, she thought, to follow a team through a season. But which team? Based in New York, Sio found the team in nearby New Jersey a few years later. The Rutgers University's women's Scarlet Knights coach was C. Vivian Stringer, the only coach in men's or women's basketball to take three schools (Cheyney University, 1982; the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 1993; and Rutgers, the state university of New Jersey, 2000) to college basketball's promised land - The Final Four. The newspaper is based in Baton Rouge, La.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=27479fdc2bccfe7ae197cf4bcb8156c8&_docnum=44&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVb&_md5=98815d0d39e895809abbc0504ab61494

Weinstock Worm Research Given OK (Mail and Guardian, Dec. 14)
The parasite known as Trichuris suis has been given the okay in an unconventional experiment to tackle inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), an ailment that is on the rise in Western countries. Crohn's disease typically features cramping abdominal pain, bleeding and diarrhoea among its symptoms, which are often combated by steroids or antibiotics. The University of Iowa researchers note that the rise in IBD over the past 50 years in rich countries has coincided with a plunge in infections by classic intestinal parasites such as roundworm and human whipworms, driven out by better hygiene. In developing countries, though, these parasites are common but IBD is very rare. Their theory is that the eradication of human intestinal parasites over such a short period is a new and potentially traumatic event in evolutionary terms. The study appears on Tuesday in Gut, published by the British Medical Association. It was authorised after one of the researchers, gastroenterologist JOEL WEINSTOCK, carried out preliminary tests on volunteers with Crohn's and another IBD called ulcerative colitis. The Mail and Guardian is based in South Africa. A story on the same topic appeared on the Web site MEDICAL NEWS TODAY.com (UK), NEWS 24 (South Africa), DEUTSCHE WELLE (Germany), THE AGE (Australia), INDEPENDENT ONLINE (South Africa), BBC News, ABC News (Australia), SYDNEY MORNING NEWS (Australia), REUTERS, THE AUSTRALIAN, YAHOO NEWS and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.mg.co.za/Content/l3.asp?cg=BreakingNews-Andinothernews&ao=176628

UI Gingkos Cited (New York Daily News, Dec. 14)
Female ginkgo trees have been banned in Beijing, removed from the streets of Washington, D.C., and Lexington, Ky., and from the campus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Now one Brooklyn legislator also wants them out of New York City. Known for their shallow roots and beautifully shaped leaves, ginkgos are among the most popular and attractive urban trees. Provided they are not the fruit-producing female ginkgo trees.
http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/261709p-224121c.html

Former Professor Elected Endodontist President (Asheville Citizen Times, Dec. 14)
Ever since she was a little girl growing up in Statesville, Dr. Sandra Madison has believed she would be the first female president. With dedication and courage, Madison reached her goal. In the American Association of Endodontists' 61-year history, Madison holds the title as the first female president of the 6,500-member organization headquartered in Chicago. Madison is a former professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Dentistry. The paper is based in Asheville, NC.
http://www.citizen-times.com/cache/article/wnchealth/72259.shtml

Workshop Alumnus Engineers Casino Merger (Las Vegas Sun, Dec. 14)
At a shareholder meeting that lasted all of a few minutes Friday, a majority of Mandalay Resort Group stock owners approved the company's merger with larger rival MGM Mirage.  The $7.9 billion deal, in which MGM Mirage is expected to swallow Mandalay by the end of March, is still subject to state and federal regulatory approvals. The meeting, likely the company's last, began and ended without fanfare or any discussion of the merger. It also finished abruptly without any talk of the company's legacy or its stellar profits over the past year. Mandalay Resort Group President and Chief Financial Officer Glenn Schaeffer said afterward that the purpose of the meeting wasn't to glorify the company but to conduct the business at hand.  "We have the most famous single hotel in the world, Mandalay Bay, and shareholders in this company have made a lot of money over the years," Schaeffer said. "I think we're pretty capable at marketing and driving shareholder value, which is what's important." A graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Writers' Workshop, Schaeffer established the International Institute of Modern Letters in Las Vegas and New Zealand, where he has a home and established that country's largest literary prize.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/gaming/2004/dec/13/517975936.html

Hansen Offers Final Exam Tips (Centre Daily Times, Dec. 13)
A story about upcoming final exams on college campuses across the country offers tips for doing well on the tests. One of these is: Don't think you -- of your academic performances -- need to be perfect. That tidbit comes from SARAH HANSEN, a health educator at the University of Iowa, who wrote about handling finals stress for Web site www.uistudenthealth.com. Hansen noted that "perfectionism is a huge time waster." Instead of trying to make everything you do --papers, presentations, studying, -- exactly perfect, she wrote, set your sights on more realistic, "but still acceptable," academic goals. You are, after all, more than your grade-point average, and there is life after finals week. The paper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/sports/horse_racing/kentucky_derby/10403112.htm

UI Student Thesis Compares SUV, Other Drivers (Montreal Gazette, Dec. 13)
Drivers of sport utility vehicles who think they're riding in a safer vehicle may be deluding themselves, researchers say. While the larger, heavier, more rigid SUV may appeal to the driver who is looking for better crash protection, the fact that it rides higher on the road could be dangerous. A thesis by a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA psychology doctoral student found that drivers tested at high eye levels drove faster than those riding at a lower level. For example, those seated 183 centimeters from the ground drove about 8 km/h faster than those seated at 122 cm. Other studies have uncovered similar results. The paper is based in Canada.
http://www.canada.com/montreal/montrealgazette/news/driving/story.html?id=61272c3b-9eca-44d2-b16e-e01ee542003a

