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UI in the News

September, 2003

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Letter Writer Cites Clark UI Appearance (Kansas City Star, Sept. 30)
A letter to the editor touting retired Gen. Wesley Clark for Democratic presidential nominee says Clark's widespread support was evidenced during his Sept. 19 lecture at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where the writer says Clark received "wave after wave of applause and standing ovations from an overflow audience as he addressed the major issues confronting our country."

UI Shares In $17 Million Federal Grant (Kansas City Star, Sept. 30)
The University of Kansas today announced that a KU center had landed a $17 million grant to help companies develop environmentally friendly manufacturing processes. The five-year grant is the largest federal research grant in KU's history. The grant, from the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers Program, goes to the Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis, which is led by KU in a partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Washington University in St. Louis.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/breaking_news/6891452.htm

Grant Includes UI Center (Topeka Capital Journal, Sept. 30)
The University of Kansas moved to the forefront of scientific research Monday with the announcement that its Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis had received the largest grant in state history. University scientists, administrators and state lawmakers heralded a new era for Kansas on Monday at the KU Sciences Research Laboratories with a $17 million grant from the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers program. The five-year grant funds a multi-university and multidisciplinary research center, led by KU, which will develop environmentally friendly and affordable chemical processes. The research package is expected to reach a value of $30 million with additional funding and donated facilities. Chancellor Robert Hemenway said the research project was unique because it included sister centers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Washington University in St. Louis.
http://www.cjonline.com/stories/093003/kan_kulab.shtml

UI Partners With Kansas On Grant (Wichita Eagle, Sept. 30)
The University of Kansas, thanks to a $17 million grant from the National Science Foundation, will be the home of a new research center focused on making the chemical industry safer. In all, a $30 million package of federal and university cash and in-kind grants will go to create the Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis, KU announced Monday. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Washington University in St. Louis will be partners in the project. The biggest piece of the package is the $17 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers Program.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/business/6894319.htm

Engineering Center Grant Announced (Lawrence Journal-World, Sept. 30)
A new engineering center at Kansas University bankrolled by Kansas' largest-ever research grant will have ripple effects reaching far beyond the professors working on new types of chemical reactions. The $17 million grant from the National Science Foundation will help industry, add jobs in Kansas and across the Midwest and help educate young children about careers in science, officials predicted Monday. "I don't know if researchers ever tear down goal posts, but today you have become real research winners," said U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan. The award -- the largest federal research grant in university and state history -- will create the Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis. When combined with support from KU, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Washington University in St. Louis and industry partners, the project will total $30 million over the next five years. The Journal World serves Lawrence, Kans.
http://www.ljworld.com/section/kunews/story/147058

UI Core Partner In New Engineering Center (WIBW-TV, Sept. 30)
The University of Kansas has received a $17 million federal grant to fund an engineering center for research on chemical reactions. University officials say additional funding and donated facilities will bring the total financial package to $30 million. The five-year grant from the National Science Foundation is the largest single federal research award ever received by the university. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Washington University in St. Louis will serve as core partners in the new center. WIBW-TV is located in Topeka, Kans.
http://www.wibw.com/home/headlines/485267.html
Similar stories appeared on the websites of the KANSAS CITY BUSINNESS JOURNAL, and KCTV and KMBC in Kansas City, Mo.

UI Law Grads Find Jobs Soon After Graduation (Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 30)
The boom in the number of lawyers in Iowa is happening more at companies than in the courts or private practice, legal officials say. Most of the growth in the field, which includes a record 7,800 active lawyers in Iowa, is happening at corporations such as banks and insurance companies, according to new information from the Iowa Supreme Court. Demand for lawyers in Iowa remains high, with an estimated 90 percent of graduates from law schools at Drake University and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA finding jobs within nine months of graduation.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=871335

Nazareth Has Left The Building -- To Speak On Elvis (LA Times, Sept. 30)
Elvis lives in the Oct. 2 UC Irvine event "Elvis in the Third World: An Afternoon with Peter Nazareth" and a screening of the Elvis movie "Flaming Star." PETER NAZARETH, a Ugandan native and professor of English and African American World Studies at the University of Iowa, will host the event. Nazareth grew up in Uganda listening to Elvis Presley and has studied his effect on the Third World and vice versa.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/pilot/news/la-dpt-briefs30sep30,1,5723769.story

UI Medical Resident Returns To Hometown (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sept. 30)
Dr. James Beattie, D.O. has come home to work in the community where he was raised and to service the neighbors he grew up with. On Sept. 1 Dr. Beattie, 35, joined Missouri Cancer Care as a medical oncologist. He graduated from Des Moines University with a degree in osteopathic medicine. He served his residency at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and most recently completed a three-year fellowship in hematology and medical oncology at St. Louis University.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/neighborhoods/stories.nsf/bydocid/5D971DB034E2114386256DB10062AFB2?OpenDocument&highlight=2%2CUniversity%2Cof%2CIowa

Friends Mourn UI Freshman Killed In Weekend Crash (WQAD, Sept. 30)
Students at West High School in Iowa City are wearing white ribbons on memory of a recent graduate who died in a car wreck over the weekend. Eighteen-year-old Brian Barry of Coralville, a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was killed early Sunday in Iowa City. Three others were injured. West Principal Jerry Arganbright says students are devastated. Many left flowers, soccer balls, photographs and ribbons at the crash site. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1463077&nav=1sW7IGa4

Kletzing To Study Aurora Borealis (Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 29)
A University of Iowa scientist has received a $450,000 grant to solve the mystery behind the glow of the aurora borealis -- also known as the Northern Lights. The three-year grant, awarded by the National Science Foundation, will help physics professor CRAIG KLETZING investigate the fundamental properties of the Alfven wave. The wave, composed of thin, electrically charged gases, is believed to play a key role in creating the Northern Lights, as well as other space phenomenon such as solar wind, Kletzing said. In each of the last two years, Kletzing and his research team have traveled to Fairbanks, Alaska, to launch rockets more than 500 miles into space. The rockets measured interactions between wave particles in the aurora and how energy is exchanged between electric fields and electrons.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=870621

Bones Shed Light On Human Ancestry (Centre Daily Times, Sept. 29)
Some bones discovered in a cave in Romania are putting a face to the oldest modern humans in Europe. The fossils -- a jawbone, part of the front of a skull and a temporal bone -- also may give more support to the theory that early Europeans bred with Neanderthals. Some critics contend that Neanderthals were a separate species from modern humans and could not have contributed to modern human ancestry. Those scientists generally favor a theory that modern humans entered Europe and replaced the Neanderthals. But the discovery of a child's skeleton in Portugal, the Romanian bones and several other fossils with both modern human and Neanderthal features is causing some scientists to rethink the notion, said ROBERT FRANCISCUS, a human paleontologist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Even if humans and Neanderthals were separate species, they likely were closely enough related to produce hybrid offspring, Franciscus said. Those hybrid people could have passed some Neanderthal genes and characteristics on to later Europeans, he said. The Daily Times is based in State College, Penn.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/news/6892030.htm

Mossman Book Distribution Described (Publisher's Weekly, Sept. 29)
A first novel published in 1972, "The Stones of Summer" was hailed by the New York Times as the work of a major new writer named Dow Mossman. But the book, published by textbook house Bobbs-Merrill during a brief foray into fiction, went out of print and into obscurity. That is, until a passionate reader plucked it off his shelf nearly 30 years later and was so moved that he made an independent film about his quest to meet Mossman and find out why he had never published another novel. Barnes and Noble has started a proprietary publishing program for the book and is supporting the film project. It is a test of other booksellers' willingness to stock a book with the Barnes & Noble Books logo on the spine. For buyer Jan Weissmiller, the book was a natural fit because of its strong ties with the writing program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which was spotlighted in "The Stone Reader" because Mossman was a student there. Though she described Mossman's book as "probably more difficult to read than [Joseph Heller's] "Catch-22," Weissmiller believed that many of her customers would seek it out. "It certainly repays one's investment in time," she said.
http://publishersweekly.reviewsnews.com/index.asp?layout=article&articleid=CA325690&display=breakingNews&publication=publishersweekly

Enrollment Up Slightly At UI (Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 27)
Enrollment in the University of Nebraska system declined by 1.9 percent from last fall to this fall, NU officials reported Friday. The drop in full- and part-time students appears to reflect changes in the state and national economy as well as international tensions, the officials said. Many institutions across the country have reported decreases or slight increases when compared with last fall's numbers, they said. NU officials noted that enrollment at Iowa State University was down 1.9 percent and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was up 0.2 percent.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=868697

Clark Speaks At UI (Time, Sept. 21)
Wesley Clark's announcement that he was running landed like a rocket-propelled grenade in the messy bunker that is the Democratic presidential field. On a post-announcement swing through Florida and Iowa, Clark deflected questions on issues that ranged from aids in Africa to the Patriot Act. But that did not dampen the enthusiasm of the supporters who greeted him wherever he went. "National security will be the primary topic during next year's election, and I believe he is the person who can beat George Bush," said Kate Lawrence, 52, a secretary from Dubuque who was part of the overflow crowd at a long-scheduled lecture Clark delivered Friday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1101030929-488778,00.html

Mother Of UI Students Comments On Caucuses (Boston Globe, Sept. 29)
Paula Hanson, a Californian visiting her twin daughter soccer players at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is happy to be far, far away from the Schwarzenegger-Davis-Huffington recall madness back home. Indeed, Iowa suddenly seems a lot less strange than it used to. The first-in-the-nation Iowa caucuses, so often mocked for being an unrepresentative arbiter of national politics, what with Iowa being so small (1 percent of the US population), white (93 percent), and rural (the cornfields never seem to stop), are seeming a lot less weird these days. http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2003/09/29/for_iowans_caucuses_now_an_oasis_of_sanity_boston_globe/

UI Alumna Answers Parent's Question (Straits Times, Sept. 29)
A parent's question about a policy encouraging children to take up extra- and co-curricular activities in school is answered by Sita Singh, principal of River Valley Primary. A brief bio of Singh says she holds a master's degree in counseling and human development from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Times is based in Singapore.
http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/singapore/story/0,4386,212101,00.html?

UI Alumnus Joins Language Staff At School (Times-Picayune, Sept. 28)
Every year, Saint Paul's adds new members to its faculty. This year, eight new faculty members with very different backgrounds have come to Saint Paul's. Among them is Chicago resident Michael Kane, who joins the languages department. Kane teaches Spanish I to mostly eighth-graders and freshmen. Kane graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and enjoys golf in his free time. The paper is based in New Orleans.
http://www.nola.com/news/t-p/index.ssf?/base/news-3/1064728978193030.xml

Jones: Fixing Voting Machines Not Enough (San Diego Union Tribune, Sept. 26)
A story about the reported flaws in the software running Diebold touch-screen voting machines says that critics of the technology said a study by Johns Hopkins University confirms their fears that voting machines can be tampered with. "I agree with the fixes that are required," said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer professor at the University of Iowa. "On the other hand, I don't think the fixes are enough." Jones also complained that several portions of the study were omitted before publication. Maryland officials, who ordered the study, said the portions were omitted to keep information out of the hands of people who would want to tamper with the machines.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20030926-9999_7m26voting.html

UI Alumna Joins Community College Trustee Board (Piqua Daily Call, Sept. 26)
Lyn W. Bliss of Greenville, Ohio is a new member of the Board of Trustees at Edison Community College, replacing Kay Seiler of Greenville whose term expired several months ago. Bliss holds a bachelor of science degree from the University of Maryland and a master of arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Ohio.
http://www.dailycall.com/1editorialbody.lasso?-token.folder=2003-09-25&-token.story=80324.111216&-nothing

Brown, Zimmerman Created 'Breakthrough' (New Haven Register, Sept. 25)
Citing promising results among kindergarten students, New Haven school officials Wednesday announced a plan to expand the reading program Breakthrough to Literacy into first- and second-grade classrooms. The curriculum, founded by researchers CAROLYN BROWN and JERRY ZIMMERMANN of the University of Iowa, also places heavy emphasis on teacher training. The company sends literacy coaches to work with the schools. The Register is based in New Haven, Conn.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=10219001&BRD=1281&PAG=461&dept_id=7576&rfi=6

Greenberg Comments On Microbial Communities (Science Daily, Sept. 25)
The size of microbes belies their impact across the globe, especially when they are grouped together in microbial communities. A new report from the American Academy of Microbiology (AAM), entitled "Microbial Communities: From Life Apart to Life Together," presents issues surrounding microbial communities and their role in human health, industrial processes, and ecology along with recommendations for future research, education, and collaboration. The report is based on an AAM-sponsored colloquium on May 3-5, 2002,ntitled "Microbial Communities: Advantages of Multicellular Cooperation" held in Tucson, Ariz. "Microbial communities operate on every scale and in every environment," says colloquium co-chair E. PETER GREENBERG, Ph.D., University of Iowa. "These communities are important drivers of many of nature's cycles, such as atmospheric cooling and weather patterns. Furthermore, many of the infections that we can't handle well, that are resistant to antibiotics, are caused by these communities of microbes."
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/09/030925070410.htm

