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Snetselaar Says Red Meat Can Provide Benefit (foodnavigator.com, April 30)
Diets rich in lean beef can help teenagers maintain their levels of useable iron and contribute to balanced eating habits, say researchers at the University of Iowa College of Public Health. When Americans try to decrease their fat intake, they refrain from red meat or eliminate meat entirely, said LINDA SNETSELAAR, associate professor of epidemiology. A recent study by Snetselaar and colleagues suggests that lean red meat can actually benefit those on a decreased-fat diet. A similar story appeared on the Web site of WebIndia123.com,
http://www.foodnavigator.com/news/news-NG.asp?id=51765

UI Fraternity House Ordered Closed (Omaha World Herald, April 30)
City inspectors ordered Beta Theta Pi evicted from its fraternity house on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus, ruling the structure unfit for human habitation. The building was cited for a host of building code violations including blocked hallways, missing and broken windows and doors, fire code violations, non-working smoke detectors and garbage. The same story appeared on the Web site of the WASHINGTON TIMES.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1082391

Graduate's Volunteer Work Lauded (Oregonian, April 29)
A profile of a local man who has volunteered for a wide variety of tasks despite battling cancer notes that one of his efforts has been tutoring students in math at a middle school after-school Homework Club. Lowell Gere's mathematical skills, honed in mechanical engineering classes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, have been a godsend to the Homework Club. He volunteers two hours every Monday to tutor students who are having trouble understanding math. For his work, Gere received Ogden's Volunteer of the Year award for 2003-04.
http://www.oregonlive.com/metrosouth/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/metro_south_news/1082807741251704.xml

Snetselaar: Lean Beef Good For Teens (WebIndia123.com, April 29)
Diets rich in lean beef can help teenagers maintain their levels of useable iron, teach important balanced eating habits, and dispel rumors that all healthy diets are challenging and lack taste. A recent study by LINDA SNETSELAAR, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health, and her colleagues shows that lean red meat can actually benefit those on a decreased-fat diet.
http://www.webindia123.com/news/showdetails.asp?id=36935&cat=Health

Alumnus Is City Manager Candidate (Battle Creek Enquirer, April 29)
Nine applicants, most from the Midwest, have made the first cut and will be considered as potential finalists for the vacant Battle Creek city manager position. One of the candidates, William R. Ross, has a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in municipal administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com/news/stories/20040429/localnews/315476.html

Alumnus Learned To Cook At UI (Eugene Register-Guard, April 29)
Eugene sculptor Jim Carpenter, who created the "Eugene Skinner" and "Leif's Dream" sculptures at the Eugene Public Library, is a former cook and baker. He still enjoys cooking at home, and appreciates the simplicity of his recipes for Corn and Crab Soup, which he prefers to make with imitation crab meat, and for an eggplant dip made from garlic-stuffed eggplants that are grilled until they are charred and collapsed. Asked how he began cooking, he replies, "Well, when I moved away (from home) I got hungry. So I fumbled around with things in boxes. Mac and cheese was a big thing. But then I got a job cooking Italian food when I was going to college (at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA) - big pans of lasagna, spaghetti for 200."
http://www.registerguard.com/news/2004/04/28/e1.fd.homecook.0428.html

UI Dorm Fire Called 'Suspicious' (Omaha World Herald, April 29)
Authorities say a trash fire at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA dorm early Wednesday -- the third such fire at the hall this semester -- is suspicious. Firefighters were called to Hillcrest Dorm about 2:15 a.m. The fire was confined to the building's trash room and was quickly extinguished. Minimal damage was reported, and no one was injured. Students were evacuated but were allowed to return a short time later. Investigation was continuing.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1081181

UI Infertility Study Cited (Chicago Tribune, April 28)
In-vitro fertilization has come a long way since the birth in 1978 of the world's first "test tube" baby, Louise Brown. Thanks to improved technology, the procedure has a higher success rate than it did a decade ago, and doctors now report fewer multiple births. A key reason for fewer triplets, quads and quints is that doctors began voluntarily limiting the number of embryos they implant in infertile women. And yet, reproductive specialists encounter patients every day who, because of the expense, emotional toll or advancing age, say they would prefer twins--or more. In the March issue of Fertility and Sterility, reproductive endocrinologists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who surveyed more than 400 infertility patients found that 20.2 percent said they would prefer a multiple birth. Of that group, 94 percent hoped for twins; 2 percent wanted triplets and 4 percent said they would be happiest with quadruplets or more. "Thus a sizable minority prefers the situation that the medical community is trying hard to avoid," the authors wrote.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/women/chi-0404280296apr28,1,6483353.story

Harvard Considers Adapting UI Rhetoric Approach (Boston Globe, April 28)
Harvard University is plotting a major academic overhaul. The proposals are in a report mostly written by Jeffrey Wolcowitz, associate dean for undergraduate education. A key step is to replace rigid requirements with more flexibility and choice in classes. The report calls for exchanging the core curriculum with "Harvard College Courses," a new general education requirement. The challenge here is to continue the tradition of building students' common knowledge while updating courses with innovative content and technology. The report suggests expanding the expository writing program so it would teach students to build their speaking and presentation skills. One example is the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's rhetoric department, which integrates critical reading, writing, research and speaking into a yearlong freshman course.
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/editorials/articles/2004/04/28/a_rethinking_at_harvard/

Ceilley: Sun Risks Outweigh Vitamin D Benefits (Detroit News, April 28)
A story about the deficiency of vitamin D in many people says the body can make its own vitamin D with the help of the sun, but production is stymied by poor sunlight in winter, and many people limit their sun exposure -- as well as their kids' -- the rest of the year to protect themselves against skin cancer. "It's not a healthy way of getting vitamin D," says Dr. ROGER CEILLEY, past president of the American Academy of Dermatology and a clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa. "You can get it in other ways, certainly not going out and baking yourself in the midday sun, promoting skin cancer and suppressing your immune system." Ceilley says damage could result from cumulative sun exposure. He urged people to avoid unnecessary sun, especially at midday, and to use appropriate clothing or sunscreen to protect their skin.
http://www.detnews.com/2004/fitness/0404/28/h06-135735.htm

Antczak To Head New College At Grand Valley (Detroit Free Press, April 27)
A University of Iowa professor and associate dean will head a new college at Grand Valley State University. FRED ANTCZAK was named dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Grand Valley State in Allendale, Mich., according to a news release from the University of Iowa. He has served 17 years at the University of Iowa, most recently as a professor of rhetoric and associate dean for academic programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences since 1998. Antczak will begin the new position on July 1. A version of the story also ran on MLIVE, a web portal that provides news and information about the state of Michigan, and on the website of the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.freep.com/news/statewire/sw96851_20040427.htm

Sale Comments On Sears Bond Dispute (Reuters, April 27)
A group of big bond holders, including J.P. Morgan, has sued Sears Roebuck & Co. for buying back its debt well before maturity in a move that left investors facing losses of tens of millions of dollars. At issue is whether Sears was entitled to exercise an obscure provision of some of its bond documents and buy back at face value at least $700 million of bonds it issued in the early 1990s. The debt, issued when rates were much higher, was trading at prices well above face value in the open market. In January, a group of bondholders including AIG Life Insurance Co. and the U.S. Steel and Carnegie Pension Funds sent a letter to Sears saying the department store chain lacked a legal basis to buy back the debt. In February, Sears sued bondholders for the right to exercise the provisions after selling its credit card portfolio to Citigroup Inc. In a complaint filed on Friday in Cook County Illinois circuit court, investors are now countersuing, claiming Sears violated its bond indenture by exercising the provision. Legal experts said the case is not open-and-shut. "Both sides seem to have valid claims. This could be a long, drawn-out court case," said HILLARY SALE, a corporate law professor at University of Iowa College of Law in Iowa City. A version of the story also ran on the website of FORBES.
http://www.reuters.com/financeNewsArticle.jhtml?type=bondsNews&storyID=4960154

Vilsack Outlines State Budget Concerns (Omaha World Herald, April 27)
Gov. Tom Vilsack said he plans to send a letter to lawmakers outlining his concerns about the more than $5 billion budget passed last week. The governor said the budget also doesn't appear to "follow the spirit" of a hard 99 percent spending limit adopted by the Legislature. It fails to do that because lawmakers opted to make $26 million in indigent care provided through the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA conditional on intergovernmental transfers from the federal government, Vilsack said. He said the Bush administration has claimed it won't allow more of those transfers, so the money will have to come from another part of the budget, stretching it past the 99 percent spending limit. The Associated Press story also appeared in AGRINEWS in Rochester, Minn.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1078742

UI Cancer Study Cited (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, April 27)
Despite nearly a decade of effort by the golf industry to mitigate the sport's environmental effects, golf courses remain as controversial as ever and the sport's soaring popularity has enlarged, not shrunk, its ecological footprint. In the United States, golf courses cover more than 1.7 million acres and soak up nearly four billion gallons of water daily, the institute estimates. They also use pesticides and fertilizers that contribute to water pollution. A 1994 review of death certificates for 618 golf course superintendents by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF MEDICINE found an unusually high numbers of deaths from certain cancers, including brain cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The Journal Gazette is based in Fort Wayne, Ind.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/sports/8530480.htm

UI Student Comments On Ritalin Use (Contra Costa Times, April 27)
Four percent to six percent of Americans have attention deficit disorder, according to the Attention Deficit Disorder Association. For some underperforming children, Ritalin and a similar drug called Adderall can increase attention span to help them reach a "normal" functioning level. Some experts have said that if used properly, the effects can be as dramatic as finding the right pair of eyeglasses for nearsightedness. Ritalin, however, is considered a universal enhancer. If a child not struggling with ADD takes Ritalin in a pill form, he might feel he has an above-average attention span. "It's related to the pressure students feel to do well at classes," said Katie Finn, 20, a junior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who knew of peers in high school who would fake attention deficit for a prescription of Ritalin. "It's a study enhancer, and people take it with the goal of being more focused." Finn said she has been tempted to try it herself, but so far she hasn't. "At times I feel distracted and would love to be focused, but my fear is the risk associated with it," she said. The Times serves Contra Costa, Calif.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/living/health/8529731.htm

Kohatsu Comments On Medical Advice (New York Newsday, April 27)
A growing list of medical recommendations have recently been tweaked, changed or outright discarded. In addition to ensuring full employment for health journalists, this trend has left many consumers baffled, annoyed and discouraged. "People want science to be definitive, but anyone who has explored science knows that it is an evolving process," said NEAL KOHATSU, president-elect of the American College of Preventive Medicine and an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa's College of Public Health. "Rarely is there a single definitive study. It's a matter of looking at patterns over time and seeing the results come up [with] by different investigators."
http://www.nynewsday.com/news/health/ny-d3773412apr27,0,5554299.story?coll=ny-health-headlines

Student Enrolls Early At UI (Troy Messenger, April 27)
Charles Henderson High School junior Andrew Dragston has accepted an offer to enroll at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as part of a special program for students who excel at the high school level. The program, called the National Academy of Arts, Sciences and Engineering, NAASE, is specially designed for high school students, like Andrew, who have completed the courses their high schools have to offer. In determining what students will be accepted, NAASE looks at grade point average, ACT scores and various other criteria. The program seeks out the most qualified candidates, rather than them seeking it out. "I hadn't even thought about entering college early, but when the packet came in the mail, just out of curiosity I filled it out and sent it back," Andrew said. The paper serves Troy, Ala.
http://www.troymessenger.com/articles/2004/04/27/sports/sports2.txt

Freedman Comments On Harvard Curriculum (New York Times, April 27)
For the first time in 30 years, Harvard University has reviewed its undergraduate curriculum, concluding that students need more room for broad exploration, a greater familiarity with the world that can only be gained from study abroad and a deeper, hands-on understanding of science. "It's always an important event when Harvard College undertakes a review of the curriculum because where Harvard leads others follow," said James O. Freedman, president emeritus of Dartmouth College, and the author of "Liberal Education and the Public Interest" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2003), which the Harvard committee was required to read.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/27/education/27HARV.html