Merrill Comments On Indian Poet, IWP Participant (The Hindu, Dec. 13)
Thachom Poyil Rajeevan's participation in the Struga Poetry Festival in Macedonia last year got him a nomination for the prestigious International Visitor Programme (IVP) of the Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs of the US Department of State held from August to November this year. For the poet and columnist, the only participant from India, it was a great honor as no Keralite has got the nomination recently. In Macedonia, American poet CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, who is also director of the International Writing Programme (IWP) of the University of Iowa, was impressed by his new genre of poetry in Malayalam. Back home from the US, he says that the writing programme has been useful at various levels since he could meet many excellent writers and poets from different nations and interact with them. "It provided me with the opportunity to travel to various parts of the US, visit cultural and educational institutions and learn how they function,'' says Rajeevan, who is also Public Relations Officer of Calicut University. The most important segment was the residency programme at Iowa university that included individual writing, panel discussions, classroom presentations, translation workshops and public readings. The paper is based in India.
http://www.hindu.com/lf/2004/12/13/stories/2004121300890200.htm

Scientist Comments On Global Warming (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Dec. 12)
James E. Hansen, who directs NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, told a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA audience in October that the administration is ignoring evidence of "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate. "Anthropogenic" means human-caused, and his phrasing is significant because the United States pledged in 1992, as part of an agreement called the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, to take all necessary steps to combat such interference. "As the evidence gathers, you would hope they would be flexible," Hansen said of the administration in an interview. "You can't wait another decade" to cut carbon dioxide emissions, he added.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/5132339.html

UI Offers Student Admission On The Spot (Washington Times, Dec. 11)
Credit card and mortgage companies promise customers an answer "while you wait" on loan applications. Now, colleges are doing the same - visiting high schools and letting applicants know their admission fate right on the spot. At Barrington and Deerfield high schools in suburban Chicago, 45 colleges came to campus for two days this fall. "It was just a major relief - one of those pressures of senior year just lifted off your chest right away," said Kari Blanas, a Deerfield student who received word that she had been accepted to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Kansas and, her top choice, Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.
http://washingtontimes.com/national/20041211-114119-5908r.htm

Infectious Diseases Project Proposed For Ohio State, UI (WCCO, Dec. 11)
Researchers at the University of Minnesota had a nearly record year for winning research funds in 2003-2004, but officials at the school are warning that the picture could get bleaker soon. In the last school year researchers took in $523.6 million in research grants and contracts, close to the $527 million record set two years earlier. But tight federal budgets could mean that funding for science research falls nearly flat, officials said. David Hamilton, the outgoing interim vice president for research, told the Board of Regents Friday that the National Institutes of Health may be able to award only 200 new grants in the whole nation. Though concerned about the research funding picture both federally and from the state of Minnesota -- state-funded awards to university researchers dropped 30 percent last year because of the state's budget deficit -- Hamilton said he sees bright spots, too. The NIH has earmarked funding for certain priorities such as infectious diseases, and the university has submitted what Hamilton called a very competitive proposal for a $50 million project to be run in cooperation with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Ohio State University. The station is based in Minnesota. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of IN-FORUM in North Dakota, the DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD and the ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS.
http://wcco.com/topstories/local_story_346160352.html

Graber Comments On Visual-Diagnosis Software (Newsday, Dec. 11)
A 4-year-old boy showed up at an Iowa hospital with a fever, swollen lymph glands and various visible clues: a diffuse rash, cracked lips and peeling skin around his fingernails. Dr. MARK GRABER, an emergency room veteran, quickly suspected Kawasaki's syndrome, a rare heart condition that can lead to fatal aneurysms. The boy had already visited several doctors and ERs "and the diagnosis was missed," Graber said. To ensure he was on the right path, Graber typed his observations into a visual-diagnosis software program designed to swiftly pinpoint and treat illnesses that appear on the skin, from chicken pox or Lyme disease to AIDS complications or even anthrax exposure. VisualDx contains nearly 10,000 medical photographs culled from 1.2 million accumulated since the 1940s in private archives and colleges, chiefly New York University and the University of California at Los Angeles. It was first licensed out to hospitals, medical schools and internists in March 2001. Graber, who teaches family and emergency medicine at the University of Iowa and uses the software most days at the campus hospital in Iowa City, said: "The beauty of having multiple pictures is you can compare them and say, yeah, this makes sense, let's go from there." The paper is based in New York.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/state/ny-bc-ny--visibleillnesses1211dec11,0,6454997.story?coll=ny-region-apnewyork