UI Coauthors Study On Public-Access Defibrillators (Dr. Koop.com, Sept. 25)
Automatic external defibrillators installed in public places are good investments if a location is expected to be the scene of at least one cardiac arrest every seven years. So says a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA/University of Michigan study in the September issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The study also concluded that locations such as large retail stores (one in 2,000 probability of being used) and hotels (one in 100 annual probability) are not cost-effective candidates for defibrillator placement.
http://drkoop.com/template.asp?page=newsdetail&ap=93&id=515112

Paper Pokes Fun At Bush Flight, Clark UI Visit (Las Vegas Mercury, Sept. 25)
An article in the paper's humor column says that President Bush, "aiming to duplicate the fanfare of his arrival aboard the USS Lincoln in a Navy S-3B Viking, is planning a similar tailhook landing on Democratic presidential candidate Gen. Wesley Clark, according to internal memos. The memos divulge that next month's landing will evoke the same 'military grandeur' and 'unflagging confidence' as May's famous stunt. Bush will be flown in the same Navy S-3B Viking and will make the same dramatic landing maneuver atop Clark at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where the former NATO commander is scheduled to give a speech." The paper bills itself as Nevada's largest alternative newsweekly.
http://www.lasvegasmercury.com/2003/MERC-Sep-25-Thu-2003/22192850.html

Squire Comments On Hillary Clinton Buzz (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sept. 25)
If only the 10 Democrats actually running for president could create such a big stir by saying so little. Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y., denied, demurred and deflected a barrage of questions Wednesday about whether she planned to run for president in 2004. As she has sought to tamp down speculation in recent weeks, each rebuttal she's issued, no matter how unequivocal, only seems to fuel more chatter. "It is sort of a curious thing that many people find her potential candidacy more exciting to talk about than the candidacies of the 10 people already in the race," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/News/Nation/5AF287D17A5B858686256DAC001251D1?OpenDocument&Headline=Forget+the+10+Democrats+running&highlight=2%2CUniversity%2Cof%2CIowa

Jones: Changing Machines Now May Hurt Voters (San Francisco Weekly, Sept. 24)
An editorial argues that delaying the Oct. 7 California gubernatorial recall vote because of concerns about voting machine errors may disenfranchise more voters than it helps. It also quotes DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa political science professor specializing in the history of voting technology. "It's very clear that if you change your voting system, you cause a huge spike in the voter error rate," Jones said. "You don't want to change voting systems very frequently. You also don't want to change them before a high-profile election. You want to try it first during an off-cycle election, something like an election for library district, something where 2 percent of the voters show up. You can use that as a dry run, then do it in a major election."
http://www.sfweekly.com/issues/2003-09-24/smith.html/1/index.html

UI Alumnus Named Interim Superintendent (Middletown Press, Sept. 25)
Robert Goldman, an Avon, Conn., resident with broad experience in school administration, joined Region 17 Wednesday to serve as its interim superintendent for the next 18 weeks. Goldman arrived for work the day after Katherine Kussy departed the district, after six years as leader of the Haddam and Killingworth school system, to become principal of a small elementary school in her home state of Michigan. Goldman holds a doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in philosophy in educational administration. The Press is based in Connecticut.
http://www.middletownpress.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=10219258&BRD=1645&PAG=461&dept_id=10856&rfi=6

UI Alumna To Head Charter School (Laramie Boomerang, Sept. 25)
Dawn Staver, who has 18 years teaching experience in grades K-6, was hired last month as principal of Snowy Range Academy in Laramie, Wyo. The 42-year-old had previously worked for the Albany County School District, where she was involved with staff development and special education. She spent about one year in that post before the charter school hired her in August. Staver graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a degree in elementary education. The Boomerang is based in Wyoming.
http://www.laramieboomerang.com/more.asp?StoryID=2042

UI Opera Director Lends Hand In 'Odyssey' Production (Inky.com, Sept. 25)
As artistic director for Tales & Scales, Evansville's nationally recognized touring musical storytelling troupe, Deborah Moore wanted to bring Homer's "The Odyssey" to stage, but she wasn't sure how to do it. Figuring it out has been a team effort, involving collaborators from New York and New Jersey to Indiana and Iowa. Gary Race, director of opera at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, came up with the stage direction. Inky.com is a website of the Evansville Courier & Press and The Henderson Gleaner, which cover Indiana, Kentucky and Illinois.
http://www.myinky.com/ecp/events/article/0,1626,ECP_765_2295458,00.html

Gronbeck Comments On Dean Debate Skills (Rutland Herald, Sept. 25)
Going into today's debate with his nine Democratic rivals, Howard Dean needs to keep his arrogance in check and make sure the newcomer to the race - retired Gen. Wesley Clark - does not hit him from the left, according to the former governor's advisers and political debate specialists. BRUCE GRONBECK, a communication studies professor at the University of Iowa, says Dean's debating skills are a work in progress. "He's good when stating his case, but when he is surprised, he gets a touch of the deer-in-the-headlight look. He is great at separating himself from others and getting in a few zingers, but what he doesn't do is demonstrate that he is at ease or in control when challenged on an inconsistency," he said. The Herald is based in Vermont. A version of the story also ran Sept. 25 on the website of the TIMES ARGUS in Vermont.
http://rutlandherald.nybor.com/News/Story/72115.html

Motions Presented In Stuttering Study Case (National Public Radio, Sept. 23)
An Iowa judge will hear motions in a case that began more than 60 years ago in a state-run orphanage. As part of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study into the origins of stuttering, orphans who spoke normally were told that they were stutterers. It was a short experiment, lasting just several weeks, but lawyers representing the orphans say it had devastating results. Lawyers for the State of Iowa are asking that the case be dismissed.
http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=1439667

Bones Shed Light On Human Ancestry (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sept. 22)
Some bones discovered in a cave in Romania are putting a face to the oldest modern humans in Europe. The fossils -- a jawbone, part of the front of a skull and a temporal bone -- also may give more support to the theory that early Europeans bred with Neanderthals. Some critics contend that Neanderthals were a separate species from modern humans and could not have contributed to modern human ancestry. Those scientists generally favor a theory that modern humans entered Europe and replaced the Neanderthals. But the discovery of a child's skeleton in Portugal, the Romanian bones and several other fossils with both modern human and Neanderthal features is causing some scientists to rethink the notion, said ROBERT FRANCISCUS, a human paleontologist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Even if humans and Neanderthals were separate species, they likely were closely enough related to produce hybrid offspring, Franciscus said. Those hybrid people could have passed some Neanderthal genes and characteristics on to later Europeans, he said.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/News/A199C7A466CD48F286256DAA001971F0?OpenDocument&Headline=Bone+find+sheds+light+on+early+habits

Arraignment Scheduled In Murder-for-Hire Case (New York Times, Sept. 22)
A Swiss bodybuilder charged with offering to kill the alleged victim in the Kobe Bryant sex assault case for $3 million is scheduled for arraignment Monday. Patrick Graber, 31, a weight training coach with an expired visa, is being held on $1 million bail after he was seized Thursday in El Segundo, Calif., as he reached for a bag filled with fake money, authorities said. The alleged murder-for-hire scheme is not the first threat to Bryant's accuser. Earlier this month, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student was arrested for allegedly leaving a threatening message on the woman's answering machine in July. The Associated Press Story also appeared on the websites of the OMAHA WORLD HERALD, MONTROSE DAILY PRESS in Colorado, MILTON DAILY STANDARD in Pennsylvania, RAPID CITY JOURNAL in South Dakota, SANTA MARIA TIMES in California, The MISSOULIAN in Montana.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/sports/AP-BKN-Bryant-Case-Arrest.html

Squire Comments On Redistricting (Riverside Press-Enterprise, Sept. 21)
Some states have taken redistricting out of the hands of lawmakers. In Iowa, a nonpartisan office of the Legislature draws the new districts. Locked in a room outside the state Capitol, staffers with the Legislative Services Agency use computer programs to draw compact and contiguous districts. Party affiliation, demographics and where incumbents live are purposely kept out of the equation. The maps are kept confidential until the day they are released to the state House and Senate. "For the two parties, the benefit is that they don't have to spend a lot of time on redistricting and they don't have to take the political heat for redrawing the lines," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "On the downside, they can't gerrymander or protect their interests." http://www.pe.com/breakingnews/local/stories/PE_NEWS_nstate21.5871f.html

Clinton Hires Former Vilsack Spokesman (Salt Lake Tribune, Sept. 21)
President Bush's slipping popularity has fueled speculation that Sen. Hillary Clinton might join the presidential race, especially because she has hired a key staffer with national credentials and experience in the battleground state of Iowa. Joining Clinton's Capitol Hill team as her new director of communications is Joe Householder, a former spokesman for Houston Mayor Lee Brown and the spokesman for Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack during his successful 2002 re-election campaign. Clinton said her choice of an expert in the politics of Iowa, which holds the first Democratic presidential contest in January, should not be interpreted as a signal that she is testing the waters for a White House bid. PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa, noted it would be "quite advantageous" for a prospective presidential candidate to have a staffer who knows key Democrats in the state.
http://www.sltrib.com/2003/Sep/09212003/nation_w/94435.asp

UI's Dual Career Network Noted (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 21)
Schools around the country also are beginning to offer academic couples help in finding jobs, said JOAN MURRIN, director of the Dual Career Network at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. The first Dual Careers International Conference, held at the University of Iowa in April, attracted representatives from 17 U.S. and Canadian institutions with programs in place. Iowa created its Dual Career Network in 1994 to help the school's overall recruiting efforts. In the program, if a department recruits an academic whose spouse also works in academia, it will try to find a job for the spouse in his or her field. "Between 65 and 75 percent of people who come through this program are successful hires" whose spouses were helped to find jobs, Murrin said. "This is a definite trend," she said. "It's our thinking that you can't recruit one half of a couple without taking into account the other half. Our program is one very successful way we've found to help dual-career couples with their work-life issues."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/custom/educationtoday/chi-0309200342sep21,1,858918.story

Informatics Courses For Nurses Offered At UI (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 21)
Many computer-savvy registered nurses are learning to be experts in the ever-changing realm of information technology as more nursing schools offer graduate programs in health-care informatics. The article lists the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as one of place that offers master's level courses in this field.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/custom/educationtoday/chi-0309200343sep21,1,1317671.story

Hawkeye Fans Provide Economic Boost (Arizona Republic, Sept. 21)
The parking lots around Iowa City's Kinnick Stadium opened at 7 a.m. Saturday for a 5 p.m. game against Arizona State to begin accommodating the tailgaters that eventually filled the 70,397-seat facility. The Hawkeyes recently had a streak of 63 straight sellouts over 12 seasons. It's a sharp contrast to Sun Devil Stadium, where an oversaturated sports market and an up-and-down ASU program have contributed to games typically 20,000 to 30,000 below capacity. Hawkeyes' fan support provides an economic boost. Each home game results in nearly $1.52 million in gas, hotel and food expenditures, according to a study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC RESEARCH.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/sports/articles/0921p2boivin0921.html

Bloom's Play To Be Performed (Dispatch and Rock Island Argus, Sept. 21)
UI School of Journalism faculty member STEPHEN BLOOM, who has written "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in the Heartland America", has also written a play "Shoedog" which will be presented Nov. 14-16 at the Quad Cities Arts Center. Bloom's father had a shoe store, and he once worked there, an experience that inspired him to write the play with a former roommate, Brian Cronk.