Kinnick's Service Noted (Palm Beach Post, April 27)
In a story about the military service of Pat Tillman, the former National Football League player who was killed in an ambush in Afghanistan, it's noted that Nile Kinnick, the 1939 Heisman Trophy winner from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, enlisted in the Navy four months before Pearl Harbor. Kinnick was killed two years later when he crashed his plane on a training flight in Venezuela. The Post serves Palm Beach, Fla.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/content/auto/epaper/editions/today/news_04d8ad6356b362650077.html

UI Press Publishes Poems Inspired By Whitman (Baltimore Sun, April 27)
Poet-professor Jesse Glass Jr. left Carroll County, Maryland, more than 20 years ago and has been teaching American literature and history in Japan for a dozen years. His writings have led to an array of artistic adventures. A collection of his poems is due out this year, and one of his poems is included in the 2003 collection Visiting Walt: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Walt Whitman, published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/carroll/bal-ca.glass27apr27,0,2407824.story

Hygienic Lab Marks Century Of Testing (Omaha World Herald, April 26)
The Iowa Hygienic Laboratory has been on the forefront of diseases for 100 years and counting. The state established the lab in April 1904. It wasn't until later that year, on Sept. 26, 1904, that the first disease sample was recorded - a tuberculosis test result for a woman from Shell Rock. It turned out to be negative. MARY GILCHRIST, the lab's director for nearly nine years, said she isn't one to dwell on the past. But, she said, history does have its place in understanding the cause of diseases. The lab has investigated scads of cases through the years and prevented problems in the future. The Hygienic Laboratory began with three employees in the old Biology Building at what was then called the State University of Iowa, to perform scientific tests required by the State Board of Health, including trying to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. The lab was moved in 1985 to University of Iowa Oakdale Campus in Coralville. The Associated Press story also appeared on the websites of the MIAMI HERALD, WIKLES-BARRE (Pa.) TIMES-LEADER, TUSCALOOSA (Ala.) NEWS, LOS ANGELES TIMES, NEW YORK NEWSDAY, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, KANSAS CITY STAR, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, SEATTLE POST-INTELEGENCER, LEXINGTON (Ky.)LEADER, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE and several others.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=706&u_sid=1078542

Kinnick's Death Recalled (Omaha World Herald, April 26)
Pat Tillman's combat death in Afghanistan last week calls to mind a great athlete from another generation who made the ultimate sacrifice in preserving our freedoms. Nile Kinnick, the 1939 Heisman Trophy winner from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and an Omaha Benson graduate, dropped out of law school and spurned pro football to enlist in the Navy four months before Pearl Harbor. Two years later in June, while training in Venezuela, his plane crashed in the Caribbean Sea. There were those in the state who thought Kinnick, the grandson of an Iowa governor, would eventually be president. The Associated Press also appeared on the websites of the MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, MIAMI HERALD, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, LEXINGTON (Ky.) LEADER and several others.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=1078423

UI Cited In Story On Gender-Neutral Dorms (Providence Journal, April 26)
A story about a student movement at Brown University and several other colleges pushing for a "gender-neutral" housing option for incoming students said the policy allows students with non-traditional gender identities and expressions -- such as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender -- to specify their preference for a gender-blind residence hall assignment on Brown's housing questionnaire. Brown is also not alone in offering added protections for transgender and gay students. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of California at Berkeley have dormitory floors dedicated to gay and transgender students. The paper is based in Rhode Island.
http://www.projo.com/news/content/projo_20040426_glbt26.eaa2c.html (registration required)

Baron Comments On Political Uniformity (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 25)
Most Americans live in counties that haven't changed their party preference in presidential elections in more than a generation. That political uniformity comes with a cost, according to social psychologists, as followers of the two parties look at the same set of facts and see two different worlds. "You have people who are generally living in a Republican or Democratic county, and they are not going to hear both sides of the story," said ROBERT BARON, a social psychologist at the University of Iowa. "So the discussion will be twisted and biased, emphasizing those things that support the dominant norm and disparaging or questioning the credibility of the things that contradict it." http://www.jsonline.com/news/editorials/apr04/224378.asp

Glass Comments On Wage Gaps (Boston Globe, April 25)
A seven-year study of 324 working mothers by University of Iowa professor and sociologist JENNIFER GLASS found that managers and professionals who teleworked or worked part time even for some part of that span suffered dramatic wage gaps compared to their peers. For example, women managers or professionals who teleworked five or more hours a week for about 20 months were paid nearly 27 percent less than office workers in similar positions. Glass did not study why this was true, but surmised that the adage ''out of sight, out of mind'' explains a lot. ''There's a huge cognitive bias against rewarding workers who aren't in supervisors' control,'' said Glass. ''People who make the decisions about compensation and salary increases are saying, `Who's around me all the time? Who seems to carry the weight of the organization?' ''
http://bostonworks.boston.com/globe/balance/archives/042504.shtml

Kinnick's Death In WWII Recalled (Washington Post, April 25)
The day before the NFL draft, one of the most overhyped events on the sports calendar, a bolt of reality struck with the news that 27-year-old former Arizona Cardinals safety Pat Tillman was killed in action Thursday in Afghanistan as a member of the U.S. Army Rangers. More than 700 members of the armed forces have been killed in Afghanistan and Iraq since 9/11. Pictures of flag-draped coffins, photos of dead soldiers in newspapers and nightly television images of casualties are painful, as is the dispatch of a rare pro athlete dying. In the Vietnam War, one pro football player, Buffalo Bills lineman Bob Kalsu, was killed. In World War II, Navy pilot NILE KINNICK, the only UNIVERSITY OF IOWA player to win the Heisman Trophy, was killed. The Iowa football stadium is named for him.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A39846-2004Apr24.html

Robinson Comments On Drugs That Raise HDL (Los Angeles Times, April 25)
HDL is the friendly half of cholesterol's yin and yang, often outgunned by its evil counterpart, LDL. Until recently, the only pills that raised HDL even modestly were generic or over the counter. The best of them, niacin, is a vitamin. Without exclusive rights, drug companies have no incentive to prove that such compounds work. "We know lowering LDL saves lives. Now we need to know if raising HDL adds to that," said Dr. JENNIFER ROBINSON, a University of Iowa epidemiologist.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-adna-heart25apr25,1,959196.story?coll=la-headlines-nation

Author Valeri's Ties To Workshop Cited (Savannah Morning News, April 24)
Author Laura Valeri, whose short story collection "The Kind of Things Saints Do" won her the esteemed John Gardner Fiction Award for 2003, won the John Simmons Short Fiction Award the previous year. The Simmons Award is given by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where Valeri was a student. Valeri feared the award was a given, a political decision, despite assurances that she won fair and square. So winning the Gardner Award reinforced the Simmons, even if the doubt was only in her head. "Writers are worry warts," she said. "There's always something in the back of your mind that says ... well?" Her worry was much ado about nothing. Valeri graduated from UI's Writers' Workshop, the most coveted writing program in the country. It attracts the best and brightest writers around. The handful admitted each year are highly literate, and competition among them is notoriously fierce.
http://www.savannahnow.com/stories/042504/LOC_bookreview.shtml

UI Alumnus Wins Grant (Roanoke Times, April 24)
Virginia Tech business professor Mary Connerley recently won a $5,000 grant to develop a program on business ethics and corporate responsibility. The grant program is supported by General Motors and the United Negro College Fund. Connerley holds bachelor's and master's degrees from Iowa State University and a doctorate in human resource management from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Virginia.
http://www.roanoke.com/roatimes/news/story166019.html

Kinnick's Death Recalled (MSNBC, April 23)
Once, in America, the news of an athlete dying in some distant place was both sad and all too common. There were 5800 professional baseball players in this country on the day the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. By January 1, 1945, of those 5,800, 5,400 were serving in the United States military. Today, it is enough to merit comment from the White House. Patrick Tillman Jr. was 27 years old of the U.S. Army Rangers, 2nd Battalion, 75th Regiment, and was killed in action last night, 25 miles southwest of the military base at Khost, Afghanistan. Patrick Tillman, Jr., better known in the National Football League as Pat Tillman, safety of the Arizona Cardinals, had turned down a new 3 year-$3.6 million contract from that team to instead enlist in the army nearly two years ago. Each war has claimed at least American professional athlete:
NILE KINNICK, the star in whose memory the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA re-named its football stadium, was a Heisman Trophy winner in 1939. He was a 24-year old U.S. Navy ensign when his fighter crashed in 1943.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/4818322/

Jones One Of Many E-Voting Critics (Chronicle, April 23)
An article about the growing number of professors sounding the alarm about the risks associated with electronic voting reports that when counties in Iowa began eyeing electronic voting machines, in 1994, state officials decided that they needed a computer expert on a state panel charged with evaluating voting equipment. They picked DOUGLAS W. JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, to fill the newly created seat, and ended up adding to the ranks of electronic-voting critics. Early on, Jones, a computer-security expert, became convinced that the Federal Election Commission's standards for judging elections systems were too lax. He says he was surprised to find that the commission had approved voting machines with software relying on "security through obscurity" -- the notion that something is safe so long as people don't know how to get at it. In 1997 he told one manufacturer of electronic voting machines that "the moment one of the machines goes to the landfill or is otherwise disposed of, someone might extract their encryption key and all of their security claims would become meaningless."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i33/33a01801.htm

UI Study Focuses On Hepatitis C Patient Care (Palm Beach Post, April 23)
Poor communication skills and incompetence are among the problems cited by people with hepatitis C virus who say they're not satisfied with their doctors, says a study in the April issue of Hepatology. The study, which included 322 patients at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, found that 23 percent questioned the competence of their doctor and 42 percent had communication problems with their doctor. Of the patients who reported communication problems with their doctor, 69 percent identified poor doctor communication skills as the main issue. This left patients feeling rushed, ignored, misunderstood and treated unkindly. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION,
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/hepa/518469.html

UI Teaching Assistant Salaries Cited (Wisconsin State Journal, April 23)
Many UW-Madison classrooms could be empty next week as faculty members from several large departments pledged their support Thursday to teaching assistants threatening a walkout on Tuesday and Wednesday. Even with a proposed raise, the assistants argue their wages will be 13 to 15 percent below their peers in the Big Ten. State and university officials say it would put them above the midpoint, but they use a slightly different set of comparable institutions. For example, the state's list leaves off Penn State and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where a lot of the competition for good teaching assistants is now centered, according to professor Susan Friedman, chairwoman of the UW-Madison English department, where 120 assistants help teach about 2,000 undergraduates. "We had a terrible time recruiting this year," she said. "The University of Iowa is offering many thousands of dollars more than we are."
http://www.madison.com/wisconsinstatejournal/local/72891.php

UI Herbarium Moved To Iowa State (Omaha World-Herald, April 23)
After two years of resistance that ended up in court, the University of Iowa's collection of dried plant specimens has moved to a new home at Iowa State University. Sixth Judicial District Judge Patrick Grady cleared the way for the move last week when he lifted a temporary restraining order. That allowed trucks loaded with 250,000 specimens to make the move Wednesday. DIANA HORTON, director of the U of I herbarium, had objected to the move. Lynn Clark, director of the ISU herbarium, said while it's awkward to move the herbarium to Ames over some faculty's objections, it makes sense for Iowa State to take charge of the collection.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1075546

UI Finds Cancer Among Golf Course Workers (Raleigh News & Observer, April 22)
Despite nearly a decade of effort by the golf industry to mitigate the sport's environmental impacts, golf courses remain as controversial as ever and the sport's soaring popularity has enlarged, not shrunk, its ecological footprint. In the United States, golf courses cover more than 1.7 million acres and soak up nearly 4 billion gallons of water daily, the institute estimates. They also use pesticides and fertilizers that contribute to water pollution. A 1994 review of death certificates for 618 golf course superintendents by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF MEDICINE found an unusually high numbers of deaths from certain cancers, including brain cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The results were similar to other studies that have found an elevated risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among farm workers and pesticide applicators. The paper is based in North Carolina. A version of the story also ran on the website of the SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE.
http://newsobserver.com/24hour/nation/story/1311232p-8455594c.html

