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UI in the News

August, 2004

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Redlawsk: 2008 Candidates Should Connect Now (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 31)
To get their foot in the door in Iowa and other leadoff states early, 2008 Republican presidential hopefuls are already meeting with national convention delegates. One possible candidate, Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., addressed the Iowa Republican delegation at breakfast on Monday. He was to speak with the New Hampshire delegation Monday evening. DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political science professor, said potential presidential candidates realize they've got to connect early "particularly when it comes to Iowa and New Hampshire." Redlawsk said Republicans can lay groundwork now without hurting any feelings because President Bush will have served his second term if he wins this election. Most observers assume Vice President Dick Cheney won't run for president in 2008, he said. This same story appeared on the web sites of the GUARDIAN (UK), NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, LOS ANGELES TIMES, NEWSDAY, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, MIAMI HERALD, BALTIMORE SUN and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/sns-ap-cvn-presidential-tryouts,1,6381747.story?coll=chi-news-hed

Fleiss: Film Showing Virus Attack Is Creepy (Winston Salem Journal, Aug. 31)
Using a creature as hideous as any sci-fi monster, scientists have produced a one-minute horror movie starring a menacing, spidery virus swooping in on a hapless blob of bacteria. The computer-generated short arose from research that could help scientists find new ways to combat viruses that cause everything from AIDS to the common cold. With help from computer animation, the movie shows the virus latching onto an E. coli bacterium and giving it an injection of DNA that turns it into a virus factory. "It's the most detailed picture yet of how any virus attaches to a cell and what happens immediately after that to get the virus' chromosomes in," said MICHAEL FEISS, a professor of microbiology at the University of Iowa. Feiss said that his normally restrained microbiologist colleagues burst into applause when the film was shown at two recent scientific gatherings. He called the movie "creepy." This same story appeared on the web sites of the ATLANTA (Ga.) JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, the South African INDEPENDENT, NORTH COUNTY (Calif.) TIMES, MSNBC, MIAMI HERALD, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031777633829&path=!nationworld&s=1037645509161

Lewis-Beck Explains Poll, Market Discrepancy (Bloomberg, Aug. 31)
While public opinion polls show the presidential election is too close to call, most electronic markets, such as the Iowa Electronic Market, predict a Bush victory. MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, says the discrepancy between polls and economic forecasts might arise because forecasts don't measure how people feel about the economy. "If you look at economic growth, 3 percent or so, that's not telling you about the increasing job insecurity people have, either because they're unemployed or underemployed," says Lewis-Beck.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=a1OhVbkS8pp4&refer=us

Nelson Comments On Failed Terrorist Market (FCW.com, Aug. 31)
Betting on terrorism is bad public relations, but is it an important tool in shaping anti-terrorism policy? Some experts say that a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency futures trading market similar to the system that works for orange juice or petroleum markets could have gone a long way toward identifying likely future terrorist activities -- if it had not abruptly gone down in flames last summer. If experts believe futures trading is viable in the anti-terrorism context and the technology to build the market is readily accessible, why did the Policy Analysis Market come to such an abrupt end? One reason was its openness to traders outside the intelligence community, said FORREST NELSON, professor of economics at the University of Iowa and a founder of the Iowa Electronic Markets. Nelson worked on the Policy Analysis Market as part of a small firm university officials created for that purpose. "We wanted to set up a market on terrorist attacks, but we wanted it done within the confines of the security agencies," Nelson said. "We wanted traders from the CIA, FBI and maybe Israeli intelligence -- a relatively small number of traders with private information. The only people who knew about it would be people who observed or traded in this market."
http://www.fcw.com/supplements/homeland/2004/sup3/hom-futures-08-30-04.asp

Knudson Helps Study Determining Brain Development (Science Now, Aug. 30)
Sex hormones influence brain development, establishing differences between male and female brains. The hormones may do this by telling neurons in certain brain regions whether to kill themselves, according to a new study that finds that male and female brains are much more similar than usual in mice missing a cell-suicide gene. The study is a "very elegant confirmation of what several of us have hypothesized" about how apoptosis might regulate brain structure based on sex," says Roger Gorski, who studies sex differences in the rat brain at the University of California, Los Angeles. The next step, says C. MICHAEL KNUDSON of the University of Iowa, whose group created the Bax knockout mice used in the research, will be to study the behavior of these mice. "It would be very interesting to me if these neuronal changes do somehow tie into altered sexual behaviors," Knudson says.
http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2004/830/2

Weinstock's Parasite Study Cited (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 30)
By introducing parasites into patients, scientists now think they can help treat a variety of autoimmune disorders -- including allergies, asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, diabetes and some intestinal diseases. Scientists have had success using worm eggs to treat inflammatory bowel disease, a painful, sometimes fatal, disorder of the digestive tract. "We saw significant benefit," says University of Iowa gastroenterologist JOEL WEINSTOCK, who led the studies. He gave about 120 patients several doses of 2,500 eggs from a worm called Trichuris suis, which normally infects pigs. The parasites live for only a few weeks in humans, and seem to cause no symptoms or damage. Half of Weinstock's subjects were so happy with the results that they maintained the worm regimen even after the studies ended.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/health/bal-te.ms.worm30aug30,1,1431567.story?coll=bal-home-headlines

UI Students Perform In Haiti Aid Concert (Peoria Journal Star, Aug. 30)
Dr. John Jost traveled to Haiti while in college to study music and became interested in Ecole Sainte Trinite, a school that provided music instruction to underprivileged children. On Sunday, members of the Friends of Haiti Orchestra received a standing ovation after their performance at Bradley University's Dingeldine Music Center. Jost, the conductor and director of choral activities at Bradley, organized the event to raise money for organizations with ongoing work in Haiti. Jost returned to Leogane, a village 30 miles from the Haitian capital of Porte-Au-Prince, in 1972 and began teaching at Ecole Sainte Trinite and working with their orchestra. Several former students of Ecole Saint Trinite summer camps were performers in the Friends of Haiti Orchestra. Regine Montes, concertmaster, her husband, Fritz-Gerald Barreau, and two brothers, Jean Montes and Guy Montes, were all born in Haiti. Regine Montes and Fritz-Gerald Barreau are both students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.pjstar.com/news/topnews/b411l9fp032.html

IEM's 'Superior Performance' Cited (U.S. News & World Report, Aug. 30)
Some of the most well-known and accurate prediction markets are the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's business school, where traders speculate about a variety of political and financial forecasts. With IEM's Presidential Vote Share Market, for instance, political junkies can invest as much as $500 in futures contracts based on what percentage of the popular vote President Bush and Sen. John Kerry will each get on Election Day. Currently, each $1 contract is going for around 50 cents, which means the market is predicting a dead-even contest. The superior performance of the Iowa market reflects one reason why these predictive exchanges work better than simple opinion polls.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/040830/biztech/30forecast.htm

Poet Justice Remembered (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Aug. 29)
A story about news in the world of poetry this past summer mentions the death this month of poet Donald Justice, who devoted much of his time to teaching the writing of poetry at several colleges, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Syracuse University and the University of Florida in his home state. "Don was a legendary teacher," said Lynn Emanuel, poet and writing professor at Pitt who was Justice's student at Iowa. "Dating back to the 1950s, it would be hard to meet a poet who hadn't studied with Don."
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04242/368904.stm

Jones Fixes Glitches In Florida Voting Machines (Washington Post, Aug. 29)
Florida, which held up the results of the 2000 presidential election by more than a month, holds a primary this week that many regard as a test of the state's readiness to avoid another fiasco in November. The Aug. 31 primary election will pick candidates for President Bush's Republicans and the Democrats for federal, local, judicial, state and federal posts, including the hotly contested seat of retiring Democratic Sen. Bob Graham, which could determine the balance of power in the U.S. Senate. But activists and analysts say most poll watchers will be focused on whether Florida can get it right this time, and carry out a ballot in which every vote counts. DOUGLAS JONES, who teaches computer science at the University of Iowa, was called in by Miami-Dade to fix some glitches in its computers. Although he remains opposed to the technology until it is accompanied by an auditable paper trail, Jones believes the machines will now do the job. "On the other hand, the whole world is looking at Miami, so they may find problems. That means that even if it's the best election they ever run, we might not know it," he said. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of LYCOS NEWS; YAHOO! NEWS; WABE PUBLIC RADIO in Atlanta, Ga.; WBUR RADIO in Boston, Mass.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A43754-2004Aug29.html

Conroy Reflects On Career As Workshop Director (New York Times, Aug. 29)
FRANK CONROY
is never far from his former students -- hundreds remain close by, filling the books that line the oak shelves of his office and lie stacked atop his cluttered desk. Each is the work of a writer who spent two years under his tutelage at the famed Iowa Writers' Workshop, tucked into a renovated Victorian home in a leafy corner of the sprawling University of Iowa campus. "This is one of the joys of my job," said Conroy, grinning as he gripped new hardback novels by recent graduates in each hand. "I get to sit in here, sit back and read their books. This is what it's all about. I don't know what could be more satisfying or enjoyable," he said. Except maybe a little more free time to teach, write and play jazz piano. Conroy, 68, has announced he is stepping down after 18 years as director of the workshop, ending an era for the nation's oldest and most prestigious creative writing program. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS, the PHILADELPHIA (Pa.) INQUIRER, the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON-JOURNAL, the WILKES-BARRE (Pa.) TIMES LEADER, the DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, the WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, the LEXINGTON (Ky.) HERALD-LEADER, the ATLANTA (Ga.) JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, the TALLAHASSEE (Fla.) DEMOCRAT, NEWSDAY, the WASHINGTON POST, and many other media outlets.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Iowa-Workshop-Director.html

Squire Comments On Leach And Iraq War (Detroit News, Aug. 28)
Many GOP House of Representative candidates -- while continuing to support the president -- are developing subtler, more nuanced and less confrontational ways to approach the issue of the Iraq war. A handful are distancing themselves from the administration or suggesting mistakes have been made. Rep. James A. Leach of Iowa, one of only six House Republicans who voted against the 2002 resolution approving military action against Iraq, is pushing for an end-of-the-year deadline for removing U.S. troops. "Such rhetoric neutralizes his Democratic challenger's ability to attack on the issue," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. But Leach "chooses his words carefully," Squire added, "never directly challenging the president or the administration's claims, so he never leaves his flanks open to serious attacks from more conservative Republicans in the district."
http://www.detnews.com/2004/politics/0408/29/politics-256545.htm

Bibas Comments On Helder Case (Casper Star-Tribune, Aug. 28)
A federal judge in Minnesota will determine next month if a former college student accused in a Midwest mailbox bombing spree should be committed indefinitely to a mental hospital. In April, Lucas Helder, 22, was declared incompetent to stand trial on charges that he planted pipe bombs and anti-government notes in rural mailboxes in Colorado, Iowa and three other states in May 2002. Since that decision, Helder has undergone additional testing at the Federal Medical Center in Rochester, Minn., to determine whether he poses a risk to himself or society. A commitment hearing is set for Sept. 1, according to a spokeswoman with the U.S. attorney's office in Minneapolis. Under federal law, he could be held indefinitely with periodic reviews by a judge. "In a case like this, the judge is going to be very reluctant to just lightly let him go," said STEPHANOS BIBAS, a law professor at the University of Iowa and former federal prosecutor. "Unless there is some evidence to suggest that his mental health status has changed, they can keep rolling over the commitment and schedule periodic reviews," Bibas said. The paper is based in Wyoming.
http://www.casperstartribune.net/articles/2004/08/28/news/regional/ea5c2c9a827842e187256efb0080eba4.txt

IEM Predicting Bush Win (CNBC, Aug. 27)
Anchor Ron Insana, on "Louis Rukeyser's Wall Street," noted the Iowa Electronic Markets in a report about the impact of the elections on the stock market: "In the marketplace of political ideas, as of this moment, speculators who bet on the presidential election at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S electronic futures market are predicting a Bush win. Other, more popular polls are beginning to swing that way as well. Now the markets have a good sense of politics as well as economics, so if the market were to improve noticeably in coming weeks, maybe even turn positive for the year, the incumbent would get a badly needed vote of confidence for Wall Street. It's been hard for an incumbent to win historically when Wall Street has been betting against him."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=328901470bb6d38fd2f1488d5fafa19d&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVb&_md5=8bcfe4701c588afd07a3b5814bfd2809

Frost Comments On E-Books (CNET.com, Aug. 27)
After more than a decade of false starts and empty promises, publishers may finally be starting to understand what consumers want from electronic books. Electronic books will continue to be greeted with slow growth of acceptance. Current book reading habits are the result of centuries of accumulation, notes GARY FROST, conservator of the libraries art the University of Iowa. Reading text on a screen and in search-equipped formats represents a profound behavioral shift, equivalent to the transition millennia ago from scrolls to multi-page codexes, Frost said. Even digital enthusiasts will need time to adjust, he said. "Think of how long it took the manuscript book to develop and transform itself into a print book," he said. "Here we are a decade into real online reading, and we expect to have the skill all developed. It takes generation of time to make a shift like that." The article also appeared on ZDnet.com and the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://news.com.com/Have+e-books+turned+a+page%3F/2100-1025_3-5326015.html

Hypnosis Used To Relieve Chronic Pain (News 8, Aug. 27)
An anesthesiologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics is taking a somewhat unusual approach to help his patients who struggle to find relief from their chronic pain. He uses hypnosis. DR. SEBASTIAN SCHULZ-STUBNER said the treatment is not often used by medical doctors because few formal studies have been done on its benefits and therefore few physicians are trained in using it for pain relief. While no one knows for sure how hypnosis helps with pain relief, "We know that hypnosis shifts attention and the way certain impulses are perceived by the brain," he said.  News 8 serves Austin, Texas.
http://www.news8austin.com/content/headlines/?ArID=117825&SecID=2

Cram Studies Weekend Hospital Stays (Chicago Sun-Times, Aug. 27)
A recent study about mortality rates for hospital patients admitted on weekends, led by DR. PETER CRAM of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, was published in the American Journal of Medicine. Cram found the weekend effect was most pronounced in major teaching hospitals, where mortality was 13 percent higher among weekend admissions. He and colleagues who worked with him on the study said this most likely results from factors such as lower weekend levels of staffing and patient supervision. The result of that, they said, is reduced availability of certain procedures and less continuity of care.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/health/cst-ftr-health27.html

Squire Comments On Leach And Iraq War (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 27)
Many GOP House of Representative candidates -- while continuing to support the president -- are developing subtler, more nuanced and less confrontational ways to approach the issue of the Iraq war. A handful are distancing themselves from the administration or suggesting mistakes have been made. Rep. James A. Leach of Iowa, one of only six House Republicans who voted against the 2002 resolution approving military action against Iraq, is pushing for an end-of-the-year deadline for removing U.S. troops. "Such rhetoric neutralizes his Democratic challenger's ability to attack on the issue," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. But Leach "chooses his words carefully," Squire added, "never directly challenging the president or the administration's claims, so he never leaves his flanks open to serious attacks from more conservative Republicans in the district." The article also appeared in the CHICAGO TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-gopcong27aug27,1,7049461.story

Hy-Vee Sponsors Cy-Hawk Series (USA Today, Aug. 27)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University announced plans to spice up their sports rivalry. It's a four-year deal with grocery store chain Hy-Vee to sponsor the Cy-Hawk Series. The Cyclones and Hawkeyes will earn points for wins in nine matchups and academics. The schools want to bring more sports into the rivalry and increase attendance at events other than football and basketball.
http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/news/20040827/a_states27.art.htm

Subsidized Housing Rules Change (WQAD-TV, Aug. 26)
Rules introduced by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will bar well-off college students from some of the most in-demand subsidized housing for the poor. Senator Chuck Grassley says the new details have been designed to prevent further abuses of the rules and ensure that assisted housing is available for those who are truly in need. The rule changes announced yesterday (Wednesday) follow reports that hundreds of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students and scholarship athletes had been accepted to live in Iowa City's only government "project" for poor families. The changes would bar students who are already declared as dependents on their parents' income taxes from being eligible. They also require that students live away from home for one year before applying or meet the Department of Education's definition of an independent student. The Associated Press story appeared on the website of WQAD, based Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2222296

