The University of Iowa
University News Services
Archives Services Contact Us A-Z Search

UI in the News

October, 2003

See UI in the New Archive Index

IEM Predicts Voter Behavior (Campaigns and Elections, Oct./Nov. 2003)
When a Pentagon agency proposed a futures market to help forecast political events in the Middle East, it quickly died amid criticism that the program would allow bettors to capitalize from predicted terrorist attacks. Largely lost amid the criticism of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) were dispassionate voices of economists, statisticians and others who contend that free markets are actually pretty good predictors of future events. That theory has long been applied to politics at the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business. Its Iowa Electronics Market (IEM) allows students and others to place bets on upcoming elections. The market-based program's creators say it is a better predictor of voter behavior than conventional polling techniques. Polls are only snapshots of public opinion during a static period of time, said THOMAS RIETZ, a University of Iowa finance professor and a director of the IEM. "They don't take into account the fact that people may change their mind," he said.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=673e753e50894b365066d90edf1740aa&_docnum=19&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=6a1422e944d63fcae10bfc019bf5f9a8

UI Graduate Organizes Readings (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 31)
Tucked away in the dimly lit Red Lion Pub on Lincoln Avenue, the tradition of telling spooky campfire stories still burns bright. True, there's no campfire, and s'mores are in short supply, but every Monday, "Twilight Tales" hosts a handful of authors reading genre fiction to a bunch of thirsty-eared adults. For 10 years, the event has provided a platform for touring horror, sci-fi and crime authors, and has nurtured a community for developing local writers. Besides holding open mic nights for aspiring spine-tinglers the first Monday of each month, "Twilight Tales" also prints annual anthologies of local fiction. Tina L. Jens, started "Twilight Tales" after attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where writers' communities program numerous readings during the week. "When I moved here, I was surprised how few readings there were," Jens says. "I wanted to go hear fiction and read my fiction aloud. There's an immediacy and intimacy of hearing the author perform their work."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/custom/friday/chi-0310310355oct31,1,2455901.story

Freedman Comments On BU President Controversy (Boston Globe. Oct. 31)
Incoming Boston University president Daniel Goldin may be fired before he even takes office, in part because he is questioning potential conflicts of interest among members of the BU board of trustees in its dealings with the university. The university has more than $30 million in transactions with trustee-related businesses and organizations, a number that surprises many university governance experts. ''That's a shocking amount of money between BU and its trustees, just shocking,'' said James O. Freedman, a lawyer and former president of Dartmouth and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/304/metro/Goldin_said_to_question_trustees_ties_to_BU_deals+.shtml

Judge Considers Motion To Dismiss (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 31)
A judge is considering whether to dismiss a lawsuit filed against the state by six former orphans who took part in a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA stuttering experiment more than 60 years ago. The state of Iowa argues it cannot be held liable for something that happened in 1939. The same story appeared in the KANSAS CITY STAR, LOS ANGELES TIMES, ROCKY MOUNT (NC) TELEGRAM, DAYTON DAILY NEWS, BILOXI SUN, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, THE GUARDIAN (UK), DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, TUSCALOOSA NEWS, NEWSDAY, FT. WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL and numerous other media outlets.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2003/10/31/national0522EST0463.DTL

Study Finds Few Substance Abuse Centers (San Mateo County Times, Oct. 31)
Some researchers have found that substance abuse in the elderly often goes misdiagnosed. Clinicians at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA surveyed all known public and private facilities for substance-abuse services in the United States and found that 18 percent, or around 2,000 of almost 18,000 programs, offered treatment programs for older Americans. Late-life alcoholism or substance abuse is also frequently dismissed as a "normal response" to the losses or conditions of aging. The Iowa study appeared in the September issue of the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. The Times is in California.
http://www.sanmateocountytimes.com/Stories/0,1413,87~11268~1735468,00.html

Gurnett Records Sounds Of Solar Storm (The Independent, Oct. 31)
A second huge magnetic solar storm hit Earth on Thursday, just a day after an earlier one hurtled into the planet in what one astronomer called an unprecedented one-two punch. DON GURNETT, a physics professor at the University of Iowa, taped the sounds of the storm as it passed, a clicking noise that resembled an old-fashioned telegraph, followed by a whoosh that sounded like a jet engine. The Independent is based in South Africa. The same story appeared in THE AGE in Australia.
http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?click_id=118&art_id=qw1067557321942B212&set_id=1