UI To Raise Dorm Rates (Omaha World Herald, April 22)
Students at Iowa's three public universities will pay more for room and board in campus residence halls next fall under a plan approved by the State Board of Regents on Wednesday. The increase for standard double occupancy rooms and full meal packages varies at each university, according to the plan. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has the smallest rate increase, just 3.2 percent, or $181, for a total cost of $5,882, according to the plan.The story also appeared April 22 on OMAHA CHANNEL 7.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1074439

Adams To Speak At Conference (Freeport Journal Standard, April 22)
An item about an upcoming local conference for physicians, nurses and other health-care professionals notes that Dr. HAROLD ADAMS, M.D., director of cerebrovascular diseases and professor for the department of neurology at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, will discuss "Stroke: Risk Factors and Treatment." The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.journalstandard.com/articles/2004/04/22/daily_features/pulse/features07.txt

UI Alumnus Featured (Newport Independent, April 21)
R. D. Rucker was the 10th child of Kirk and Demora Rucker of Swifton, born on Jan. 14, 1950. During his lifetime, he achieved success in several areas and stood as a stalwart example to the African American community as one from Jackson County who lived to make a difference in the lives of others. Among his numerous academic achievements and degrees is a 1981 Ph.D. in History from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Arkansas.
http://www.newportindependent.com/articles/2004/04/21/special/special97.txt

Incoming Freshman Is In Color Guard Competition (Chicago Tribune, April 21)
A story about high school students taking part in drills as part of the Chicago citywide Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps color guard competition said one of the participants, Shannon Crawford, signed up for color guard her freshman year of high school because she wanted to get out of gym class. But she enjoyed the discipline and precision and became commander of the drill platoon. Inspired by her experience, Crawford enlisted in the Army National Guard and will attend boot camp this summer and undergo more training this fall before starting college at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA next year.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0404210353apr21,1,7051368.story?coll=chi-newslocalchicago-hed

Ryan Warns Of Risks Associated With Multiple Births (WebIndia, April 21)
Multiple births -- twins, triplets or more babies in one pregnancy -- have more risks of infant death and long-term disabilities such as cerebral palsy than births of single babies do. However, many couples seeking infertility treatments desire multiples and have poor knowledge particularly about the risks for twins, a University of Iowa study reported. The investigation found that one in five women seeking treatment desired multiples over having a singleton, or one baby. While patients usually knew about risks of triplets and higher order multiples, slightly less than 50 percent knew about twins' increased risk of cerebral palsy. Even fewer, 30 percent, knew of the increased risk of infant death, which is eight times higher for twins than for singletons. The findings appeared in the March 2004 issue of the journal Fertility and Sterility. "Most of the twins seen in public or on the news are success stories. However, there are many risky and unsuccessful twin pregnancies," said GINNY RYAN, UI fellow in obstetrics and gynecology and study co-author. A version of the story also ran on the website of innovations-report.com, based in Germany.
http://www.webindia123.com/news/showdetails.asp?id=36303&cat=Health

Solow: Ruling Would Invite Suits (Rolling Stone, April 20)
In a legal setback for the world's largest concert promoter, Clear Channel Communications, a U.S. District Court judge granted a jury trial to a Denver competitor that accuses the company of "monopolistic and predatory practices." Judge Edward W. Nottingham's 125-page ruling, which mentions Puddle of Mudd, Orgy and the Tattoo the Earth Tour (headlined by Slipknot), says the evidence suggests Clear Channel illegally reduced radio airplay for artists who booked concert tours with competing promoters. If these claims are upheld -- the trial starts Aug. 2 -- other cases would likely follow, says JOHN SOLOW, an antitrust expert and professor at the University of Iowa: "It would open the door to lots of people saying, 'You did it to us, too!'"
http://www.rollingstone.com/news/newsarticle.asp?nid=19630

Talbott Discusses Political Books (WJR, April 20)
BASIL TALBOTT, a University of Iowa journalism professor who spent 35 years as a political reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times, was interviewed by WJR's Paul Smith on the ABC radio network's Sam Donaldson Show about the proliferation of political books during the current presidential campaign. WJR is a news radio station in Detroit and is part of the ABC radio network.

Schmidt Discusses Emotional Intelligence (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, April 20)
Contrary to common perception, experts say, traditional tests of general mental ability, GMA or IQ, do not measure some single, fixed genetic aptitude. They measure a variety of mental skills, as well as the ability to learn -- qualities that are partly linked to genes. These generally include numeric ability, verbal fluency and spatial aptitude (the ability to rotate and visualize objects mentally). Each of these skills functions differently in each individual: A mechanic may have sublime spatial skills but limited numeric ability, and vice versa for an accountant. But the idea is that by measuring several things at once you detect an intelligence that shares all three, said FRANK SCHMIDT, an industrial psychologist who studies intelligence testing at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Fort Wayne, Ind.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/business/8474129.htm

Cisnernos Attended Writers' Workshop (San Diego Union-Tribune, April 20)
When she was just 22, author Sandra Cisneros began addressing issues of ethnicity and class when she started writing "The House on Mango Street." The book centers on a young Chicana character named Esperanza, which in English means "hope." The character struggles with poverty and yearns for her own dream house. Cisneros said the rage she felt while attending a seminar in the late-1970s, as a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP student, spurred her to write. The seminar was on novels that prominently featured homes. "We were talking about the archetype of a house, and people were talking about a happy place that had tables and chairs and a yard," Cisneros said. "It was then that I realized then the class differences between me and the other students. Those weren't the houses I lived in -- mine were rundown and fixer-uppers. We pretend we live in a country where there's an equal playing field and people can pull themselves up from their bootstraps."
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/features/20040420-9999-1c20author.html

Test Assesses Ability To Live Alone (Tallahassee Democrat, April 20)
The decision to convince loved ones they shouldn't be living alone is often difficult and emotional. But now, professors at the University of Iowa College of Nursing have developed a new test -- the Assessment for Risk of Living Alone -- to help caregivers and professionals make the call with more objectivity. The assessment is a checklist that groups problems by the severity of risk they pose. The most serious problems, such as making medication mistakes or wandering outside the home, require immediate action. A second group of behaviors, such as incontinence or allowing garbage to accumulate, needs to be addressed within a few weeks. A third group, which includes losing or hiding belongings, should be monitored. GERI HALL, a University of Iowa nursing professor who helped create the test, described the new assessment recently at the Alzheimer's Association Western Carolina Chapter spring conference in Charlotte, N.C. Often, it's hard for families to recognize risks, she told her audience. Even when they see a problem, they assume it won't happen again. "You never want to think the worst about your parent." People can misjudge risk, too, she says. "Nobody died from not bathing," she says. "You can live a long time with dirty clothes." The newspaper is based in Tallahassee, Fla.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/living/people/family/8469012.htm

Local Folk Singer Attended UI (Washington Post, April 20)
In 1969, when singer-songwriter Greg Brown was in his first year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, he'd worked up enough songs to win a contest to open a show for singer-songwriter Eric Andersen, who invited him to New York. He dropped out and headed east "to see what was going on." Folk's commercial heyday was pretty much over by then, but Brown didn't know that. "I wasn't aware of the folk boom at all," he says. "I grew up in the thing where people sat around and played these old songs."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A25914-2004Apr19.html

Hogan's Replacement At OSU Named (Columbus Business First, April 19)
John Roberts has been appointed dean of Ohio State University's College of Humanities, effective June 1. He replaces MICHAEL HOGAN, who left Ohio State to become provost of the University of Iowa. The publication is based in Ohio.
http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2004/04/19/daily1.htm

3. Galvin To Read At Portland State (Salem Statesman Journal, April 19)
Poet JAMES GALVIN will give a reading at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in Room 238 of Smith Memorial Student Union Browsing Lounge on the campus of Portland State University at 1825 SW Broadway in Portland. The Laramie rancher and University of Iowa writing professor will read from his works and discuss poetry. The paper is based in Oregon.
http://news.statesmanjournal.com/article.cfm?i=78849

Fertility Clients Often Want Multiple Kids (Los Angeles Times, April 19)
In vitro fertilization has come a long way since the birth in 1978 of the world's first "test tube" baby, Louise Brown. Thanks to improved technology, the procedure has a higher success rate than it did a decade ago and doctors now report fewer multiple births. A key reason for fewer triplets, quads and quints is that doctors began voluntarily limiting the number of embryos they implant in infertile women. And yet, reproductive specialists encounter patients every day who, because of the expense, emotional toll or advancing age, say they'd prefer twins -- or more. In the March issue of Fertility and Sterility, reproductive endocrinologists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who surveyed more than 400 infertility patients found that 20.2 percent said they would prefer a multiple birth. Of that group, 94 percent hoped for twins; two percent wanted triplets and four percent said they'd be happiest with quadruplets or more.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-invitro19apr19,1,4340572.story?coll=la-headlines-health

Bishop Comments On Youngest Liver Transplant Recipient (The Star, April 19)
Kaylee Lindley, gurgling under a pale yellow blanket, has good fortune and medical derring-do to thank for making her one of the world's youngest liver transplant survivors. For reasons that still baffle medical experts, she was born in November without the cells needed to make her liver function, including clotting blood and removing toxins. Lacking options and time, Kaylee's father Jim agreed to donate a piece of his liver, and with his wife Kellie, gave specialists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS permission to perform a risky and complex transplant on their daughter. Months later, the operation has been deemed a success and has made the Port Byron, Illinois, toddler -- just 19 days old at the time -- among the youngest ever to survive the transplant procedure, hospital and donor organizations say. "She is still working through some surgical-related complications," said Dr. WARREN BISHOP, a specialist in paediatric gastro-enterology. "But we expect her to have a normal childhood and that she will grow up to be a normal adult." The paper is based in South Africa. A version of the story also ran on the website of the CHICAGO SUN TIMES, the EVANSVILLE (Ind.) COURIER & PRESS, WCCO-TV in Minnesota, CBS 11 in Texas, CBS New York, WBBM in Illinois, the ITHACA JOURNAL in New York, NEWSDAY and many other media outlets.
http://www.thestar.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=132&fArticleId=407555

Coleman's UI Presidency Cited (Battle Creek Enquirer, April 18)
Mary Sue Coleman, president of the University of Michigan, is this year's commencement speaker at Albion College's graduation ceremonies May 8. Coleman served as president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for seven years. She became U of M president in 2002. The paper is based in Michigan.
http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com/news/stories/20040418/localnews/204950.html

Workshop Graduate Patchett To Read (Houston Chronicle, April 17)
Ann Patchett and Julia Glass, two much-praised novelists who have escaped the ghetto of literary fiction and achieved a mass audience, will read Monday in the concluding event of this year's Inprint Brown Reading Series. Patchett is the author of four novels, most recently Bel Canto, a tale that combines love, opera and hostage-taking in an unnamed South American country. Patchett, who was born in Los Angeles and now lives in Nashville, Tenn., is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/ae/books/news/2508415

Ciochan Writes About Peking Man (New Scientist, April 17)
Far from being civilized, was Peking Man at heart a simple creature, shunning the cold and with only tenuous control over fire? A reconstruction by Noel T. Boaz and RUSSELL L. CIOCHON, professor of anthropology at the University of Iowa, is forcing us to rethink the lifestyle of our famous ancestor. The professors write about this subject in "Dragon Bone Hill, an Ice-Age Saga of Homo Erectus," published this month in the UK by Oxford University Press.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a0143bbc584f441945a3bf7ee1d821fe&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVA&_md5=a1c80ecfc673aa5445b2d23377073300

Press Credentials Denied To Student Newspapers (MSNBC, April 16)
When the president visited Des Moines, Iowa, yesterday, the White House press office refused to issue media credentials to the representatives of the student newspapers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State and a Des Moines community college. This report was made in MSNBC's "Countdown" program.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5bd8b0043785e943996d57630fcf16e3&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVA&_md5=6391fc8473d1e3b680df81c6c0fdd2f9