IEM Predicts Presidential Outcomes (National Public Radio, Aug. 26)
The folks at the University of Iowa's business school think they know how to predict the outcome of the presidential election. First, they say, you need to stop thinking of President Bush and John Kerry as candidates and start thinking of them as pork bellies or frozen orange juice -- commodities to be bought and sold. That's exactly what they do at the Iowa Electronic Markets. Traders buy and sell Kerry and Bush contracts, in effect betting on who's going to win in November. The market uses real money, up to $500 per trader. "Presumably, each trader that comes onto our markets hopefully think they know something about what the outcome of the election is likely to be or else they wouldn't be trading," said ROBERT FORSYTHE, co-founder of the Iowa Electronic Markets. Traders put aside who they would like to win in November and focus instead on who they think is going to win. "We can only credit it to the profit motive, that by trying to make a few dollars here, they are able to come up with a pretty good forecast," Forsythe said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=203efe21d6e17a501888955f958c955e&_docnum=18&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVA&_md5=29f821d853cb47dd881edbf8f9d14c37 (transcript)
http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=3872604 (audio)

Teaching Assistant's Conviction Upheld (WQAD-TV, Aug. 26)
The Iowa Court of Appeals has upheld the third-degree sexual abuse conviction of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA teaching assistant. In today's ruling, the court rejected Frederick Williams' claims that he received ineffective counsel during his trial. Williams, who was also convicted of indecent exposure, was sentenced up to 10 years in prison. Williams was charged in 2002. He was a teaching assistant in Iowa's biological sciences department at the time. The Associated Press story appeared on the website of WQAD, based Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2225036

UI Pharmacy Grads Merge Businesses (Monmouth Daily Review-Atlas, Aug. 26)
After more than 40 years of friendly competition, Monmouth pharmacists Jim Vugteveen and Bill Axline have decided to join forces in serving the health care needs of area residents. The graduates of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and will merge their pharmacies Sept. 1. The newspaper serves Monmouth, Ill.
http://www.reviewatlas.com/articles/2004/08/26/news/local/news1.txt

UI Pushes Energy Savings Plan (WQAD-TV, Aug. 26)
The University of Iowa has a message to students and faculty this year -- when not in use, turn off the juice. The message is part of the school's plan to save energy and cut $250,000 dollars from its utilities budget. The university is putting up signs across campus reminding people to turn off the lights and equipment, including coffee makers, computer monitors and printers. University President DAVID SKORTON cut the school's general fund budget by $2 million this year. It's part of an overall effort to cut $12 million in the next two or three years. The Associated Press story appeared on the website of WQAD, based Moline, Ill. http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2222969

Artist Studied At UI (Mountain View Telegraph, Aug. 26)
A new art show titled "The Real West," featuring the work of local artists Joe J. Brazil and William Riley, will open Saturday at The Art Center of Mountainair in New Mexico. Riley studied art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in New Mexico.
http://www.mountainviewtelegraph.com/213789mtnview08-26-04.htm

Man Arrested In Boating Death  (WQAD-TV, Aug. 26)
An Iowa City man has been arrested in the death of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student at Coralville Lake last month. Twenty-seven-year-old Todd Laabs is charged with drunken boating. His friend, 27-year-old Aaron Hill, fell off the boat and died of head and neck injuries after he was run over. The Associated Press story appeared on the website of WQAD, based Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2222735

Bibas: Mental Commitment Likely For Bomber (Chicago Sun-Times, Aug. 26)
A federal judge in Minnesota will determine next month if a former college student accused in a mailbox bombing spree covering five states, including Illinois, should be committed indefinitely to a mental hospital. In April, Lucas Helder, 22, was declared incompetent to stand trial on charges that he planted pipe bombs and anti-government notes in rural mailboxes in Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado and Texas in May 2002. A commitment hearing is set for Sept. 1, according to a spokeswoman with the U.S. attorney's office in Minneapolis. Under federal law, he could be held indefinitely with periodic reviews by a judge. "In a case like this, the judge is going to be very reluctant to just lightly let him go," said STEPHANOS BIBAS, a law professor at the University of Iowa and former federal prosecutor. "Unless there is some evidence to suggest that his mental health status has changed, they can keep rolling over the commitment and schedule periodic reviews." Versions of this Associated Press article appeared Aug. 26 in the CASPER (Wyo.) STAR TRIBUNE, the PIONEER PRESS in St. Paul, Minn., the DENVERCHANNEL.com, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, and FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-mailbox26.html

UI Awards 'Participation Credit' To Athletes (Washington Post, Aug. 26)
Some universities allow student-athletes to earn academic credit for playing sports. A Washington Post survey of physical education courses taught at the 117 schools that field Division I-A football teams found that nearly three dozen universities award academic credit for participation on intercollegiate sports teams. Eleven football teams in the Associated Press preseason top 25 poll have players earning academic credit for practicing. At some schools the participation courses can't be used toward degree requirements, but at all schools, they are counted in fulfilling the NCAA's eligibility rule of six hours of academic credit each semester. Most athletic conferences require athletes to earn additional credit hours; the Big Ten Conference, for example, requires athletes to complete 12 credit hours per semester. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Nebraska, among other schools, allow student-athletes to apply the credits from participation courses toward their degrees. University of Iowa records show 43 Hawkeye football players were enrolled in its football class last fall, and 32 are enrolled this semester. The course instructor is Bill Dervich, the Hawkeyes' director of football operations and a former strength and conditioning coach. Iowa officials said 189 student-athletes were enrolled in classes for all sports last fall semester, and 186 received "satisfactory" marks. During spring semester this year, all 83 students enrolled in the sports classes received passing grades. Iowa allows its student-athletes to repeat the participation courses once. A version of this article also appeared Aug. 26 on MSNBC.com.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A33987-2004Aug25.html

Alumnus Named Executive Editor (St. Petersburg Times, Aug. 26)
Neil Brown was named executive editor of the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times Wednesday after serving the past nine years as managing editor and a vice president. Brown joined the Times in 1993 as world editor, overseeing coverage of Washington and national politics, as well as foreign coverage. Before that he spent five years in Washington, D.C., at Times affiliate Congressional Quarterly, including nearly four years as CQ's managing editor. He also worked for eight years as a reporter and editor at the Miami Herald. Brown has served as president of the Florida Society of Newspaper Editors, a professional association of newspaper journalists. Originally from Chicago, Brown graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, majoring in journalism and political science. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.sptimes.com/2004/08/26/Business/Times_names_new_publi.shtml

McLeod Comments On State Fair Appeal (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Aug. 26)
The happy hordes heading for the Pronto Pup stands as the Minnesota State Fair opens today might not realize they're part of a broader movement -- a national groundswell of support for state fairs. Call it the State Fair Renaissance. The past few years could be considered the Dark Ages for many state fairs. Although Minnesota weathered the crisis, it's been among the exceptions. Elsewhere, dwindling state funds and declining attendance driven by their unhip image and downtrodden facilities have left many state fairs mired in debt or struggling to open each year. In today's world, people are increasingly bowing out of public life and places, said KEMBREW MCLEOD, a University of Iowa communications studies professor and pop-culture expert. State fairs, no matter where they're held, have taken on new importance in defining communities and a sense of place. "Essentially, it's an extension of the public square, and the public doesn't want to let it go," McLeod said.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/4948422.html

Alumna Named Recreation Director (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Aug. 26)
Meagan Kula, the new recreation director for the town of Sussex, has a bachelor's degree in health promotion from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/wauk/aug04/253911.asp

Author Verghese Attended UI (Mansfield News Journal, Aug. 26)
An item about Abraham Verghese, a physician and author, won critical acclaim for his first book, "My Own Country," a memoir about treating AIDS patients in rural Tennessee, notes that he worked at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA outpatient AIDS clinic. While there, he enrolled in the university's noted WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.mansfieldnewsjournal.com/news/stories/20040826/localnews/1117835.html

Lewis-Beck Forecasts Bush Winning 51 Percent (Business Times, Aug. 25)
Despite an embarrassing failure in their forecasting four years ago, political scientists and economists are again predicting the outcome of the presidential election, and most foresee a win for President George W Bush. MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK at the University of Iowa, is predicting that Mr. Bush will win 51 per cent of the vote. After predicting an easy victory for Mr. Gore in 2000, Mr. Lewis-Beck has changed his model to take account of job growth over the presidential term. Under Mr. Bush, there has been a 1.1 million net job loss. The newspaper is based in Malaysia.
http://business-times.asia1.com.sg/story/0,4567,126529,00.html

UI Tiny Baby Registry Cited (The Hindu, Aug. 25)
The smallest-ever pre-term infant known in medical history -- all of 280 grams weight and a length of 25 centimeters -- has survived past infancy and turned 15 years old. Madeline Mann was born pre-term as her mother suffered from a pregnancy disorder called preeclampsia, which starved her of essential nutrients. What is indeed remarkable is that Mann born at a gestational age of nearly 27 weeks (26 weeks and six days to be precise) has none of the physical or neurological problems that often afflict such pre-term children as they grow up. Doctors say gestational age, more than weight at birth, is a very critical factor deciding the chances of survival. One more factor, which turned in Mann's favour was her sex. Fifty-two newborns with an average gestational age of 25 weeks and six days with a birth weight of less than 400 grams have been described in the literature. And the number of girls is an astonishing 83 per cent. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Registry for the tiniest babies shows an overwhelming number of infants being females. The newspaper is based in India.
http://www.hindu.com/seta/2004/08/26/stories/2004082600411400.htm

Author Mukherjee Attended Writers' Workshop (San Jose Mercury News, Aug. 25)
A profile of novelist Bharati Mukherjee says she met and fell in love with her future husband Clark Blaise in the early 1960s when both were students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, even though her father already had arranged a bridegroom for her. After a two-week courtship, Mukherjee and Blaise were married in a five-minute ceremony at a lawyer's office in Iowa City.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/entertainment/9489566.htm

UI Alumna Named Curator At Ulrich Museum Of Art (Wichita Eagle, Aug. 25)
Katie Geha has been named curator of modern and contemporary art at the Ulrich Museum of Art at Wichita State University. She will work to enhance the museum's art collection and help organize art exhibitions. She begins her duties Sept. 7. Geha, 25, comes to the Ulrich from Chicago, where she earned a master's degree in art history, theory and criticism at the Art Institute of Chicago. She was also a teaching assistant there. She earned her bachelor of arts degree in art history and English at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Kansas.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/news/local/9484868.htm

Professors Study Search Engine Satisfaction (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 24)
Americans were more satisfied with search engines, portals and news sites in the second quarter than they were a year earlier, according to research conducted by the University of Michigan. Search engines led the pack in customer satisfaction, with Google Inc. scoring 82 out of 100 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index, a national economic indicator of customer evaluations of the quality of products and services, which is updated quarterly. The difference of just a few points matters. By examining 10 years of ACSI data, University of Iowa professors THOMAS GRUCA and LOPO REGO found that a one-point increase in a firm's customer-satisfaction score resulted in an increase of more than seven percent in a firm's future net cash flow from operations -- an average of $40 million for companies studied -- and a four percent decrease in variability. They published their findings last year in MSI Reports, a publication of Marketing Science Institute, a not-for-profit organization of marketing organizations.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109336243616799680-search,00.html?collection=autowire%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

UI Alumna Named Associate Curator (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Aug. 24)
Sarah Kirk will take over as associate curator of prints, drawings and photographs at the Milwaukee Art Museum with the departure of Britt Salvesen on Oct. 7. Kirk holds a bachelor of fine arts degree in printmaking and art history from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and a master of arts degree in museum education from the University of the Arts, an affiliate of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
http://www.jsonline.com/onwisconsin/music/aug04/253518.asp

Conroy Stepping Down As Writers' Workshop Head (CNN, Aug. 24)
FRANK CONROY, the longtime head of the celebrated Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa, will step down at the end of the year. Conroy, who has run the program since 1987, underwent surgery for colon cancer last year. "I'm doing fine, but I've been in this job for almost 20 years, and it's time for new blood," said Conroy, 68. This story also appeared on the web site of the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.
http://edition.cnn.com/2004/SHOWBIZ/books/08/24/iowa.workshop.director.ap/index.html

Lewis-Beck Predicts Bush Will Net 51 Percent Of Vote (WFTV, Aug. 24)
Political scientists and economists are predicting a victory for President George W. Bush in the 2004 presidential election, according to a published report. Their predictions are based on a variety of election models that take different combinations of economic factors -- inflation, unemployment, wage growth -- to calculate a winner on Nov. 2, Reuters reported Tuesday. MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK at the University of Iowa -- whose model takes into account jobs growth -- predicted that Bush will win 51 percent of the vote. The station is based in Orlando, Fla. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of KFOX-TV in New Mexico, KITV 4 in Hawaii, WNBC in New York and other media outlets.
http://www.wftv.com/money/3676455/detail.html

Conroy Stepping Down As Writers' Workshop Head (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 24)
FRANK CONROY, the longtime head of the celebrated Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa, will step down at the end of the year. Conroy, who has run the program since 1987, underwent surgery for colon cancer last year. "I'm doing fine, but I've been in this job for almost 20 years, and it's time for new blood," said Conroy, 68. This story also appeared on the Web sites of the KANSAS CITY STAR, BOSTON GLOBE, USA TODAY, PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORDER, SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN STATESMAN, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, RAPID CITY (S.D.) JOURNAL, ABC NEWS, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, NEW YORK TIMES and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0408240222aug24,1,3559581.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Jones Hired As Miami Voting Consultant (Omaha World Herald, Aug. 24)
A University of Iowa professor whose nickname is "the Yoda of voting" has been hired as a consultant by one Florida county hoping to avoid another presidential election debacle this November. DOUGLAS JONES, an assistant professor of computer science, has emerged in recent years as a national expert on computer election systems and security. To that end, election officials in south Florida's Miami-Dade County asked for his help as they work to implement a controversial, $25 million touch-screen, paperless voting system. The same story appeared on the Web site of the NAPLES (Fla.) DAILY NEWS.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1673&u_sid=1183503

Alumna To Retire From Court (Metropolitan News Enterprise, Aug. 24)
California Court of Appeal Justice Margaret Grignon of this district's Division Five will retire at the end of this year. Grignon, a judge since 1984 and a member of the Court of Appeal since 1991, is planning to return to private law practice. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger will appoint a replacement. Grignon received her undergraduate degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and her law degree from the UI College of Law. The News Enterprise is based in Los Angeles.
http://www.metnews.com/articles/2004/grig082304.htm

Alumnus Invents Stroke Treatment Device (Eugene Register Guard, Aug. 24)
There is a maxim among doctors who treat strokes by threading catheters through arteries leading to the brain: Time equals brain. "The quicker you can intervene, remove the clot, restore blood flow, the more brain tissue is going to be viable, and the better the patient is going to do," says Dr. J.P. Wensel, a Eugene, Ore., neuro-radiologist. It was that maxim that gave Wensel the idea nine years ago for a new way of treating strokes, by using a mechanical device to quickly extract a clot instead of trying to dissolve it with drugs. That idea bore fruit last week when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the Merci Retriever, the first device to use mechanical means to rid the brain of potentially debilitating and deadly blood clots. Wensel has a medical degree and Ph.D. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Register Guard is based in Oregon.
http://ewatch.prnewswire.com/rs/display.jsp?a=22992-105581932-167532614

Lewis-Beck Says Election Too Close To Call (CNN, Aug. 23)
Despite an embarrassing failure in their forecasting four years ago, political scientists and economists are again predicting the outcome of the presidential election, and most foresee a win for President George W. Bush. Among those forecasters is MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa, who is predicting that Bush will win 51 percent of the vote, which makes the election too close to call. After predicting an easy victory for Gore in 2000, Lewis-Beck has changed his model to take account of jobs growth over the four-year presidential term. Under Bush, there has been a 1.1 million net job loss. "Bush has the worst jobs record of any incumbent since the Second World War and that is hurting him," Lewis-Beck said. The same story appeared on the web sites of REUTERS, NEW YORK TIMES and STUFF (New Zealand).
http://money.cnn.com/2004/08/23/news/election_models/index.htm?cnn=yes