New Phoenix City Councilman Graduated From UI (Arizona Republic, Sept. 21)
Phoenix, Ariz. District 4's newly elected City Councilman Tom Simplot, a Republican and the city's first openly gay councilman, is a native of Ottumwa and graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW in 1986.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/0921simplotqa21.html

Clark: I Wouldn't Have Voted For War (Richmond Times-Dispatch, Sept. 21)
Democratic presidential candidate Wesley Clark reversed an earlier opinion that he likely would have voted for war in Iraq. "At the time, I probably would have voted for it, but I think that's too simple a question," The New York Times quoted Clark as saying Thursday. But on Friday Clark told more than 1,000 people jammed into a lecture hall at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that the invasion was "a major blunder" he never would have supported. "There may be times when you may have to use force, but only as a last resort," he said. In an interview with the Associated Press, Clark said: "Let's make one thing real clear: I would never have voted for this war, never." The paper is based in Virginia. Versions of the story also ran Sept. 20 on the websites of MSNBC, the Pakistan DAILY TIMES, KFMB-TV in California, AL-JAZEERAH TV, PENN LIVE in Pennsylvania, THE CONTRA COSTA TIMES in California, KPOM-TV in Arizona, SALT LAKE TRIBUNE in Utah, the FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM in Texas, CNN, the ORANGEBURG TIMES DEMOCRAT in South Carolina, the MUNSTER TIMES in Indiana, the BECKLEY REGISTER-HERALD in West Virginia, the MILTON DAILY STANDARD in Pennsylvania, the APPEAL-DEMOCRAT in California, the IDAHO STATE JOURNAL, THE PORTERVILLE RECORDER in California, DUNN COUNTY NEWS in Wisconsin, SANTA MARIA TIMES and LODI NEWS-SENTINEL in California, the MATTOON JOURNAL in Illinois, ALBANY TIMES UNION in New York, the TIMES PICAYUNE in Louisiana, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, ABC NEWS and many other media outlets.
http://www.timesdispatch.com/frontpage/MGBGG1L8UKD.html

Writer Quotes Clark UI Speech (The Telegraph, Sept. 21)
The writer of a critique of newest Democratic presidential candidate, retired Gen. Wesley Clark, says Clark has been slow to develop positions on important campaign issues. For example, the article's author writes, on Thursday Clark said he would have supported the Congressional resolution that authorized the United States to invade Iraq. But in a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Friday, he said "Let's make one thing real clear, I would never have voted for this war." The Telegraph is based in the U.K.
http://www.opinion.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2003/09/21/do2102.xml&sSheet=/opinion/2003/09/21/ixopinion.html

Squire: Labor Support Key To Candidates' Success (Post-Gazette, Sept. 21)
Retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark's decision to enter the 2004 presidential race this week thrilled "Draft Clark" Democrats and some party elders, but it produced a collective groan at the campaign headquarters of the other Democratic candidates, who have been trying to distinguish themselves in an already crowded field. Labor support is especially important in getting voters to attend the caucuses in Iowa, and unions in the state are split at the moment. PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at University of Iowa, said the leadership is leaning toward Missouri Rep. Dick Gephardt while many rank-and-file members support former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean. Clark has never publicly addressed many of organized labor's key issues, such as limiting trade or raising the minimum wage. The Post-Gazette is based in Pittsburgh, Pa.
http://www.post-gazette.com/election/20030921prezrace0921p1.asp

Travel Article Praises Iowa City, UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Sept. 21)
A woman in town for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SUMMER WRITING FESTIVAL writes that in Iowa City "lovers of the written word have a unique and comfortable refuge. ... The University of Iowa is home to the IOWA WRITERS WORKSHOP and is famous for its award-winning graduates, who include the likes of John Irving, Flannery O'Connor and Rita Dove. The city celebrates these and other Iowa inspired writers on the Iowa Avenue Literary Walk. Forty-nine writers are featured in bronze relief panels. Connecting the panels are quotations about books and writing, stamped into the sidewalk."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/425/4103109.html
A companion article provides information about getting to Iowa City and the UI, as well as events and activities.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/425/4103111.html

Clark Clarifies War Position At UI (Arizona Republic, Sept. 20)
On the third day of his campaign Friday, Gen. Wesley Clark struggled to clarify his statement Thursday that he would "probably" have voted for the congressional resolution authorizing the invasion of Iraq. Clark, a former NATO commander who has retired from the Army, never denied making the statement in an interview with four reporters on his chartered plane. But he seemed stunned by the headlines that it generated, as supporters worried that he had undercut his position as an antiwar candidate with military bona fides. "I never would have voted for war," he said in Iowa City on Friday afternoon in an interview and in response to a question after a lecture at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "What I would have voted for is leverage. Leverage for the United States to avoid a war. That's what we needed to avoid a war."
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0920clark20.html

Music Student Picks Iowa Because Of Gompper (Register Herald, Sept. 20)
Joe Dangerfield hopes to tread the same ground as Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, Moussorgsky and other renowned Russian composers. A 1995 graduate of Fayetteville High School in West Virginia, Dangerfield long held a fascination with Russian composers and has been invited to study at the Moscow Conservatory for six months beginning in the fall of 2004. "I chose (Iowa) because it's a Big 10 institution and I want to study with one of the professors here, DAVID GOMPPER," said Dangerfield, who is in a doctoral course at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I really like his music. He's had works performed all over the world." The paper is based in Beckley, W.Va.
http://www.register-herald.com/articles/2003/09/20/news/local_news/39moscow21.txt

UI Student Arrested For Threatening Accuser (Napa Valley Register, Sept. 20)
A Swiss bodybuilder who claims ties to organized crime was arrested for investigation of offering to murder the alleged victim in the Kobe Bryant sex assault case. Patrick Graber, 31, allegedly agreed to carry out the killing for $3 million, said Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca. He made the offer to Bryant's security director and met several times with undercover detectives before being arrested during a sting Thursday. The alleged murder-for-hire scheme is not the first threat to Kobe Bryant's accuser. Earlier this month, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student was arrested for leaving a threatening message on the woman's answering machine in July. The paper is based in California. A version of the story also ran Sept. 20 on the websites of ESPN, the SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE in California, the TORONTO STAR in Canada, MODESTO BEE, MID COLUMBIA TRI CITY HERALD in Washington, the ANCHORAGE DAILY NEWS in Alaska, the PORTERVILLE RECORDER in California, the RALEIGH NEWS in North Carolina, THE MISSOULIAN in Montana, THE BALTIMORE SUN, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, BOSTON GLOBE, WXIA-TV in Georgia, THE SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, THE WYOMING NEWS, FOX SPORTS, SANTA MARIA TIMES in California, THE PORTERVILLE RECORDER in California, TIMES PICAYUNE in Louisiana, the TIMES DAILY in Alabama, THE LEDGER in Florida, the MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS in South Carolina, the COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia, the COLUMBIA STATE in South Carolina, the GRAND FORKS Herald in North Dakota, the MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD in California, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota, the FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL in Indiana, the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE and MIAMI HERALD in Florida, the MACON TELEGRAPH in Georgia, the BOSTON GLOBE, the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS in California, MSNBC, the WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas, USA TODAY and many other news web sites.
http://www.napanews.com/templates/index.cfm?template=story_full&id=FBC16B6A-B15A-42C7-BFD6-512A545421BE

Clark Comments At UI Quoted (Topeka Capital Journal, Sept. 20)
Democratic presidential candidate Wesley Clark backtracked from a day-old statement that he probably would have voted for the congressional resolution authorizing the use of force in Iraq, saying Friday he "would never have voted for this war." The retired Army general, an opponent of the conflict, surprised supporters when he indicated in an interview with reporters Thursday that he likely would have supported the resolution. On Friday, Clark sought to clarify his comments in an interview with The Associated Press. "Let's make one thing real clear, I would never have voted for this war," Clark said before a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I've gotten a very consistent record on this. There was no imminent threat. This was not a case of pre-emptive war. I would have voted for the right kind of leverage to get a diplomatic solution, an international solution to the challenge of Saddam Hussein." The paper is based in Kansas.
http://www.cjonline.com/stories/092003/pag_clarkback.shtml

Clark Disputes Times War Quote (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Sept. 20)
Just three days into his campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, retired Gen. Wesley Clark of Little Rock was forced to backpedal and clarify remarks on one of the key issues of the race - the war against Iraq. As Clark left Little Rock early Friday to fly to Iowa for a foreign-policy speech, he saw that The New York Times and The Washington Post had quoted him as saying he would have voted for the congressional resolution that authorized use of force against Iraq if he had been a lawmaker. Clark had given special access to reporters from the two papers as he flew to Florida on Thursday for a fund-raiser. Clark, along with Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, was supposed to be one of the leading anti-war candidates in the Democratic field. The quotes in the Times and the Post had suddenly cast doubt on his anti-war credentials. On Friday, shortly before he was to give a speech on foreign policy and national security at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Clark was forced to use a series of brief one-on-one interviews with other news organizations to explain his stance. "I would have never voted for war. I would have voted for leverage," Clark told the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. "The headlines got it wrong."
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/story_National.php?storyid=42142

Clark: I Wouldn't Have Voted For War (Dallas Morning News, Sept. 20)
Democratic presidential candidate Wesley Clark reversed an earlier opinion that he likely would have voted for war in Iraq. "At the time, I probably would have voted for it, but I think that's too simple a question," The New York Times quoted Clark as saying Thursday. But on Friday Clark told more than 1,000 people jammed into a lecture hall at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that the invasion was "a major blunder" he never would have supported. "There may be times when you may have to use force, but only as a last resort," he said. In an interview with the Associated Press, Clark said: "Let's make one thing real clear: I would never have voted for this war, never." The paper is based in Virginia. A version of the story also ran in the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE.

Clark To Address National Security In UI Speech (Orlando Sentinel, Sept. 20)
A story about Gen. Wesley Clark's decision to take his new presidential campaign to Florida says a more immediate concern for the Democratic Party is Iowa, home of the first caucuses Jan. 19. Clark heads there today for an address on national security at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

Squire Says Clinton Tie Helps Clark (AlterNet, Sept. 19)
UI political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE believes that Democratic presidential candidate's embrace of former president Bill Clinton will not hurt him. "I think the active backing from a number of former Clinton supporters is a net advantage for Clark," said Squire. "Clark has never run for office before and surrounding himself with people who have been associated with winning campaigns is one route to overcoming his inexperience. They also provide him with a host of contacts and ties to major figures in the Democratic Party that most outsider candidates could never attain."
http://alternet.org/story.html?StoryID=16798

Clark Alarmed By Headlines (New York Times, Sept. 19)
On the third day of his campaign, Gen. Wesley K. Clark struggled today to clarify his statement on Thursday that he would "probably" have voted for the Congressional resolution authorizing the invasion of Iraq. General Clark, a former NATO commander who has retired from the Army, never denied making the statement in an interview with four reporters on his chartered plane. But he seemed stunned by the headlines that it generated, as supporters worried that he had undercut his position as an antiwar candidate with military bona fides. "I never would have voted for war," he said here this afternoon in an interview and in response to a question after a lecture at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "What I would have voted for is leverage. Leverage for the United States to avoid a war. That's what we needed to avoid a war." Clark's debut day in Iowa, whose early caucus is crucial to the Democratic Party's nomination process, was barely a toe touch, with a brief diner stop and a pageant of 10-minute news media interviews crammed between private receptions surrounding the long-scheduled nonpolitical lecture, for which a foundation paid $25,000. (General Clark receives 80 percent.)
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/09/20/politics/campaigns/20CLAR.html

UI To Get Planning Grant (Chronicle, Sept. 19)
The National Institutes of Health announced this month that it would award large, multiyear grants totaling $350 million to seven universities for research to protect against terrorist attacks involving biological weapons and to study infectious diseases. In addition, the NIH will give "planning" grants to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, to help them build the capacity to compete later for full-fledged awards. The grants "will lead to new and improved therapies, vaccines, diagnostics, and other tools to protect the citizens of our country and the world against the threat of bioterrorism and other emerging and re-emerging diseases," said Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the NIH branch that awarded the money.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i04/04a02602.htm

Media Expected To 'Devour' Clark UI Speech (CNN, Sept. 19)
Wesley Clark, the 10th Democrat to join the '04 presidential primary in 10 months, today (Friday, Sept. 19) makes his first Big Speech since his campaign kickoff Wednesday in Little Rock. In Iowa City, Clark is to deliver a speech focusing mostly on his field of expertise: national security and foreign policy. He'll deliver the speech, titled "The American Leadership Role in a Changing World," at 5 p.m. EDT (4 p.m. local time) at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The national media will likely devour Clark's speech. But reporters, especially Iowa ones, are sure to press Clark on his Iowa strategy, which as of this writing was still being sorted out by his campaign manager, Donnie Fowler Jr.
http://www.cnn.com/2003/ALLPOLITICS/09/19/mgrind.day.clarkgore/index.html

UI Student Arrested For Threatening Accuser (New York Times, Sept. 19)
A Swiss bodybuilder who claims ties to organized crime was arrested for investigation of offering to murder the alleged victim in the Kobe Bryant sex assault case. Patrick Graber, 31, allegedly agreed to carry out the killing for $3 million, said Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca. He made the offer to Bryant's security director and met several times with undercover detectives before being arrested during a sting Thursday. The alleged murder-for-hire scheme is not the first threat to Kobe Bryant's accuser. Earlier this month, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student was arrested for leaving a threatening message on the woman's answering machine in July. Versions of the story also ran Sept. 19 on the websites of The PORTERVILLE RECORDER in California, ABC NEWS, KOTV in Oklahoma, WJXX in Florida, the MISSOULIAN in Montana, the WYOMING NEWS, THE LEDGER in Florida, the DOYLESTOWN INTELLIGENCER in Pennsylvania, the TIMES DAILY in Alabama, the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE in Florida, the NEW YORK DAILY NEWS in New York, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, and the RAPID CITY JOURNAL in South Dakota.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/sports/AP-BKN-Bryant-Case.html