Jones To Replace Hines As UI Law Dean (Chronicle, April 16)
The publication's Coming and Goings column reports that in July CAROLYN C. JONES, 48, will become the first woman to lead the University of Iowa's law school. She leaves the University of Connecticut and replaces N. WILLIAM HINES, who is retiring.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i32/32a01101.htm

Tiny Transplant Survivor Amazes UI Doctors (USA Today, April 16)
Kaylee Lindley, gurgling under a pale yellow blanket, has good fortune and medical derring-do to thank for making her one of the world's youngest liver transplant survivors. For reasons that still baffle medical experts, she was born in November without the cells needed to make her liver function, including clotting blood and removing toxins. Lacking options and time, Kaylee's father, Jim, agreed to donate a piece of his liver, and with his wife, Kellie, gave specialists at the University of Iowa Hospitals permission to perform a risky and complex transplant on their daughter. Months later, the operation has been deemed a success and has made the Port Byron, Ill., toddler -- just 19 days old at the time -- among the youngest ever to survive the transplant procedure. Doctors predict she will lead a happy, healthy life. "She is still working through some surgical-related complications," said Dr. WARREN BISHOP, a specialist in pediatric gastroenterology. "But we expect her to have a normal childhood and that she will grow up to be a normal adult." This story also appeared on the Web sties of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, LOS ANGELES TIMES, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, ORLANDO SENTINEL, MIAMI HERALD, BALTIMORE SUN, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, KANSAS CITY STAR, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL, TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT, THE INDEPENDENT (South Africa), PALM BEACH POST and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2004-04-16-tiny-transplant_x.htm

Squire Comments on Iowa's Electoral Votes (Bloomberg News, April 16)
In the upcoming presidential elections, Iowa is clearly a toss-up state. "Iowa is divided evenly between Democrats and Republicans, and it's clearly a state both parties think they can win," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "The Democrats are probably favored to win because the state has drifted toward that party in the last four presidential elections, but it's so close that the Republicans have to try."
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=aVo1Wn0KjH7k&refer=us

Jones Comments On La Crosse Deaths (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 16)
As news spread Thursday that Jared Dion was the sixth University of Wisconsin-La Crosse student to drown in the Mississippi River in recent years, the word "coincidence" didn't sound convincing to many who heard it. Parents and average citizens doubted it. Students were skeptical. And relatives of other young men found floating in its mighty waters didn't buy the determination by police that all six deaths were unrelated accidents. Police blamed the deaths on binge drinking near a treacherous body of water. But if those were the only factors, University of Iowa vice president of student services PHILLIP E. JONES wonders why his university of nearly 29,000 students doesn't face the same problem. "We're right up there along with Wisconsin as having some of the worst binge drinking," he said. "We have more bars per mile or square inch than anybody I've ever heard of. There are probably 50 within a mile of the center of campus." And the Iowa River, more than 100 yards wide, cuts through the center of campus. As at UW-La Crosse, most nightclubs are within three blocks of the river. "Most of the students have to cross the river to get home," he said. "It's just not seen as a major liability."
http://www.jsonline.com/news/wauk/apr04/222574.asp

Spreen Discusses MBA Admissions Policies (BusinessWeek, April 15)
A Q & A about MBA admissions policies with MARY SPREEN, director of MBA admissions and financial aid at the Tippie School of Management at the University of Iowa, is featured.
http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/content/apr2004/bs20040415_4033_bs037.htm

Alumnus Named Community College President (Bend Bulletin, April 15)
James Middleton was named president of Central Oregon Community College in Bend, Ore. Middleton earned his B.A. and M.A. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.bendbulletin.com/news/story.cfm?story_no=13229

Swiss Comments On "Digital Epistolary Novel" (New York Times, April 15)
" Intimacies," the earnest new "novel" by Eric Brown, is drawing notice more for its style than for its content. A former English professor who teaches executives how to write, Mr. Brown, 59, calls "Intimacies" a digital epistolary novel, or DEN, terms that he has trademarked. The plot of "Intimacies" is based on "Pamela," the 18th-century work by Samuel Richardson that is one of Western literature's first epistolary novels. It is the format of Mr. Brown's work rather than its story that makes it postmodern: it is meant to be read with the aid of a software interface designed by Billy McQuown, an employee at Mr. Brown's consulting firm, Communication Associates. The story unfolds through e-mail messages, instant-message conversations and Web sites, all within a window generated by the DEN software; the program can be downloaded free from Mr. Brown's Web site, www.greatamericannovel.com. Although they have attracted a lot of attention, digital epistolary and message fiction like "Intimacies" are not the only electronic forms of literature vying for attention on the Web. A small community of so-called hypertext writers, many of them affiliated with academia, have been publishing more experimental work in online journals like The Iowa Review Web and BeeHive for more than a decade. Such writing includes texts with animation and works created by using rules and random processes to generate something different for each reader. THOM SWISS, editor of The Iowa Review Web and a professor of English at the University of Iowa who focuses on those forms of hypertext, said that to him Mr. Brown's creation seemed mechanical. "While inventive if buggy, I'm not sure how useful it is," he said. "At this stage of its development, it's more of a game and less literature -- and not because of the pulp story but because the formal elements of composing the piece are given to you: you just fill in the content."
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/15/technology/circuits/15nove.html

Tiny Transplant Patient Progressing Well (Duluth News Tribune, April 15)
Kaylee Lindley, gurgling under a pale yellow blanket, has good fortune and medical derring-do to thank for making her one of the world's youngest liver transplant survivors. For reasons that still baffle medical experts, Lindley was born in November without the cells needed to make her liver function, including clotting blood and removing toxins. Lacking options and time, Kaylee's father, Jim, agreed to donate an apple-sized piece of his liver, and with his wife, Kellie, gave specialists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA permission to perform a risky and complex transplant on their daughter. Months later, the operation has been deemed a success and has made the Port Byron, Ill. toddler -- just 19 days old at the time -- among the youngest ever to survive the transplant procedure, hospital and donor organizations say. "She is still working through some surgical related complications," said Dr. WARREN BISHOP, a specialist in pediatric gastroenterology. "But we expect her to have a normal childhood and that she will grow up to be a normal adult." The newspaper is based in Minnesota. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared April 15 on the web sites of the BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, WILKES BARRE (Pa.) TIMES LEADER, MLIVE.com in Michigan, SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, WTOP and WJLA both in Washington, D.C., GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, MIAMI HERALD, ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, PALM BEACH (Fla.) POST, ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, NEWSDAY, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, MONGOMERY COUNTY (Pa.) RECORD, and OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/living/health/8437805.htm

Adams' Choreography Featured (Tuscon Weekly, April 15)
An upcoming dance performance includes the duet "Now and Then," which was choreographed by CHARLOTTE ADAMS, the former director of Tucson's 10th Street Danceworks and now a professor of dance at the University of Iowa.
http://www.tucsonweekly.com/gbase/Arts/Content?oid=oid:55715

UI Dean Praises Vilsack Air Quality Veto (Pork Magazine, April 15)
Gov. Tom Vilsack vetoed air quality legislation for livestock confinements because he contends the limits are too lenient. "It is believed that, under this standard, there is not a single confinement facility in the state of Iowa that would have any fear of violating this standard," says Vilsack. Members of the activist group, Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, and the dean of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH, praised the veto.
http://www.porkmag.com/news_editorial.asp?pgID=675&ed_id=2631

Dental Microbiologist Worked At UI (Chicago Tribune, April 14)
After a talk with microbiologist Christine Wu, you might think twice about kissing anyone on the mouth without first passing out some antiseptic mouthwash. Why? Because "everything starts with the mouth," Wu says during a break in one of her two offices at the College of Dentistry at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is a professor of periodontics and associate dean for research there. Wu arrived in Chicago from Taiwan in 1970 for graduate school at Loyola University. Eventually she took a position at the University of Colorado Dental School, where her work took her deeper into exploration of natural antibacterial agents. She did the same at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she went to work in 1990.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/women/chi-0404140026apr14,1,6487935.story?coll=chi-leisurewomannews-hed

'UI Professor' Quoted In Story On India Job Exports (Watley Review, April 13)
A satirical article about India's alleged frustration over the export of American customer service jobs to that country quotes a fictitious professor of economics at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, "Mandy Tomarski." The faux story reports that India is a popular location for outsourcing call centers because it has a skilled workforce fluent in English. Many companies, in fact, provide extensive coaching to their Indian employees in order to create the illusion that the help centers are located in the United States. "They help them acquire regional American accents and cultural references," says the mythical Tomarski. "Many Indian workers take pride in emulating these accents and personas, even going to far as to study local details and cultural references so they can, for example, pretend they are from Minnesota." A disclaimer on the website states that "The Watley Review is dedicated to the production of articles completely without journalistic merit or factual basis, as this would entail leaving our chairs or actually working."
http://www.watleyreview.com/2004/041304-3.html

Woman Took Part In UI Health Study (Everett Herald, April 13)
Only half the women over 50 that were eligible for mammograms paid by Medicare had one in 2001 or 2002, according to the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. That translates to about 7.6 million women nationwide. The numbers suggest older women may be misjudging the value of regular breast cancer screenings. Lorna Johns was part of a women's health study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1994 and had two mammograms -- one by the university, the other ordered by her doctor. "I had two in a short time and I thought, 'I won't have one this year,' " she said. Luckily, the cancer was found before it spread and became life-threatening. But the diagnosis meant that for five years after surgery she was on the drug tamoxifen, which slows or stops the growth of new breast cancer cells. She has remained cancer-free. The paper is based in Washington state.
http://www.heraldnet.com/Stories/04/4/13/18446129.cfm

Kohatsu Comments On Medical Advice (Wichita Eagle, April 13)
People who thought the conclusions of medical research were ironclad find themselves baffled, annoyed and discouraged as widely held medical advice is tweaked, changed or outright discarded. "People want science to be definitive, but anyone who has explored science knows that it is an evolving process," said NEAL KOHATSU, president-elect of the American College of Preventive Medicine and an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa's College of Public Health. The Eagle is based in Wichita, Kan.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/living/8415576.htm

UI Alumna Named Provost At SUNY Oswego (Oswego Daily News, April 13)
Dr. Susan M. Coultrap-McQuin will be the new provost and vice president for academic affairs at SUNY Oswego, President Deborah F. Stanley announced April 9. Coultrap-McQuin earned her doctorate in American studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Daily News serves Oswego, N.Y.
http://www.oswegodailynews.com/homearticle.asp?id=42026&section=home&network=oswego

Alumna Named MALDEF Director (Los Angeles Times, April 13)
A Mexican American businesswoman with a history of Latino rights activism has been chosen to head the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, officials announced Monday. Ann Marie Tallman, 40, will become president and general counsel of the national advocacy nonprofit organization on June 1. She is the senior vice president of mortgage lender Fannie Mae and has been on the MALDEF board for six years. Tallman received a bachelor's degree in psychology and political science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and her law degree from the University of California at Berkeley.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-maldef13apr13,1,2192567.story?coll=la-headlines-california

UI Student Bills To Be Mailed Earlier (Omaha World Herald, April 13)
Starting this summer, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will bill students a month earlier for tuition and room and board. Tuition for the summer session will be billed June 1, while for the fall, it's Aug. 1. The payment due date will now be about the 22nd of each month. Installment plans will still be offered to students, officials said. The new billing cycle will coincide with those at Iowa State University, the University of Northern Iowa, as well as many other Big Ten universities, officials said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1064827

Poet Will Retire From Teaching (Baltimore Sun, April 12)
Some day soon, the infamous Dr. B, the Zen Poet, the former litterateur Mr. Electric, will retire from Catonsville High School and become merely Gary Blankenburg again. All over town, people remember Blankenburg. You will find them working at the library, serving customers at the coffee shop. They are writing novels, posting their poems on the Internet. Some, like Laurel Snyder, class of '92, have moved away, earned degrees and have not yet published their first books. But, like Snyder, they will proudly say, with fine Blankenburgian humor, "I have an MFA in poetry - can I take your order?" They wear their indifference to the quotidian world proudly, just as he would have them do. "It's important to say that I am where I am because I took a creative writing class in high school," said Snyder, who works at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and writes poetry. "And it happened because Gary Blankenburg made it happen. In the end, he changed my life."
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/education/bal-to.poet13apr13,0,5993797.story?coll=bal-education-k12