Blanck, Schmeling Comment On Disability Case (Capital Times, Dec. 11)
When her daughter Jessica was 5 years old, Helenville, Wis., resident Peggy Schwartz had to fight to get the developmentally disabled girl into a "regular" kindergarten class for just 15 minutes twice a week. When Jessica graduated from high school two years ago, she had not only made friends but found a job working five days a week at two Lake Mills businesses with the help of a state-funded job coach. Now Schwartz says Jefferson County officials are trying to sideline her daughter's chances to work in the real world by cutting back on the job coaching she receives. In a case that could have implications for human service programs statewide, Schwartz is suing Jefferson County, claiming that those limits violate the Americans With Disabilities Act. While the Americans With Disabilities Act has been on the books for more than a decade, there has been few major cases relating to access to employment services, says PETER BLANCK, director of the Law, Health Policy and Disability Center at the University of Iowa and an authority on the disabilities law. Citing recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions, however, Blanck warns that if Jefferson County "is restricting access to supported employment (the general term for job-coaching services) on the basis of disability severity, that could be problematic under the ADA." Blanck's colleague, JAMES SCHMELING, adds that many counties nationwide are grappling with the choice between supported employment and sheltered workshops for people with developmental disabilities. "Many counties provide little or no (supported employment) services rather than equivalent services, so the option might be that they totally eliminate that class of service rather than provide it to everybody," he says. The paper is based in Madison, Wis.
http://www.madison.com/tct/news/stories/index.php?ntid=20929&ntpid=1

Scientist Comments On Global Warming (Seattle Times, Dec. 10)
James E. Hansen, who directs NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, told a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA audience in October that the administration is ignoring evidence of "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate. "Anthropogenic" means human-caused, and his phrasing is significant because the United States pledged in 1992, as part of an agreement called the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, to take all necessary steps to combat such interference. "As the evidence gathers, you would hope they would be flexible," Hansen said of the administration in an interview. "You can't wait another decade" to cut carbon dioxide emissions, he added. The article originally appeared in the WASHINGTON POST.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2002115229_warming10.html

Musician Lived In Iowa City (Boston Herald, Dec. 10)
His voice is what first earned Alastair Moock some attention: an old, gnarled rasp of a voice that seemed a bit bizarre for such a fresh-faced folk singer. Yet his new album, "Let It Go," makes it clear Moock's voice is less remarkable, and less expressive, than his songs. Moock has become simply one of the top songwriters in the region. "Let It Go" is Moock's first album since returning to Boston from a two-year stay in Iowa City, where his wife was enrolled in the famed UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://theedge.bostonherald.com/musicNews/view.bg?articleid=58084

UI Study Links Children's Asthma To Hog Farms (ABCNews.com, Dec. 10)
A University of Iowa study released Thursday said children living on hog farms are more likely to have asthma. The prevalence of asthma is even more dramatic among children living on hog farms where antibiotics are added to feed, said the study's author DR. JAMES A. MERCHANT, dean of the College of Public Health and an environmental health professor. Researchers examined 644 children from birth through 17 years old living in Keokuk County. They considered other risk factors for asthma including premature birth, respiratory infections at a young age, personal history of allergies and family history of allergic disease. The study indicated that 55.8 percent of children living on hog farms where antibiotics are added to feed had at least one health indicator of asthma. That compares to 26.2 percent of children on farms that do not raise hogs. "We believe that some of the increase in asthma risk is related to occupational and bystander exposures in animal feeding operations," Merchant said. The Associated Press story also appeared in NEW YORK NEWSDAY, LOS ANGELES TIMES, NEW YORK TIMES, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, KANSAS CITY STAR, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN-HERALD, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, MIAMI HERALD, SEATTLE POST-INTELLEGENCER, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE and several other media outlets.
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory?id=317383

Iowa Writers' Workshop Noted (Moscow Times, Dec. 10)
Moscow's Literary Institute is the only school in Russia that provides higher vocational training for writers, poets and playwrights. While writing programs such as the masters' course at the University of East Anglia and the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa are common abroad, the Literary Institute remains the only place in Russia where aspiring writers can study.
The institute was founded in 1933 by writer Maxim Gorky, and began by providing evening courses for workers.
http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2004/12/10/101.html

Wald: Fertility Study Just First Stage (Wired News, Dec. 9)
Men who regularly balance their laptop computers on their laps when working may be jeopardizing their ability to have children, according to a new study from fertility researchers at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The potential risk comes from the heat generated by the laptop computer and the close position of one's thighs when balancing the computer on one's lap, the researchers found. This heat is transferred to the scrotum, where the temperature can rise several degrees, putting users within the danger zone for testicular dysfunction. But because the tests did not measure the volunteers' actual sperm production, laptop users may want to wait for further studies before deciding to change their computing habits, cautioned MOSHE WALD, a male infertility specialist in the University of Iowa's urology department who was not affiliated with the study. "They definitely made their point that temperatures are elevated. And since we know that elevated temperatures might affect sperm production, this is something we might want to look into," he said. But, "I am reluctantly going ahead with recommendations about laptop use at this point. This is a first-stage study."
http://www.wired.com/news/medtech/0,1286,65970,00.html?tw=wn_tophead_2

Lollipop Fights Morning Sickness (Detroit News, Dec. 8)
Pregnant women who take 25 milligrams of vitamin B6 every eight hours can significantly reduce morning sickness symptoms, according to research from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. That dosage is available in a new cherry-flavored, nausea-fighting lollipop called B-Natal TheraPop. Since the early 1940s, vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) has been recognized for its abilities to soothe the symptoms of nausea and vomiting that 70 to 85 percent of women experience in the first nine weeks of their pregnancy.
http://www.detnews.com/2004/fitness/0412/09/h03-27042.htm