Jones Hired To Monitor Electronic Voting In Florida (Miami Herald, Aug. 23)
A professor from the University of Iowa has been hired to help one Florida county avoid another mess come election time this fall. DOUGLAS JONES has earned a nickname as "the Yoda of voting." He's an assistant professor of computer science who has become a national expert on computer election systems and security. Florida's Miami-Dade County hired Jones as a consultant as they work to install new, touch-screen voting systems. Jones is a critic of the touch screen machines because of the lack of a paper trail -- but one Florida official says the county wants an outsider's perspective. Jones says he thinks there are steps in place in Florida to avoid a repeat of 2000 -- but adds that the outcome is likely to be controversial no matter what happens. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of WQAD in Moline, Ill., the SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, the BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, The Lakeland (Fla.) Ledger and other media outlets.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/state/9470576.htm

Workshop Alumnus Named Wyoming Poet Laureate (Casper Star Tribune, Aug. 23)
Poet, musician and writer David Romtvedt of Buffalo has been named Wyoming's poet laureate by Gov. Dave Freudenthal. Romtvedt is the author of nine books of poetry and prose, including "A Flower Whose Name I Do Not Know," which won the National Poetry Series Award in 1991. He is also a member of the musical group The Fireants, which has performed at schools, libraries and festivals throughout the state and region. Romtvedt holds a bachelor's degree in American studies from Reed College and a master's in fine arts from the WRITERS' WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Wyoming.
http://www.casperstartribune.net/articles/2004/08/23/news/wyoming/35bc00ed0b2c470287256ef7000537e5.txt

UI Study Examined Tax Incentives (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Aug. 22)
Georgia and Bartow County, Ga. will give Toyo Tire North America up to $71 million in tax breaks and infrastructure to build a new factory outside the town of White. The incentives over a 20-year period would total about $78,000 for each job created. State and local authorities who recruited the tire-making giant say landing the factory is a win in today's hyper-competitive bidding wars for jobs. Their studies show it will pay off in increased taxes for the county, Cartersville and the state. Others in Bartow question the wisdom of the giveaways to bring in jobs that will pay less than the local average manufacturing wage. Such giveaways played an important role in the reduction of corporate state income taxes in the United States by 40 percent from the early 1980s through the 1990s, according to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study of tax incentives and taxes paid by expanding companies. Critics call the incentives corporate welfare. If companies pay fewer taxes, guess who pays more to keep budgets floating -- average citizens.
http://www.ajc.com/news/content/business/horizon/0804/23tireplant.html

IEM Tracking Of Presidential Race Cited (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 22)
With the stock market in a funk, market analysts have turned to a different wager -- Bush versus Kerry. Betting on who will win is under way through several web sites. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, conducted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, offers trading in futures contracts pegged to predictions of the vote split between the Republican and Democratic candidates. In previous presidential elections, the Iowa Electronic Market has proven to be an accurate forecaster. Currently, the market shows a toss-up election, with Kerry gaining slightly. Conservative commentators leaped on the results to blame Kerry for the recent decline in the stock market. A version of the story also ran on the website of the HARTFORD (Conn.) COURANT.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/investing/personalfinance/chi-0408210335aug22,1,5560172.column?coll=chi-businessyourmoney-hed

Blanck Comments On Closing Of School (Great Falls Tribune, Aug. 22)
Great Falls resident Lee Ann Evatt anxiously awaits the first day of school -- not this coming Thursday, but the 2005-06 school year 12 months away. By then, if all goes as planned, East Middle School will be closed and Evatt's disabled son, Justin, will transfer either to Paris Gibson or North. When that happens, Evatt intends to file a complaint with the Montana Human Rights Commission. The reason: Neither Paris nor North will work for her son, she says. Great Falls school trustees thought they were resolving the problem of declining student enrollment when they voted last spring to close East in the fall of 2005. In the process, though, they created an entirely new hot potato: the possibility that, by shuttering the city's only completely handicapped-accessible middle school, the district will end up with a costly day in court. Are East supporters right? Experts contacted by the Tribune weren't sure. "It's not per se a violation of the ADA, what they're doing here," said PETER BLANCK, director of the University of Iowa College of Law's Health Policy and Disability Center and an expert on disability law. "I would think they may want to revisit (closing East), but there must be other options." The paper is based in Montana.
http://www.greatfallstribune.com/news/stories/20040822/localnews/1094959.html

Cuban Artist Attended UI Art School (Miami Herald, Aug. 22)
A major retrospective, Ana Mendieta: Earth Body, Sculpture and Performance 1972-1985, on display at the Whitney Museum in New York through September 19, seeks to remake the artist's legacy. Mendieta was born in Cuba in 1948 to a prominent Havana family. In 1961, to protect Ana and her sister from a deteriorating political situation, the Mendieta family shipped them off to the States. Because the sisters had no relatives there to claim them, a Catholic charity placed them in St. Mary's Home in Dubuque, Iowa. Mendieta eventually wound up attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the late 1960s and early 1970s, a time when that school had one of the most radical experimental art programs in the country. Run by a German artist, Hans Breder, with whom Mendieta had a decade-long romance, the Intermedia Program was dedicated to erasing the boundaries between artistic disciplines. Mendieta, whose artistic vision was in large part formed by the trauma of her exile, landed in a hothouse for young conceptual artists, a safe place to make dangerous art.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/entertainment/9455723.htm

Murray Studies Genetic Causes Of Cleft Lips (Indianapolis Star, Aug. 21)
A variation in a gene plays a significant role in the development of a cleft lip or cleft palate, says a major international study involving almost 2,000 families. The discovery -- the first of its kind -- should improve genetic counseling for families at increased risk for these types of birth defects. It also could speed research into preventing cleft deformities before they start. "Because we now know that this gene is involved in clefting, it gives us some insights into the other kinds of genes or environmental factors that we might want to look at," said lead researcher Dr. JEFFREY C. MURRAY, of the University of Iowa. His team's findings appear in Thursday's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.indystar.com/articles/6/172293-7986-010.html

Jones Speaks On eVoting Firm Donations To GOP (Rocky Mountain News, Aug. 21)
A Colorado company under contract to ensure that the nation's touch-screen voting machines are accurate has been a substantial contributor to Republican candidates and groups. The donations linked to CIBER Inc. are by no means against the law, but have raised some eyebrows with the approach of a hotly contested 2004 presidential election and the recent discovery of flaws in the ATM-like machines that will be used by millions of voters. DOUGLAS JONES, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, said it's fair for people to raise questions about such contributions, given CIBER's role as a voting software tester. But he doesn't think the donations should be seen as evidence that CIBER is engaged in partisan mischief -- given that good citizens in a democracy are expected to be active participants in the political process. "It's fine for it to raise eyebrows," he said of the CIBER donations. "I'd hate for it to generate conspiracy theories." But Jones does worry about this: If there is a problem with the voting software and votes can't be 100 percent verified, then questions would arise about CIBER's partisan leanings. "I'm not convinced that the system is bankrupt. I'm convinced we're at risk," Jones said. The paper is based in Colorado.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/business/article/0,1299,DRMN_4_3127246,00.html

UI Helps Earn Iowa City 'IQ Campus" Status (Forbes, Aug. 20)
A story about Bohemian Bargains -- defined by the magazine as core cities in the 150,000 to 750,000 population range with lively downtowns and a reasonable cost of living -- includes Iowa City, which by virtue of the presence of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is considered one of the country's "IQ Campuses." "If Iowa City were a student, it would be class valedictorian," the article states. "This heartland university town consistently scores top scores on countless lists: FORBES 'Best Small Places for Business and Careers'; Men's Journal's list of sexy, healthy and safe places to live; USA Today's 'Best Educated Cities'; Utne Reader's 'Most Enlightened Towns'; AARP's best college towns in which to retire; and the Milken Institute's best small metro economy. And the town's pride, the University of Iowa, scored tops on Kaplan's best value for your tuition dollar (2004), noting its outstanding medical program."
http://www.forbes.com/2004/08/11/cz_rk_bohem.html

IEM Gives Bush Narrow Lead Over Kerry (Reason.com, Aug 20)
Polls are not the only way to take the temperature of the electorate--one can also look at political markets. Probably the most famous of these are the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) run by professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Researchers claim that such "prediction markets are considerably more accurate long-run forecasting tools than polls across elections and across long periods of time preceding elections." The IEM U.S. Presidential Election Winner Takes All Market offers futures contract such that a Bush contract will earn an investor $1 if he wins and $0 if he loses; the same for a Kerry contract. So what are the IEMs predicting about the 2004 election? So far the IEM Market shows Bush with a narrowing lead -- the current market price for Bush contract is $0.508 and $0.493 for a Kerry contract.
http://www.reason.com/links/links081904.shtml

UI Study Cited In Air Crash Investigation (The Guardian, Aug. 20)
Air safety regulators warn today of the danger of jet-lagged pilots taking over-the-counter drugs to help them sleep. Their concern comes after an investigation into a fatal crash at Birmingham airport found a common sedative in the blood of two US cockpit crew. The Air Accident Investigation Branch say pilots are taking products such as Nytol -- a widely advertised sleep aid often used by international travelers. Investigators found Nytol's active ingredient, diphenhydramine, in the blood of the pilots of an American executive jet that exploded on takeoff at Birmingham two years ago. Investigators cited a study in the US which found that 18 percent of pilots killed in plane crashes between 1994 and 1998 had over-the-counter drugs in their blood. Diphenhydramine was among the most common drugs, found in 54 cases. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA compared the effect of the drug to alcohol on motorists. They found that it had a greater impact on coordination than a blood alcohol level of 100mg for every 100 millilitres -- roughly equivalent to three pints of beer. The Guardian is based in the UK.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,1287103,00.html

UI Research Connects Gene, Cleft Lip (Health24.com, Aug. 20)
A multinational research team has discovered a gene that increases a baby's risk of developing a cleft lip and palate, one of the most common major birth defects. The study, which was headed by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. Health24 is based in South Africa. Registration required. The same story appeared in Science Daily, Betterhumans.com, REDDING (Calif.) RECORD SEARCHLIGHT and INNOVATIONS REPORT (Germany).
http://www.health24.com/news/Genetics/1-916,29111.asp

Olshansky Says Technology Improves Medicine (Drkoop.com, Aug. 20)
Technology now allows doctors to see heart problems never before possible, and new tools can fix problems not possible before. Still, the heart creates its own set of challenges with its intricate twists and turns and the beating makes holding a piece of equipment in one place nearly impossible. Now, giant magnets may be the answer doctors and heart patients have been waiting for. "We are now approaching a time when we can do much more sophisticated types of procedures we never thought we could in the past," Dr. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, of University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, said. The same story appeared on the web site of News8 TV in Austin, TX.
http://drkoop.com/template.asp?page=newsdetail&ap=93&id=8009299

UI Ranked 19th In U.S. News Survey (Macon Telegraph, Aug. 20)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ranks 19th among public universities in the latest college rankings from U.S. News and World Report. The Telegraph is based in Macon, Ga. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the TALLAHASSEE (Fla.) DEMOCRAT, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER ENQUIRER and WSB TV.
http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/news/local/states/georgia/counties/houston_peach/9448046.htm

Former UI Researcher Looks For Gene (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Aug. 20)
A profile of Anne Calof, a former researcher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and her husband Arthur Lander, who are now looking for a gene that mysteriously kills babies, are researchers at the University of California-Irvine. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, KANSAS CITY STAR, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, MYRTLE BEACH (Fla.) SUN NEWS, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/nation/9450856.htm

Alumnus Now Living In Israel Profiled (Jerusalem Post, Aug. 20)
Ezra Shapiro (born Bobby) has gone from Sioux City to a kibbutz in Israel. He received his degree in mathematics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1092884503046

Alumnus Records Family Histories (Lake Forester, Aug. 19)
Riverwoods, Ill., resident and entrepreneur Dan Gelfond always requests that his interview subjects have on hand two key items when he arrives at their homes: a glass of water and a box of tissues. For the next two hours, his subjects will relate their life stories, some happy, some painful. Both the water and the tissues will come in handy. Using techniques Gelfond, 45, learned while interviewing Holocaust survivors for Steven Spielberg's "Survivors of the Shoah Foundation," Gelfond produces two-hour tapes that captures the memories of his subjects in their own words for future generations. Gelfond is an alumnus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Lake Forester is based in Illinois.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/lf/08-19-04-362696.html

UI Research Connects Gene, Cleft Lip (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Aug. 19)
A multinational research team has discovered a gene that increases a baby's risk of developing a cleft lip and palate, one of the most common major birth defects. The study, which was headed by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04232/363982.stm

Research Opens Door To Test For Cleft Lip Risk (Medical News Today, Aug. 19)
Researchers report they now can predict whether some parents are more likely than others to have a second child with the "isolated" form of cleft lip and palate, one of the world's most common birth defects, according to results of a study published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research was supported in part by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health. The authors say their latest gene test applies to about 12 percent of isolated cleft lip and palate, or babies born with clefts only and no other birth defects. "This study shows that we've reached a point where it's possible to take blood samples from parents, test certain genes and determine whether their risk for a second child with cleft lip or palate is, say, one or 20 percent," said JEFFREY MURRAY, M. D., a scientist at the University of Iowa and the senior author on the study. "Now is the time to begin thinking about how best to apply these types of tests clinically and ensure that they truly benefit the families and their children." The medical news web site is based in the U.K. A version of this article appeared Aug. 19 on WEBMD.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=12257

Former UI Professor Named Interim Dean In Ohio (Athens News, Aug. 19)
Gregory J. Shepherd, Ph.D., has been named interim dean of the College of Communication at Ohio University, effective Aug. 23, for a one-year appointment, the university announced earlier this week. Shepherd currently directs the School of Communication Studies within the college. Prior to joining OU, Shepherd was an assistant professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA from 1983 to 1989 and an assistant and associate professor at the University of Kansas from 1989 to 2001. The newspaper is based in Ohio.
http://www.athensnews.com/issue/article.php3?story_id=17560

UI Panic Disorder Study Cited (Women's eNews.com, Aug. 19)
Research suggests daughters of women with panic disorder are more likely to inherit it. Panic disorder -- marked by repeated and unexpected attacks that typically last about 10 minutes -- strikes up to five percent of Americans or at least 2.4 million people. Women are two times as likely to be affected as men. The disorder often runs in families and, while researchers don't know its physiological or psychological sources, they do know daughters are more likely to inherit the disorder. A 1983 study of 43 people -- male and female -- found that among female relatives the risk of developing the disorder was twice that of male relatives. That study, led by Raymond Crowe of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE, left many unanswered questions about how panic disorder is inherited. "Its method of transmission remains uncertain," Crowe noted at the time.
http://www.womensenews.com/article.cfm/dyn/aid/1954/context/archive

Gymnast Is UI Graduate (The Reporter, Aug. 19)
A story about a local man who came close to making the 1996 Olympic team in gymnastics notes that he graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's dental school in 2000. The newspaper is based in Fon du Lac, Wis.
http://www.wisinfo.com/thereporter/news/archive/local_17384080.shtml

Butterfly Swim Stroke Developed At UI (Liverpool Daily Post, Aug. 19)
A description of the butterfly swimming stroke says that it is the most physically demanding of the swimming strokes, but is also the most beautiful to watch. It features the simultaneous overhead stroke of the arms combined with the dolphin kick, in which both legs move up and down together. The butterfly was developed in the 1930s and evolved from the breaststroke, although it did not become an official Olympic stroke until the 1956 summer games. In 1934, David Armbruster, coach at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, devised a double over-arm recovery out of the water. This "butterfly" arm action gave more speed but required greater training and conditioning. In 1935, Jack Sieg, a swimmer at Iowa, developed the skill of swimming on his side and beating his legs in unison like a fishtail. Armbuster and Sieg combined the butterfly arm action with this leg action. Then in the late 1950s, the butterfly stroke with a dolphin kick was legalized.
http://icliverpool.icnetwork.co.uk/0100news/0100regionalnews/tm_objectid=14548269&method=full&siteid=50061&headline=medal-hero-parry-calls-for-olympic-pool-in-liverpool-name_page.html