UI Rankings Cited In Opinion Piece (New York Times, April 12)
Austan Goolsbee, a professor of economics at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, deconstructs the annual graduate school rankings by U.S. News & World Report. "For the large mass of schools that rate in the middle of lists like U.S. News & World Report's, rankings are extremely sensitive to small blips," he writes. "Any criteria included in a survey, like undergraduate grade point average or percentage of applicants accepted, will have random variations over time. ... It's why schools at the top seldom move more than a place or two, but the TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA can move up five spots one year and down 18 the next (which is what just happened)."
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/12/opinion/12GOOL.html

UI May Cut Some Athletic Programs (Omaha World-Herald, April 12)
The University of Iowa athletic department might have to drop one or more varsity sports if the school reduces an annual $2.4 million subsidy, Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY said. In a copyright story, the Des Moines Register reported Sunday that Bowlsby said a cut of more than $300,000 to $400,000 would probably result in programs being dropped. The yearly subsidy from the school's general education fund is under review, according to JONATHAN CARLSON, a law professor who is chairman of a task force charged with finding ways to cut $12 million from academic and nonacademic programs for the 2004-05 fiscal year. The task force is expected to make recommendations to university President DAVID SKORTON at the end of the month.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=1063841

UI Mentioned In Article On Assault (Abilene Recorder Chronicle, April 11)
A Talmage, Kan., man who plead guilty to three counts of aggravated assault on a law enforcement officer is looking at a little more than 11 more months in prison, in addition to time he has already served since the September incident. Terry Lee Landes, 55, was sentenced to 18 months in prison Wednesday by District Judge Ben Sexton. Landes' brother and sister both live in Iowa and testified they had researched both mental health and drug and alcohol treatment programs at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. All three witnesses said they felt it would be better for Landes to receive treatment for his alcohol, depression and bulimia problems, than it would be to send him to prison. The paper is based in Kansas.
http://www.abilene-rc.com/NF/omf/abilene/ssiuname=WebOSTTN/news/news_story.html?rkey=0005018+sid=20040411140046.26F26+cat=news

IEM Cited On Presidential Race Predictions (Miami Herald, April 11)
A story about the various models and formulas used to predict the outcome of presidential elections mentions the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, which allows participants to buy and sell futures contracts that pay out relative to actual votes received by each candidate. The market opened only in 1988, but in the five presidential elections during which it has operated, it has been more accurate in predicting final vote shares than the last national polls taken before Election Day. As of midweek, the Iowa market gives Bush a 52 percent lead over Kerry's 48 percent.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/national/8409014.htm?1c6

Study Supports Braking System Effectiveness (Lorain Morning Journal, April 11)
Under pressure from safety officials and several lawsuits, and hoping to keep its market edge, Ford Motor Co. is studying safety changes and added features for its big passenger vans produced exclusively in Lorain County, Ohio. Ford's Econoline passenger vans, jointly made at the Lorain Assembly Plant and Avon Lake's Ohio Assembly Plant, could offer several new safety devices that focus on improved handling and prevention of rollovers in the 2006 models. The National Transportation Safety Board researched the safety and performance of passenger vans on the road, and in November 2002 first recommended that manufacturers install electronic stability control devices that will help to improve handling and vehicle reaction to quick or sudden movements, like swerving. ESC slowly applies brakes and reduces engine speed when sensors detect a loss of vehicle equilibrium, said Kristen Kinley, spokeswoman for Ford's Environmental and Safety Public Affairs. In early March, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA released findings from its automotive safety study that tracked the effectiveness of ESC systems, and said that the devices could help prevent 15 percent of all crashes. The paper is based in Ohio.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1699&dept_id=46377&newsid=11287068&PAG=461&rfi=9

UI Alumna Presents Play At Humana Festival (Miami Herald, April 11)
Though it wasn't a lineup designed with statement-making in mind, five of the six new full-length works at this year's buzz-generating Humana Festival of New American Plays in Louisville, Ky., were written by women. Kirsten Greenidge, whose Sans-culottes in the Promised Land is her "first production on a very big stage," encountered plenty of women-playwright peers during her three years in a master's degree program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. But, she says, "outside of grad school, it's drastically different" and rare to have so many women writers in one place.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/entertainment/8400715.htm

UI To Raise Admission Standards (Omaha World-Herald, April 11)
Some high school students planning to attend the University of Iowa will have to hit the books harder. Beginning in 2005, the university plans to raise admission standards for students who rank academically in the bottom half of their graduating class because of concerns that many do poorly after being admitted, said MICHAEL BARRON, the university's admissions director.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1062992

Student Taking Part In UI Young Writers Program (Jackson Sun, April 11)
Among the five West Tennessee women who are recipients of the 2004 Jefferson Awards for Public Service is Kaylen Mallard, one of 60 students from across the country participating in the Young Writers Program at Kenyon College and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She is a published writer with articles that have appeared in seven publications, including The Jackson Sun. The paper is based in Tennessee.
http://miva.jacksonsun.com/miva/cgi-bin/miva?NEWS/news_story.mv+link=200404116031282

UI Press Book By Freedman Quoted (New York Times, April 11)
The ever-intensifying competition among the nation's top schools grows out of a profoundly democratic movement toward meritocratic admissions. Increasing numbers of young people have been admitted to institutions that were, just 40 years ago, bastions of wealthy, privileged, Protestant white male elites. Now, constantly growing numbers of applicants compete for the same number of slots. "You want to make this resource of an outstanding faculty and an outstanding library and laboratories available to the very strongest students you can find," said James O. Freedman, president emeritus of Dartmouth College, and the author of "Liberal Education and the Public Interest" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2003). What concerns Mr. Freedman and other college officials is that some students have been so programmed that they haven't had time to be reflective, which gets in the way of their educations. In his book, Mr. Freedman wrote that a liberal education is about grappling with life's most important questions as preparation for the moral dilemmas and disappointments of life beyond the college years. The "hyper-managed lives of contemporary students" get in the way of these questions, Mr. Freedman said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/11/weekinreview/11sara.html?ex=1082260800&en=5a8b2769b639cfc3&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Kohatsu Lead Study On Doctor Discipline (American Medical News, April 11)
A new study of California doctors identified physician characteristics associated with the likelihood of discipline by a state medical board. Males were nearly three times as likely as females to be disciplined. Doctors who were not board-certified had about twice the risk of discipline as did board-certified physicians, according to the study in the March 22 Archives of Internal Medicine. NEAL D. KOHATSU, MD, MPH, lead author of the Archives study, said more attention on quality care is partly responsible for greater interest by researchers in physician discipline. The study, "Characteristics Associated with Physician Discipline," found that international medical education was linked with an elevated risk for disciplinary action. "Age is a factor, but the association is less strong," said Dr. Kohatsu, former medical director of the California board and now associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health.
http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2004/04/12/prsb0412.htm

IEM Cited On Presidential Race Predictions (St. Paul Pioneer Press, April 11)
A story about the various models and formulas used to predict the outcome of presidential elections mentions the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, which allows participants to buy and sell futures contracts that pay out relative to actual votes received by each candidate. The market opened only in 1988, but in the five presidential elections during which it has operated, it has been more accurate in predicting final vote shares than the last national polls taken before Election Day. As of midweek, the Iowa market gives Bush a 52 percent lead over Kerry's 48 percent.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/business/columnists/edward_lotterman/8397370.htm

IEM Noted In Prediction Markets Story (Financial Times, April 10)
The idea of using futures markets to help predict everyday events is not quite as crazy as you might think. Derivatives markets are fluid enough to assemble and produce a price, or a probability, for any sort of event - however unpalatable. The University of Iowa has its own functioning futures market, the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET (IEM), for staff and students to use. It looks at a range of different markets, including presidential elections, Federal Reserve monetary policy issues, and the like. Students use their own money to back their judgment: their professors say it is a teaching aid.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=146969e53385879c2e5425975ac5c848&_docnum=18&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=4d308e2ef5aa928164351e10f612f537

Daily Iowan Editorial Quoted (Capital Times, April 10)
For college students outside Wisconsin following the Audrey Seiler story, the revelation of her faked abduction created consternation. Student newspapers have weighed in with editorials. The Daily Iowan at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City criticized the media for making news out of non-news. It noted that CNN also had reported on a missing Iowa student, who later admitted she'd lied about being abducted. "With countless children missing across the country," the Iowan said, "cute white college students seem to get all the airtime -- whether they're actually missing or not." The Capital Times in based in Madison, Wisc.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=146969e53385879c2e5425975ac5c848&_docnum=14&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=8829ccbda3a0be22905523ae5eced71d

Tiwari Comments On Mutual Fund Trading (Wall Street Journal, April 9)
A key advantage of mutual funds is that investors can get their money out quickly -- a feature that comes at a huge cost, a provocative new study argues. The study by consultant and researcher Gary Gastineau alleges that the way fund shares are bought and sold each day, with millions of dollars sloshing in and out of funds just before or after the market close, whittles investor returns even more than the improper trading practices that have come to light in recent months. Effecting a tectonic shift in how fund shares or bought and sold -- making redemptions less immediate for example -- could also have unintended consequences. "The current redemption structure of mutual funds has a cost, but it has a real positive too," says ASHISH TIWARI, a finance professor and mutual-fund researcher at the University of Iowa, because the threat of redemptions focuses fund managers on performance. Rather than adjust trading deadlines, Prof. Tiwari and other observers suggest shareholder segregation: different fund share classes for frequent traders and buy and hold investors, so the former's added costs won't be paid by the latter.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB108145777658578272,00.html

Former UI Student Settles Bar Burning Suit (Chicago Tribune, April 9)
A Palatine, Ill., college student burned two years ago during a bar stunt involving flaming alcohol has reached a settlement with the bartender and the bar's management, the student's lawyer confirmed Thursday. Amy Shah, 22, was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in April 2002 when a bartender at Et Cetera poured high-proof rum on the bar and ignited it. Shah received second- and third-degree burns on her arms and forehead. "It's a fine resolution from our point of view," said Tom Riley, Shah's lawyer. The terms of the agreement, which was reached last week, are confidential.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/nearnorthwest/chi-0404090302apr09,1,6562812.story?coll=chi-newslocalnearnorthwest-hed

Gallery Is More Than A Football Player (New York Times, April 9)
The first day ROBERT GALLERY walked into the classroom, ducking his head under the doorway, dozens of eyes stared up at him, wide with awe. He still smiles at the memory, a group of fourth to sixth graders rendered silent before he could even say a word. The kids had been told an Iowa football player would be their student-teacher, but nothing could quite prepare them for Gallery. "There were a few Kodak moments there," Gallery said, laughing. "It was great."
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/09/sports/football/09GALL.html

Squire Comments On Governor's Races (InfoZine, April 9)
State spending issues, not celebrity, will drive the 2004 gubernatorial races as Republicans try to add to 28 governorships and Democrats hope to increase their ranks of 22. "The issue this year, I suspect, will be money, money, money," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa who specializes in state issues. "Everything is going to revolve around questions about the budget."
http://www.infozine.com/news/stories/op/storiesView/sid/1985/

Pierce Case Cited In Story On Fan Behavior (Chronicle, April 9)
In January students at Iowa State University yelled "rapist!" at Pierre Pierce, a guard for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who pleaded guilty to an assault-causing-injury charge in 2002. Incivility at sporting events is as old as blood-boiling collegiate rivalries, and perhaps, just as inevitable. Still, some administrators, tired of plugging their ears, are trying to promote more tasteful cheering -- a delicate task in an era when students believe they have a right to say what they please while supporting the home team.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i31/31a00101.htm