Dean Is Strong In College Towns (Boston Globe, Oct. 30)
Iowa is a must-win state for Democratic presidential candidate Richard Gephardt. Not only is he from next door, Missouri, he won the caucuses in 1988 before dropping out of the presidential race about two months later. If he loses this time, Iowa will be Gephardt's Alamo, the last stand in a distinguished 28-year congressional career. Howard Dean's tech-savvy insurgency threatens to derail him. Polls have shown the former Vermont governor and Gephardt locked in statistical ties for the lead, with Gephardt slightly ahead recently. Gephardt has strong union support while Dean has deep strength in Iowa's largest metropolitan areas, Des Moines and Cedar Rapids, and strongholds in college towns, particularly Iowa City (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA) and Ames (Iowa State University).
http://www.boston.com/news/politics/president/gephardt/articles/2003/10/30/in_methodical_style_gephardt_pursues_must_win_strategy_in_iowa/

Andrejevic: Left Could Learn From 'Daily Show' (In These Times, Oct. 30)
An article about "The Daily Show," a program about current events shown nightly on cable television's Comedy Central, notes that the seemingly agnostic show provides lessons for progressives, in and outside the media, on how to speak with, produce news for and activate the electorate. Building audience, speaking our minds, lampooning conventions: All are key as progressives seek to recapture the public's imagination this election cycle. Although he doubts that a "Daily Show" approach could galvanize the left, MARK ANDREJEVIC, with the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa, agrees that the right has been more effective in coalescing and activating its base through media efforts. "The left has nothing to identify with in that way," he says. "Creating the possibility of shared identity might be a good starting point for organizing collective political participation." As progressives develop a media strategy, Andrejevic suggests we take a lesson from "Daily Show" host Jon Stewart: "I think it could help to combine values with smartness and humor," he says. "Maybe there's something beneficial in changing the left's image from an ineffectual sincerity to a hipper, smarter but still committed approach to left politics." "In These Times" is a national, biweekly magazine of news and opinion published in Chicago.
http://www.inthesetimes.com/comments.php?id=418_0_1_0_C

Hunnicutt Comments On Time (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Oct. 29)
A columnist who recently stopped herself in the middle of a search for the perfect parking spot wonders, Who established my life's imperatives anyway? Who decided that living the good life means getting the closest parking spot and packing the most errands into the day? Maybe the good life is parking far enough away to stop and smell the exhaust fumes. (Maybe by now you're thinking I've smelled too many of them.) Time is the imperative, of course. It's the one resource we spend that we can't recover. There are no exchanges or refunds. Once we've spent it, it's gone. But time is measured in more than just quantity. There's quality, as any grade-schooler leaving three hours of standardized tests for a half-hour on the playground can tell you. "Work is the central value of our culture, a way we establish our identity and find meaning and purpose," said BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of, yes, leisure studies at the University of Iowa. His remarks appeared in Sunday's paper, in an article on "Take Back Your Time" day. The newly organized event aims to make Americans' aware that we work nine weeks more per year than our European counterparts and that we might want to reconsider this choice. Professor Hunnicutt doesn't see that happening on a national scale, largely because working is our "modern religion." We've abandoned "I think, therefore I am" in favor of, "I'm busy, therefore I am."
http://www.postgazette.com/columnists/20031029ndailey1029p1.asp

Jones Comments On Georgia Electronic Voting (Flagpole, Oct. 29)
DOUG JONES
, a University of Iowa computer science professor who serves on the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems, recently served on a panel at a symposium in Atlanta, Ga. The panel discussed the recent statewide elections in Georgia that employed electronic voting machines. Jones pointed out that there's no real way to ask for a hand recount of the votes in Georgia's system. The memory cards used in the voting machines are treated as the primary voting record, and Jones said these should only "have the weight of hearsay evidence," since they can be changed or tampered with. Flagpole bills itself as Athens, Ga.'s "standard for art, entertainment, music, politics, clubs, events, movies and just about anything else."
http://63.172.85.108/flagpole/FMPro?-DB=articles.fp5&-lay=articles&-Format=magprint.htm&-RecID=36883&-Find