Cell Phones Invaluable For UI Students, Parents (The Pantagraph, Aug. 19)
The prevalence of cell phones and computers capable of transmitting e-mail and instant messages have changed the way students adjust to the first few weeks at college, counselors said. That can be a mixed blessing as parents and newly independent students sort out their new roles in life, experts said. When Holli Painter left for Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville last fall, she was homesick right away. "Lots of kids were gone on the weekends, and she felt isolated there," said her mother, Teresa Painter of Bloomington. Several times a day, she'd call crying. But Teresa Painter said she was glad last week that her daughter had a cell phone at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the school to which she transferred in January. That way, she got the news that her sister had delivered a healthy baby boy -- the first grandchild for Teresa and Mark Painter. "The cell phone really came in handy then," the new grandmother said. The newspaper is based in Bloomington, Ill.
http://www.pantagraph.com/stories/081904/new_20040819013.shtml

Alumna Named School Administrator (Munster Times, Aug. 19)
Glenwood School's South Campus will have a new face in the principal's office when classes start. Susan Niendorf assumes the role of director of academic affairs this school year. Niendorf has a bachelor's degree in education and special education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a master's degree in school administration from Chicago State University and a doctorate of education in leadership and policy from Loyola University. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.thetimesonline.com/articles/2004/08/19/news/local_illinois/dd644f439675305786256ef4007d2534.txt

McPherson Recalls Childhood In Library (Savannah Morning News, Aug. 19)
The thick, shiny circulation desk dominates the entrance of the Carnegie Library, just as it has since 1914. Right behind it are original book stacks, tables and chairs. But tucked away on a small table just behind the librarian is the first sign of change -- a flat-screened Dell computer. Look farther back and you'll see more computers lining the walls of the main building and one of the just-constructed wings of the newly reopened library. A ceremony Saturday will officially mark the Carnegie's return as a vital community resource. Carnegie once housed a reference collection of African-American books that numbered more than 1,000. By the time the library was closed in 1997, that number had dwindled to about 200. The rejuvenated Carnegie has some 3,000 books in this collection, Kruse said, with an emphasis on the Harlem Renaissance. U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas used the Carnegie as a child. So did former Savannah Mayor Floyd Adams Jr. Another youngster who sat at those tables was JAMES A. MCPHERSON, the 1978 winner of a Pulitzer Prize for fiction and a professor of English at the University of Iowa. McPherson detailed fond memories of the old Carnegie in a 1999 letter to library officials. "The Carnegie Library was just down the street from our apartment," McPherson wrote, "so I solved my problems with the outside world by playing hookey from school some days and going into the Colored Branch of the Carnegie Library (that is what we called it) to read books. I went in the mornings, stayed until 3 p.m. or so, and then went home to our apartment to cook lunch for my brothers and sisters, who had been in school." The Carnegie, McPherson added, "was a life-saver for me." The newspaper is based in Georgia.
http://www.savannahnow.com/stories/081804/2380833.shtml

Murray Reports Gene Connected To Cleft Lip (Healthday.com, Aug. 18)
A variation in a single gene plays a significant role in the development of a cleft lip or cleft palate, says a major international study involving almost 2,000 families. The discovery -- the first of its kind -- should improve genetic counseling for families at increased risk for these types of birth defects. It could also speed research into preventing cleft deformities before they start. "Because we now know that this gene is involved in clefting, it gives us some insights into the other kinds of genes or environmental factors that we might want to look at," said lead researcher Dr. JEFFREY C. MURRAY, of the University of Iowa. His team's findings appear in the Aug. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. A version of this article also appeared Aug. 18 on CNN Industry Watch, LEX18.com in Kentucky, WFIE-TV in Indiana, NEWS-MEDICAL.net, HEALTHCENTRAL.com, FORBES.com, and numerous other news outlets.
http://www.healthday.com/view.cfm?id=520718

UI Ranked In Princeton Review Guide (Omaha World Herald, Aug. 18)
Students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA prefer Jack Daniels over Sam Adams. The Princeton Review released its "Best 357 College Rankings" on Monday. The report is based on surveys of 110,000 students at 357 campuses nationwide. The University of Iowa came in at No. 5 for consumption of hard liquor. It ranked 13th for consumption of beer. The report quoted Iowa students as saying of their school: "Even if most people are 'Christian, middle-class Dave Matthews fans who love the bars,' they also share the common traits of 'friendliness, enthusiasm and openness.'"
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1178260

IEM Tracks Google's Initial Public Offering (CNN Industry Watch, Aug. 18)
Shares of Google Inc, the company planning the biggest Internet initial public offering (IPO), may rise on their first day of trading, futures contracts traded on the web show. Contracts on Mountain View, California-based Google's planned US$3.47 billion IPO at Intrade.com showed a 59 per cent chance the shares will advance once trading starts. The futures contracts are at odds with some investors and analysts who say the stock will fall after declining demand for IPOs led 13 companies to withdraw share sales since August 1. The Iowa Electronic Markets, a futures market run by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA business school professors, suggests investors are almost evenly split between traders expecting the shares to trade within the IPO range and those foreseeing a decline. Traders at the Iowa City, Iowa-based market see about a 35 per cent chance that the company will have a first-day market value of US$30 billion to US$35 billion, little changed from Google's own projected IPO price. About 34 percent anticipate a market value of US$25 billion to US$30 billion after the first day, suggesting the shares will fall. Some money managers and analysts echo the sentiments of traders on the Iowa market, saying the slowing market for IPOs and more competition from Microsoft Corp and Yahoo! Inc will hold share gains in check. The article originally appeared in the North American edition of CHINA DAILY.
http://cnniw.yellowbrix.com/pages/cnniw/Story.nsp?story_id=55654619&ID=cnniw&scategory=Business+and+Finance percent3AIPO percent27s&

Princeton Review Ranks Iowa On TAs (Lawrence Journal World, Aug. 18)
Kansas University didn't make Princeton Review's list of top party schools, but it was high on another list -- schools that have graduate teaching assistants in charge of upper-level classes. But KU officials said they were not concerned KU was ranked third nationally on the GTA list, partly because assistants teach far fewer classes than they did 10 years ago and partly because even Princeton Review admits its rankings are based on a handful of student surveys not hard data. KU was topped on the list of universities with too many teaching assistants by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Kansas.
http://www.ljworld.com/section/kunews/story/178826

Jones: Testing Can Catch E-Voting Flaws (San Jose Mercury News, Aug. 17)
Election reformers say there are key measures election officials should take to prevent reliving an ugly piece of history. Foremost among them is election-day testing of the machines. They point to states like California, which performs such testing. Experts say the so-called parallel testing is the best way to make sure the new technology doesn't contain a flaw that could taint an election. "It's the best thing we know how to do," said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer technology professor at the University of Iowa, hired as a consultant to oversee Miami-Dade's elections. The concept is easy: Randomly selected machines are taken offline and used only for testing. Participants, whether they are citizens or officials or observers, pick the candidates they want. Someone takes notes or videotapes them touching the choices. The paper is based in California. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the TALLAHASSEE (Fla.) DEMOCRAT, the Akron (Ohio) BEACON-JOURNAL and other media outlets.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/politics/9423443.htm

Slusarski Nets $635,000 Cancer Grant (Lexington Herald-Leader, Aug. 17)
A University of Iowa researcher has received a $635,000 grant from the American Cancer Society, the organization announced Tuesday. DIANE C. SLUSARSKI will use the four-year grant to study the genetic link between cancer and the potential involvement in tumor growth. The grant is one of more than 108 new cancer research projects worth $48 million in medical institutions nationwide. "Since it started funding research in 1946, the American Cancer Society has allocated more than $2.7 billion in pursuit of better methods to prevent, detect and treat cancer," said Dr. Harmon J. Eyre, national chief medical officer for the group. "The Society is proud to be the only private funding source that can claim 32 researchers who have gone on to win the Nobel Prize." A version of the story also ran on the websites of the OMAHA WORLD HERALD, the GADSEN TIMES in Alabama, the SAN LUIS OBISPO TRIBUNE in California, the MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, ABC NEWS and other media outlets.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/news/nation/9423699.htm

UI Election Futures Market Closely Watched (CNN Money, Aug. 17)
The world's money managers believe Sen. John Kerry will defeat President Bush in the November election, according to survey results released Tuesday. But they also doubt whoever is president will have much of an impact on U.S. financial markets. Forty-one percent of 293 fund managers surveyed by Merrill Lynch between Aug. 6 and Aug. 12 said they believe Kerry, a Democrat from Massachusetts, will win the presidency in November, compared with 37 percent who expected Bush to be re-elected. Twenty-two percent were uncertain about the outcome. Wall Street would generally prefer a Bush victory, since the Republican president is considered friendly to business concerns, but fund managers doubted a Kerry victory would have much of an impact on U.S. financial markets. The closely watched presidential election futures market run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, in which traders bet money on the election's outcome, currently gives Bush a slight edge in the election.
http://money.cnn.com/2004/08/17/markets/election_survey/index.htm

UI Law Alumna Named VP, In-House Counsel For Musicland Group (MI2N, Aug. 17)
Musicland Group Inc., one of the nation's leading specialty retailers of music, movies, games and entertainment-related products, today named Kristin Peterson LeBre as Vice President and In-House Counsel. Peterson LeBre will manage the legal function for Musicland's corporate headquarters and the more than 900 Sam Goody, Suncoast and Media Play stores. Along with supporting the company's legal team, her responsibilities include intellectual properties work, litigation and coordination of outside resources. Peterson LeBre earned her J.D., with distinction, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF LAW. MI2N is the Music Industry News Network.
http://www.mi2n.com/press.php3?press_nb=70246

Rietz Comments On Accuracy Of IEM (USA Today, Aug. 17)
Iowa political futures markets have President George W. Bush and Democratic nominee Sen. John Kerry in a tight race, with a scant edge for Bush. Consumer confidence data indicate the GOP could hold the White House, though September numbers will be key. Several comprehensive models combining economic and political data show Bush should win about 54 percent to 57 percent of the vote. But others say a GOP victory isn't a lock. Created as a research and teaching tool by the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business, the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) have -- for period this year -- shown Kerry trailing Bush when public opinion polls have shown him ahead. Recently, the markets have tightened. Since the 1988 presidential election, the IEM has had an average election eve prediction error of 1.37 percent, outperforming many polls. "If your weatherman did that, you'd be thrilled," says THOMAS RIETZ, associate professor of finance and a director of the IEM.
http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/money/20040818/econ18.art.htm

IEM Predicts Google IPO (Bloomberg, Aug. 17)
Shares of Google Inc., the company planning the biggest Internet initial public offering, may rise on their first day of trading, futures contracts traded on the web show. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a futures market run by University of Iowa business school professors, suggests investors are almost evenly split between traders expecting the shares to trade within the IPO range and those foreseeing a decline. Traders at the Iowa City, Iowa-based market see about a 35 percent chance that the company will have a first-day market value of $30 billion to $35 billion, little changed from Google's own projected IPO price.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=agVEfgU8RWBQ&refer=us

Haynes Studies Fat, Blood Pressure Connection (Kansas City Star, Aug. 17)
If fat cells, those glistening globules packed into our ever-swelling buttocks and bellies, would only spend their days in idle repose like good couch potatoes, they wouldn't be such a worry. But it's turning out that those blobs of blubber are industrious. That's not to say they burn a lot of calories. They don't. What researchers are discovering is that fat cells are busy manufacturing and secreting all manner of hormones and other chemicals that seem to fuel chronic ailments such as heart disease and hypertension. Obese people tend to have high levels of C-reactive protein, or CRP, according to WILLIAM HAYNES, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa. Haynes studies how obesity raises blood pressure and damages blood vessels. Some medical people think that C-reactive protein is a better indicator of heart disease than cholesterol levels. "It could be that fat cells make (the compounds) that cause the liver to make CRP," Haynes said. Registration is required to read this story.
http://www.kansascity.com

Jones Says Testing Can Catch Electronic Voting Flaws (Miami Herald, Aug. 17)
Election reformers say there are key measures election officials should take to prevent reliving an ugly piece of history. Foremost among them is election-day testing of the machines. They point to states like California, which performs such testing. Experts say the so-called parallel testing is the best way to make sure the new technology doesn't contain a flaw that could taint an election. "It's the best thing we know how to do," said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer technology professor at the University of Iowa, hired as a consultant to oversee Miami-Dade's elections. The concept is easy: Randomly selected machines are taken offline and used only for testing. Participants, whether they are citizens or officials or observers, pick the candidates they want. Someone takes notes or videotapes them touching the choices.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/9419432.htm

UI Study Shows Hospital Based Doctors More Efficient (MSBNC, Aug. 17)
People who are treated by doctors who work at hospitals instead of clinics have  shorter hospital stays and spend less money on treatment, a new study shows. A study by the Department of Veterans Affairs Iowa City Health Care System and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers showed factors associated with reduced hospital costs and length of stay that accompany care by "hospitalists" -- doctors who devote their time to taking care of hospitalized patients rather than having an outside clinical practice. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES, TALLAHASSEE (Tenn.) DEMOCRAT, FORTH WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, MIAMI HERALD, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, KANSAS CITY STAR, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE and numerous other news organizations.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/5725014/

UI Colonoscopy Study Cited (Branson News Leader, Aug. 17)
In March 2000, NBC "Today Show" host Katie Couric's colonoscopy was broadcast live on the show. Couric wanted to help dispel the embarrassment people feel over the test; she took up the cause after losing her husband, Jay Monahan, to colon cancer in 1998. According to a study conducted by the University of Michigan Health System and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the rate of people having colonoscopy rose 20 percent in the months following Couric's TV demonstration and stayed at that rate for nearly a year. Still, only about half of Americans who are over age 50 have the test. The News Leader is based in Branson, Mo.
http://branson.news-leader.com/news/0817-Singeradvo-157794.html

Ziegler Discusses Milk Bank (ABC News, Aug. 16)
When Elizabeth Schmid gave birth to triplets, she was able to give them everything except the one thing they needed most -- breast milk. Born three months prematurely, Bridget, Caroline and Jamie weighed no more than two pounds each. Very little and very sick, the three girls needed expert care and the best nutrition to survive. The donated milk came from Mother's Milk Bank of Iowa in Iowa City, about two hours away from Schmid's home in Dubuque. The milk bank -- one of six in the United States -- collects, pasteurizes, stores and distributes human breast milk to babies in need. University of Iowa pediatrician EKHARD ZIEGLER, medical director and co-founder of the bank, says he started it because he wanted all babies -- and especially ones born prematurely -- to have the benefits of breast milk. "I knew that many mothers of premature babies either couldn't provide breast milk at all or tried and couldn't provide enough," said Ziegler. "In our hospital, premature babies have the benefit of getting mother's breast milk when the mom cannot give milk themselves."
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/Living/US/breast_milk_bank_040816-1.html

Reporter Backs Kerry But Bets On Bush In IEM (Salon, Aug. 16)
Two weeks after John Kerry's big speech, the Massachusetts senator appears, by all standard political indices, to be doing very well in his bid for the White House. But traders on the Iowa Electronic Markets -- a real-money futures-trading system celebrated for its accuracy in predicting presidential election winners -- aren't buying it. Or, more specifically, traders aren't buying shares of John Kerry futures and are instead favoring shares that will yield a payoff if George Bush wins the race in November. Traders on the IEM don't really care about a theoretical election held today -- they're mainly concerned with how things will play on the actual Election Day, and what happens today matters only if it affects what happens in November. The many and various opinion surveys, the big convention speeches, the pundits' prognostications, the usual summertime speculation that precedes any election: "Our traders pretty much ignore all that," says THOMAS GRUCA, an associate professor of marketing at the University of Iowa and a co-director of the IEM. Betting money on an election focuses the mind, Gruca says, and traders learn to weed out real information from the fluff. http://www.salon.com/tech/feature/2004/08/16/iem2/index.html

UI Creation Of Transgender Dorm Floor Cited (Record-Journal, Aug. 16)
For the past year, Paige Kruza, an openly transgendered student at Wesleyan University, has lived in a gender-neutral housing community at the university. A small dorm hallway with about a dozen students, the initiative was one of the first of its kind in the nation. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, recent graduate Cianan Russell led a group called Transitions, which was seeking to overhaul the university's housing policies. He was passionate about it partly because of his own experience, living in an all-female dorm his freshman year as he was realizing he wanted to transition to a man. While his roommate was understanding, others were not. The paper is based in Connecticut.
http://www.record-journal.com/articles/2004/08/16/news/state/state03.txt