Weinstock Shows Worms Fight Bowel Disease (Toronto Star, April 8)
It may sound revolting, but scientists say drinking a concoction containing thousands of pig whipworm eggs could protect people against bowel disease. Early trials of the drink called TSO, developed by German company BioCure, suggest it can dramatically reduce the abdominal pain, bleeding and diarrhea associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). "A lot of researchers couldn't believe this treatment was effective, but people are always skeptical when confronted with new ideas," JOEL WEINSTOCK, a University of Iowa gastroenterologist who developed the treatment, told New Scientist magazine. BioCure hopes to have TSO approved by regulators and on the market in Europe by May. Weinstock came up with the TSO idea after noticing that a rise in IBD cases coincided with a drop in infections caused by roundworms and human whipworms. IBD is rare in developing countries where parasitic infections are more common. Versions of this story appeared April 8 on MEDICAL NEWS TODAY, a news Web site based in the U.K.; AL-JAZEERA.net; the AUSTRALIAN; NEW ZEALAND HERALD; and the STRAITS TIMES in Singapore.
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1081375812615&call_pageid=968332188854&col=968350060724

Man Charged With Counterfeiting UI Logo (Chicago Tribune, April 8)
A Romeoville company and a Burr Ridge man were charged Wednesday with unauthorized use of a trademark, a felony, for allegedly selling counterfeit items, the Will County state's attorney's office said. American Family Products, 1275 Lakeside Drive, and Donald C. Bruno were named in the complaint. The items had a retail value of more than $100,000 and depicted logos from several schools, such as the UNIVERSITIES OF IOWA, Virginia and Miami, and companies such as the National Football League and Harley-Davidson Motor Co., a statement from the state's attorney's office said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/west/chi-0404080348apr08,1,4659838.story

Bezanson Comments On Tax Rate Differences (Omaha World Herald, April 8)
Legislative leaders continue to worry about the impact of an Iowa Supreme Court decision that struck down the state's two-tiered tax on casinos as unconstitutional. The Iowa Supreme Court, ruling in a suit filed by three racetrack casinos, said different tax rates for casinos on riverboats and at racetracks violate the equal protection clause of the Iowa Constitution. Senate Majority Leader Stewart Iverson, R-Dows, said the way the ruling was worded, "almost every tax we have is discriminatory in some way, shape or form." Bob Brammer, a spokesman for the Iowa Attorney General's Office, said he was unaware of any new cases challenging the state's tax system. University of Iowa law professor RANDALL BEZANSON, a former clerk of the U.S. Supreme Court, agreed that the appeal's chances are very unlikely. He said the premise of the Iowa Supreme Court's decision is that there is no difference between riverboat and land-based casinos that justifies a difference in tax rate. Bezanson said it raises the question of what other taxes fall under that reasoning. "There are a whole lot of taxes in the United States that are not strictly equal, such as taxes on diesel versus gasoline, big trucks versus little trucks, income taxes," he said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1059987

Family Finance Author Is UI Alumnus (Johnson County Sun, April 8)
Local author Sam Goller wants to help young couples prepare themselves for the high cost of raising children. Goller is creator of "Yes, You Can ... Afford to Raise a Family" published by Stowers Innovations Inc. He got the idea for the book after talking with other parents surprised by the cost of raising a child, which has risen to more than $170,000. Goller earned a bachelor's degree in communications and theater arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1981. The newspaper is based in Kansas.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=11263568&BRD=1459&PAG=461&dept_id=155725&rfi=6

IDT Expands At UI Oakdale Campus (Miami Herald, April 7)
Integrated DNA Technologies Inc. has signed a lease in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Oakdale Research Park to house the company's expanding information systems division. The privately held biotech firm will lease a 7,200-square-foot office building at 2300 Oakdale Blvd. from Midwest Development & Investment Corp. of Fairfield. Integrated DNA is one of the world's leading suppliers of synthetic DNA. Dr. Joseph Walder, Integrated DNA founder and president, said the Oakdale building provides an ideal location for expansion. The expansion at Oakdale is something of a homecoming for Integrated DNA. It was founded in the UI Technology Innovation Center at Oakdale before moving to commercial space in Coralville. "We're pleased that Dr. Walder and his colleagues have attained such spectacular growth and industrial prominence," said BRUCE WHEATON, director of the UI Oakdale Research Park. "Because of their hard work, they have grown from a little incubator company with a couple of employees and a dream into a substantial corporate citizen of our area."
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/national/8378043.htm?1c

Ritalin Tempts Non-ADD Students (Fort Wayne News Sentinel, April 7)
The controversial prescription drug Ritalin, best known as a treatment for children diagnosed with attention deficit disorder (ADD), has been co-opted by a new population: healthy people trying to boost their mental performance. If a child not struggling with ADD takes Ritalin in a pill form, he might feel he has an above-average attention span. "It's related to the pressure students feel to do well at classes," said Katie Finn, 20, a junior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who knew of peers in high school who would fake attention deficit for a prescription of Ritalin. "It's a study enhancer, and people take it with the goal of being more focused." Finn said she has been tempted to try it herself, but so far she hasn't. "At times I feel distracted and would love to be focused, but my fear is the risk associated with it," she said. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/8377691.htm

Bibas Says Helder Will Likely Stay In Jail (St. Paul Pioneer Press, April 7)
The law under which a judge declared Luke Helder incompetent to stand trial on federal charges linked to a string of mailbox bombings in May 2002 also could set him free if government doctors find Helder is not a threat to society. But considering the violent nature of the mailbox bombings that triggered a nationwide manhunt, legal experts say it's doubtful the former Wisconsin college student from Pine Island, Minn., will be freed in the near future. "In this case, I would think the government has some pretty decent evidence that he is a harm to other people," said STEPHANOS BIBAS, a former federal prosecutor and University of Iowa law professor. "I think it's unlikely he's going to go out and walk the streets any time soon," Bibas said. This story also appeared on the Web sites of the Reno (Nev.) GAZETTE JOURNAL, the Minneapolis STAR TRIBUNE, San Francisco CHRONICLE, Omaha WORLD HERALD and WCCO-TV.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/news/local/states/wisconsin/8371003.htm

Weinstock Shows Worms Fight Bowel Disease (Times of India, April 7)
Fancy a change from orange juice for breakfast? How about a yummy glass of... worms? The concoction will soon be on sale in Europe, after researchers found that tiny parasites called pig whipworms appear to have an astonishing effect on symptoms for a crippling form of bowel disease. The idea for this comes from US gastroenterologist JOEL WEINSTOCK, professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa, who believes modern man's bowel system is over-sanitized. He noticed that Western countries have experienced a sharp rise in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the past 50 years. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the BBC, the INDEPENDENT of South Africa, WEBINDIA, NEWS24 of South Africa, FOODINGREDINTSFIRST of the Netherlands, PLANET ARK, the SCOTSMAN and REUTERS.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/604758.cms

Hall Helps Develop Elderly Living Alone Test (San Jose Mercury News, April 7)
The decision to convince loved ones they shouldn't be living alone is often difficult and emotional. But now, professors at the University of Iowa College of Nursing have developed a new test -- the Assessment for Risk of Living Alone -- to help caregivers and professionals make the call with more objectivity. The assessment is a checklist that groups problems by the severity of risk they pose. The most serious problems, such as making medication mistakes or wandering outside the home, require immediate action. A second group of behaviors, such as incontinence or allowing garbage to accumulate, needs to be addressed within a few weeks. A third group, which includes losing or hiding belongings, should be monitored. GERI HALL, a UI nursing professor who helped create the test, says it's hard for families to recognize potential risks. Even when they see a problem, they assume it won't happen again. "You never want to think the worst about your parent." People can misjudge risk, too, she says. "Nobody died from not bathing," she says. "You can live a long time with dirty clothes."
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/entertainment/8374228.htm

UI Fights Computer Viruses (Toronto Globe and Mail, April 7)
Iowa colleges hit hard by computer viruses, spam and spyware are fighting back. Last fall, the viruses swarmed the state's three public universities, infecting thousands of computers and threatening to shut down networks, leaving students and faculty without access to the Internet for weeks. This fall, the University of Northern Iowa will require students who live in residence halls to have their computers scanned for viruses before connecting to the UNI network. Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are considering the same strategy, and all three schools have bought or plan to buy software to protect them. Iowa university officials say it's hard to quantify how much has been spent on viruses this academic year. The cost, however, keeps rising. Not only do universities have to pay employees to fix infected computers, but other projects fall by the wayside when a virus hits. Students suffer because they can't access assignments on the Internet or communicate with teachers and friends. "I can't open up half my stuff half the time," said Jeremy Evans, a UI industrial engineering student. The same story appeared on the Web sits of the Minneapolis STAR TRIBUNE and BIZ REPORT.
http://www.globetechnology.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20040405.gtiowaapr5/BNStory/Technology/

Student Art Stolen From UI Art Building (Fox News, April 7)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student wanted his art display on greed to prove a point. Point taken. A piece titled "The American Flag" made of 130 dollar bills, meticulously hand-sewn together and colored to resemble the flag, was stolen. "My whole show is about greed and how it can take over anyone, and just having this piece stolen further proves the point," Curtis William Readel said. The piece was put on display Saturday in the UI Art Building. It was stolen between 9 p.m. and midnight Wednesday, said DUANE PAPKE, associate director of UI police.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,116363,00.html

Iowa-penned Williams Play To Be Staged (New York Times, April 7)
In 1937, when Tom Williams was 26, he wrote a play called "Spring Storm," and the following year read it aloud in his playwriting seminar at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It was greeted by "a long and all but unendurable silence," he later recalled, and "was quite finally rejected by the class." After failing to get the play produced, he filed it in the forgotten drawer. He soon changed his name to Tennessee Williams, and within a few years began his career as a playwright. "Spring Storm" was never produced or published during Williams's lifetime. Next month the play will finally have its New York premiere. The production, sanctioned by the Tennessee Williams estate, was brought about by an enterprising young director, Coy Middlebrook.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/07/theater/newsandfeatures/07TENN.html

Hendrix Comments On Stem-Cell Research (Miami Herald, April 7)
Legislators in 24 states -- including Illinois -- have introduced bills this session that would restrict embryonic stem-cell research or, in some cases, ban it outright, as Iowa, Arkansas, Michigan and North Dakota have done. In Illinois, two proposed anti-cloning bills are in the House Rules Committee. "Certainly, some of the work and the outcomes we anticipate could be done with these [stem cell sources]," said Mary Hendrix, one of the leading stem-cell researchers in the United States. But scientists need the freedom to do comparative studies of stem cells from various sources, including embryos, "to see what their properties are and what their limitations may be," she argued. In the absence of government support, this research will be done "in secret ... without the full transparency that is so critical to both the science and the public debate," said Hendrix, president and scientific director of Chicago's Children's Memorial Institute for Education and Research. Hendrix had been a top cancer researcher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but recently moved to Chicago after Iowa enacted legislation prohibiting any stem-cell research involving cloning. "There is now an inability in the state of Iowa to recruit scientists who want to do human therapeutic cloning, and economic development in this field has been completely compromised," said Hendrix.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/national/8368974.htm?1c

Alumnus is Oregon College Presidential Candidate (Bend.com, April 6)
James Middleton is the leading candidate to be the next president of Central Oregon Community College. Middleton earned his bachelor's degree in European literature and thought and a Master's degree in English from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Bend.com is based in Bend, Oregon.
http://bend.com/news/ar_view%5e3Far_id%5e3D14698.htm

Medicare-Eligible Women Urged To Get Mammograms (Ocala Star-Banner, April 6)
Two mammograms within 10 months in 1994 cleared Lorna Johns of breast cancer so she decided to skip the X-ray the following year. "That was wrong," she said. "That was the one I shouldn't have skipped." She was 68 when her doctor discovered a lump during a 1996 exam. A lumpectomy soon followed, then radiation therapy to help rid Johns of one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in women. Six years after Medicare began paying for an annual mammogram for women over 40, only 51.8 percent of the eligible women over 50 had at least one mammogram in 2001 or 2002, according to the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. That translates to about 7.6 million women nationwide. The numbers suggest older women may be misjudging the value of regular breast cancer screenings. Johns was part of a women's health study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1994 and had two mammograms - one by the university, the other ordered by her doctor. The paper is based in Ocala, Fla. The story also appeared on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.starbanner.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040406/NEWS/40406003/1017/FEATURES01