Clark UI Visit May Draw Many Media (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Sept. 19)
New Democratic presidential candidate Wesley Clark got down to business Thursday, flying to Florida for his first official fundraiser while his Little Rock office struggled to get his nascent campaign organized. Things appeared to be chaotic as Clark's four-person consulting-firm office at 1120 North St. in Little Rock became campaign central, overrun with volunteers and newly anointed staff operating off a smattering of laptop computers crowded three or four to a desk. Many of the workers are veterans of former President Clinton's campaigns; others represent various draft-Clark movements on the Internet. "It's crazy here," said a volunteer from Pennsylvania. Today, Clark is in line to get considerable media coverage when he speaks on foreign affairs and national-security issues at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/story_National.php?storyid=42060

Clark To Speak On National Security At UI (Orlando Sentinel, Sept. 19)
Gen. Wesley Clark, striving to bypass nine rival Democrats, carried his new presidential campaign straight to Florida on Thursday with "tough questions" for President Bush in a state that Republicans count on carrying. The retired four-star general and former commander of NATO forces chose to spend the second day of his late-starting campaign targeting the swing-voting state that handed Bush the White House in the bitterly disputed 2000 election. Florida will not hold its presidential primary until March 9, at the tail end of a winter blitz that should determine the party's nominee by then. A more immediate concern is Iowa, home of the first caucuses Jan. 19. Clark heads there today for an address on national security at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/nationworld/orl-asecclark19091903sep19xx,0,1974305.story?coll=orl-news-headlines

UI Alumnus Named CEO At Medical Center (Gary Post-Tribune, Sept. 19)
Citing long commutes and the need for family time, Susan Nordstrom Lopez has resigned her position as president and chief executive officer of St. Anthony Medical Center in Crown Point, Ind. Lopez, who's headed the 250-bed facility for nearly three years, has accepted the position of chief executive at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center in Chicago. Nordstrom Lopez received her bachelor's degree from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend. She received her master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Post-Tribune is based in Indiana.
http://www.post-trib.com/cgi-bin/pto-story/news/z1/09-19-03_z1_news_11.html

Clark May Head To N.H. After UI Visit (Politics New Hampshire, Sept. 18)
Two days after Wesley Clark entered the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, New Hampshire supporters already began planning for a trip from Clark to the Granite State they understand will happen sometime late next week, most likely either Friday or Saturday. Clark, who will be speaking Friday night at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was in south Florida on Thursday where he reportedly met with many crowds wishing him well. Politics New Hampshire is based in Concord, N.H.
http://www.politicsnh.com/archives/pindell/2003/september/9_18Clark.shtml

Group Challenges UI Course (TownHall.com, Sept. 18)
The conservative Young America's Foundation has published its annual list of "The Dirty Dozen" -- college courses that it says demonstrate that conservative ideas are being shunned in college courses. A University of Michigan course, "How to Be Gay: Male Homosexuality and Initiation," topped the list as one of the most egregious offerings. Others include "Elvis as Anthology" at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, "Black Marxism" at the University of California at Santa Barbara and "Feminist Biblical Criticism" at the University of Florida. (Townhall.com is a conservative news and information web site.)
http://www.townhall.com/news/politics/200309/CUL20030918d.shtml

UI Lures Top Researcher (Seattle Times, Sept. 18)
Ruedi Aebersold, one of the key scientists who split from the University of Washington three years ago to co-found the Institute for Systems Biology with Leroy Hood, is leaving to run a government lab in his homeland of Switzerland. Aebersold's pending departure follows the exits of two up-and-coming younger scientists. Proteomics group leader David Goodlet has accepted a tenure-track faculty spot with the University of Washington, and Anup Madan left for a tenure-track faculty position in neurosurgery at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/PrintStory.pl?document_id=2001734439&zsection_id=268448455&slug=ruedi18&date=20030918

Clark To Speak At UI (Investor's Business Daily, Sept. 18)
Wesley Clark declared Wednesday that he's the 10th Democratic presidential candidate, shaking up the entire race. He's seen as someone who can take on surging Howard Dean, challenge President Bush on national security and suck the oxygen from everyone else. Clark's first major campaign appearance will be Friday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he has scheduled a foreign policy address. Versions of this story also appeared Sept. 18 on REUTERS.com and FOXNEWS.com
http://www.investors.com/editorial/general.asp?v=9/18

Former Californians Watch Recall Circus (New York Times, Sept. 18)
Even before the recall campaign, the teasing could get a little rough for Californians who've transplanted themselves to other states. The start-stop election -- with actors, porn purveyors and a billboard model among candidates vying to unseat Gov. Gray Davis -- is providing fresh ammunition for late-night comics and non-Californians alike. Born and raised in temperate, sunny San Diego, Kellee Thorburn McCrory says she never imagined she would live where she does now, Iowa City, Iowa, where her husband took a job five years ago. But, she says, she can't imagine ever returning to California -- home, she says, to "strange politics." "Iowa politics are much more grass-root in my opinion. Local candidates actually knock on your door and are very accessible," says McCrory, who's 41 and the coordinator for the Center for Public Health Program Evaluation at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Like many people, she sees the recall campaign as a political circus. This Associated Press story also appeared Sept. 18 on the web sites of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, SARASOTA HERALD TRIBUNE, THE GUARDIAN (U.K.), LONG BEACH (Calif.) PRESS TELEGRAM, FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL, NEWSDAY, GRAND FORKS HERALD, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, WILKES BARRE (Pa.) WEEKENDER, TIMES PICAYUNE (La.), MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, TIMES DAILY (Ala.), ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT, FORTH WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, KANSAS CITY STAR, WICHITA EAGLE, CENTRE DAILY TIMES (Pa.), FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, OREGONlive.com, PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL, and SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Recall-California-Transplants.html

Regents Seek Deadline Extension (Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 18)
The Iowa Board of Regents is considering asking the Legislature to eliminate a November deadline for setting tuition rates, instead setting class prices at any time, members said Wednesday. The regents are reviewing tuition policy for the state's public universities in the wake of three years of double-digit tuition increases, brought on in part by cuts in state funding and an economic downturn. The review will take several months and will include task force reports on the impact of policy changes at Iowa State, Northern Iowa and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The board set a February deadline for those task force reports. Board members agree that a top priority is changing the timing for setting rates. Since 1987, the board has been required by law to set tuition in November, nearly a full year before rates go into effect, giving students and their families time to save money for the next academic year. Regents said the deadline forces tuition decisions months before lawmakers approve higher education budgets or raises for faculty and staff.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=36&u_sid=859105

Korean Writer Attends UI Conference (Dow Jones Newswires, Sept. 17)
South Korean writer Kim Young Ha's third novel, Black Flower, published in Korean last month to great acclaim, follows the lives of a group of 1,033 Koreans who emigrated to South America in the early part of the 20th century, fleeing Japanese wartime aggression. From the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the United States, where Kim is attending a conference on Asian writers, he checks South Korean Web sites daily to gauge reaction to his new book. "One professional reviewer says that it could be my No. 1 novel!" he says gleefully.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,BT_CO_20030917_006796-search,00.html?collection=autowire%2F30day&vql_string=%22University+of+Iowa%22%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29 (subscription required)

Clark To Speak At UI (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Sept. 17)
Retired Gen. Wesley Clark of Little Rock will announce his candidacy today for the Democratic presidential nomination, a senior member of the state's congressional delegation said Tuesday. Clark had promised to make a decision before Friday, the day he is due to give a speech on foreign affairs at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Versions of this story also appeared Sept. 17 on POLITICSNH.com, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, BECKLEY (W.V.) REGISTER HERALD, the APPEAL-DEMOCRAT (Calif.), RAPID CITY (S.D.) JOURNAL, NBC6 (Fla.), NEWSDAY, SANTA MARIA (Calif.) TIMES, and OMAHA WORLD-HERALD
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/story_National.php?storyid=41898

Squire Calls Clark 'Wild Card' (The Commercial Appeal, Sept. 17)
Retired general Wesley Clark met with political advisers Tuesday in Little Rock, Ark. and told them he would make a late entry into the Democratic presidential field, according to participants and media reports. After months of television appearances and hints that he might run, Clark is scheduled to announce his political intentions today in his hometown of Little Rock, making him the 10th Democrat in the race for the party's nomination. "Clark is clearly the wild card," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, political scientist at the University of Iowa. "He may be able to do what most other candidates probably couldn't do -- jump into the race pretty late and run a competitive campaign." The newspaper is based in Memphis, Tenn. A version of this story appeared Sept. 17 on the web site of the ORLANDO SENTINEL.
http://www.gomemphis.com/mca/nation_and_world/article/0,1426,MCA_454_2265552,00.html

Titze's Voice Research Cited (USA Today, Sept. 17)
A columnist writes about a number of new tech devices that are reaching new places in everyday human existence, including technology to make your singing voice sound better. Research into the singing technology is led by Purdue University professor Mark Smith. In April, he presented it at the Acoustical Society of America conference, where other scientists presented papers such as "Vibrational Communication in Treehoppers." Smith's presentation was simply called "Helping Average Singers Sound Better." Smith's technology can actually reconstruct your voice so it sounds like a professional version of yourself. As the software gets better and computer chips get faster, it will be able to transform your voice instantly, as you sing. How far will this go? For a glimpse, imagine if Smith's technology could be married to another technology presented at that acoustical conference. As described in the conference schedule: "Ingo Titze of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will present a voice simulator that recreates adjustments in the lower vocal tract to mimic such vocal qualities as twang."
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/columnist/kevinmaney/2003-09-16-maney_x.htm

Defibrillators Aren't Always Cost Effective (HealthandAge.com, Sept. 17)
Money spent on installing defibrillators in certain public places could perhaps be better spent on other ways of improving the nation's health. An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a user-friendly device which can shock the heart back into a normal rhythm after cardiac arrest. Given that around a quarter of a million people in the U.S. die annually from cardiac arrest, it is perhaps no surprise that AEDs have been appearing in public places, like airports and shopping malls, in the hope of saving lives. But an AED, with a price tag of around $3,000, will only earn its keep if the location is expected to have at least one cardiac arrest every seven years. This is the conclusion of researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Michigan, who have been looking into the costs of AEDs versus the number of lives saved.
http://www.healthandage.com/Home/gm=1!gid1=4765

UI Student Still Supports Clinton (The American Prospect, Sept. 17)
Six of the nine Democratic presidential candidates came to Sen. Tom Harkin's (D-Iowa) annual steak fry on Saturday and waited in the rain for former president Bill Clinton. It was as though they were waiting for a beloved preacher to perform a laying-on of hands. But when Clinton did arrive, his attendance proved to be something of a double-edged sword: While he drew a sizable contingent of fans, his presence also made it impossible to ignore the still-large gap between him and his would-be heirs. The longer the event went on, the more it seemed like a Clinton campaign rally. "I'd totally vote for him," said Kucinich supporter, recent California transplant and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate student Alysha Meyers.
http://www.prospect.org/webfeatures/2003/09/ganeshananthan-v-09-16.html

UI Alumnus Charged In Drug Case (Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Sept. 17)
Prosecutors Tuesday claimed University of Alaska Fairbanks economics professor Bob Logan undertook a "statewide commercial drug enterprise" that led to charges of selling marijuana to undercover investigators in both Fairbanks and Barrow. A university spokesperson said Logan has worked in the school of management since 1986, the year after he received his doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The tenured professor was teaching three economics classes this semester. The paper is based in Alaska.
http://www.news-miner.com/Stories/0,1413,113~7244~1637129,00.html

Painter Attended UI (Rocky Mountain News, Sept. 17)
A story about painter Frank Sampson says he didn't study art formally until college, when in 1946 he enrolled at Concordia College in Morehead, Minn. An instructor there urged him to pursue a graduate degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he plunged into printmaking with Mauricio Lasansky. (Sampson would still be making prints now, he says, but his press needs to be repaired.) The News is based in Colorado.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/arts/article/0,1299,DRMN_55_2261913,00.html

Rietz Comments On IEM, Presidential Race (CNNfn, Sept. 16)
Tom Rietz, associate professor of finance at the TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS, commented on how the Iowa Electronic Markets are reacting to the news that retired General Wesley Clark will join the ranks of Democratic presidential candidates. Rietz noted that over the past couple of weeks, the contract that represents candidates who are not yet listed has been going up steadily. This contract includes Howard Dean and Wesley Clark among others. Rietz added that President Bush has been losing ground in markets that are designed to predict the vote shares taken by the Democrats versus the Republicans. "We've seen Bush losing ground since about the middle of May. In effect, against the typical Democratic nominee right now, he's shown less than 50 percent of the vote share," Rietz said.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7140a0a3cfaf33c6aa0e148eb993582d&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=897dd0bfba1dbe7c1c966901d8c07577