Ghoneim Comments on Anesthesia Problems (South Bend Tribune, Dec. 8)
Every year an estimated 20,000 to 40,000 of the 21 million patients who receive general anesthesia wake up during surgery because they are underanesthetized, usually by mistake or because doctors fear too high a dose of anesthesia could be dangerous. "Anesthesiologists think they can measure the depth of anesthesia, but there are times when this is not true," said MOHAMED M. GHONEIM, a professor of anesthesiology at the University of Iowa. "It's really difficult to measure, especially in light anesthesia such as cardiac cases or trauma with lots of blood loss."The best way to detect whether a patient is sufficiently anesthetized is by using a specialized EEG machine that monitors brain waves, Ghoneim said. He predicts such monitoring will become the standard of care in a few years. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2004/12/08/living.20041208-sbt-MICH-D1-Terrify.sto

Ghoneim Comments on Anesthesia Monitor (South Bend Tribune, Dec. 8)
The leading device that measures brain waves to detect whether a patient is adequately anesthetized is easy to use, costs about $9,000 and has been shown in early studies to reduce the risk of waking up in surgery. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, however, says there is not enough evidence to prove the monitors provide greater protection for patients. Although BIS (bispectral index) monitors have been installed in the operating rooms of 34 percent of the nation's hospitals -- and 78 percent of teaching hospitals -- they are used in only about 10 percent of operations, according to manufacturer Aspect Medical Systems of Newton, Mass.  Anesthesiologist MOHAMED M. GHONEIM, an expert on anesthesia awareness who is a professor at the University of Iowa, said he uses a BIS monitor in all his cases. In Ghoneim's view, apathy is the reason many anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists do not use the devices. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2004/12/08/living.20041208-sbt-MICH-D2-Agreement_lacking_on.sto

Oregon Attorney Faces Ethics Charges (The Oregonian, Dec. 8)
An ordained Episcopal priest, a former big-time college football standout and a one-time potential congressional candidate, Justus Lloyd "Buck" Humphreys has a resume to match his impressive name. But the Eugene attorney is in the cross hairs of the Oregon State Bar for what he didn't list on his 1997 application to practice law in the state: a federal conviction for tax evasion and his subsequent disbarment in Iowa and Texas. Late last month, the bar authorized the prosecution of Humphreys, 66, for violating various ethical rules. Humphreys graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW. From 1957 to 1960, he played football for Iowa, earning three letters as his teams won or shared three Big Ten championships and two Rose Bowls.
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/110251113198331.xml

UI Student Teacher Seeking Job (The Leaf Chronicle, Dec. 8)
Clarksville-Montgomery County School System in Tennessee is looking for quality teachers to begin teaching Jan. 3. Meanwhile, scores of December graduates are looking for jobs. Jennifer Thorson, a graduating science teacher, said she's looking for a career placement that will offer a supportive administration and a mentoring program. Thorson of Fort Campbell recently wrapped up her student teaching at Northwest High School and had a previous stint at Richview Middle School. Thorson, who will graduate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but completed her student teaching obligation through Austin Peay, believes student teaching in Clarksville will help her transition to a permanent job. The newspaper serves Clarksville, Tenn.
http://www.theleafchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041208/NEWS01/412080306/1002

Health Workers Note 'Teledoc' Success (KVTO-TV, Dec. 7)
Health workers at Van Buren County Hospital in Keosauqua, Iowa say they are seeing great success with their "Teledoc" unit. The system allows patients to visit with medical specialists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA without leaving the county. "We have the benefit of having Iowa City specialists right here all the time," Dixie Daugherty, Director of Outreach Health Services said. The Telemedicine system has been in place at Van Buren County Hospital for about seven years. At first crews used the "Teledoc" unit more for education, but now more patients are using the system. The TV station is based in Kirksville, Mo.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/Global/story.asp?S=2662262&nav=1LFsTwyI

Yin: Balco Chief May Be Uncontrollable Client (San Jose Mercury News, Dec. 7)
With his confession on national television Friday, Victor Conte Jr. seemed to leave his lawyer little to do but enter a guilty plea to charges of distributing steroids. In an interview on the ABC news program ``20/20,'' the president of Balco Laboratories said he watched sprinter Marion Jones inject performance-enhancing drugs, and gave steroids to Greg Anderson, the trainer for Giants left fielder Barry Bonds. Legal experts and lawyers for Conte's fellow defendants in the Balco case were mulling the fallout Monday. Some observers said Conte seemed to be the classic ``uncontrollable' client, doing what he did with no legal strategy in mind. ``Client control is often a problem,'' said TUNG YIN, a professor at the University of Iowa's law school. ``If he's not angling for some plea, it's not a very wise thing he's done.''
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/10357686.htm

Bar Manager Testifies About Fire Stunt (Washington Times, Dec. 7)
An Iowa bar manager told a civil trial he routinely set his bar afire with wood grain alcohol because customers enjoyed it, until nine people were burned. The former manager of Iowa City's Etc. tavern testified he performed the stunt 15 to 20 times before April 18, 2002, when something went terribly wrong and nine people were burned. He was the first witness called in a civil lawsuit filed by Deanine Busche of Schaumburg, Ill. The former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA junior received third-degree burns on her hands and face and has amassed more than $100,000 in medical bills.
http://washingtontimes.com/upi-breaking/20041207-014419-6690r.htm