Ex Sex-Change 'King' A UI Medicine Alumnus (Rocky Mountain News, Aug. 16)
Stanley Biber, who single-handedly transformed Trinidad into the "Sex-Change Capital of the World," who has turned more men into women and women into men than any other surgeon on the planet, has just spent another boring morning at the office. He treated one man with a sore throat, two women complaining of nausea, an elderly woman with a fractured wrist and a man with bronchitis. But at the end of the day, everyone is still, well, genitally intact. At 81, Biber is going through a major change of his own. He performed his last sex-change surgery last year -- topping off at 5,800, by his count -- and dejectedly says he'll never do another. Because of his age, his medical malpractice insurance skyrocketed to more than $250,000 a year. He couldn't pay those premiums and had to give up his transsexual practice. Biber earned his medical degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1948. A few years later, he went to Korea as chief surgeon of a MASH unit. He ended his service at what is now Fort Carson in Colorado Springs.
http://rockymountainnews.com/drmn/state/article/0,1299,DRMN_21_3113990,00.html

Ingram Comments On Economy (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Aug. 15)
With inflation outpacing wage growth and the job market on a month-to-month roller coaster, analysts say the economy is in danger of stalling if businesses don't begin boosting capital investment and hiring more workers. The Federal Reserve, in raising interest rates last week, said all the indicators suggest strong growth lies ahead. But as the recent weak jobs reports have demonstrated, a full recovery in business spending and hiring, widely anticipated each of the past three years, has yet to take hold. And that has economists puzzled. In a recession, "investment spending tends to go down faster than consumption spending," said BETH INGRAM, chairwoman of the economics department at the University of Iowa. "As the recession ends, the investment spending picks up. That hasn't happened yet, which is a little bit surprising."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/4926648.html

Hornbuckle Finds Chemicals In Lakes (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Aug. 15)
Four years after 3M stopped making the chemicals behind such innovative products as Teflon, Scotchgard and Stainmaster, the compounds are showing up everywhere from remote Minnesota lakes to polar bears in Alaska and albatrosses in the Pacific Ocean. The compounds, known as fluorochemicals, are a concern because they don't degrade and it's unclear how they spread. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is studying whether one of the compounds poses environmental or health risks, but it does not consider fluorochemicals harmful. Researchers at the University of Iowa recently detected fluorochemicals in lakes Ontario and Erie. The study, published in June in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, said traces of the chemicals were found in all 16 samples taken. "They are not high in a toxic sense," said KERI HORNBUCKLE, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa. "There is no danger from exposure to the water, but they are high enough that they there is no question that animals are going to accumulate them from the aquatic food chain." Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE. GRAND FORKS HERALD and the ST. PAUL PIONEER-PRESS.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/4927444.html

Jones Comments On Electronic Voting Machine Test (Miami Herald, Aug. 15)
Miami-Dade County election officials wrapped up their extensive, somewhat chaotic test of the electronic voting system at 2:30 a.m. Saturday, announcing they had perfect results but ran into some unexpected problems along the way. A computer program designed to detect fraud froze up some results from the mock election because more ballots were cast than there were active registered voters in the precincts. It took at least an hour for election officials and representatives of the machines' manufacturer, Election Systems & Software (ES&S), to override the program. "ES&S is aware that the county was a little miffed at how complicated this all was," said DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa computer science professor and consultant for the county. He emphasized that this was not a glitch, merely an unanticipated result of the most extensive test of the iVotronic voting machines in the county to date.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/local/9404491.htm (Free registration required)

Article Touts Iowa City, UI To Tourists (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 15)
The paper reprints an article that originally appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES about visiting Iowa City. The story makes multiple references to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, including the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, the UI MUSEUM OF ART and the HERKY ON PARADE displays around town.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1458&u_sid=1173547

Squire: Candidates Scrambling To Turn Out Vote (USA Today, Aug. 14)
Trying to energize the electorate in heavily Republican western Iowa, President Bush hammered home the message Saturday that voters must keep rival John Kerry out of the White House because the Democrat will raise taxes on the middle class. The president's stop in Sioux City comes 10 days after his last visit to Iowa, a day when the president and Kerry campaigned just blocks apart in the city of Davenport on the banks of the Mississippi River. Political analysts say the Sioux City stop reflects the fear in both the Bush and Kerry camps, that some of their supporters won't go to the polls on Election Day. "I think both campaigns are going to scramble to turn out every voter they can," said University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE. Versions of the story also ran on the website of SOLON.COM, the CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, the BALTIMORE SUN and the TRI-VALLEY (Calif.) HERALD, THE STATE in Columbia, S.C., the SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS and many other media outlets.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/2004-08-14-bush-iowa_x.htm

Heimer Authors Study On Women And Fraud (Lancaster Online, Aug. 14)
White-collar fraud and embezzlement by women have seen a dramatic increase in the past 20 years, according to FBI statistics quoted in a 2000 study by the University of Iowa. In the many local cases, the crime is the same but the details vary: A credit union employee dips into members' accounts; a bank teller helps herself to elderly customers' savings; a bookkeeper for a nonprofit steals so much she is laid off for lack of funds; a bookkeeper at a small manufacturer writes herself checks to pay off her own debts; another pilfers cash to help her adult child out of a bind. The University of Iowa report, authored by professor KAREN HEIMER, said 90 percent of women convicted of bank embezzlement were in clerical jobs of some kind, and "consequently, their offending tended to involve minor sums of money." By contrast, Heimer writes, "Forty percent of men convicted were bank managers ... and their embezzlement involved larger sums of money." Because of the seeming petty nature of their crimes, women embezzlers are shuffled through the justice system with little notice. Most of them avoid jail (few district attorneys want to put a mom behind bars); and most are put on probation, during which time they are to make restitution. Lancaster Online is the web presence of the INTELLIGENCER JOURNAL and the LANCASTER NEW ERA newspapers.
http://www.lancasteronline.com/pages/news/local/4/8008

UI Takes Part In T-Rex Studies (Medical News Today, Aug. 14)
Most teenagers have growing pains, but none probably compared to those of Tyrannosaurus rex as it ascended to adulthood more than 65 million years ago, according to a Florida State University researcher. From around age 14 to 18, T. rex took on about 70 percent of its adult mass, growing from a one-ton carnivorous lizard to a bone-crushing, six-ton dinosaur eating machine with few rivals in the prehistoric kingdom, according to FSU biologist Gregory Erickson. At the peak of this spurt, T. rex grew more than 4.5 pounds a day. Erickson and his team of paleontologists are the first to establish an accurate picture of how T. rex accelerated its growth over a relatively few years to become gargantuan while earlier, smaller relatives had much slower growth. Erickson assembled a team of researchers from the American Museum of Natural History, The Field Museum, Canada's Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Stanford University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. They examined cross sections of bones from 20 Tyrannosaurs that ranged from two to 28 years of age and establish T. rex's accelerated growth rate during its teenage years. Medical News Today is based in the U.K.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=12078

Cochran: Men Can Be Masculine, Balanced (New York Daily News, Aug. 13)
In recent years, some psychologists have contended that men who fit the masculine ideal of a guy -- tough, stoic, powerful, invulnerable -- are more susceptible to various forms of psychological distress, especially depression and anxiety. But the results of a new study call into question whether conflict between that masculine ideal and functional ways of coping with life's curve balls -- what's often referred to as masculine gender-role stress -- is really to blame for men's distress. They found that, contrary to their expectations, it wasn't masculine-role conflict that accounted for the greatest risk of psychological distress, but the men's appraisals of their own problem-solving behaviors and attitudes. On the other hand, the study suggests that it is possible to be traditionally masculine and emotionally well-adjusted, too. "There's value and adaptability in working hard and being strong and striving to be a provider," says SAM V. COCHRAN, Ph.D., director of university counseling at the University of Iowa and the author of several books on treating depression in men. "It's the dysfunctional part of that -- being overly preoccupied with work or overly restricted with your emotions or overly concerned about being intimate with people -- that can be problematic."
http://www.nydailynews.com/07-28-2004/city_life/health/story/216338p-186221c.html

Squire Comments On Bush, Kerry Campaign Tactics (Corvallis Times, Aug. 13)
President Bush and Democratic opponent John Kerry seem to be playing a modern version of "Me and My Shadow" these days. The two presidential candidates keep popping up in the same states within days of each other -- sometimes within hours. "The appearances are both intended to persuade the people who haven't made up their minds, and to make sure the people who have decided show up on Election Day," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. The Times is based in Corvallis, Ore. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, BOSTON GLOBE, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, ABCNews.com, KATU TV, KGW TV, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, NEWSDAY and numerous other news organizations. http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2004/08/13/news/oregon/frista00.txt

Renowned Poet Justice Taught At UI (Washington Post, Aug. 13)
An obituary of poet DONALD JUSTICE notes he taught at the University of Iowa.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A61518-2004Aug12.html

Study: Dependency Rarely Discussed (Rochester Democrat Chronicle, Aug. 13)
A person typically has only about 15 minutes to visit with his or her primary doctor. And doctors often have a litany of things to go over with the patient: diet, exercise, mood, calcium intake (if you're a woman), cholesterol screening (if you're older). The list goes on. But some doctors and drug counselors say that asking "How often do you drink alcohol or take illicit drugs" isn't as routine as it should be. A 2002 study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA said doctors speak less frequently about alcohol abuse with their patients than they do about other health-related issues. Substance abuse centers typically get most of their referrals from the criminal justice system, or family and friends of the patient.
http://www.democratandchronicle.com/news/0813N657HMG_news.shtml

Alumnus Scores Musical for Palestinian Children (Ha'aretz, Aug. 13)
Suhail Khoury, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, composed the score to "Fawanees," a musical written to be performed by Palestinian children in Ramallah. Ha'aretz is based in Israel.
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/464163.html

UI Press Cited In Story On Budget Struggles (Chronicle, Aug. 13)
The 90 institutions of higher education that have their own academic presses now bear all the costs of a system used by most if not all universities. And many of those presses are under increasing pressure from their parent institutions to break even. One proposed solution now gaining ground is that universities and other institutions that support academic research create a pool of money to provide subsidies for authors to help offset the costs of publishing. Under this plan, all institutions would contribute to the pool, and give authors $5,000 to $10,000 in what are called "subventions" that they could take to an academic press interested in publishing their book. Yale University provides up to $5,000 to younger faculty members in the humanities. Ohio State University approves subsidies up to $2,000, but requires that the money come equally from departments and academic divisions. Other institutions with similar programs include the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, North Carolina State University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i49/49a00101.htm

UI Researcher On T. Rex Team (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 12)
Tyrannosaurus rex, most famed of all the dinosaurs, has long puzzled scientists who wonder how it came to pass that the beast grew so huge -- six tons or more, one of the largest meat-eaters that ever lived. Now two former Stanford researchers -- one an avid dinosaur hunter, the other an engineer who studies bone mechanics in people -- say they and their colleagues have finally figured out some answers. T. rex, it seems, experienced an extraordinary growth spurt during adolescence, as human teenagers do, only to a much greater degree. At the peak of their growth spurt, the giants were gaining more than 4 1/2 pounds a day, the scientists have calculated. Gregory Erickson, a paleontologist at Florida State University and Scott Yerby, a biomechanical specialist in the orthopedics department at St. Mary's Hospital in San Francisco, together with paleontologists at the Field Museum in Chicago and the American Museum of Natural History in New York, are reporting the first insights into T. rex's growth patterns today in the British science journal Nature. For their study Erickson and his colleagues -- including scientists from the American Museum of Natural History in New York, the Royal Tyrell Museum of Paleontology in Alberta and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- examined more than 60 bones from 20 different fossils of T. rex and three of its close North American Tyrannosaurus relatives, and compared their growth rings and ages under the microscope. They estimated the mass of the animals by examining the size of their femurs.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2004/08/12/MNGHB86G4Q1.DTL

IEM Offers Google IPO Market (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 12)
Several web sites allow betting on Google's highly anticipated initial public offering in prelude to the main Wall Street event. People can wager on whether the company's shares will rise or fall in the first day of trading and their percentage change in value. Money is also being placed on what the firm's market capitalization will be. A legal option for placing money on Google is IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, at www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem/, which is operated by the University of Iowa faculty. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the body that oversees the futures industry, sanctioned the market as long as there are no paid advertisements, no trading fees and no trader accounts bigger than $500. Traders can buy and sell contracts related to Google or other topics such as the 2004 presidential election, Federal Reserve monetary policies and Microsoft's stock price. The most active of the Iowa Google markets is predicting the company's market capitalization at the end of its first day of trading. Traders have a choice of ranges in $5 billion increments.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/08/12/BUG5C86C0Q1.DTL&type=business

Brochu Is Part Of T. Rex Growth Study (New York Times, Aug. 12)
Tyrannosaurus rex, as every child of five or six knows, was huge, the most menacing predator in the age of dinosaurs. But no child or scientist ever figured out how these creatures grew to such commanding bulk. A new study of tyrannosaur bones, scientists reported yesterday, has determined that from about 14 to 18 years of age, a meat-eating T. rex with a humongous appetite gained about 6,600 pounds to reach its full adult weight of more than 11,000 pounds, length of 42 feet and height of about 14 feet at the hips. Peter J. Makovicky of the Field Museum of Chicago and Gregory M. Erickson of Florida State University led of the team of paleontologists that conducted the research on 20 fossil specimens of four closely related tyrannosaur species. They used an innovative technique of estimating ages by counting growth rings in the bones and calculated the corresponding body size from circumference measurements of leg bones. Erickson is the lead author of the formal report, in today's issue of the journal Nature. The research team also included Mark A. Norell of the American Museum of Natural History; Philip J. Currie of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology in Drumheller, Alberta; Scott A. Yerby of Stanford University; and CHRISTOPHER A. BROCHU of the University of Iowa. This article also appeared Aug. 12 in the MARIN INDEPENDENT JOURNAL in California.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/12/science/12dinosaur.html

Brochu: Team Can't Say Why, Only How T. Rex Grew (Boston Globe, Aug. 12)
New clues in the bones of Tyrannosaurus rex skeletons paint a fresh picture of one of Earth's most fearsome predators: a giant with a teenage growth spurt of almost five pounds a day, and which probably died by age 30. "They lived fast and died young," said Gregory Erickson, an evolutionary biologist at Florida State University and lead author of a study published in today's issue of the journal Nature. "They left behind a gorgeous corpse." By reliably measuring growth rings in the dinosaurs' fossilized bones for the first time, the researchers offer a glimpse into the evolutionary phenomenon known as gigantism, in which some species inexplicably grow far bigger than their ancestors or relatives. T. rex was one such giant, as was the woolly mammoth. Today's gigantic species include giraffes, whales, and elephants. During T. rex's peak growth spurt, the researchers showed, it gained 4.6 pounds per day, allowing it to develop from an estimated 10-pound hatchling into a six-ton giant by age 20. By comparison, humans, who also experience accelerated growth in adolescence, gain about a quarter ounce a day during peak growing years, Erickson said. Still unanswered, however, is why some dinosaurs grew so big -- larger than any land animal before or since. Scientists have long thought that something in the dinosaurs' environment allowed cases of gigantism to occur, giving them some sort of evolutionary edge. "Were they going after bigger prey? It's hard to say. We just don't know enough," said CHRISTOPHER BROCHU, another coauthor of the study and a professor at the University of Iowa. Also unclear is why T. rex lived such a short life. Elephants, which also experience a teenage growth spurt, live about 70 years. "We can't give answers to why -- only how they grew," Brochu said.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2004/08/12/during_its_terrible_teens_t_rex_soared_in_size/

UI Researcher Was Part Of T. Rex Study (Talahassee Democrat, Aug. 12)
Florida State University biologist Gregory Erickson has determined that the Tyrannosaurus rex took on 70 percent of its six tons of weight during its teenage years. His research made the cover of today's edition of the journal Nature. Scientists, as well as young children, have long been fascinated with the gigantic proportions of prehistoric animals. The earliest dinosaurs were much smaller, weighing between 50 and 100 pounds. But about eight different groups of them -- including the T. rex -- mysteriously evolved into colossal creatures, Erickson said. Several years ago while Erickson was examining Sue, the world's largest, oldest and most complete T. rex fossil, which resides at The Field Museum in Chicago, he stumbled upon a drawer of rib chunks that had retained a growth-line record. Erickson assembled a team of researchers from the American Museum of Natural History, The Field Museum, Canada's Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology, Stanford University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. They counted growth rings in ribs, the leg's fibula and some hip bones to determine age; they figured out the T. rex 's weight at the time of death by measuring the circumference of the femur, the thigh bone. They verified their results by comparing them with the growth rings with known-age specimens of lizards and alligators. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/news/local/9377588.htm