Bergman Comments On Medical Anomalies (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 16)
The writer of this story found she was born without a second kidney, but this was just the start of her search about medical anomalies. Many thousands of people are walking around with other oddball configurations: extra vertebrae, duplicated or oddly placed blood vessels, absent or multiple muscles, little supernumerary spleens, bladders shaped like hourglasses, even 12-lobed livers. Often, they are never discovered -- secrets that crumble to dust with their owners. It is a lesson all good surgeons take to heart: None of us are possessed of Gray's Anatomy perfection -- we are all variations on a theme. But it is still hard to accept when you are the anomaly. "We are all amazed when we discover that no two humans are exactly the same. Sometimes we have extra parts and sometimes we were shortchanged," said RONALD BERGMAN, professor emeritus of anatomy at the University of Iowa, who has been diligently cataloging human anatomical variations for decades. "No two faces are alike -- it's the same inside." (This story originally appeared Sept. 16 in the LOS ANGELES TIMES.)
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/showcase/sns-othernews-body,1,5928439.story

Clark To Become Presidential Candidate (USA Today, Sept. 16)
Wesley Clark, the retired general with a four-star military resume but no political experience, decided Tuesday to become the 10th Democratic presidential candidate, officials close to him said. "He's made his decision and will announce it tomorrow in Little Rock," said Mark Fabiani, a spokesman for Clark. The announcement will be made at 1 p.m. ET Wednesday in Arkansas, sources said. Fabiani did not reveal Clark's decision, but officials close to the former Army general said he told his fledgling campaign team that he's in the race. Clark is scheduled to deliver a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Sept. 19.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/nation/2003-09-16-clark-race_x.htm
The Associated Press story appeared in the MEMPHIS COMMERCIAL APPEAL in Tennessee, THE GUARDIAN in the United Kingdom, ABCNEWS.COM, ARIZONA REPUBLIC, and YAHOO NEWS. Earlier versions of the story noting a possible Clark run and his UI speech appeared on the websites of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, DOW JONES NEWSWIRES, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, BALTIMORE SUN, ATLANA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, BOSTON GLOBE, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, CNN, FOX NEWS, and several TV stations and smaller newspapers.

Bergman Comments On Medical Anomalies (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 16)
The writer of this story found she was born without a second kidney, but this was just the start of her search for information about medical anomalies. Many thousands of people are walking around with other oddball configurations: extra vertebrae, duplicated or oddly placed blood vessels, absent or multiple muscles, little supernumerary spleens, bladders shaped like hourglasses, even 12-lobed livers. Often, they are never discovered -- secrets that crumble to dust with their owners. It is a lesson all good surgeons take to heart: None of us are possessed of Gray's Anatomy perfection -- we are all variations on a theme. But it is still hard to accept when you are the anomaly. "We are all amazed when we discover that no two humans are exactly the same. Sometimes we have extra parts and sometimes we were shortchanged," said RONALD BERGMAN, professor emeritus of anatomy at the University of Iowa, who has been diligently cataloging human anatomical variations for decades. "No two faces are alike - it's the same inside."
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/la-sci-kidney16sep16002422,1,6609967.story
The story also appeared in the BALTIMORE SUN.

Jazz-Loving Businessman Attended UI (Lansing State Journal, Sept. 16)
Skills learned from jazz music harmonize well with the business world, according to two Lansing executives who can do more than simply pick out a tune. Steve Winninger, president and chief executive officer of the State Employees Credit Union, is a pianist who jammed with renowned saxophonist David Sanborn while both attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the late 1960s. Jim Kasprzak, director of the Family Independence Agency's Bureau of Administrative Services, a trumpeter, began his lessons at age 4 at his music-teacher father's knee. They aim to hit the right note Wednesday at a Capital Quality Initiative breakfast, "Jazz & Leadership: Parallel Performances." The newspaper is based in Lansing, Mich.
http://www.lsj.com/news/business/030916_jazz_1d-3d.html

Clark To Speak At UI (Philadelphia Inquirer, Sept. 16)
A story about Gen. Wesley Clark's decision to summon his political team to Arkansas to discuss strategy for mounting a Democratic presidential campaign says he is scheduled to speak at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Friday.

Snee Comments On Clark Visit (Orlando Sentinel, Sept. 15)
A story about Gen. Wesley Clark's plans to give a lecture at the University of Iowa says his appearance was part of a campus lecture series booked last winter, "long before anyone considered him a presidential candidate," university spokesman TOM SNEE said. It's not a political event. But the school is setting up a news conference for the general, too - though Snee warned that any real news is likely to break out before Friday. "He's been telling people that he'll announce beforehand, before he gets to Iowa City," Snee said.

Johnson To Leave UI (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 15)
A top-ranking official is leaving the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. Dr. CYNDA JOHNSON, chairwoman of the Department of Family Medicine, is going to East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. She leaves Sept. 26. Johnson says nothing pushed her away from Iowa. She was recruited for a position that will allow her to care for patients in an underserved community, something she says appeals to her. "I've always been interested in serving the underserved," she said. "And my career has always been in rural areas, whether it's been Kansas, Iowa or North Carolina."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=36&u_sid=855937

Squire: Dean Ads Appeal To Voters (Christian Science Monitor, Sept. 15)
A story about Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean's use of television ads says the messages Dean has been sending have been as important as the medium. "Dean has gotten a lot of attention, because he was the first prominent candidate in the field to seriously question whether we should be involved in Iraq," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "He's been able to capitalize on that." On the other hand, Squire says, Democratic rival John Edwards's first ad focused on introducing himself to voters, not on policy. "He comes across as very pleasant, not out of step with the basic values of Iowa," says Squire. "But he does have to take that next step and explain why they should vote for him."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0915/p03s01-uspo.html

Clark May Announce Before UI Visit (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Sept. 14)
A story about possible Democratic presidential candidate Gen. Wesley Clark reports Clark has said he will announce his presidential intentions before Friday, when he is scheduled to give a speech on foreign policy issues at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0903/14clark.html?urac=n&urvf=10636410333000.4536037867127385
Similar stories that also mention Clark's upcoming UI speech ran Sept. 13 and 14 on the websites of:
The FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM in Texas
http://www.dfw.com/mld/startelegram/news/local/6769919.htm
The BALTIMORE SUN
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/bal-te.clark14sep14,0,4234750.story?coll=bal-nationworld-headlines
THE INDEPENDENT (U.K.)
http://news.independent.co.uk/world/americas/story.jsp?story=443107
The MILFORD DAILY NEWS in Massachusetts
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/local_regional/ap_clarkforpres09132003.htm
The MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE
http://www.startribune.com/stories/384/4078759.html

Kinsey To Speak At Nebraska Seminar (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 14)
Four seminars on the Lewis and Clark expedition are scheduled during the spring semester at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, including one on April 21, "I Wished for the Pencil of Salvator Rosa: The Artistic Legacy of Lewis and Clark," by JONI KINSEY, an art professor at the University of Iowa. The presentation is part of the Paul A. Olson Seminars in Great Plains Studies presented by the Center for Great Plains Studies at UNL.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=36&u_sid=854916

Man Dies Before Airlift To UI Hospitals (Rock Island Argus, Sept. 14)
A 21-year-old Rock Island man died Sunday evening from injuries sustained when he fell or jumped off the Centennial Bridge approach while being pursued by police. The man, whose name was not being released by Davenport officers late Sunday, was a passenger in a gold Isuzu Trooper reported stolen from Moline that Davenport police pulled over near the 200 block of Gaines Street just after 7 p.m., said Capt. Dave Struckman. The man was taken to Genesis Medical Center, East Campus, Davenport, but died at 9:04 p.m., before medical personnel could airlift him to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS in Iowa City. The Argus is based in Rock Island, Ill.
http://www.qconline.com/archives/qco/sections.cgi?prcss=display&id=167967

Johnson Accepts Position At East Carolina University (WQAD-TV, Sept. 14)
Another top-ranking official is leaving the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. CYNDA JOHNSON, chairwoman of the Department of Family Medicine, is going to East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. She leaves Sept. 26. The former dean of the college, ROBERT KELCH, left two weeks ago for the University of Michigan and another department chairwoman, MARY HENDRIX, will leave at the end of the month. Johnson says nothing pushed her away from Iowa. She was recruited for the position, which will allow her to care for patients in an underserved community, something she says appeals to her. A committee has been formed to conduct a national search find Johnson's replacement. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1441869&nav=1sW7Hz3G

Author Haslett Mentions Workshop (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Sept. 14)
In a Q&A with Adam Haslett, author of the debut collection of short stories "You Are Not a Stranger Here, Haslett says the stories came together over four years, including two years in graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/384/4078759.html

IEM Noted As "Granddaddy" of Information Markets (Fortune, Sept. 13)
In an article profiling Robin Hanson, founder of the Policy Analysis Market, a Pentagon-sponsored online futures market that would have allowed traders to speculate on wars, assassinations and terrorism, several other prediction markets are noted, including the Iowa Electronic Markets. In 1988, IEM co-founder ROBERT FORSYTHE launched the "granddaddy" of information markets at the University of Iowa. In a study published three years ago, Forsythe and his colleagues found that over 12 years -- a period covering 41 elections in 13 countries -- the IEM consistently outperformed opinion polls in forecasting election outcomes.

Squire: Dean Attacks Prove He's In Lead (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sept. 12)
A story about the rising level of criticism being leveled against Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean by the party's other hopefuls quotes PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "You can see that they're all in agreement as to who is in the lead right now," said Squire. "They've got to try to slow Dean's momentum and give the voters some reason to look their direction." Squire said Dean's rise has put Dick Gephardt "in a particularly vulnerable position" in Iowa because it is seen as a crucial state for the Missouri congressman.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/News/5FCD6B6BD558600886256DA00014C990?OpenDocument&Headline=Gephardt+aims+at+Dean,+linking+him+to+Gingrich

Kerber Comments On Ruling (Chronicle of Higher Education, Sept. 12)
A story about the study of gay history says that aside from studying history, scholars in the field have recently helped to make some. In June, several works by gay historians were cited by the U.S. Supreme Court in Lawrence v. Texas, in which the justices ruled that laws forbidding homosexual activity are a violation of "personal dignity and autonomy." It was a decision that brought one era to an end and began another. Critics of the decision cite a Connecticut statute from 1642 that reads: "If any man lie with mankind as with a woman, both of them hath committed abomination, they both shall surely be put to death." And in his dissent from the majority opinion, Justice Antonin Scalia noted the existence of "records of 20 sodomy prosecutions and four executions during the colonial period" -- citing as his source the work of John Katz. For LINDA K. KERBER, a professor of history and a lecturer in law at the University of Iowa, who contributed to a supporting brief submitted for Lawrence, such objections reveal an ignorance of the documentary evidence and of the way historians go about reconstructing the past. "When conservatives make those arguments," she says, "I want to tell them, 'We don't make it up. Check the footnotes, go read the sources. If you don't agree with the way I've interpreted things, my cards are on the table.'"
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v50/i03/03a01401.htm

Clark Expected to Decide Candidacy Before UI Speech (Boston Globe, Sept. 12)
The Democratic Party roiled with speculation yesterday about Wesley Clark's potential impact on the party's presidential nomination race, amid word that Howard Dean and other current candidates have been seeking the retired Army general's political support. Clark aides said they expect a decision before next Friday, when Clark delivers a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/255/nation/A_would_be_presidential_candidate_edges_closer_to_decision+.shtml
This same story appeared in the CONTRA COSTA (CA) TIMES.
A story on the same topic was published in the NEW YORK TIMES (this story was also published in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE and the BALTIMORE SUN):
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Clark.html
A story on the same topic was published in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/search/chi_all.jsp?Query=%22university+of+iowa%22
A similar story was published on CBSNEWS.COM (this story was also published by the ALBANY TIMES UNION, KANSAS CITY STAR, TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL, CARLISLE (PA) SUN, OAKLAND TRIBUNE, ABCNEWS.COM, NEWARK STAR LEDGER, HELENA (MT) INDEPENDENT RECORD, MILTON (PA) DAILY STANDARD, BECKLEY (WV) HERALD REGISTER, CHEBOYGAN (MI) TRIBUNE, KOTV-TV, KFSN-TV, and many other publications.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/09/12/politics/main572856.shtml

Dean Reportedly Asks Clark To Join Ticket (Denver Post, Sept. 11)
Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean has asked retired Army Gen. Wesley Clark to join his campaign, if the former NATO commander does not jump into the race himself next week, and the two men discussed the vice presidency at a weekend meeting in California, sources familiar with the discussions said. It was the fourth time Dean and Clark have met face-to-face to discuss the campaign. No decisions were made at the California meeting because Clark is still considering a run for president. Clark is scheduled to make a speech Sept. 19 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA , when many political insiders expect him to announce his intentions. A version of this story also appeared Sept. 11 in the FLORIDA TIMES-UNION in Jacksonville, Fla.