UI Air Monitoring Study Cited (AgriNews, Dec. 7)
A state air monitoring study has recorded levels of ammonia near factory farms that far exceed health standards set in a controversial study, but environmental officials don't know if anything will be done about the high levels of the toxic gas. The ammonia standard recommended in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University air quality study in 2002 was set at 150 parts per billion. ISU has since withdrawn its endorsement of the study, but it does support the 300 ppb standard set by the U.S. Department of Health's Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. The newspaper is based in Rochester, Minn. http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/363536156208995.bsp

Baldus: Race Difficult to Use in Death Sentence Appeals (Washington Times, Dec. 7)
A Supreme Court ruling in 1987 over a study about the impact of race in death penalty sentences in Georgia found that discrepancies in sentencing "are an inevitable part of our criminal justice system." That has significantly dulled the effect of appeals based on broad, statistical analyses of capital punishment, said University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS, who wrote the Georgia study. Defense attorneys must prove that the decision to seek the death penalty was driven by racial prejudice in a specific prosecutor's office or with a particular prosecutor, he said. Broad studies rarely go that deep. "The court says statistical evidence is irrelevant," he said. "You've got to come up with an admission by a prosecutor or jury that they took race into account. That's impossible to do."
http://washingtontimes.com/metro/20041206-102107-6071r.htm

UI Grants Waiver to Student Group (Arizona Republic, Dec. 7)
An unregistered student group is suing ASU, alleging that its inability to ban homosexuals and non-Christians from the group infringes on the members' religious freedom. The Christian Legal Society, which has seven members, filed a federal lawsuit Nov. 17 demanding recognition as a registered group, which would give it access to organizational and financial support from ASU. This has been denied to the group because of its refusal to sign the non-discrimination pledge. The society argues that First Amendment freedoms of association and free exercise of religion mean it should not have to comply. The society specifically wants to require its members to sign a standard statement of Christian faith, which would exclude homosexuals and non-Christian students from joining the organization, although a spokesman says such students are welcome to attend society meetings. If the society prevails, it is likely that many other religious organizations - most of them Christian but also those representing Judaism, Islam and other religions - would seek similar waivers. The society has filed similar actions at least six other schools. Some of them, including Ohio State and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, have granted exemptions to non-discrimination policies.
http://www.azcentral.com/families/education/articles/1206christianlaw06.html

Kaldjian: Doctors Willing to Lessen Dying Pain (Innovations Report, Dec. 7)
Doctors appear willing to use intensive treatment to lessen otherwise untreatable pain or other severe symptoms in dying patients even if the treatment, at least in theory, risks hastening the dying process, according to two University of Iowa and Yale University studies on end-of-life care. Both studies were led by Dr. LAURIS KALDJIAN, assistant professor of internal medicine in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and member of the college's Program in Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities. Kaldjian was formerly on the faculty at Yale University. "End-of-life care involves many treatment decisions, some of which are focused on extreme pain and other symptoms that are very challenging to control," Kaldjian said. "We studied the specific ethical issues of treatments that control symptoms versus interventions that intend to cause or hasten death." Innovations Report is based in Germany. The same story appeared on the Web site of Medical News Today and Senior Journal.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/studien/bericht-37364.html

Campbell, Moore Study Muscles (Medical News Today, Dec. 7)
Healthy military personnel and muscular dystrophy patients are at opposite ends of the spectrum when is comes to muscle strength and resilience. However, a new University of Iowa study may provide insights that improve muscle health for both these groups. Researchers in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine have been awarded a four-year, $1.97 million grant from the United States Department of Defense to study how muscles resist damage and repair damage that does occur. Improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in muscle resilience and repair could lead to strategies for enhancing muscle recovery following strenuous exercise, or treating muscle deterioration caused by diseases like muscular dystrophy. The study, led by KEVIN CAMPBELL, the Roy J. Carver Chair of Physiology and Biophysics and interim head of the department, professor of neurology, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator, will build on earlier muscular dystrophy studies from Campbell's lab that identified important roles for two proteins in muscle maintenance and repair. STEVEN MOORE, UI professor of pathology, is co-principal investigator on the grant.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=6737

Bowlsby's Influence Noted (Street & Smith's Sports Business Journal, Dec. 6-12)
The University of Iowa and its intercollegiate athletics program found its way onto another Top 20 list this week only this time it wasn't a team that claimed its place among the nation's elite, it was the UI's director of athletics, BOB BOWLSBY. Bowlsby, Iowa's director of athletics since 1991, was tabbed the 12th most influential person in intercollegiate athletics in the December 6-12 edition of Street & Smith's Sports Business Journal. Bowlsby is currently overseeing the single largest undertaking in the history of intercollegiate athletics at the University of Iowa: The multi-million dollar renovation of historic Kinnick Stadium. "Bowlsby has been the head of Iowa's athletic department since 1991 and is considered to be excellent at what he does," the article states. "He has strong values and is never hasty in making decisions. He's also had much influence beyond his program. He was the first chairman of the NCAA Division I management council, dean of Big Ten Ads, and has served as president of the Division I-A athletic directors association. It's not surprising that his name was among those considered for ht top NCAA post after [Cedric] Dempsey announced his retirement." Current NCAA president Myles Brand headed the list. He was followed by Jim Delany, commissioner of the Big Ten Conference, and George Bodenheimer, president of ESPN and ABC Sports.
http://www.sportsbusinessjournal.com/ (paid subscription required)