UI Gymnasts' Invention Now Olympic Sport (Winston-Salem Journal, Aug. 12)
The Olympic trampoline competition should come with a warning. Don't try this at home. Backyard trampolining is to competitive trampolining what bumper cars are to NASCAR. The athletes participating in trampolining next week in Athens are highly skilled gymnasts who can bounce 25 feet in the air then turn a front somersault with 1 1/2 twists. Trampoline jumping debuted as an Olympic sport four years ago in Sydney. It is considered a discipline within the sport of gymnastics. Competitors perform a routine with a set number of elements. They are judged on the difficulty and the execution of those elements. George Nissen and Larry Griswold, gymnasts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, are credited with inventing the sport and manufacturing trampolines in the mid-1930s. The newspaper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031777240970&path=!living&s=1037645509005

Brochu Anticipates Next Steps In Study (Richmond Times-Dispatch, Aug. 12)
The teenage Tyrannosaurus rex ate so much, packing on more than three tons in four years, scientists say, that one wonders if it ever refused seconds. A see-food diet gave T. rex the quickest growth rate -- nearly five pounds daily at its peak -- of any nonavian dinosaur, a team of scientists said yesterday. In this week's Nature, they report that T. rex matured by about age 20, standing roughly 15 feet high and 40 feet long and weighing about six tons. An accelerated growth rate explains how T. rex achieved its heavyweight status while roaming North America and Asia 85 million to 65 million years ago, said team leader Gregory Erickson of Florida State University. He announced the findings yesterday at Chicago's Field Museum, home to the fearsome fossilized T. rex named "Sue." Paleontologists now need to examine other types of dinosaurs, such as sauropods, to see if they have the same physiology. Team member and "Sue" expert CHRISTOPHER BROCHU, a University of Iowa paleontologist, said he hopes the study will help explain when dinosaurs evolved from "something more crocodilelike to something more birdlike." The newspaper is based in Virginia.
http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD%2FMGArticle%2FRTD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031777251693&path=!news&s=1045855934842

UI Alumnus Aids Dissident Writers (Voice of America, Aug. 12)
A leader in the Las Vegas resort industry once hoped to become a writer but found success instead as a corporate executive. Glenn Schaeffer is president of the Mandalay Resort Group, which operates casinos and hotels throughout the United States. He has found an outlet for his literary passion through an institute that helps persecuted writers. Mr. Schaeffer completed masters degrees in fine arts and writing at the University of California at Irvine and the prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. "I was at the Iowa Writer's Workshop. This was almost 30 years ago, and what I learned in two years was, I might not have the right stuff to be a novelist, so I came back to the West Coast and went into business," he said. In 2000, he founded an organization called the International Institute of Modern Letters, in part to promote the work of a program called the "cities of asylum," which offers help to persecuted writers. The first U.S. branch was in Las Vegas, and two others are operating in Santa Fe, New Mexico and Ithaca, New York. Each offers the dissident writers a place to live and work.
http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=E99062E1-A3F5-48EB-AFFB0F9CD2D6A5FD

Brochu Part Of Team Studying T. Rex Growth (National Geographic, Aug. 12)
Teenagers are known for rapid growth spurts, but some 65 million years ago juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex dinosaurs may have outstripped them all. Studies indicate that between 14 and 18 years of age, T. rex grew from a one-ton dinosaur into a six-ton colossus -- adding as much as five pounds (2.3 kilograms) a day. The animals reached full adult size by about age 20. The new growth and age findings are described in the August 12 issue of Nature by Gregory M. Erickson, professor of biological science at Florida State University, and his collaborators: Mark A. Norell of New York's American Museum of Natural History, Peter J. Makovicky of Chicago's Field Museum, Philip J. Currie of Alberta, Canada's Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology, Scott A. Yerby of California's Stanford University, and CHRISTOPHER A. BROCHU of the University of Iowa.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/08/0811_040811_trex.html#main

Schulz-Stubner Uses Hypnosis To Treat Pain (KING TV, Aug. 12)
University of Iowa anesthesiologist SEBASTIAN SCHULZ-STUBNER uses hypnosis to ease chronic pain. "Hypnosis is effective probably in the range of 65 to 70 percent," he said. Recent research suggests hypnosis may work by changing the way the brain receives impulses. He even uses hypnosis as an alternative to regional anesthesia. "We actually did some studies looking at that, you know how effective it is, and it proved to be a rather successful method," he said. KING is based in Seattle, Wash. This is a registration-required site.
http://www.king5.com/health/stories/NW_081204HE_KINGONLY_hypnosispainSW.6e658949.html

Tyler Studies Music For Tinnitus Relief (drkoop.com, Aug. 11)
The American Tinnitus Association estimates that over 50 million Americans experience tinnitus or ringing in the ears. Of these, about 12 million have a severe enough condition to seek medical attention, and about two million patients are so seriously debilitated that they cannot function on a normal, day-to-day basis. University of Iowa audiologist RICH TYLER, Ph.D., is studying whether music can help tinnitus. The idea is to give patients control over the sound by shifting their focus away from the tinnitus. "What we are trying to do is to move the people from the group that are seriously disabled by tinnitus into a group where they are not bothered by it," Tyler says.
http://drkoop.com/template.asp?page=newsdetail&ap=93&id=8009254

IEM Data Used To Analyze Upcoming Election (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 11)
An opinion piece about the presidential race draws heavily from data provided by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HENRY B. TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS-RUN IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM), including a graphic comparing the 2004 presidential vote share market vs. the S&P 500. The writer states, "As a measure of Sen. John Kerry's likelihood of election, data is used from the trading of real money future contracts based on election outcomes run by the Iowa Electronic Market. Academic research has shown that this market has been a very accurate predictor of elections -- better than large-scale polling services."
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109217833883588077,00.html?mod=todays_us_opinion (subscription required)

Tyler Studies Music For Tinnitus Relief (HealthCentral.com, Aug. 11)
The American Tinnitus Association estimates that over 50 million Americans experience tinnitus or ringing in the ears. Of these, about 12 million have a severe enough condition to seek medical attention, and about two million patients are so seriously debilitated that they cannot function on a normal, day-to-day basis. University of Iowa audiologist RICH TYLER, Ph.D., is studying whether music can help tinnitus. The idea is to give patients control over the sound by shifting their focus away from the tinnitus. "What we are trying to do is to move the people from the group that are seriously disabled by tinnitus into a group where they are not bothered by it," Tyler says.
http://www.healthcentral.com/news/NewsFullText.cfm?id=8009254

Kurth Comments On Saturn Lightning (Florida Today, Aug. 11)
Titan is glowing. The thick atmosphere enveloping Saturn's most intriguing moon, Titan, reflects sunlight in a way that makes the planet appear to glow from outside and from the ground below. That's just one of the discoveries made by the spacecraft Cassini. The spacecraft also has detected as-yet unexplained changes in the behavior and location of super-sized lightning bolts that ravage Saturn's atmosphere -- differences from previous readings collected from the Voyager probe in the 1980s. "This is exactly the point of doing a mission like this," said WILLIAM KURTH, a Cassini investigator from the University of Iowa. "You might think of the solar system as a giant laboratory. We can study Earth's atmosphere. But it's very hard to tweak the conditions to change the variables very much. We can go to another planet like Saturn that is much further from the sun, that has a different type of atmosphere." There, Kurth said, scientists can gain new understanding of how different variables interact with one another, sometimes with applications to mysteries back here on Earth.
http://www.floridatoday.com/news/space/stories/2004b/spacestoryN0811CASSINI.htm

UI Alumna Named School-To-Work Program Director (Hillsboro Argus, Aug. 10)
Ann Mackiernan has been chosen the new director of the Hillsboro School to Work program. Her responsibility is to bring local businesses and high school students together to introduce students to the world of work. Mackiernan recruits businesses and helps with scheduling visits. She holds a B.S. degree in accounting from Northeastern University in Boston, Mass., and an M.S. degree in public health from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Oregon.
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/argus/index.ssf?/base/news/1092173459234590.xml

Kurth: Static Indicates Saturn Lightning (Discovery Channel.com, Aug. 10)
A dash through the rings, a fleeting glimpse of Titan and the Saturn-orbiting Cassini probe is racing away from the gleaming planet on the first leg of a long, looping journey that already is providing rich scientific fodder for research teams back on Earth. For instance, the planet hosts a wide array of lightning storms, which were discovered by an instrument that measures radio waves. "We were able to detect the same crackle and pop one hears when listening to an AM radio broadcast during a thunderstorm," said University of Iowa's BILL KURTH, deputy principal investigator on the radio and plasma wave instrument.
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/briefs/20040809/saturn.html

Poet, Workshop Professor Justice Dies (New York Times, Aug. 10)
Donald Justice, an elder of American poetry whose formalist verse and teaching skills were equally acclaimed, died last Friday at an Iowa City nursing home, where he had been since a stroke several weeks ago. He was 78 and lived in Iowa City. His family said the cause was pneumonia; he had also been suffering from Parkinson's disease. Just before his final illness, he checked the review copies of the last of 14 volumes of his poetry, "Collected Poems." It will be issued by Knopf on Aug. 18, the publisher announced. Justice pursued a successful parallel academic career, with many years on the faculty of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Syracuse University and, for 10 years until 1992, the University of Florida in Gainesville. He was also associated with the legendary IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, first in the early 1950's, where he was taught and influenced by the likes of Robert Lowell and Karl Shapiro, and then when he returned to teach in 1957 and added to its luster with weekly workshops of his own.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/10/books/10justice.html

Candidate Is UI Alumnus (Palm Beach Post, Aug. 10)
Kirk Sorenson, a candidate in the Martin County (Fla.) Commission race, is noted as a 1982 alumnus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Post serves Palm Beach, Fla. http://www.palmbeachpost.com/localnews/content/martin_stlucie/epaper/2004/08/10/m1a_3mccom_0810.html

Coleman Served As UI President (People's Daily, Aug. 10)
In an interview with University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman, it is mentioned that she served as President of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for seven years. The story appeared in the English version of the paper located in Beijing, People's Republic of China.
http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/200408/10/eng20040810_152405.html

Journalism Website Noted (National Business Review, Aug. 10)
In a column discussing hate speech vs. free speech, the Journalism Resources site at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is noted as a resource. The publication is based in New Zealand. http://www.nbr.co.nz/home/column_article.asp?id=9825&cid=14&cname=Editor's%20insight

Dreher Named To Board Of Directors (Arkansas Business Online, Aug. 9)
Beverly Enterprises Inc., a nursing home chain based in Fort Smith, Ark., announced that MELANIE CREAGAN DREHER has been elected to its board of directors. Dreher is a dean and professor at the University of Iowa College of Nursing and has held teaching and administrative positions at the University of Massachusetts, University of Miami and Columbia University.
http://arkansasbusiness.com/news/headline_article.asp?aid=38274

Fish Oil May Halt Wasting (Toronto Sun, Aug. 9)
Loss of weight and muscle mass, common among people with cancer, may be improved with fish oil supplements, says a new report. Intestinal upsets make high-dose fish oil capsules difficult for many people with cancer-related wasting to tolerate. However, those who are able to take the supplements regularly may be able to stabilize their weight or even gain pounds, according to DR. PATRICK BURNS of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=63c7037914a3bf715508e2ea6970450c&_docnum=17&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=f7848a8d4ee5f2494939d39008498ad7

IEM Shows Bush Leading (Bloomberg, Aug. 9)
The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS shows President George W. Bush leading in election futures contracts with 51.5 Sunday compared with 48.6 for Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry. The price of a Kerry futures contracts slipped from 51.6 on July 26, the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Boston. Bush's re-election contracts rose from 49.2 at the start of the Democratic convention. The futures trade on a scale of 0-100. After the election, the contracts on the winner will pay out $1 and the losing candidate's contracts will expire worthless. The market is operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S HENRY B. TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS. The institution is based in Iowa City.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=ajKz8LfYxC3U&refer=us

UI Alumnus Retraces Lewis And Clark On Bike (Dallas Morning News, Aug. 9)
When Meriwether Lewis and William Clark began their westward journey in 1804 to find a waterway to the Pacific Ocean, they took 45 men, two canoes, a boat full of supplies and a dog. They did not see their families for nearly three years. In recognition of the 200th anniversary of the expedition, Jack Garlick of Richardson and California buddy Chris Hunter set off on almost the same path. Jack and Chris carried supplies, but they had no canoe, no boat and no dog. They did have transportation, however. Bicycles. The two biked 3,327 miles through 11 states to reach the Pacific Ocean. They did not see their families for two months. Their homecoming was July 27. The two adventurers, both 64 and retired, connected May 23 at the Spirit of St. Louis airport in Missouri. A friend drove them and their gear -- including disassembled, boxed bicycles -- across the Mississippi River to Hartford, Ill. The next morning Jack and Chris set off from Hartford, where Lewis and Clark also departed. It was not their first adventure together. They were high school friends in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Jack received an MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and went to work for Collins Radio. He was transferred to Richardson in 1966, before Collins became Rockwell International, and retired in 1995.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/city/richardson/columnists/lbrown/stories/080804dnriclois.7ea6b.html

Travel Guide Reviewed (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 8)
An ethnic travel guide, "On the Viking Trail: Travels in Scandinavian America," published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS is reviewed.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/travel/chi-0408070214aug08,1,779211.story

UI Whipworm Study Cited (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Aug. 8)
Wound-care clinics around the country are giving maggots a try on some of their sickest patients after high-tech treatments fail. It's a therapy quietly championed since the early 1990s by a California physician who's earned the nickname Dr. Maggot. But Dr. Ronald Sherman's maggots are getting more attention since, in January, they became the first live animals to win Food and Drug Administration approval -- as a medical device to clean out wounds. In June, FDA also gave its seal of approval to leeches, those bloodsuckers that help plastic surgeons save severed body parts by removing pooled blood and restoring circulation. And in the spring, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers reported early evidence that drinking whipworm eggs, which causes a temporary, harmless infection, might soothe inflammatory bowel disease by diverting the overactive immune reaction that causes it. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/9350473.htm

Berg Comments On IEM Track Record (New York Times, Aug. 8)
Sen. John Kerry's failure to get a bounce in the polls after the Democratic convention may have surprised the chattering classes, but not the people who let their money do the talking. Meanwhile, though, traders in political futures were busy shifting their bets to President George W. Bush at two online markets, Intrade and the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, where tens of thousands of investors spend real money to buy futures contracts. Whatever their calculations, the traders have a good collective track record, said JOYCE BERG, the co-director of the Iowa market, which is run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's business school. In the last four presidential elections, she said, the election-eve trading price has typically been within 1.5 percentage points of the actual result, which is about half a point more accurate than the average election-eve poll.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/08/politics/campaign/08points.html

Rietz Quoted On IEM (New York Times, Aug. 8)
In the presidential campaign season, which is now unmercifully upon us, the worlds of politics, economics and the markets merge. Traders watch opinion polls for guidance on whether to buy or sell, pollsters track the markets for indications of the popular mood and campaign managers await each new macroeconomic gleaning with the jangled impatience of 3-year-olds at a Wiggles concert. While most public opinion polls show the Democratic nominee, John Kerry, with a slim lead, some market and economic indicators are telling a different story. On two exchanges where investors trade contracts on political outcomes -- the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS and Intrade, based in Dublin -- President Bush has a slight lead. The Iowa market, housed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has been around since 1988. A comparison of 596 opinion polls with Iowa's presidential futures prices at the time the polls were conducted shows that the futures prices were closer to the actual result 76 percent of the time, according to THOMAS A. RIETZ, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa and a director of the market. As of Friday, Iowa traders thought that Mr. Bush had a 52 percent probability of winning. A version of the story also ran on the website of the L.A. DAILY NEWS in California.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/08/business/yourmoney/08view.html