UI International Student Applications Down (KETV-Omaha, Sept. 11)
Two years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, foreign student applications at the University of Iowa are down. SCOTT KING, director of international students at the University of Iowa, said the new guidelines are necessary. But, King said many foreign students now go to school in countries that are easier to get into, including Australia and Canada. He said the university loses tuition money and the U.S. loses a chance to promote democracy.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/iowabureau/2475521/detail.html

Dean Reportedly Asks Clark To Join Ticket (Washington Post, Sept. 11)
Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean has asked retired Army Gen. Wesley Clark to join his campaign, if the former NATO commander does not jump into the race himself next week, and the two men discussed the vice presidency at a weekend meeting in California, sources familiar with the discussions said. It was the fourth time Dean and Clark have met face-to-face to discuss the campaign. No decisions were made at the California meeting because Clark is still considering a run for president. Clark is scheduled to make a speech Sept. 19 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, when many political insiders expect him to announce his intentions. Versions of this story appeared Sept. 11 on the web sites of Reuters UK, Wired News, MSNBC, San Francisco Chronicle, Topeka (Kan.) Capital Journal, Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Seattle Times, St. Paul Pioneer Press, and Omaha World-Herald.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A57770-2003Sep10.html

Clark May Announce Before UI Speech (USA Today, Sept. 11)
Wesley Clark knows how to wage a successful campaign: He's a former top Pentagon war planner and the former commander of NATO forces in Kosovo. But if the retired Army four-star general announces next week, as expected, that he will join the field of nine Democrats running for president, he will have to maneuver quickly to survive on the political battlefield. And yet, analysts say, Clark brings a resume that could rattle John Kerry, who has struggled as former Vermont governor Howard Dean has pulled ahead in polls in Iowa and New Hampshire, the first two contests. Clark may announce his candidacy in his hometown of Little Rock, Ark., before Sept. 19, when he is scheduled to speak at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The state holds the first presidential caucus Jan. 19.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/nation/2003-09-10-clark-usat_x.htm

Robillard: Stem Cell Ban Is Restrictive (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 11)
The state's ban on using human embryos to create therapeutic stem cells has had a chilling effect on efforts to recruit researchers at the University of Iowa's Carver College of Medicine and could scare away certain high-tech businesses, according to the dean of the medical school. "Clearly this law is restrictive and could really prevent companies from coming to Iowa that want to invest in biotechnology and partner with the university," Dr. JEAN ROBILLARD said. "I would like to see this law modified and made less restrictive." Iowa joined Arkansas, Michigan and North Dakota in banning both reproductive and therapeutic research cloning. Nebraska has no such laws. "We are against reproductive cloning, but therapeutic cloning is very different," Robillard said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=36&u_sid=851741

UI Monitoring Student File Sharing (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 11)
Despite efforts to educate students about copyright laws, illegal online music swapping persists on college campuses. In recent years, Nebraska and Iowa universities have worked with the recording industry to combat piracy. To teach students about copyright rules, Nebraska and Iowa universities have used fliers, posters or computer messages. When the RIAA notifies a university of suspected illegal file-sharing, officials talk to the student and either shut down the computer immediately or soon after the student is notified. Once the student removes the file-sharing software, computer access may be reinstated. At the University of Nebraska's Kearney, Lincoln and Omaha campuses and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, students rarely are repeat offenders, technology specialists said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1458&u_sid=851897

UI Faculty Seek Fewer Athletic Scholarships (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 11)
The University of Iowa Faculty Council has approved a resolution in favor of limiting the number of athletic scholarships. "At a time when the university has budget problems, we have to think seriously about how every dollar is spent," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor on the 19-member council which makes recommendations to the university's Faculty Senate. Money going to football and basketball should be used for other men's and women's athletic programs, Squire said. University athletics would be affected only by changes the NCAA would make at the national level, said Fred Mims, associate athletic director.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=852122

UI Tuition Hike Cited (Sydney Morning Herald, Sept. 10)
When you consider how much attention we (rightly) pay to American politics, it's surprising how little we hear about the adventures - and misadventures - of the 50 American state governments. Few of us know those governments are putting themselves and their citizens through the financial wringer at present, even though it's a cautionary tale for our own state governments. California's budgetary crisis is just the most extreme of the crises facing virtually all the US states. Between them, they have deficits totaling $125 billion. All but one of the states has constitutional or legislative provisions requiring them to at least balance their recurrent budgets. Fortunately, however, most of those provisions have built-in loopholes that allow the pollies to fudge around them to a greater or lesser extent. Even so, for the past year or two the states have been under huge pressure to do whatever it takes to eliminate their deficits (notwithstanding the weak state of their economies). About half of them have raised tax rates, or are considering it, particularly taxes on cigarettes and alcohol. Some have increased sales tax and a few income tax. Some states are looking to increase their revenue from gambling, while most have jacked up all manner of court fines and fees for services, including tuition fees at state universities and colleges. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's fees were raised by 18 per cent. For the most part, however, the states are slashing their spending rather than raising taxes (some enacted provisions during the '90s requiring that bills for tax increases be passed by more than a simple majority).
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/09/09/1062902053377.html

UI Alumnus Named Reorganized Conseco VP (Indianapolis Star, Sept. 10)
Conseco's bankruptcy reorganization plan was approved by a federal judge Tuesday in a move that breathes new life into the beleaguered insurer and ends one of the largest and most complex cases of its kind in U.S. history. Among the top executives named to the company is Ronald F. Ruhl, executive vice president and chief actuary, who previously directed corporate actuarial duties, operations, product and financial management for Conseco's insurance business units. Ruhl has a bachelor's degree from Union College and a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/5/072889-9125-031.html

Blank Quoted On ADA Retaliation Case (Herald Tribune, Sept. 10)
A man who became the target of a city investigation after assessing violations of the Americans With Disabilities Act at its new municipal building has the right to sue for damages, an appeals court has ruled. An individual has the right to sue public agencies for retaliation under the 1990 federal law codifying the rights of disabled people, the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said Monday in reinstating the lawsuit by ADA consultant Frederick Shotz. The court agreed to dismiss the mayor and city attorney as defendants but reinstated the lawsuit against the city, council member Ron Jacobs and private investigator Peter Markowitz. The lawsuit filed in 2000 had been dismissed by U.S. Magistrate Judge Barry Seltzer in Fort Lauderdale. "It's something that will send a cautionary message reverberating from Florida to California about the conduct of public officials toward their citizens with disabilities," said PETER BLANCK, a University of Iowa law professor specializing in disabilities law. Blanck said most government agencies welcome ADA enforcement, but people who claim retaliation now have a legal recourse. The Tribune covers southwest Florida. A version of the story also ran Sept. 10 on the website of THE LEDGER in Florida.
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20030909/APN/309090816

Law Alumnus Named To Ethics Commission (KFMB-TV, Sept. 9)
Edward F. Kolker, a private mediator and arbitrator, was named Tuesday to the City of San Diego's Ethics Commission. Kolker, a former municipal court judge and assistant United States attorney for the Southern District of California, has more than 30 years experience in the legal profession. A registered independent, Kolker replaces Commissioner Charles LaBella, whose term has expired. Kolker has a bachelor's degree in political science and a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. KFMB-TV is based in California.
http://www.kfmb.com/topstory17958.html

King Comments On Foreign Student Application Decline (WQAD, Sept. 9)
Two years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, foreign student applications at the University of Iowa are down. After federal officials discovered that one of the 19 hijackers had legally entered the U.S. on a student visa, tighter immigration guidelines for college students were put in place. Government officials use a new computer database to make sure that foreign students with potential ties to terrorists are not allowed in the country. SCOTT KING, director of international students at the University of Iowa, says the new guidelines are necessary. But, King says many foreign students now go to school in countries that are easier to get into, including Australia and Canada. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1435247&nav=1sW7HtZC

Clark To Speak At UI (KETV, Sept. 9)
Retired General Wesley Clark will deliver the 2003 Levitt Lecture at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 4 p.m. Sept. 19. Clark is considering seeking the Democratic Party's presidential nomination, but he is expected to make an announcement before his visit. The former supreme commander of NATO and leader of the allied forces Kosovo in 1999 will examine the complexities of America's new foreign relations in his lecture, "The American Leadership Role In a Changing World." Clark also is the author of Waging Modern War, a 2002 bestseller that recounts his experiences leading NATO forces during the Kosovo war. He worked as a military, security and foreign affairs analyst for CNN during this year's war against Iraq. KETV is based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/news/2466260/detail.html

Cooper Studies School Bathroom Practices (Washington Post, Sept. 9)
In an ideal world, says CHRIS COOPER, schoolchildren would be allowed to use the bathroom whenever they felt the urge. As a pediatric urologist, he knows that this would cut down on incontinence, infections and the long-lasting humiliation associated with having accidents in class. But Cooper's recent survey of school-time potty practices, published in the September issue of the Journal of Urology, shows that this ideal remains a pipe dream. Cooper, associate professor of urology at University of Iowa, sent questionnaires to a random sampling of 1,000 elementary-school teachers throughout Iowa; 467 completed and returned the surveys. Of these, 80 percent reported using set times for student bathroom breaks; within this group, 61 percent of these teachers requested that all children go to the bathroom at those set times, while 39 percent sent only those who chose to go. Forty percent of respondents allowed children to use the bathroom at any time; one-third said they had asked kids requesting a bathroom break during class to wait.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A44867-2003Sep8.html

UI Offers Shoe Advice (News 14 Carolina, Sept. 9)
Summer footwear can be fun, though not practical for everyone. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE says you should pay attention to any pain in your feet and consider what you're putting on your feet if you have problems. Choose the right footwear for outdoor activities. And, if you experience arch, heel or even back pain, wear shoes with better arch support, or pop in shoe inserts, to help you tiptoe through the summer.
http://rdu.news14.com/content/headlines/?ArID=35349&SecID=2

UI Study: Drinking Soda Leads To Cavities (Ivanhoe News Wire, Sept. 9)
Not only does more soda contribute to obesity in children, but a new study also shows it increases the chance for cavities. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA report the decrease of milk consumption, in exchange for an increase in juice and soda, means children are likely to have more cavities. The study investigators note a trend of children drinking more soda and 100 percent juice drinks and less milk. They theorized this would lead to more cavities. The study involved nearly 700 children aged 1 through 5 years. The children's food and drink intake was recorded for three days. Dentists analyzed the children for cavities at 4 to 7 years old.
http://www.ivanhoe.com/channels/p_channelstory.cfm?storyid=6952

Author Of Chile Essay Attending UI (Frontpage Magazine, Sept. 8)
Roberto Ampuero, who was a member of the Chilean Communist Students Organization when the elected president of his country, Salvador Allende, was overthrown in a bloody coup on Sept. 11, 1973, by Gen. Augusto Pinochet, writes of the experience in an essay titled "The Left Killed Allende, Too." A bio at the beginning of the piece says that Ampuero is the author of seven published novels and that he is now pursuing a Ph.D. in Latin American literature at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The essay originally ran in the WASHINGTON POST. Frontpage Magazine is a publication by activist and author David Horowitz, one of the founders of the New Left in the 1960s and editor of its largest magazine, Ramparts.
http://frontpagemag.com/articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=9725

Coleman Named To Johnson & Johnson Board (Stock World, Sept. 8)
Mary Sue Coleman, president of the University of Michigan, today was elected to the Board of Directors of Johnson & Johnson, the world's most broadly based health care products company. Coleman is beginning her second year as president of the University of Michigan. She is professor of biological chemistry in the University of Michigan Medical School and professor of chemistry in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Coleman served as president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for seven years before becoming Michigan's 13th president in August 2002. Stock World is based in Germany. A version of the story also ran Sept. 8 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://www.stockworld.de/msg/570830.html

Berg Comments On IEM (BizReport, Sept. 8)
A story about the University of Iowa's Iowa Electronic Markets quotes JOYCE BERG, a member of IEM's board of directors and an accounting professor at the UI's Henry B. Tippie College of Business -- inventor and custodian of the electronic market. "We ask you to think about not what you want to happen (in various elections), but what you think is going to happen," said Berg. "You make money here by buying low and selling high." IEM traders are predicting that about 54 percent of California voters will choose to recall Gov. Gray Davis (D), that actor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) will get around 39 percent of the gubernatorial vote and that Lt. Gov. Cruz M. Bustamante (D) will get 32 percent. But the market has been running only since Aug. 27, and the differences are still wide between the buying prices bid on various outcomes ("contracts") and the selling prices asked for them. With more "traders" and more transactions, the differences between "bid" and "ask" will shrink. BizReport, based in Denmark, is recognized internationally as a leading source for Internet business and e-commerce news, according to its website.
http://www.bizreport.com/article.php?art_id=4890