Wisconsin Businessman Donated to UI (MSNBC.com Dec. 6)
Bulk Petroleum Corp., based in Meqoun, Wisc. has added to its gas station empire by purchasing 188 gas stations and convenience stores from an Indiana company for $31.9 million. Darshan Dhaliwal, president of Bulk Petroleum, is a well-known Milwaukee-area philanthropist. Dhaliwal donated $9 million to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the early 1990s.The article originally appeared in the MILWAUKEE BUSINESS JOURNAL.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6657811/

Non-Discrimination Policy Challenged (Arizona Republic, Dec. 6)
 An unregistered student group is suing Arizona State University, alleging that its inability to ban homosexuals and non-Christians from the group infringes on the members' religious freedom.  The Christian Legal Society, which has seven members, filed a federal lawsuit Nov. 17 demanding recognition as a registered group, which would give it access to organizational and financial support from ASU. This has been denied to the group because of its refusal to sign the non-discrimination pledge. The society has filed similar actions at at least six other schools. Some of them, including Ohio State and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, have granted exemptions to non-discrimination policies.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/1206christianlaw06.html

UI To Review Campus Security (USA Today, Dec. 6)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is reviewing campus security measures in light of recent vandalism at a campus laboratory. A new group has been formed to review how the university can better account for keycards issued. The university temporarily closed Seashore Hall last month after vandals removed animals and spilled chemicals in a psychology lab. The Animal Liberation Front claimed responsibility.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/states/iamain.htm

Conductor Earned Degree at UI (Advocate Messenger, Dec. 5)
The Centre College music program will present a free concert Dec. 6 featuring the Centre College Orchestra with conductor Steven Pederson, who earned his M.A. degree in clarinet performance from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Danville, Ky.
http://www.amnews.com/public_html/?module=displaystory&story_id=10563&format=html

Alaska Writing Teacher Graduated from UI (Anchorage Daliy News, Dec. 5)
Ron Spatz is dean of undergraduate research and scholarship at University of Alaska at Anchorage, director of the University Honors Program and a professor of creative writing and literary arts. He is a writer who doesn't begrudge the time he spends developing and promoting other writers. Spatz, who has a master's degree from the renowned UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, sees Alaska as a land of creative opportunity and enjoys his role in making that opportunity happen. The newspaper is based in Alaska.
http://www.adn.com/life/story/5876462p-5788988c.html

Brokaw Attended UI (St. Paul Pioneer-Press, Dec. 5)
In a column about the retirement of NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw, it's noted that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/news/local/10341033.htm

Scientist Comments on Global Warming (Washington Post, Dec. 5)
James E. Hansen, who directs NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, told a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA audience in October that the administration is ignoring evidence of "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate. "Anthropogenic" means human-caused, and his phrasing is significant because the United States pledged in 1992, as part of an agreement called the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, to take all necessary steps to combat such interference.  "As the evidence gathers, you would hope they would be flexible," Hansen said of the administration in an interview. "You can't wait another decade" to cut carbon dioxide emissions, he added. The article also appeared in the CHARLOTTE (N.C.) NEWS-OBSERVER, MSNBC.COM and HARTFORD (Conn.) COURANT.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A35915-2004Dec4.html

Study Examines Rare Cancer (Deseret News, Dec. 5)
The Huntsman Cancer Institute in Utah is leading a rare surgical study that spans the United States and Canada to determine if less extensive surgery to remove a rare cartilage cancer works as well as traditional, sometimes deforming surgery. Tumor tissue from each surgery in the study will be sent to HCI for molecular study, where researchers hope to find whether molecular signatures can be used to discern actual cancer from its benign counterpart. Other tissue samples will go to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to look at proteins. The newspaper is based in Salt Lake City, Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,595110155,00.html

Video Shows African Pottery Techniques (Newark Star-Ledger, Dec. 5)
Part of "Earthen Elegance: African Ceramic Vessels" at the Newark Museum includes a video taken by University of Iowa professor CHRISTOPHER ROY showing how traditional potters in Ghana and Burkina Faso make their spherical water vessels and storage jars.  It shows the potters working the clay, pressing it down over round molds to make a fairly pure ovoid shape, and finally firing the vessels in piles of brush in the open air, occasionally splashing the fire with water from plastic buckets to keep it from getting too hot. The newspaper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/entertainment/ledger/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/110222735350270.xml

Goldman Comments on Stress Study (Science News, Dec. 4)
A new study puts evidence behind the old adage that stressful experiences can give a person gray hairs. Scientific data now indicate that prolonged psychological stress might cause a person's cells to age, and possibly die, significantly faster than normal. Previous research had shown that protein-DNA complexes called telomeres serve as a cell's timekeeper, telling it how long to live. Elizabeth Blackburn of the University of California, San Francisco, studied the relationship between stress and cell aging, and found a striking connection between stress and telomere length. Blackburn's results "make sense," says FRED GOLDMAN, a pediatric oncologist who studies telomere biology at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "We know that people who are stressed out look haggard. . . . If we have less stress in our lives, we might live longer."
http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20041204/fob1.asp