Modern Trampoline Has Origin At UI (New York Times, Aug. 8)
A brief historical note about the trampoline says that primitive versions of the device first bounced into the world long before the sport made its Olympic debut in 2000. Eskimos used walrus skins to catapult their friends into the air by lifting and lowering the skins. In circuses, trapeze artists used springy nets for safety. In 1936, after seeing those circus nets, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, George Nissen, a diver and a gymnast, fastened a piece of canvas to a steel frame with pieces of rubber inner tube. His invention was used for exercise in universities, then for more serious pursuits like training American pilots in World War II. http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/08/sports/08trampoline.html

Poet, UI Alumnus Donald Justice Dies (Miami Herald, Aug. 8)
Poet and Pulitzer Prize winner Donald Justice, a Miami native and author of more than 10 books, died Friday from pneumonia at a nursing home in Iowa. He was 78. Born and raised in Miami, Justice graduated from Miami High and the University of Miami. In 1946, he moved to North Carolina and earned his master's degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. That same year, he met Jean Ross, a short story writer also working on her master's. The couple married a year later and had one son, Nathaniel. After they married, the couple moved back to Florida and Justice taught for several years at UM. During his tenure, he took a year off and studied at Stanford. The Justices then moved to Iowa, where he earned his doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1954. The couple lived in Iowa for a few years, but Justice still traveled quite a bit, teaching at different universities, including Syracuse University, the University of California, Iowa, Princeton and the University of Florida. In the 1980s, they returned to Florida and Justice taught at UF for 10 years. The family then moved back to Iowa when Justice retired from teaching.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/state/9346930.htm?1c

IEM Data Used To Predict Equities Market (The Australian, Aug. 7)
Do elections affect share prices? Well, history says the first year after the election (or re-election) of a Republican president is nearly always a bear market for US equities, for example. But what if I told you that George W. Bush's win in the 2000 US presidential election transferred over $US100 billion in market capitalization to companies that Wall Street analysts expected to profit from a Bush victory? This riveting snippet of information comes from a recent paper by US economist Brian Knight. His interest was piqued by reports in The New York Times and elsewhere the day after the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Bush over the disputed Florida ballot papers. Among other things, Knight calculated the difference between Bush and Al Gore equity prices and plotted it against the probability of a Bush victory. The probability was derived from the value of futures contracts for the two candidates on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET (IEM). The IEM is a fascinating story in its own right. Set up by the business school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, it allows you to buy and sell "shares" in a presidential candidate online, with the final payout depending on who wins the popular vote -- $US1 per share if your candidate wins; nothing if he loses. http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,10365793%255E31478,00.html

Squire: GOP Nervous About Economy (Globe & Mail, Aug. 7)
The U.S. economy delivered a blow to President George W. Bush's re-election effort yesterday, as job creation fell well below expectations after a week of surging oil prices and a stock-market slide. Mr. Bush has repeatedly said while campaigning that economic growth is "strong and getting stronger," but the U.S. Labor Department reported that only 32,000 new jobs were created in July, the lowest monthly total since last December. Economists last month predicted the figure would be more than seven times as high. Republicans are "pretty nervous," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, located in a state where the race is extremely tight. "What's weighing against the President is that the economy has perked up a little bit but not a lot," he said. "This just feeds into people's larger sense that maybe things aren't progressing as well as we might have hoped several months ago."
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20040807/ECONOMY07/TPInternational/TopStories

Kurth Comments On Saturn Discoveries (Straits Times, Aug. 6)
The United States-European Cassini spacecraft has found that lightning in Saturn's atmosphere is occurring much differently now than when NASA's Voyagers flew by in the early 1980s, scientists said. It has also discovered a new radiation belt around the ringed planet. The discoveries announced on Thursday are part of an early wave of information about the Saturn system from Cassini, which arrived on June 30 on a US$3.3-billion exploration expected to last four years. The mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is a joint project of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. "This is exactly the point of doing a mission like this," said BILL KURTH of the University of Iowa, the deputy principal investigator for Cassini's radio and plasma wave instrument, which detects "cracks" and "pops" from lightning like those that can be heard on an AM radio during a thunderstorm on Earth. "Cassini now has evidence for changes in the thunderstorms that occur on Saturn over more than 20 years since we first started making measurements of these," Kurth said. The Times is based in Singapore. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of YAHOO NEWS, the SAN DIEGO (Calif.) UNION TRIBUNE, WTEV-TV in Florida and other media outlets.
http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/techscience/story/0,4386,265745,00.html

Burns Comments On Use Of Fish Oil Supplements (Reuters, Aug. 6)
Loss of weight and muscle mass, common among people with cancer, may be improved with fish oil supplements, according to a new report. Intestinal upsets make high-dose fish oil capsules difficult for many people with cancer-related wasting to tolerate, but those who are able to take the supplements regularly may be able to stabilize their weight or even gain pounds, according to Dr. C. PATRICK BURNS of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City and colleagues. Animal studies and some clinical investigations have suggested omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oils may protect against cachexia, as weight loss related to a chronic disease is called. There are three mechanisms by which omega-3s may have this effect, Burns noted in an interview with Reuters Health.

Iowa Electronic Markets Cited (The Atlantic, September 2004)
In the neck-and-neck race between George W. Bush and John Kerry, even the slightest twitch in poll numbers can make headlines. Pundits have been issuing declarations about who will win for months. But some election junkies believe that "political markets" are where the smart money turns for the best predictions. These markets allow one to bet on the election's outcome by buying futures whose value will be determined by a candidate's share of the two-party popular vote (in 1992 H. Ross Perot was included). Since 1988 the TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has run the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, the premier political-futures market. We took a look at its predictions on July 1 of each of the past four presidential-election years, and compared them with the actual results. (It turns out that political markets aren't much better than pundits.)
http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/prem/200409/littlefield (Subscription required to read full article)

Kurth Comments On Saturn Radiation Belt Finding (Daily Telegraph, Aug. 6)
The US-European Cassini spacecraft discovered a new radiation belt around Saturn and had found that lightning in the ringed planet's atmosphere was occurring much differently now than when NASA's Voyagers flew by in the early 1980s, scientists said. The discoveries are part of an early wave of information about the Saturn system from Cassini, which arrived on June 30 on a $3.3 billion exploration expected to last four years. Managed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Cassini mission is a joint project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. "This is exactly the point of doing a mission like this," said BILL KURTH of the University of Iowa, the deputy principal investigator for Cassini's radio and plasma wave instrument, which detects "cracks" and "pops" from lightning like those that can be heard on an AM radio during a thunderstorm on Earth. "Cassini now has evidence for changes in the thunderstorms that occur on Saturn over more than 20 years since we first started making measurements of these," he said. The paper is based in Australia. Versions of the Associated Press article also ran on the websites of THE AUSTRALIAN, the MELBOURNE HERALD SUN, the AUSTRALIA ADVERTISER and AUSTRALIA NEW SCIENTIST, all based in Australia, THE LAKELAND (Fla.) LEDGER, ABC NEWS, the WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, the NEW YORK TIMES, the TIMES DAILY in Alabama, the WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM, the TUSCALOOSA (Ala.) NEWS, USA TODAY, the HINDUSTAN TIMES in India, the PASADENA (Calif.) STAR-NEWS, the LOS ANGELES (Calif.) TIMES, the HOUSTON (Texas) CHRONICLE and other media outlets.
http://dailytelegraph.news.com.au/story.jsp?sectionid=1274&storyid=1737919

Regents Back Plan For Divergent Tuition Rates (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 6)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University could charge higher tuition than the University of Northern Iowa under a proposal endorsed by the State Board of Regents. The board, at its monthly meeting this week, backed a plan that would allow the state's two largest public universities to boost faculty salaries by charging higher tuition than UNI. The nine-member board is expected to formally vote on the plan at its September meeting. Under the new policy, each university would charge an identical base tuition rate that would vary according to the Higher Education Price Index, which considers a range of items such as faculty salaries, equipment and library materials.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1168144

New Volume Of Whitman Writings Lauded (Washington Post Book World, Aug. 5)
Reviewed is Walt Whitman, The Correspondence, Volume VII, edited by Ted Genoways and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. "...This is the posthumous offspring of The Collected Writings of Walt Whitman, the first volume of which appeared in 1961," the reviewer writes. "Posthumous, because the general editors and all members of the advisory editorial board for the project are now dead. No new members were ever appointed. Scholars continue to prepare new volumes, though their fate is uncertain. According to the foreword written by ED FOLSOM, our foremost Whitman scholar, the project is now 'hopelessly scattered, fragmented, and incomplete.' ... "Kudos to the University of Iowa Press -- and to Folsom, Genoways and others -- for championing an admirable crusade against the tide of the times."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A44103-2004Aug5.html

Freyer's Ebay Sale Noted (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Aug. 5)
A story about an Atlanta artist who's looking to sell off all his belongings online -- including a large collection of 1950s era housewares -- says that selling one's life online isn't new, but it's still relatively novel. Probably the most well-known individual to do this is John Freyer, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate who sold most of his belongings on eBay in 2001 and then chronicled where these ended up on his web site, allmylifeforsale.com, and a similarly titled book.
http://www.ajc.com/tliving/content/living/0804/06auction.html (Registration required)

UI Whipworm Study Cited (Press-Enterprise, Aug. 5)
Wound-care clinics around the country are giving maggots a try on some of their sickest patients after high-tech treatments fail. It's a therapy quietly championed since the early 1990s by a California physician who's earned the nickname Dr. Maggot. But Dr. Ronald Sherman's maggots are getting more attention since, in January, they became the first live animals to win Food and Drug Administration approval -- as a medical device to clean out wounds. In June, FDA also gave its seal of approval to leeches, those bloodsuckers that help plastic surgeons save severed body parts by removing pooled blood and restoring circulation. And in the spring, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers reported early evidence that drinking whipworm eggs, which causes a temporary, harmless infection, might soothe inflammatory bowel disease by diverting the overactive immune reaction that causes it. The paper is based in California. A version of this story appeared Aug. 4 on the website of the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://www.pe.com/sharedcontent/health/stories/080304ccjccwHealthMaggots.3ed766d0.html

Davidson Genetics Work Breaks New Ground (New Zealand Herald, Aug. 5)
Fatal brain diseases once considered to be incurable could soon be treated using a revolutionary technique that has effectively triggered a recovery from a similar disorder in laboratory animals. In a groundbreaking study, scientists have shown for the first time that it is possible to stop a progressive brain disease in mice with a genetic technique known as RNA interference (RNAi). The research is important because it raises the possibility of using the method to treat degenerative brain conditions such as Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's. The latest research was carried out by a team led by BEVERLY DAVIDSON of the University of Iowa, who used RNAi to correct a genetic defect in mice suffering from a progressive brain disorder similar to Huntington's disease in humans. The RNAi process used by the Iowa team specifically targeted the defective Huntington's gene by silencing it, leaving the healthy version of the same gene to carry out its normal duties that are vital to life. "This is the first example of targeted gene silencing of a disease gene in the brains of live animals, and it suggests that this approach may eventually be useful for human therapies," Dr Davidson said. "We have had success in tissue culture, but translating those ideas to animal models of disease has been a barrier. We seem to have broken through that barrier."
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay.cfm?storyID=3582236&thesection=news&thesubsection=world

Schulz-Stubner Recommends Hypnosis For Pain (WABC-TV, Aug. 5)
Hypnosis often brings up the thought of people clucking like a chicken. In the health area, it's often used to help people quit smoking. Now anesthesiologists are using it for another reason -- to help patients who struggle with headache pain and find that despite drugs and therapies they get little relief. University of Iowa Anesthesiologists SEBASTIAN SCHULTZ-STUBNER uses hypnosis to ease chronic pain. "Hypnosis is effective probably in the range of 65 to 70 percent." Recent research suggests hypnosis may work by changing the way the brain received impulses. "We actually did some studies looking at that, you know how effective it is and it proved to be a rather successful method," said Dr. Schulz-Stubner. The television station is in New York City.
http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/news/health/wabcl_080404_painshowcase2.html

Carmichael Studies Air Pollution (Omaha World Herald, Aug. 5)
A group of University of Iowa students and a professor are working with scientists from around the world to study air pollution. The project aims to "really understand what pollutants are in the air and how widely spread pollution is," said GREG CARMICHAEL, associate dean for graduate studies and research in the College of Engineering. More than 200 government and university scientists are sampling the quality of air this summer as part of the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation. About a dozen Iowa students are working on the project, which includes scientists from NASA.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1167004

Squire: Some Farmers Looking For Bush Alternative (Bloomberg, Aug. 4)
President George W. Bush, campaigning in Iowa and Minnesota, said his administration has been good for America's farmers and he deserves another four years to govern. Bush's farm bill provides $180 billion in aid to farmers over 10 years, nearly 75 percent of it in subsidies. The bill marked a reversal of the 1996 Republican-backed Freedom to Farm law, which aimed to trim subsidies. When farm prices plunged in 1998, Congress stepped in with four straight years of bailouts costing about $30 billion. Subsidies accounted for 40 percent of net farm income of $49.4 billion in 2001, Agriculture Department figures showed. Iowa's economy is about 30 percent agrarian, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at University of Iowa. "The farm economy hasn't been very good over the last generation," he said. "It's traditionally a Republican stronghold, but some farmers are now looking at the Kerry campaign as a better alternative."
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000176&sid=aSGfQPZNbcwA&refer=us_elections

Stone, Sheffield Contend With Gene Patents (Wired.com, Aug. 4)
Researchers in Iowa have come up with a plan to get critical genetic tests to patients at risk for rare but devastating eye diseases. It's working now, but they worry their plan could be a legal time bomb. EDWIN STONE and VAL SHEFFIELD, professors at the University of Iowa, have discovered links between 15 genes and certain eye diseases, which means genetic tests could be developed for the diseases. But often the scientists find the genes or parts of them have already been patented. Any diagnostic test involving a patented gene could infringe on someone's intellectual property. Most of the genes are linked to diseases that affect a small number of people, too few to make tests based on the genes commercially viable. So Stone and Sheffield had an idea: Why not just ask the patent holders for permission to test patients? So far, no one has said no. The Iowa clinic is now offering 22 genetic tests at around $200 per gene (complete tests can cost up to $1,000). But it's not always clear who might own intellectual property associated with one of their tests, and Stone and Sheffield worry that without legislation to protect them, their good luck could run out.
http://www.wired.com/news/medtech/0,1286,64452,00.html?tw=wn_1techhead

Weinstock Worm Treatment Cited (Seattle Times, Aug. 4)
Leeches, maggots and parasitic worms can play healing role in medicine, according to the article. Gastroenterologist JOEL WEINSTOCK of the University of Iowa noticed there was more inflammatory bowel disease when public-health sanitation efforts improved, yet it was nearly nonexistent in less-developed countries where intestinal parasites are common. He theorized that the human immune system evolved to cope with a gut full of worms, and without them, it can become hyperactive, triggering an autoimmune response. Over 24 weeks, he studied 29 patients with autoimmune inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Every three weeks, they drank a cocktail containing 2,500 eggs of the pig parasite Trypanosoma suis. By the 12th week, the disease was in remission for 21 of the 29 patients.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/health/2001995746_healthleeches04.html

UI Whipworm Treatment Noted (Billings Gazette, Aug. 4)
Wound-care clinics around the country are giving maggots a try on some of their sickest patients after high-tech treatments fail. It's a therapy quietly championed since the early 1990s by a California physician who's earned the nickname Dr. Maggot. But Dr. Ronald Sherman's maggots are getting more attention since, in January, they became the first live animals to win Food and Drug Administration approval -- as a medical device to clean out wounds. In June, FDA also gave its seal of approval to leeches, those bloodsuckers that help plastic surgeons save severed body parts by removing pooled blood and restoring circulation. And in the spring, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers reported early evidence that drinking whipworm eggs, which causes a temporary, harmless infection, might soothe inflammatory bowel disease by diverting the overactive immune reaction that causes it. The paper is based in Montana. The Associated Press story also appeared on the websites of the ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS NETWORK and THE MERCURY in South Africa.
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2004/08/04/build/health/40-maggots.inc