IEM Offers California Recall Market (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 8)
A columnist writes that Iowa has its presidential caucuses in January, "but if you are inclined to take risks before then, there's the IOWA ELECTRONICS MARKET, the University of Iowa business college's 'real-money futures markets in which contract payoffs depend on economic and political events such as elections.' Just now the hot market is California's recall election. The IEM opened for recall trading on Aug. 27 in two markets: one on the recall itself and the second on a possible new governor. It's a benign, business-school spin on the now-defunct Pentagon online futures market for betting on Middle Eastern developments that was advertised as a vehicle for profiting on assassinations and other terrorist acts. Unlike Iowa's program, the Pentagon's was not promoted as a possible part of a college curriculum."
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-polcol8sep08,1,4520787.story

Nelson: Markets Good At Aggregating Information (Chicago Business, Sept. 8)
A story about terrorism futures markets says the general public has shown some interest in applying futures-trading concepts to non-financial markets like sports and elections. TradeSports.com, an Irish exchange, allows visitors to place contracts on sporting events. The 15,000 traders registered with the Iowa Electronic Markets, run by the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business, trade positions on national political races and high-profile local elections, like the California recall vote. (Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger is the early favorite, in light trading.) Iowa's political exchange consistently outperforms public opinion polls in predicting election outcomes, including those in 2000. The system's average margin of error is a slim 1.5 percent, vs. the 2.25 percent-to-2.5 percent margin that's typical for polled results. "Markets aggregate information; they're really good at that," says FORREST NELSON, a professor of economics at the University of Iowa. "Different people have different beliefs. Let them trade away, and what emerges is a single price, which is the average aggregated belief of all traders."
http://chicagobusiness.com/cgi-bin/news.pl?id=9991

UI Alumnus Called Hero In Flood Rescues (Fort Worth Star Telegram, Sept. 8)
Albert Aubrey Larsen spent the last hours of his life slogging through high floodwaters on the Kansas Turnpike, knocking on car windows and helping trapped motorists to higher ground, his widow said Sunday. Albert Larsen, 31, helped a 79-year-old Kansas woman climb through her car window and carried her to safety, Elizabeth-Anne Larsen said. "He almost dropped her because it was so windy and raining," she said. "He took her to a car where they put blankets around her. Before he left she thanked him and asked his name, and he said, 'All that matters is that you're safe,' and he waded back into the deep water." A technical specialist at the Verizon corporate office in Las Colinas, Texas, Albert Larsen had met his wife in college at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. They were married for almost six years. They had no children.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/news/6720363.htm

UI Press, Simmons Award Cited (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 7)
A brief review of "Bring Me Your Saddest Arizona" by Ryan Harty says the collection of short stories was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS and won the UI's John Simmons Short Fiction Award for 2003.
http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/books/la-bk-reynolds7sep07,1,2783961.story

Berg Comments On IEM (Washington Post, Sept. 7)
A story about the University of Iowa's Iowa Electronic Markets quotes JOYCE BERG, a member of IEM's board of directors and an accounting professor at the UI's Henry B. Tippie College of Business -- inventor and custodian of the electronic market. "We ask you to think about not what you want to happen (in various elections), but what you think is going to happen," said Berg. "You make money here by buying low and selling high." IEM traders are predicting that about 54 percent of California voters will choose to recall Gov. Gray Davis (D), that actor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) will get around 39 percent of the gubernatorial vote and that Lt. Gov. Cruz M. Bustamante (D) will get 32 percent. But the market has been running only since Aug. 27, and the differences are still wide between the buying prices bid on various outcomes ("contracts") and the selling prices asked for them. With more "traders" and more transactions, the differences between "bid" and "ask" will shrink. A version of the story also ran Sept. 8 on the website of the FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM in Texas.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A36444-2003Sep6.html

Squire Comments On Dean Candidacy (Star-Banner, Sept. 7)
In 1828, newly elected President Andrew Jackson rode the train from Tennessee to Washington with a broom strapped to the engine, signifying his intention to sweep the slate clean and start fresh. Since then, governors, rather than congressmen and senators, have been the popular presidential picks among America's voters. That bodes well for Howard Dean, former governor of Vermont, who hopes to secure the Democratic nomination for president in 2004 - but not necessarily well in his plans to unseat the incumbent, President George Bush, the former governor of Texas. "Dean can tout his executive experience - his current competitors cannot match that claim," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, site of the first presidential caucus. "Dean gets the credit, or the blame, for his record in Vermont. Figuring out what a member of Congress' record really is - what is really their responsibility - is very difficult. Moreover, members of Congress have to go on record with votes on issues that they might otherwise wish to avoid. Governors can usually pick and choose their battles to a greater degree."
http://www.starbanner.com/apps/pbcs.dll/artikkel?SearchID=73146635726121&Avis=OS&Dato=20030907&Kategori=NEWS&Lopenr=209070356&Ref=AR

Jones Cites Flaws In Voting Machine Software (Sacramento Bee, Sept. 7)
As California election officials rush to prep new electronic voting machines for the Oct. 7 recall, some computer security experts are raising alarms over what they see as the devices' potential for permitting electoral fraud. At issue are touch-screen computers that will be used next month in Shasta, Alameda, Plumas and Riverside counties, which account for about nine percent of all votes cast in the state. In July, a team from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and Rice University in Houston analyzed software from Diebold, makers of the voting machines, and found widespread vulnerability. Diebold released a highly technical, 27-page rebuttal of the Johns Hopkins findings. But some computer scientists consider Diebold's response unconvincing. "I think the primary issues raised in the Hopkins study are still valid," said DOUGLAS JONES, who teaches computer science at the University of Iowa and has studied electronic voting since 1994. Jones said he analyzed the Hopkins findings and Diebold's responses, and said Diebold essentially agreed with the Hopkins researchers on many points, though the company said many of the scenarios were highly unlikely.
http://www.sacbee.com/content/politics/ca/election/story/7371370p-8315027c.html

Critic Mentions Yates' UI Affiliation (Salt Lake Tribune, Sept. 7)
A review of the book "A Tragic Honesty: The Life and Work of Richard Yates," by Blake Bailey, says the writer was hired by an ex-student, David Milch, producer of TV's "Hill Street Blues," to work on treatments (storylike ideas that might be developed into scripts). According to the article, Yates didn't even like Milch, who he had taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA (Yates, a high school graduate who never took a college course, taught at six colleges, including Columbia and the University of Southern California), and working for Milch made Yates miserable. None of his treatments ever made it to the screen.
http://www.sltrib.com/2003/Sep/09072003/arts/90217.as

Marshall Discusses Tooth Decay Study (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 7)
A new study suggests soft drinks and powdered beverages cause more cavities in kids than fruit juice, but even orange juice can spell trouble if children overdo it. When sugar reaches the teeth, it interacts with bacteria. "You produce acid as a byproduct," explained study co-author TERESA A. MARSHALL, a clinical assistant professor of preventive and community dentistry at the University of Iowa. The acid erodes the enamel of teeth. Children with more cavities reported drinking more soft drinks and powdered beverages. Kids who drank a lot of fruit juice had more cavities, too, "but it was really a much lower effect than we saw with the other two beverages," Marshall said. "This doesn't mean that excessive drinking of juice is perfectly safe. But it isn't as bad as the others." Marshall and her colleagues report their findings in the September issue of Pediatrics.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0309070144sep07,1,23991.story

UI Alumnus' Brother Died In 9-11 Attacks (Knoxville News, Sept. 7)
A story about the death Sept. 11, 2001, of Timothy Aaron Haviland, who was working in the north tower of the World Trade Center when a hijacked aircraft slammed into the building, says he is survived by seven brothers and sisters, including Andrew (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, class of '78; master's in international relations, Columbia University, 1986; MBA, Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, 2001), an economics officer with the State Department in India.
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/local_news/article/0,1406,KNS_347_2239438,00.html

Clark To Speak At UI Sept. 19 (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Sept. 6)
A story about the buzz around retired four-star Army Gen. Wesley Clark, the former supreme commander at NATO credited with leading a successful military operation in Kosovo in 1999, says he finds himself being touted as the great Democratic hope for unseating President Bush in November 2004. The story says Clark is scheduled to speak at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA - in the state that kicks off the national delegate-selection process - Sept. 19. A version of the story also ran Sept. 6 on the website of the KNOXVILLE (Tenn.) NEWS SENTINEL.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/news/6707865.htm

UI Student President Seeks Tuition Relief (Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 6)
Student presidents at Iowa's three public universities want the Iowa Board of Regents to consider capping tuition increases at 5 percent a year for the duration of a student's college career. In a letter Thursday, the student leaders asked regents to consider ways to control tuition and to increase student aid and student representation. The move comes in the wake of double-digit tuition hikes in each of the past three years. During that time, tuition for Iowa residents has climbed more than 39 percent to $4,342 this year. Nonresident tuition has risen 27 percent to $14,634. The regents are also being asked to delay setting tuition rates until after the Legislature decides on state funding for the universities. The letter was signed by Nate Green, student government president at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; Emiliano Lerda, student president at Northern Iowa; and Mike Banasiak, student president at Iowa State.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=36&u_sid=847252

IC Police Won't Staff UI Games (Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 6)
The police department won't provide extra officers for traffic control before and after UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football games unless the university pays for it, the city's police chief said this week. The department has traditionally paid officers overtime for traffic control, but Winkelhake said it's become too much of a financial burden on the city and taxpayers. University officials say they're not going to pay for traffic enforcement for football games.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=36&u_sid=847250

UI Gets Grant For Biodefense Planning (Lawrence Journal World, Sept. 5)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will be the lead research organization using a $1.47 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to plan a Regional Center for Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research. Other universities that will participate include Kansas University, Iowa State University and Wichita State University. The Lawrence Journal World is located in Kansas.
http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/story/144497

UI Receives Grant, UC-Davis Doesn't (Sacramento Bee, Sept. 5)
The University of California-Davis' bid for a proposed bio lab suffered a crushing setback Thursday when federal officials denied the university funding for a critical research consortium that would have operated out of its proposed facility. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA received one of the grants.
http://www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/7350562p-8294465c.html

Futures Market Started for Recall (San Jose Business Journal, Sept. 5)
There are coffee futures. And oil futures. And even the intriguing pork belly futures market. Now, however, there's the California governor recall futures market. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET says it has opened trading on the outcome of the Oct. 7 California governor recall election, offering futures contracts on the outcome of the voting. Traders can speculate on several outcomes. Among them are whether Gov. Gray Davis will be recalled, and if he is, who will be elected governor. Listings include contracts for candidates Cruz Bustamante and Arnold Schwarzenegger. The IEM is run by six professors at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa.
http://sanjose.bizjournals.com/sanjose/stories/2003/09/01/daily47.html

UI Student Roche Pleads Innocent To Threat Charges (USA Today, Sept. 4)
A story about a judge's decision to release several documents in the case against NBA superstar Kobe Bryant, accused of rape in Colorado this past summer, says the decision came a day after and Iowa man accused of threatening Bryant's alleged victim pleaded innocent in federal court in Denver. John Roche, 22, a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is accused of leaving threats of assault and death on the woman's phone answering machine in July.

Student Barred From Drinking (Jefferson City News Tribune, Sept. 4)
Kobe Bryant's lawyers have subpoenaed a Colorado hospital to see his accuser's medical records -- the first indication they might make her mental health an issue if the sexual assault case against the basketball star goes to trial. Meanwhile, an Iowa college student pleaded innocent in Denver federal court Tuesday to making a death threat against Bryant's accuser in a profanity-laced telephone message last month. John Roche, 22, said nothing in court and ignored reporters outside. He remains free on $250,000 bail. U.S. Magistrate Patricia Coan barred Roche from drinking alcohol and limited his travel to Colorado and to Iowa, where he attends the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Tribune is based in Missouri. Versions of the story also ran on FOXSPORTS.COM, USA TODAY and the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.newstribune.com/stories/090403/spo_0904030020.asp

Book Reviewer Attended UI Writers' Workshop (Salon, Sept. 4)
In a review of Nell Frudenberger's first novel, Lucky Girls, writer Curtis Sittenfeld says that he'd first heard of Frudenberger after graduating from the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and while still living in Iowa City.
http://www.salon.com/books/feature/2003/09/04/freudenberger/index.html

UI Student In Bryant Case Barred From Drinking (New York Times, Sept. 3)
Kobe Bryant's lawyers have subpoenaed a Colorado hospital to see his accuser's medical records -- the first indication they might make her mental health an issue if the sexual assault case against the basketball star goes to trial. Meanwhile, an Iowa college student pleaded innocent in Denver federal court Tuesday to making a death threat against Bryant's accuser in a profanity-laced telephone message last month. John Roche, 22, said nothing in court and ignored reporters outside. He remains free on $250,000 bail. U.S. Magistrate Patricia Coan barred Roche from drinking alcohol and limited his travel to Colorado and to Iowa, where he attends the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Versions of the story also ran in the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD in Nebraska, KOTV in Oklahoma, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE in Minnesota, the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, THE LEDGER and the ST. PETERSBURG TIMES in Florida, the DENVER POST in Colorado, the TIMES DAILY in Alabama and the LONG BEACH PRESS-TELEGRAM, the REDLANDS DAILY FACTS, the SAN BERNARDINO SUN and the VENTURA COUNTY STAR, all in California, as well as other media outlets.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/sports/AP-BKN-Bryant-Case.html