UI Alumnus Named President At Minot State (Bismarck Tribune, April 6)
David Fuller, vice president for academic affairs at Wayne State, Neb., should be the new president of Minot State University, the Board of Higher Education has concluded. Fuller earned a doctorate in English from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Associated Press article also appeared in the OMAHA WORLD HERALD and the FORUM in Fargo, N.D.
http://www.bismarcktribune.com/articles/2004/04/06/news/state/sta04.txt

Hendrix Comments On Stem-Cell Research (Chicago Tribune, April 6)
Legislators in 24 states -- including Illinois -- have introduced bills this session that would restrict embryonic stem-cell research or, in some cases, ban it outright, as Iowa, Arkansas, Michigan and North Dakota have done. In Illinois, two proposed anti-cloning bills are in the House Rules Committee. "Certainly, some of the work and the outcomes we anticipate could be done with these [stem cell sources]," said Mary Hendrix, one of the leading stem-cell researchers in the United States. But scientists need the freedom to do comparative studies of stem cells from various sources, including embryos, "to see what their properties are and what their limitations may be," she argued. In the absence of government support, this research will be done "in secret ... without the full transparency that is so critical to both the science and the public debate," said Hendrix, president and scientific director of Chicago's Children's Memorial Institute for Education and Research. Hendrix had been a top cancer researcher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but recently moved to Chicago after Iowa enacted legislation prohibiting any stem-cell research involving cloning. "There is now an inability in the state of Iowa to recruit scientists who want to do human therapeutic cloning, and economic development in this field has been completely compromised," said Hendrix.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0404060197apr06,1,5590984.story?coll=chi-news-hed

Hall Offers Tips On Parenting Teens (Huntington Herald-Dispatch, April 5)
Parents of teens agree keeping their kids busy with activities -- band, drama, sports and jobs -- means less idle time for trouble. Have dinner together, says JIM HALL, associate professor of pediatrics, social work, public health and nursing at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine. Shoot for at least once a week. Sometimes, parents expect adult behavior out of teens, says Hall at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine. But kids at that age haven't mentally matured. "The adolescent brain is not fully developed until 20 to 23." The paper is based in West Virginia.
http://www.herald-dispatch.com/2004/April/05/LFlist1.htm

Some UI Rankings Slip In U.S. News Report (Omaha World-Herald, April 5)
Rankings declined for several major graduate programs at both the University of Iowa and Iowa State University in U.S. News & World Report's annual "America's Best Graduate Schools" edition, though the University of Iowa maintained its consistently high standing in specialty health-related fields. The Tippie College of Business, the U of I's MBA program, tumbled from a ranking of 29th last year to 47th this year. ISU's graduate engineering program dropped from 38th last year to 46th this year. GARY GAETH, the associate dean of MBA programs at the U of I's College of Business, said low salaries for graduates in the Midwest are a big reason for the drop. "It's my fault strategically," Gaeth said. "I didn't adequately anticipate the impact of the downward spiral of the economy."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1056880

UI License Plates Among Most Popular (Omaha World-Herald, April 5)
Iowans apparently aren't lining up to buy specialty license plates that support an expanding array of causes from colleges to kids. In a state with more than 3.4 million registered motor vehicles, fewer than 50,000 sets of the top specialty plate were in circulation in 2003. Only about 10 of the 30 or more specialty plates had more than 1,000 sets outstanding. The success story of Iowa's specialty plate lineup is the goldfinch-adorned Natural Resources plate. Buyers of the Resources Enhancement & Protection plate contribute $35 to the protection fund when they buy the plate and $10 to the fund each year they keep the plate. That added up to more than $1 million annually in early years of the plate program.
A distant second to the natural resources plate is the collegiate plate. A total of 14,500 collegiate plates were issued last year, a number that was split among the state's three public universities -- the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa. Third in popularity is the firefighter plate. A total of 8,600 firefighter plates were issued last year.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1056841

Iowa Universities Battle Computer Viruses (Omaha World Herald, April 5)
Iowa universities hit hard by computer viruses are fighting back. Last fall, viruses swarmed through the state's three public universities, infecting thousands of computers and threatening to shut down networks, leaving students and faculty without Internet access for weeks. This fall, the University of Northern Iowa will require students who live in residence halls to have their computers scanned for viruses before connecting to the UNI network. Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are considering the same strategy, and all three schools have bought or plan to buy software to protect them. The Associated Press article also appeared in the PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORDER, RALEIGH (N.C) NEWS, the FORUM in Fargo, N.D., BOSTON GLOBE, LOS ANGELES TIMES, BALTIMORE SUN, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, KANSAS CITY STAR, ORLANDO SENTINEL, BUCKS COUNTY (Penn.) COURIER TIMES, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM, MIAMI HERALD, SEATTLE POST-INTELLEGENCER, NEWSDAY in New York, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE and many other media.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1056741

Tiwari Study On Mutual Funds Noted (WSJ.com, April 5)
Recent studies have alleged that investors actually have some skill at picking funds and fund managers, but a paper set for publication later this year says that's bunk. Over the past few years, academics have found that funds with positive cash flows tend to outperform those with negative cash flows, at least in the short term. Their take: Investors tend to have some skill shifting money to better funds, so it's sensible that more money is invested with active managers than index funds even though the former tend to trail the latter. But Iowa State Professor Travis Sapp and University of Iowa professor ASHISH TIWARI show that this short-term boost is mostly explained by fleeting momentum for the stocks held by funds that happen to have performed well lately. So why do so many people bother with active managers? "The puzzle remains," they write. Tiwari co-authored the paper, "Does Stock Return Momentum Explain the 'Smart Money' Effect?" WSJ.com is the online edition to the WALL STREET JOURNAL.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB108085877279772116-search,00.html?collection=autowire%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

Lederer Work Reviewed (Fort Wayne News Sentinel, April 5)
" Poker Face," subtitled "A Girlhood Among Gamblers," is poet Katy Lederer's tale of how her family's entry into the world of professional gambling influenced her during her formative years. In this review, it's noted that Lederer was accepted to a graduate poetry program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Fort Wayne, Ind.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/8360323.htm

Goplerud Named Dean (Jacksonville Daily Record, April 5)
A Midwesterner who has made legal education his life's work has been named the new dean at Florida Coastal School of Law. Peter Goplerud, who has been dean of the Drake University Law School in Des Moines, Iowa, for the past six years, will take over the job June 30. His father, an obstetrician/gynecologist, was also in academics most of his career. He spent 35 years on the faculty of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Medical School. The Daily Record serves Jacksonville, Fla.
http://www.jaxdailyrecord.com/showstory.php?Story_id=40608

Workplace Myths Examined (The Montreal Gazette, April 5)
The people in business who are supposed to know most about employees actually seem to know surprisingly little, according to University Of Iowa researchers who surveyed nearly 1,000 human resources managers and executives. The survey participants, who averaged 14 years of experience in the field of human resources, were asked questions that tested their knowledge of basic aspects of employee performance. Many of them flunked, reported Iowa management professor SARA RYNES. One of the most widely held misconceptions was: employee surveys overestimate pay's true importance to workers. Nearly six in 10 survey respondents agreed -- and they were wrong. More than three decades of studies has revealed that employee surveys consistently underestimate the importance of pay in keeping employees motivated and productive, the researchers reported in the Academy of Management
Executive Journal.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=c169c69b8fb61a2acc9d821732a9f087&_docnum=9&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=216e37b8f76cb82e23093d1142c569d4

Writer Received Michener Award (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, April 4)
John Dalton's first novel "Heaven Lake" received a starred review in Publishers Weekly that favorably compared the book to the work of Graham Greene and Norman Rush. In this article Dalton notes that he funded for a year by a writing award from James Michener and that the award had been granted through the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=c169c69b8fb61a2acc9d821732a9f087&_docnum=21&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=d81b6e0e8b94580c3e72e0050444444b

UI Alumna's Play Finds Success In London (Chicago Tribune, April 4)
At London's Royal Court Theatre, the birthplace of modern English drama, famous American actors like Gillian Anderson might get their picture on the program, but they don't get their name in lights. The incandescent bulbs on the historic Sloane Square facade that once proudly announced the premiere of John Osborne's seminal "Look Back in Anger" in 1956 remain reserved for two things only. One is the title of a new play. The other is the name of the person who wrote it. Since the era of artistic director Ian Rickson, a decade ago, the Royal Court's most frequently produced playwright has not been a British writer at all, but Chicago playwright Rebecca Gilman. But if Gilman's dark, startling and intensely personal play, "The Sweetest Swing in Baseball," which opened here on Wednesday, is read between the lines, Gilman is seemingly using her prestigious but distant London perch to exorcise demons unleashed by her rapid rise from unknown local Chicago playwright to a prominent national figure expected to have a major career. When Gilman was studying at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, would this day in this place not have been the fulfillment of a wild dream? "That's true," she finally allows. But it's clear she has come to believe that success and pressure are far better in the abstract. "I guess you don't know the reality," Gilman says, "until it already has happened."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/arts/chi-0404030381apr04,1,104465.story?coll=chi-leisurearts-hed

Talbot Comments On Political Books' Popularity (Indianapolis Star, April 4)
Books, the oldest of the "old media," are pushing serious issues into the presidential campaign. They're shoving aside cable news networks and flashy Web sites, the "new media" it was fashionable to think would dominate political reporting. The influential role that books are playing is unusual, historians and political scientists say. "Why are books selling and driving the news? They mirror the polarized, energized nature of the nation," says BASIL TALBOTT, a journalism lecturer at the University of Iowa. "People want to read and hear about these issues."
http://www.indystar.com/articles/8/135085-9388-010.html

UI Study Cited On Rape In Military (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, April 4)
That honorable calling of the U.S. military has been racked by one sexual "scandal" after another. A Department of Defense inspector general survey found that 18.8 percent of women cadets had been sexually assaulted at least once while at the Air Force Academy; 7.4 percent of all respondents, including 11.7 percent of the class of 2003, had been raped or had suffered attempted rape. Sexual harassment is often the rapist's foreplay. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Veterans Affairs Medical Center study found that women veterans whose superiors made or tolerated sexually demeaning comments had a nearly fourfold greater risk of rape. Without harassment, mixed-gender sleeping quarters do not elevate women's risk.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/opinion/167338_focus04.html

Investigator Clears UI In Recruit Case (Winfield Daily Courier, April 4)
An investigator appointed to look into an allegation that the University of Iowa may have played a role in a football prospect's sexual encounter has cleared the football program of any wrongdoing, according to a report issued Friday. Iowa Deputy Attorney General Douglas Marek said the allegation made earlier this month by high school quarterback Nick Patton is without merit. Patton, who committed to Kansas State, told reporters from a Kansas newspaper that he had consensual sex with a college student during his official recruiting visit last fall, and that the encounter appeared to have been arranged either by players or football staff. Patton's claims, first reported by The Manhattan (Kan.) Mercury, set off a controversy for the university and coach KIRK FERENTZ because it came in the wake of reports of illegal recruiting violations at the University of Colorado. The paper is based in Kansas.
http://www.winfieldcourier.com/Sports/s040403a.html

Rynes Studies Workplace Myths (Washington Post, April 4)
The people in business who are supposed to know most about employees actually seem to know surprisingly little, according to University Of Iowa researchers who surveyed nearly 1,000 human resources managers and executives. The survey participants, who averaged 14 years of experience in the field of human resources, were asked questions that tested their knowledge of basic aspects of employee performance. Many of them flunked, reported Iowa management professor SARA RYNES. One of the most widely held misconceptions was: employee surveys overestimate pay's true importance to workers. Nearly six in 10 survey respondents agreed -- and they were wrong. More than three decades of studies has revealed that employee surveys consistently underestimate the importance of pay in keeping employees motivated and productive, the researchers reported in the Academy of Management Executive Journal.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A46853-2004Apr2.html