Duyn, Alumna And First Female Poet Laureate, Dies (USA Today, Dec. 3)
Mona Van Duyn, the nation's first female poet laureate and a Pulitzer Prize winner, died Thursday morning at her home from bone cancer, her husband said. She was 83. A writer of poetry since age five, Van Duyn published nine volumes of poetry and won a Pulitzer for Near Changes in 1991. The following year she became the sixth poet and the first woman named U.S. poet laureate, an eight-month position appointed by the Librarian of Congress since 1986. Van Duyn was born in Waterloo, Iowa. She studied at the University of Northern Iowa and received a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1943. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, HINDUSTAN TIMES in India, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, TUSCALOOSA (Ala.) NEWS, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, WASHINGTON POST, NEW YORK TIMES, BRISBANE COURIER MAIL in Australia, NEWSDAY, MSNBC and many other media outlets.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2004-12-03-van-duyn-obit_x.htm?POE=LIFISVA

UI Student Thesis Compares SUV, Other Drivers (Vancouver Province, Dec. 3)
Drivers of sport utility vehicles who think they're riding in a safer vehicle may be deluding themselves, researchers say. While the larger, heavier, more rigid SUV may appeal to the driver who is looking for better crash protection, the fact that it rides higher on the road could be dangerous. A thesis by a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA psychology doctoral student found that drivers tested at high eye levels drove faster than those riding at a lower level. For example, those seated 183 centimeters from the ground drove about 8 km/h faster than those seated at 122 cm. Other studies have uncovered similar results.
http://www.canada.com/vancouver/theprovince/news/driving/story.html?id=58044256-7ec8-48e1-bc25-407ca880f491

Gurnett Plays Saturn Ring Sounds At Meeting (Science, Dec. 3)
At the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences in Louisville, Ky., space physicist DONALD GURNETT of the University of Iowa, Iowa City, drew applause for "the music of the rings," a plasma-wave signal from Saturn's rings, stepped down to audible frequencies. Gurnett's plasma-wave instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft recorded the signal as it flew over the rings last July. The music resembled the sound of crickets: short, 1- to 2-second tones every second or so, each with a narrow frequency range. Gurnett decided that marble-size, 200,000-kilometer-per-hour ring impacters were producing the tones. Ring specialists will want to use his recorded impact tempo in their studies of how impacts age and erode the rings.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/306/5702/1677b

Andreasen Comments On Interdisciplinary Effort (Chronicle, Dec. 3)
To foster interdisciplinary research, academic institutions and researchers must change both policies and ideologies, according to a report released in November by the National Academy of Sciences. Interdisciplinary research is well known for projects such as determining the structure of DNA, mapping the human genome and analyzing global climate change. Despite those accomplishments, the report says, interdisciplinary researchers face barriers and disincentives to their proposals. NANCY C. ANDREASEN, one of the committee's chairs, said interdisciplinary projects may not be as efficient to run as single-discipline studies. But institutions should exercise patience, she said, and they will see rewards. "There is more risk in cutting-edge interdisciplinary research," said Andreasen, who is chair of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "That sometimes causes the project to bleed and make mistakes. It will be necessary to regroup and regularly evolve and redesign the scope of the work."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i15/15a02502.htm

Ishigami Study Predicts Patient Complications (Medical News.net, Dec. 2)
University of Iowa researchers have found that using MR angiography before a liver transplant can help identify which patients will suffer complications. The study found that if the liver artery anatomy is unusual, there is an increased risk of complications after the transplant procedure, said KOUSEI ISHIGAMI, lead author of the paper. The study analyzed 84 patients who underwent the imaging prior to liver transplantation. Of the sixty patients who had normal artery anatomy, only two had complications after surgery, whereas five of the 24 with variant anatomy experienced complications after surgery.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=6600

Brokaw Partied Hearty at UI (Ventura County Star, Dec. 2)
A profile of retiring NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw says that he focused more on parties than studies when he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and was fired from a couple of radio stations.
http://www.venturacountystar.com/vcs/county_news/article/0,1375,VCS_226_3368974,00.html

A similar story about Tom Brokaw's retirement was published on the Web sites of WSRW Radio (Ohio), WTEV-TV (Florida), WXXA-TV (New York), WORK-TV (New York), WBEX Radio (Ohio), KTOK TV (Oklahoma), and numerous other news organizations: http://wsrw.com/script/headline_newsmanager.php?id=369065&pagecontent=entertainment&feed_id=44

Alumnus Hits 100 (Durham Herald Sun, Dec. 2)
A profile of Travis Shankle, who turned 100 on October 4. Shankle graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Pharmacy in 1926. The Herald Sun is based in North Carolina.
http://www.herald-sun.com/durham/4-550495.html