Nauseef Comments On Bacteria Research (Independent Record, Sept. 3)
What happens in moments after flesh-eating bacteria invades the body can best be described as bizarre. The bacteria - caused by the same streptococcus pyogenes that causes strep throat - tells the body's front-line immune system cells to kill themselves. And they obey. "I was surprised," said Frank De Leo, a scientist at Rocky Mountain Laboratories who headed the team of Montana scientists who discovered strep's subversion strategy and shed new light on how the body's immune system works. It's not just the unexpected activities of strep that caught the attention of the science world, said WILLIAM NAUSEEF, a University of Iowa expert on inflammation. De Leo's work turns on its head the traditional view of the immune system as a troop of disease-killing soldiers, armed with everything they need to wipe out invading bacteria. The Independent Record is based in Helena, Mont. A version of the story also ran Sept. 3 on the website of the BILLINGS GAZETTE in Montana.
http://www.helenair.com/articles/2003/09/03/montana_top/a01090303_05.txt

Plea Expected From Man Charged In Bryant Case (Rocky Mountain News, Sept. 3)
Chances are good that the Iowa man accused of threatening Kobe Bryant's alleged victim will reach a plea bargain with federal authorities, his lawyer said Tuesday. "I think there is a good possibility," attorney Nathan Chambers told Denver U.S. Magistrate Judge Patricia Coan when she asked if 22-year-old John Roche might make a deal. Roche appeared in federal court in downtown Denver on Tuesday to plead not guilty to making a telephone death threat to the Eagle County woman who has accused Bryant of sexually assaulting her. Roche's trial, if there is one, is scheduled for Nov. 9 before Denver U.S. District Judge Walker Miller. He was arrested Aug. 21 in Iowa City, Iowa, where he was registered as a senior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Chambers said that Roche has left the university because of the charge against him and will live in Davenport, Iowa, with his parents.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_2229155,00.html

Flying Dentist Graduated From UI (Billings Gazette, Sept. 3)
A story about the estimated 8,000 spectators who attended the Billings, Mont., baseball team's season opener in 1913 says the visitors also came to watch the flight of Dr. Frank J. Bell, Billings' flying dentist. Just before the opening pitch, Bell took off smoothly and reached a height of more than 500 feet. He headed south over the Yellowstone River, swung back, flew over downtown and circled the ball field eight or nine times before landing in the center of the diamond-shaped field. Ill health initially propelled the Billings dentist to take flying lessons. Bell set up practice in Billings after graduating in dentistry from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1903. In 1905, he married Alice McCormick, the daughter of a prominent pioneer Billings family. But, at the age of 32, Bell got tuberculosis, and his doctor recommended that Bell move to Southern California for his health. In San Diego in 1912, Bell became a close friend of Glenn Curtiss at the Curtiss Flying School. Bell got his pilot's license, No. 198, in December of 1912. The Gazette is based in Billings, Mont.
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?tl=1&display=rednews/2003/09/03/build/local/38-crowd.inc

Fitch Ponders Use Of God's Name (Detroit News, Sept. 3)
Fans of European soccer star David Beckham show their appreciation by filling the Internet with "Beck is God" posts, and some replica jerseys have replaced the name "Beckham" on the back with "God." The increasing use of God in this way isn't a sign that the culture as a whole is leaning away from God, said KRISTINE FITCH, an associate professor at the University of Iowa. Fitch works in the Department of Communication Studies, researching the way language helps to form culture. "If anything, U.S. culture is leaning more toward organized religion," she said. "Fundamentalism is stronger than it has ever been." Perhaps, Fitch theorizes, the increasing use of God on signs and in conversation is a form of subtle resistance to the increasing fundamentalism.
http://www.detnews.com/2003/religion/0309/03/d06d-260791.htm

UI Student In Bryant Case Barred From Drinking (Detroit Free Press, Sept. 3)
Kobe Bryant's lawyers have subpoenaed a Colorado hospital to see his accuser's medical records -- the first indication they might make her mental health an issue if the sexual assault case against the basketball star goes to trial. Meanwhile, an Iowa college student pleaded innocent in Denver federal court Tuesday to making a death threat against Bryant's accuser in a profanity-laced telephone message last month. John Roche, 22, said nothing in court and ignored reporters outside. He remains free on $250,000 bail. U.S. Magistrate Patricia Coan barred Roche from drinking alcohol and limited his travel to Colorado and to Iowa, where he attends the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

UI Student In Kobe Case A 'Sports Fanatic' (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Sept. 2)
A college student arrested on a charge of threatening Kobe Bryant's accuser is a "sports fanatic" who had been drinking all day at a golf tournament, a friend says. John William Roche, 22, allegedly left the profanity-laced threat on the woman's answering machine July 27. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, Roche waived extradition to Denver, where he is to appear in federal court today. He is charged with making a threatening telephone call across state lines. If convicted, he faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Bryant, 25, is charged with sexually assaulting a 19-year-old resort employee near Vail, Colo., on June 30. The Los Angeles Lakers star has said the sex was consensual. The paper is based in Texas. A version of the story also ran Sept. 2 in the New York DAILY NEWS and the BOSTON HERALD.

UI Student In Kobe Case A 'Sports Fanatic' (Chicago Sun-Times, Sept. 2)
A college student arrested on a charge of threatening Kobe Bryant's accuser is a "sports fanatic" who had been drinking all day at a golf tournament, a friend says. John William Roche, 22, allegedly left the profanity-laced threat on the woman's answering machine July 27. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, Roche waived extradition to Denver, where he is to appear in federal court today. He is charged with making a threatening telephone call across state lines. If convicted, he faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Bryant, 25, is charged with sexually assaulting a 19-year-old resort employee near Vail, Colo., on June 30. The Los Angeles Lakers star has said the sex was consensual.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-kobe02.html
The Associated Press story also appeared on websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS in Colorado, Seattle Post Intelligencer, FOX NEWS, ABC NEWS, the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS and PORTERVILLE RECORDER in California, RAPID CITY JOURNAL in South Dakota, SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE in Florida, GRAND FORKS HERALD in North Dakota, the WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas, and several other news and television news websites.

Fisher Questions Tax Break Effectiveness (Miami Herald, Sept. 2)
Michigan has awarded tax breaks worth more than $1 billion dollars to businesses, but some people question if the state is getting its money's worth. The 176 Michigan Economic Growth Authority tax credits were given to businesses - ranging from fledgling technology firms to automobile industry giants - in exchange for promises to create some 46,000 jobs. Those credits will total $1.38 billion over their duration, which can be up to 20 years, The Detroit News reported in a Tuesday story. Critics say these numbers suggest the authority might be going too far. And state officials who operate the program concede that they are in the tax abatement game mainly because they are afraid that if they quit they will lose out to states offering better deals. "It's an expensive way for a state to bring about a very modest increase in job creation," said PETER FISHER, a University of Iowa professor of urban and regional planning. "If most of the credits go to firms that would have located there anyway, which I suspect is the case, then you've blown a lot of money for nothing."
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/6671994.htm
The story also appeared in the MACON TELEGRAPH in Georgia, the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL in Ohio, the FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL in Indiana, the WICHITA EAGLEin Kansas, the FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM, the KANSAS CITY STAR and DETROIT NEWS.

Deputy Coroner Starts New Career (Modesto Bee, Sept. 2)
Rex Cline, a Stanislaus County deputy coroner for 21 years, is looking forward to retiring from one career and starting another. In November, he plans to start work for Coldwell Banker-Vinson Chase Realtor. Cline was born and raised in Iowa City, Iowa. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a degree in general science.
http://www.modbee.com/local/story/7381045p-8302022c.html

'Today' Fans Make Showing Outside Studios (Kansas City Star, Sept. 2)
A story about the fans who gather outside NBC studios in New York each morning to catch a glimpse of Today show personalities says crowd members clutch homemade signs, with many people wearing funny hats or outfits as if they were queuing up for "Let's Make a Deal." A group of young women, for example, was recently clad in identical shirts that say "UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE, BLOOD DONATION CENTER," with "I Bleed Black and Gold" (the school's colors) on the back. The story also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/living/6631123.htm

Cooper Studies School Bathroom Practices (Arizona Republic, Sept. 2)
The move from kindergarten to first grade is a big step. The rules, including less access to the bathroom, are tougher. But some elementary-school students' bladders just aren't mature enough to handle that restricted access. And that could lead to problems such as infection and incontinence, say University of Iowa researchers who surveyed public schools about their bathroom policies. Their report appears in the September issue of the Journal of Urology. A team led by Dr. CHRISTOPHER S. COOPER, an associate professor of urology, analyzed 467 surveys returned by public-elementary-school teachers in Iowa who taught kindergarten or early elementary grades. Nearly 80 percent said they set specific times for bathroom breaks, and teachers of higher grades are more likely to do so than the kindergarten teachers. http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/arizonaliving/articles/0902bathroom02.html

Clark Gauges Support To Enter Presidential Race (The Scotsman, Sept. 2)
An article about presidential candidates notes that former NATO commander Gen. Wesley Clark, who orchestrated the Kosovo campaign, has spent the summer crisscrossing the country to gauge the amount of support a Clark campaign might attract. Although Clark has yet to enter the race formally, friends insist that he intends to enter the lists, possibly in mid-September, when he speaks at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on the theme of "American Leadership in a Changing World."
http://www.thescotsman.co.uk/index.cfm?id=966702003

UI Student In Kobe Case A 'Sports Fanatic' (USA Today, Sept. 2)
A college student arrested on a charge of threatening Kobe Bryant's accuser is a "sports fanatic" who had been drinking all day at a golf tournament, a friend says. John William Roche, 22, allegedly left the profanity-laced threat on the woman's answering machine July 27. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, Roche waived extradition to Denver, where he is to appear in federal court today. He is charged with making a threatening telephone call across state lines. If convicted, he faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Bryant, 25, is charged with sexually assaulting a 19-year-old resort employee near Vail, Colo., on June 30. The Los Angeles Lakers star has said the sex was consensual.

UI Press Publishes 'Planned Solstice' (Publisher's Weekly, Sept. 1)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS has published "Planned Solstice" by New York poet David Micah Greenberg.

UI Press Publishes 'Twelve Millennia' (American Archaeology, Sept. 1)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS has recently published "Twelve Millennia: Archaeology of the Upper Mississippi River Valley" by James L. Theler and Robert F. Boszhardt. The book is the story "of one of America's richest archaeological locales in the beautiful Mississippi Valley."

IEM Starts California Recall Market (Daily Bulletin, Sept. 1)
If you want to know the outcome of California's recall, you might look to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where a futures market run by six professors has out-predicted 75 percent of polls in recent presidential elections. As voters and pundits across the nation speculate about whether or not Gov. Gray Davis will be recalled, and who might replace him as governor, investors from across the nation have begun buying shares of Arnold Schwarzenegger, Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante, State Sen. Tom McClintock and other gubernatorial candidates. Investors, who can risk up to $500, hope to make a quick buck in the Iowa Electronic Market by buying up "contracts" of the winner and cashing in on election day. The Daily Bulletin serves Ontario, Calif.
http://www.dailybulletin.com/Stories/0,1413,203~21481~1604795,00.html

Kay Study Questions Zinc Theories (Biophotonics Post Scripts, September 2003)
A study by UI professor of biosciences ALAN R. KAY recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience challenges the theory that zinc acts as a neuromodulator that is co-released with neurotransmitters when information is relayed from one nerve cell to another. This article is not available online.

Sale Discusses Roles Of Attorneys In Big Corporations (Inc., Sept. 2003)
An American Bar Association task force recently outlined specific steps attorneys should take to become more independent of a client company's executive team. The task force recommends that lawyers sit in on board meetings and that they inform the board if they are replaced for questioning management decisions. Lawyers can reveal information about clients, the task force reiterates, if their services are used to further a crime that is "reasonably certain to result in injury to the financial interests of others." While this advice is geared to big business, ABA president Alfred P. Carlton Jr. says that "corporate governance isn't related to size -- good practices should always be established." HILLARY SALE, a University of Iowa law professor, adds that new standards are necessary because "the line has been blurred as officers play increasingly large roles in corporations." The blurring is especially bad at small companies where people wear many hats.
http://www.inc.com/magazine/20030901/newrules.html

Schnell Designs Lab On Wheels (Reader's Digest, September 2003)
A writer describes a drive through Chicago rush hour traffic while connected to monitors that gauge how his body reacts to driving. The lab on wheels was created by THOMAS SCHNELL, assistant professor of engineering at the University of Iowa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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