Ciochon Interviewed About Book 'Dragon Bone Hill' (WILL Radio, Aug. 3)
RUSSELL CIOCHON
, a professor in the University of Iowa Department of Anthropology, was interviewed live for 55 minutes on David Inge's morning show "Focus 580" on WILL, a National Public Radio affiliate based in Urbana, Ill. The topic of the interview was Ciochon's new book, "Dragon Bone Hill: An Ice Age Saga of Homo erectus". The broadcast was heard throughout Illinois and Indiana and the surrounding areas, and the interview is archived on WILL's website.
http://www.will.uiuc.edu/am/focus/default.htm

Kearney Comments On Bike Safety Study (ScienCentral News, Aug. 3)
Warm weather means more people on bicycles. But bike riding can be risky behavior; each year, more than 700 people in the U.S. die as a result of bicycle-related injuries, and children are at particularly high risk. The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control reports that in 2001, children 15 years old and younger comprised 59 percent of bike-related injuries in the U.S. JOSEPH KEARNEY, associate dean for research and development at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and computer science professor at the University of Iowa, studied how cyclists -- especially kids -- choose to cross intersections. Rather than taking to the mean streets, the 60 study participants, consisting of 10- and 12-year-olds and adults, each rode a stationary bike through a life-sized computer simulation of busy roads and six intersections. With continuous car traffic coming at them at 25 or 35 miles per hour, the riders had to wait for gaps they judged were okay for crossing. Kearney and his team found that children and adults chose the same gaps, but children left less time between themselves and the approaching vehicle when they crossed the intersection. Compared to adults, kids took longer to reach the roadway. These results, published in the journal Child Development, suggest that kids find it harder than adults to coordinate their own movement with that of cars. "They're slower to initiate their motion and it takes them longer to get up to speed and cross the intersection, and this leaves them less time to spare," say Kearney. "It means it's a more risky operation for them than for adults."
http://www.sciencentral.com/articles/view.php3?type=article&article_id=218392319

UI Whipworm Treatment Noted (Chicago Sun-Times, Aug. 3)
Wound-care clinics around the country are giving maggots a try on some of their sickest patients after high-tech treatments fail. It's a therapy quietly championed since the early 1990s by a California physician who's earned the nickname Dr. Maggot. But Dr. Ronald Sherman's maggots are getting more attention since, in January, they became the first live animals to win Food and Drug Administration approval -- as a medical device to clean out wounds. In June, FDA also gave its seal of approval to leeches, those bloodsuckers that help plastic surgeons save severed body parts by removing pooled blood and restoring circulation. And in the spring, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers reported early evidence that drinking whipworm eggs, which causes a temporary, harmless infection, might soothe inflammatory bowel disease by diverting the overactive immune reaction that causes it. The Associated Press story also appeared in the CTV in Canada; CNN; CBS NEWS; ABC NEWS; BALTIMORE SUN; HARTFORD COURANT in Connecticut; the PIONEER PRESS, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE and DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota; CHARLOTTE OBSERVER in North Carolina; PALM BEACH POST, ORLANDO SENTINEL, TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT, MIAMI HERALD, BRADENTON HERALD and FT. LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL in Florida; FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM in Texas; MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS; COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER and MACON TELEGRAPH in Georgia, ARIZONA DAILY STAR; PROVO DAILY HERALD in Utah; CENTRE CITY TIMES in Pennsylvania; ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD; WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE; KANSAS CITY STAR; LOS ANGELES TIMES, MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO TRIBUNE and SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS in California; BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD; and several other media outlets.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/health/cst-nws-mag03.html

UI Capital Campaign Total Updated (Chronicle, Aug. 3)
Twenty-one American universities that are seeking to raise at least $1 billion collected a total of $372.1 million in gifts and pledges. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA had raised $745.9 million as of July 1; the goal is $1 billion by 2005.
http://chronicle.com/prm/daily/2004/08/2004080302n.htm

UI MBA Program In China Noted (Arizona Republic, Aug. 3)
Foreign MBA programs and similar offerings began trickling into mainland China in the late 1990s. Only recently have they surged and grown in size. Among Arizona institutions in the past year, Arizona State University's W.P. Carey School of Business launched an executive MBA program in Shanghai, Western International University began a pilot undergraduate program in international business in Beijing, and longtime player Thunderbird, the Garvin School of International Management, hired a full-time representative in Shanghai to expand its presence there. Nationally, the University of Southern California has a new global executive MBA program in Shanghai, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Purdue University recently launched a joint executive MBA program in food and agribusiness.
http://www.azcentral.com/business/articles/0803china-education.html

Driving Simulator Finances Explained (Omaha World Herald, Aug. 3)
A driving simulator that was touted as a one-of-a-kind research facility has fallen short of financial expectations and will cost Iowa taxpayers $1.3 million this year. The $80 million National Advanced Driving Simulator at the University of Iowa re-creates the look, feel and experience of driving in just about every traffic situation computer programmers can design. The project was supposed to pay for itself, but so far that hasn't happened. L.D. CHEN, the program's director, said he hopes that that will change. The federal government, which paid for 80 percent of the project, gave the university the right to increase user fees to pay for running the simulator. The university increased hourly fees from $1,000 to $1,400 last fall.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1165095

UI Group Studying Air Pollution (WQAD-TV, Aug. 3)
A group of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students and a professor are working with scientists from around the world to study air pollution. The project aims to understand what pollutants are in the air and how widely spread pollution is. More than 200 government and university scientists are sampling the quality of air this summer as part of the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation. About a dozen Iowa students are working on the project, which includes scientists from NASA. The TV station is located in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2121912&nav=1sW7PRXO

Jones Comments On Optical Scanners (Palm Beach Post, Aug. 2)
Optical scanners used to read absentee ballots don't necessarily count all votes. Programmed to set aside ballots in which a person voted for more than one candidate for the same office and to alert elections officials of completely blank ballots, they don't kick out ballots in which a voter failed to vote in one or more races -- so-called undervotes. The reason for such a system is clear, said DOUG JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa. "Very few people vote in the mosquito control board race except the guy who's running and the five members of his family and his friends," he said.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/politics/content/news/epaper/2004/08/02/m1a_absentee_0802.html

Davidson Studies Gene 'Switch' For Disorders (Belfast Telegraph, Aug. 2)
Incurable brain disorders, such as Huntingdon's disease, could soon be treated using a revolutionary technique for "switching off" disease genes. In a groundbreaking study, scientists have shown for the first time that it is possible to stop a progressive brain disease in mice with a genetic technique known as RNA interference (RNAi). The research raises the possibility of using the method to treat degenerative brain conditions such as Alzheimer's. Specialists in Huntington's -- a fatal inherited disease that strikes in middle age -- are particularly excited with the results. The latest research was carried out by a team led by BEVERLY DAVIDSON of the University of Iowa who used RNAi to correct a genetic defect in mice suffering from a progressive brain disorder similar to Huntington's disease in humans. Mice with the inherited defect who were given the RNAi treatment did not develop the symptoms seen in untreated mice. Nor did the treated mice show any signs of suffering from toxic side-effects, indicating that the technique is safe. The paper is based in Ireland. A version of the story also ran on the web site of THE INDEPENDENT in the U.K.
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/story.jsp?story=547040

Niebyl Comments On Hormone Replacement Therapy (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 2)
Pediatricians who specialize in the treatment of premature infants have made remarkable gains. Twenty years ago, a baby born 12 weeks early in the United States would have had little chance of surviving; today, that baby's chances of survival are more than 90 percent. In spite of this progress, the issue of prematurity remains a great concern because the number of children born too early is on the rise. Between 1981 and 2002, the rate of premature births in the United States increased almost 30 percent. The challenge of decreasing these numbers has fallen to obstetricians. Many of the things they've been trying haven't worked, but a new approach, using the hormone progesterone, offers some promise. The most common cause of premature delivery is preterm labor, or regular contractions beginning before 37 weeks. In most cases, it's impossible to identify what causes the contractions. "There are probably several different causes," says JENNIFER NIEBYL, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. In some women, the contractions may be related to an overstretching of the uterus; in others, an infection could trigger them.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-themd2aug02,1,6016809.column?coll=la-headlines-health

Workshop Alumna's Friendship Recounted (Grand Rapids Press, Aug. 1)
Lucy Grealy's 1994 memoir "Autobiography of a Face" was filled with a surprising hopefulness. The book told the story of Grealy's battle with cancer of the jaw and the resulting disfigurement of her face. Here was a young woman who had transcended her day-to-day trials and become a successful writer with a host of dedicated friends. The future, it seemed, looked very bright for Lucy. Unfortunately, the story does not end happily. On Dec. 18, 2002, Lucy Grealy died of a heroin overdose. The many years of facial reconstruction surgery had taken their toll on her body and spirit. From the time she entered the WRITERS WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in her early 20's until the time of her death at age 39, Lucy Grealy had a very good friend, a fellow writer named Ann Patchett, now known mostly as the author of the novel "Bel Canto." They maintained an intense, resilient and almost symbiotic friendship. The paper is based in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/news/grpress/index.ssf?/base/features-0/1091355413199300.xml

Father Of UI Law Student To Pen Columns (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Aug. 1)
Craig Westover, who will write regular columns for the paper on state and local issues, is a life-long Minnesotan and has had a varied career that includes 15 years as a freelance writer, as well as work in corporate communications and marketing. He's ghost-written several books on quality assurance and is co-author of the humor books "Why Cucumbers are Better than Men" and "Why Beer is Better than Women." Westover lives in Afton with his wife, Tam. He has a daughter, Blair, attending law school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and a son, Tyler, studying acting in Los Angeles.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/columnists/9284928.htm

Tax Incentive Survey By Peters, Fisher Cited (Philadelphia Inquirer, Aug. 1)
Do places that offer tax incentives to businesses grow faster than those that don't? Do incentives pay off for residents, either by stimulating investment or creating jobs where they're needed? And what do such policies really cost? The amazing truth is that nobody really knows. Two University of Iowa scholars, ALAN PETERS and PETER FISHER, surveyed research done over the last 30 years and found that very little of it suggests there's much to be gained by sinking public money directly into private business through grants or tax incentives. "It is possible that incentives do induce significant new growth... and that both states and local governments benefit fiscally from that growth," they wrote in the Journal of the American Planning Association earlier this year.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/9290776.htm

Author Butler Attended UI (Tallahassee Democrat, Aug. 1)
A story about Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Florida State University writing professor Robert Olen Butler says he was born in Granite City, Ill., and graduated as a theater major from Northwestern University in 1967. He earned a master's degree in playwriting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1969 before shipping out to the Vietnam War to serve as an interpreter for the military. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/9275065.htm

Schoenbaum Comments On History Of Violin (Star-Ledger, Aug. 1)
A story about the violin says that as a cultural touchstone, the instrument appealed to all levels of society, from monarchs to transients. It was portable, adaptable and relatively affordable. It could be played indoors or out, by adults or children, for fun or profit. "It's an instrument of incredible flexibility," said DAVID SCHOENBAUM, a University of Iowa historian and amateur violinist who is writing a social history of the violin. "Everybody in the world plays it for every imaginable reason," Schoenbaum said. "Norwegian fishermen, Mexican mariachis, Hungarian gypsies, Jewish klezmorim, north Indian and south Indian raga players, Celtic fiddlers from the Orkney Islands to West Virginia, jazz players from Joe Venuti to Regina Carter. Plus Paganini, Heifetz and Perlman. What other instrument can match that? It literally sings like nothing else." The paper is based in Newark, N.J.
http://south.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-16/1091337224184670.xml

Pappajohn's Many Contributions To UI Cited (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 1)
As a venture capitalist, John Pappajohn has risked hundreds of millions of dollars on new, untested businesses that have gone on to great success. It made him a rich man. Now he's betting on Iowa. In recent years, Pappajohn has sunk millions of dollars into educational ventures around the state: the Iowa State University Pappajohn Center for Entrepreneurship; the JOHN PAPPAJOHN ENTREPRENEURIAL CENTERS at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Northern Iowa and Drake University; the Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center at North Iowa Community College; and the list goes on. Pappajohn attended North Iowa Area Community College and later the University of Iowa, now two of the biggest recipients of his philanthropy.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1163351

Johnson Praises Omaha Zoo (Omaha World-Herald, July 31)
The paper's "Notebook" section says that a University of Iowa law professor, NICHOLAS JOHNSON, praised Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and its executive director, Lee Simmons, as models for Iowa. "This extraordinarily gifted and modest man lives by simple rules," Johnson wrote in the July 17 Des Moines Register. "Raise capital from local donors, not government. Don't borrow; pay as you go."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1636&u_sid=1162782

Lee Investigates Asphalt Problem (Peoria Journal-Star, July 31)
The contractor who last fall rebuilt the northern portion of Allen Road, only for the asphalt to chip away over the winter, is on the job again, fixing the problem at no cost to the city. Allen Road from near Alta Road to Cedar Hills Drive first began showing unusual signs of wear soon after construction crews completed the work last fall. Then, freeze and thaw cycles brutalized the roadway, forcing city street crews to repeatedly patch gaping potholes. The cause still baffles engineers. DAVID LEE, associate professor of civil engineering and member of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, was on site this week to investigate instigating factors. He speculates the culprit was the surface laid on top of the recycled base material. After milling work this week excavated the top road layer, the material beneath lacked ruts and cracks, which would have indicated a failure of the base material. "It may be more of a problem with the surface layer," Lee said. "If it's bonded well, it's OK. But if it's not bonded, the surface cracks." The paper is based in Illinois.
http://www.pjstar.com/news/local/b3o2upaa053.html

UI Legal Clinic Represents Woman In Search Case (Aberdeen News, July 30)
A jury has decided that Hy-Vee employees acted appropriately when they detained and searched a woman after she accidentally set off shoplifting alarms at an Iowa City store. Elite Kiray, 39, of Iowa City, filed a lawsuit against the grocer seeking damages for false imprisonment, slander and battery. A jury on Thursday disagreed. "I think our challenge was just to have the jurors understand that there was never any intent on the part of Hy-Vee employees to do anything to embarrass, humiliate or upset Ms. Kiray," said Terry Abernathy, a lawyer for Hy-Vee. "They genuinely believed they were trying to help her so this wouldn't happen again." JOHN ALLEN, a supervisor of the University of Iowa Legal Clinic, which represented Kiray, declined to comment. The paper is based in South Dakota.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/9284677.htm

Berg Cites IEM Accuracy (Dow Jones Newswire, July 30)
Two months ago, when ICAP Energy and the New York Mercantile Exchange launched derivatives that allowed traders to bet each week on the outcome of the U.S. Department of Energy's natural gas storage survey, reactions from energy analysts and traders were at best mixed, but the market proved to be an accurate indicator. Similar markets in other arenas are uncannily accurate. Take the Iowa Electronic Markets, which 76 percent of the time since 1988 has done a better job than opinion polls of predicting the outcome of presidential elections (on Thursday, the market had Bush and Kerry in a dead heat). Participants in the market, who essentially place bets on which candidate will win, may not be representative of typical voters. They may not even vote. But that doesn't matter. "We've found that our markets tend to predict election outcomes better than polls," said JOYCE BERG, an associate professor at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa and a director of the program. "In surveys and polls, people don't have an explicit requirement to be accurate and honest," she explained. "In a market, people express strength of belief."

IEM "Winner-Takes-All" Market Noted (MSNBC, July 26)
On the Lester Holt show, it was noted that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS has set up a real money futures market and the payouts will be determined by the popular vote cast in November.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=8b3014db7cf9af029d9d9354b020539e&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=687d15f811d95799dd5e683ac5cc25b4

Stone Comments On Macular Degeneration Study (Dayton Daily News, July 21)
For two decades, scientists have suspected that genes may play a role in the development of age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. Now researchers have found that mutations in a specific gene are sometimes associated with the vision-robbing disease. "This gene causes 1.7 percent of what a well-trained clinician would call 'typical' macular degeneration," said Dr. EDWIN M. STONE, director of the Center for Macular Degeneration at the University of Iowa. His report appears in the July 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "This we think will lead us to an understanding of a mechanism of the disease," he said, emphasizing it is probably only one of several mechanisms.
http://www.daytondailynews.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/eyes/520200.html

Wing Takes Law Students To Italy (Tiburno, June 30)
University of Iowa law professor ADRIEN WING took a group of UI law students to Italy this summer, where they met many of the country's leading legal authorities. Tiburno is based in Italy. The story is not available on the web.

 

 

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