Keel Describes Eating Disorder (Wilmington Star News, Dec. 1)
Thousands of women with eating disorders fall into a category that doctors have been relying on for years, a vague nondiagnosis known by the acronym Ednos: eating disorder not otherwise specified. The history of eating disorders has been a gradual one as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual has been revised through the years. A candidate for a new eating disorder in the fifth edition of the manual can be thought of as the flip side of binge eating, a condition that has been labeled "purging disorder" by DR. PAMELA KEEL, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Iowa. Just as binge eating disorder has many of the characteristics of bulimia, so does purging disorder. But neither meets the strict criteria for bulimia nervosa. People with purging disorder, Dr. Keel said, are of normal weight, and they purge after eating normal or even small amounts of food. The newspaper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.wilmingtonstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041201/ZNYT04/412010372/1002/BUSINESS

Alumna To Perform (Nashua Telegraph, Dec. 1)
Abbey Hallberg-Siegfried will present a concert of Baroque music for the Christmas season on Dec. 9 in at the University of New Hampshire. She is the director of Music at St. John's Episcopal Church in Portsmouth, N.H. and organ instructor at Phillips Exeter Academy. She is a doctoral candidate at the University of Washington in Seattle and holds degrees in organ and German from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in New Hampshire.
http://www.nh.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041201/EVENTS01/41201004/-1/EVENTS

Brokaw To Retire (Lansing State Journal, Dec. 1)
NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw is retiring after 22 years. Brokaw attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but left. "I didn't flunk out, but I didn't do very well, because I spent most of my time on the party circuit," Brokaw said. The newspaper is based in Michigan.
http://www.lsj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041201/THINGS0206/412010324/1055/news

Fuortes Comments On Beryllium Tests (Bradenton Herald, Dec. 1)
The nation's leading manufacturer of beryllium sought to derail a Florida county's proposed screening program to help former workers of the now-defunct American Beryllium Co. and their family members learn if they may have been sickened by their exposure to the toxic dust from the plant. Marc Kolanz, vice president of environmental health and safety for Brush Wellman Engineered Materials, warned that the proposed screening program could "heighten uncertainty and anxiety, as well as depress property values, to no one's benefit." Kolanz's statements are from an industry perspective, cautioned Dr. LAURENCE FUORTES, professor of Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of Iowa College of Public Health. "All of Kolanz's statements of limitations have some validity," Fuortes told the Herald. "But they also hold true for other diagnostic medical tools. You could take out the name BeLPT test and insert mammography or HIV or colorectal screening and the same statements would hold true." Fuortes said he hopes Branic and the health department can operate independently from Kolanz's viewpoint. "If mammography or HIV screening is acceptable to medical community in non-occupational settings, why then is a different standard applied to medical screening tools in an occupational setting," said Fuortes, who lauded the county program as a stellar example of an appropriate public health response. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/news/local/10308556.htm

Alumnus Promoted (Daytona News-Journal, Dec. 1)
Colonial Bank has hired Todd Mellenberndt as vice president in one of its area offices. Mellenberndt earned a bachelor's degree in business and finance, attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Kansas. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/Business/Headlines/03BusinessBIZ09120104.htm

Couple Killed In Accident (Shreveport Times, Dec. 1)
David and Sandi Rasanen died Nov. 19 in an accident on U.S. Highway 71 near Shreveport, La. Friends and relatives say the Rasanens, tireless in their service to their church, community and careers, had already accomplished much. More than 250 people attended a memorial service Nov. 23 at LSU Medical Center, where David was in his second year as an orthopedic surgery resident. David received the Hancher Finkbine Medallion Award for community service at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, which he attended while Sandi taught first grade at Heritage Christian School. The couple met in Waterloo, Iowa. The newspaper is based in Louisiana.
http://www.shreveporttimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041201/NEWS01/412010336/1002/NEWS

Colangelo Comments On Accelerated Education (Buffalo News, Nov. 30)
Rafael Davtian, 16, is studying for his doctorate at the University at Buffalo. He has, in effect, skipped eight grades of school. Most accelerated students skip just a year or two of school, and Rafael's academic career is highly unusual but not unique, said NICHOLAS COLANGELO, director of the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education at the University of Iowa. Colangelo, an advocate of acceleration for gifted students, said even dramatic advancement can work with the support and planning of parents and schools. "The bottom line is, kids develop at different rates, and some very much so," he said. "The question you have to ask is: What would it have been like for this young man if he stayed with his age group?" The newspaper serves Buffalo, N.Y.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20041130/1028399.asp

Iowa's Playboy Readership Noted (Fox News, Nov. 30)
According to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA newspaper, "The Daily Iowan," residents of the Hawkeye state are the country's biggest fans of "Playboy" magazine; 18.6 of every 1,000 Iowans read the men's magazine, more than any other state. A student explains the magazine's popularity by saying, "I think Iowans are politically active, and it meets our intellectual needs." The article was noted on the Hannity and Co. program.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=455987cc9fc70729948ac13221ee1d27&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkVb&_md5=b200790f87b8866d231b5c7d8ba740fb

Singh Studies Bacteria in Biofilms (Science News, Nov. 20)
Researchers have long known that diversification strengthens large groups, and new finding suggest that the same idea applies to bacterial communities and may explain why some infections are notoriously difficult to treat. While studying biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients, PRADEEP SINGH and his colleagues at the University of Iowa noticed a strange phenomenon. When they used a small number of identical bacteria to start a biofilm culture, the microbes quicky diversified into several types that looked and behaved differently. Singh suggests that once researchers are convinced that a biofilm's survival hinges on diversity, they may develop new ideas for fighting chronic infections.

 

 

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