UI Officials Comment On Dorm Floor Proposal (Omaha World-Herald, April 3)
University of Iowa officials expect to approve a special dormitory floor for students interested in sexuality studies. "The academic group said it was an excellent proposal," said VON STANGE, residential services director. "I don't see why I wouldn't approve it, but I do have to look at it." Cianan Russell, a senior chemistry major from Kansas City, Mo., started the push for the new floor in the fall of 2002. Before his sex-change surgery, he lived in a dormitory on a women's floor and suffered insults related to his masculine appearance. Thursday he said an online survey he conducted showed that many other students have experienced similar problems. The plan calls for 15 sophomores to live in the west tower of the Quadrangle Residence Hall, according to LOLA LOPES, associate provost for undergraduate education. She said the university would expand the program and probably move it if student interest dictates. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of THE ADVOCATE and OMAHA CHANNEL 7.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1640&u_sid=1055267

Jones Comments On Texas Vote Count Dispute (KVUE-TV, April 3)
The lore of South Texas election shenanigans grew this week as teams of lawyers and politicos dashed county to county in a congressional vote-counting dispute reminiscent of Florida 2000. The incumbent, Democratic Rep. Ciro Rodriguez of San Antonio, has seen his lead evaporate after recounts turned up previously untallied votes. An 11-county recount this week showed that primary foe Henry Cuellar of Laredo erased a 145-vote deficit and moved ahead by 203 votes, nearly all of them on solid Cuellar political turf, the border counties of Webb and Zapata. Mr. Cuellar's staff attributed the vote swing to human fatigue and mechanical woes similar to those that plagued the chad-pocked presidential recount four years ago in Florida. Experts said that whatever explanation is ultimately deemed true -- probably in court -- the conflict serves as a reminder of the fragility of the voting process, that a perfect election is only as plausible as a flawless machine, or a faultless human, to run it. All but two of the 11 counties in the sprawling 28th Congressional District use optical scanning in which voters pencil in a spot to mark their preference -- the technology used in 148 of 254 Texas counties. An expert familiar with the brand and model of voting machines used in Webb County said that the expected number of miscounts for all reasons -- including clumping -- would be a fraction of that reported in Webb County. "I know how the anti-clumping mechanism of that machine works. It's pretty good," said DOUGLAS JONES, an associate computer science professor at the University of Iowa and a member of the state board that certifies voting machines there. "I would be shocked to see clumping like that." He said clumping could increase if poll workers failed between elections to change a wide rubber belt used to separate ballots. "They'd have to go for a long time before it got that bad," he said. The station is based in Austin, Texas. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, the DENTON RECORD CHRONICLE and WFAA-TV, all in Texas.
http://www.kvue.com/news/state/stories/040304kvuetampering-jw.eb7a69e7.html (Registration Required)

Iowa Cleared Of Wrongdoing In Prospect Visit (Seattle Times, April 3)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football program has been cleared of any wrongdoing in a prospect's sexual liaison during a visit to campus, according to a report issued yesterday. Douglas Marek, Iowa deputy attorney general, said an investigation found no merit in an allegation made last month by high-school quarterback Nick Patton. Patton, who committed to Kansas State, told The Manhattan (Kan.) Mercury that he had consensual sex with a 21-year-old woman during his two-day official recruiting visit to Iowa last fall, and that the encounter appeared to have been arranged either by players or football staff. The woman is a college student, but not at Iowa. Patton's claims set off a controversy for the university and coach Kirk Ferentz, partly because they came in the wake of reports of alleged sexual scandal and alleged recruiting violations at Colorado. A version of the story also ran on the website of the KANSAS CITY STAR.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/sports/2001894575_grid03.html

Marek: UI Not Involved In Recruit's Liaison (ESPN, April 3)
Iowa's football program has been cleared of any wrongdoing in a football prospect's sexual liaison during a visit to campus, according to a report issued Friday. Iowa Deputy Attorney General Douglas Marek said an investigation found no merit in an allegation made last month by high school quarterback Nick Patton. Patton, who committed to Kansas State, told the Manhattan (Kan.) Mercury that he had consensual sex with a college student during his two-day official recruiting visit last fall, and that the encounter appeared to have been arranged either by players or football staff. Marek said that while Patton's visit was not typical, football staff and players had nothing to do with his sexual activity on campus. Patton's claims set off a controversy for the university and coach KIRK FERENTZ, because it came in the wake of reports of sexual scandal and recruiting violations at Colorado. University president DAVID SKORTON said Friday that he was "very gratified" to learn that the allegations were without merit. He said there was no reason to believe any school policies or NCAA rules were broken, and he was confident in the integrity of Iowa's football program. Ferentz attended the news conference, and athletic director BOB BOWLSBY participated via telephone. Versions of this story also ran on the websites of the LINCOLN JOURNAL WORLD in Kansas, CANADA.COM, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, the SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, CNN/SI, MLIVE.COM, the ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, FOX SPORTS, WJLA CHANNEL 7 (ABC affiliate) in Washington, D.C., MSNBC, the FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, the MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Penn.) RECORD, the TIMES PICAYUNE in New Orleans, La., the GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, the MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, MIAMI HERALD and many other media outlets.
http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id=1774192

Skorton Receives Letter Clearing UI In Case (Omaha Channel 7, April 2)
The University of Iowa released results Friday afternoon of an investigation into football recruiting. In a letter Friday to UI President DAVID SKORTON, Deputy Iowa Attorney General Douglas Marek said: "I completed my investigation today and have concluded that the allegations are without merit. Neither the university nor the football program encouraged or facilitated any sexual activity for Mr. Patton during or after his visit." The investigation started in early March after Nick Patton, a high school football player from Kansas, reportedly said he had sex with a young woman while on an official recruiting trip last September. A Kansas newspaper said Patton thought the woman was assigned to him, but Patton later said he was misquoted. Skorton appointed Marek on March 8 to investigate the claim. Iowa coach KIRK FERENTZ hasn't commented on the investigation, but he said there should be changes in campus visits for recruits. He said the university should start paying for parents to join their children on official trips.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/sports/2970565/detail.html

Schmidt Discusses Emotional Intelligence (Chicago Tribune, April 2)
Contrary to common perception, experts say, traditional tests of general mental ability, GMA or IQ, do not measure some single, fixed genetic aptitude. They measure a variety of mental skills, as well as the ability to learn -- qualities that are partly linked to genes. These generally include numeric ability, verbal fluency and spatial aptitude (the ability to rotate and visualize objects mentally). Each of these skills functions differently in each individual: A mechanic may have sublime spatial skills but limited numeric ability, and vice versa for an accountant. But the idea is that by measuring several things at once you detect an intelligence that shares all three, said FRANK SCHMIDT, an industrial psychologist who studies intelligence testing at the University of Iowa.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/chi-0404020068apr02,1,7928693.story?coll=chi-leisuretempo-hed

UI Students Start Support Group (Omaha World Herald, April 2)
Two UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students have started a support group for students with loved ones in the military. Carissa Swanstrom, 22, a senior from Ottumwa, and Emily Pries, 23, a senior from Davenport, got the idea earlier this year when their loved ones went to Iraq with the Army National Guard's 834th Combat Engineer Battalion out of Davenport. "A lot of the groups set up by the Army are really helpful, but they focus on families and people with very young children," Swanstrom said. "We wanted something by students for students."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1054257

Young Writer Workshop Alumna Honored (Haddon Herald, April 2)
The Borough of Haddonfield, NJ, last week paid tribute to nearly 60 of its most accomplished and talented women in recognition of March as Women's History Month. Among them is Sarah Zoubek, a high school student who attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Young Writers Workshop the past two summers.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1695&dept_id=44106&newsid=11225900&PAG=461&rfi=9

Talbott: Political Books Mirror Polarized Nation (USA Today, April 1)
Books, the oldest of the "old media," are pushing serious issues into the presidential campaign and will remain a powerful force in coming weeks. They're shoving aside cable news networks and flashy web sites, the "new media" it was fashionable to think would dominate political reporting. Why are books selling and driving the news? "They mirror the polarized, energized nature of the nation," says BASIL TALBOTT, a journalism lecturer at the University of Iowa. "People want to read and hear about these issues."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/nation/president/2004-03-31-political-books_x.htm

Vibhakar Calls Law Vague (New York Times, April 1)
The doctor who led the fight to get the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down Nebraska's ban on a type of late-term abortions was scheduled to testify Thursday at a trial challenging a similar federal law. Dr. LeRoy Carhart of Bellevue was to testify in U.S. District Court in a case stemming from a lawsuit filed by the Center for Reproductive Rights on behalf of him and three other abortion doctors. The ban has not been enforced, because judges in three cities agreed to hear evidence before deciding whether it violates the Constitution. Other challenges to the ban, filed by the National Abortion Federation and the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, are being heard this week in San Francisco and New York. Also party to the Lincoln case is Dr. JILL VIBHAKAR, who practices medicine at Emma Goldman Clinic for Women and at the University of Iowa College of Medicine Hospital in Iowa City, Iowa. Vibhakar testified Tuesday that the term "overt act" was vague in the law. Enforcing the ban might force her to quit doing abortions in the second trimester of pregnancy, Vibhakar said. It would force other doctors to inject drugs such as digoxin to induce fetal demise before a late D&E, after 20 weeks, she said. "I might not be willing to incorporate that into my practice," she said. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared April 1 on the websites of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Pa.) RECORD, THE GUARDIAN (U.K.), ORLANDO SENTINEL, NEWSDAY, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, THE LEDGER in Florida, WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, FORT WAYNE (Ind.), JOURNAL GAZETTE, TIMES DAILY in Alabama, ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, FORT WAYNE (Ind.), NEWS SENTINEL, MIAMI HERALD, KANSAS CITY STAR, WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, WJLA in Washington, and SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Abortion-Ban.html

'Hours' Author Cunningham Attended UI (San Jose Mercury News, April 1)
An article about Michael Cunningham, author of "The Hours" notes that he attended, "the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's famed Writers' Workshop."
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/living/8327952.htm

Noyes Explores Hypochondria Therapy (International Herald Tribune, April 1)
Hypochondria, a disorder that afflicts one of every 20 Americans who visit doctors, has been one of the most stubborn puzzles in medicine. Dr. RUSSELL NOYES, an emeritus professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, is exploring whether interpersonal therapy, which encourages patients to examine their social and family relationships for clues to their problems, is effective. Inevitably, some patients will stand by their hypochondriacal convictions in the face of any effort to dislodge them.
http://www.iht.com/articles/512865.html

Hunnicutt Discusses Six-Hour Work Day (BBC Radio, April 1)
BEN HUNNICUTT, UI professor of leisure studies, discusses a Depression-era experiment in which the Kellogg company in Battle Creek, Mich., introduced a six-hour working day in an attempt to employ more people. The demise of the six-hour day was a reflection of a bigger shift in social and cultural attitudes which took place in the second half of the 20th century, Hunnicutt says. "In the 1930s these workers looked on work as a means to an end. They looked on time away from work as a good thing," he said. "Work to live don't live to work -- that sort of vision that was part of employees' consciousness has been lost."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours/index_20040401.shtml

Lowe: Even Occasional Smoking Presents Risks (Glamour, April 2004)
A story about the risks of smoking even occasionally quotes JOHN LOWE, Dr.PH., a national smoking expert at the University of Iowa. "A lot of social smokers are on their way to becoming full-timers," Lowe says. In fact, smokers have more than twice the risk of heart attack as nonsmokers.

Jones Quoted On Electronic Voting (Vanity Fair, April 2004)
An article titled "Hack the Vote" about the risks inherent in current electronic voting systems quotes DOUG JONES, a computer science professor and expert on electronic voting at the University of Iowa.

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