Dean Drew More Than 800 During UI Stop (New York Times, Oct. 29)
One presidential hopeful relies on the Internet to attract crowds and get followers to practices for the Iowa caucuses. The other prefers the traditional approach, letting rank-and-file labor spread the word from one union hall to the next. Atop the field in Iowa, Democratic rivals Howard Dean and Dick Gephardt are engaged in more than just a fierce fight for a high-stakes win. Dean has used the Internet from the start, signing up backers not just in Iowa but across the country. His list of supporters has grown to 478,000, and his campaign brings them together once a month for discussions on Dean's effort, for community projects or, more recently, for trial runs for the caucus. At a recent event at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Dean drew more than 800 people. Versions of the Associated Press story also ran Oct. 29 on the websites of the HERALD-NEWS in Massachusetts, the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS in California, THE GUARDIAN in the UK, ABC NEWS, PENN LIVE in Pennsylvania, MLIVE in Michigan, the LOS ANGELES TIMES, the SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, NEWSDAY, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, the CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, the SEATTLE TIMES, and the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Iowa-Strategy.html

UI Holds Symposium On Topic Of Overwork (Capital Times, Oct. 29)
Around the nation this past Friday, scores of communities observed the inaugural "Take Back Your Time Day." The event was designed to "challenge the epidemic of overwork, over-scheduling and time famine" that organizers say threatens our health, our families and personal relationships. "Take Back Your Time Day" is a project of the Center for Religion, Ethics and Social Policy at Cornell University. The event generated quite a bit of attention on the East and West coasts and was also noted here in the Midwest, including a daylong symposium at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on the topic of overwork.
http://www.madison.com/captimes/business/ivey2/59918.php

UI Puts On Hold Alcohol Education Center (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 29)
The University of Iowa has shelved plans to pursue funding for a center that would have helped students deal with alcohol problems. After meeting with a group of health care professionals and city officials on Oct. 11, the university said other methods of dealing with student drinking should be pursued first. PHILIP JONES, the university's vice president for student services, said efforts will be directed toward enforcement of city ordinances discouraging youth drinking. "The people felt that yes, it is possible and it is doable, but it is not worth it for a problem that could be addressed by not allowing people into bars in the first place," Jones said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=900972

Dean Visits UI (Hartford Courant, Oct. 29)
A story about the different approaches the Democratic presidential candidates are using to stir support for their campaigns, from traditional to high-tech, mentions former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean's use of the Internet, as well as his visit to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which drew more than 800 people.

Guard, Gate Greet UI Tailgaters (Arizona Republic, Oct. 28)
The decade-long tradition of tailgating in a parking lot south of the Kinnick Stadium at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was stifled over the weekend by university security officers and a newly installed fence. A sometimes unruly crowd of students typically gathered around cars and barbecue grills, drinking heavily and taunting fans.

Panchero's Chain Launched Near UI (Fort Wayne News-Sentinel, Oct. 28)
A story about the opening in Fort Wayne, Ind., of a Panchero's Mexican Grill says that Rodney Anderson and his father, Thomas Anderson, founded the concept in 1992 and opened two restaurants -- one near the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in Iowa City and the other near Michigan State University in East Lansing. The chain proved popular, and Panchero's restaurants have been popping up throughout the Midwest for the last decade.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/7123479.htm

Study Looks At Cause Of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (Washington Post, Oct. 28)
Cutting back on fructose -- a sugar found in many fruits, soft drinks, canned foods and sweeteners -- may reduce symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to University of Iowa researchers. IBS, a gastrointestinal disorder whose symptoms include cramping, bloating, constipation, diarrhea and gas, affects some 58 million Americans, according to the American College of Gastroenterology. While scientists have suspected for some time that fructose may contribute to IBS, the new study is the first to show a fructose-restricted diet effective in relieving symptoms for some patients, according to gastroenterology professor and lead researcher SATISH RAO.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A27512-2003Oct28.html

Hunnicutt: Americans' Work Habits Slow To Change (Salt Lake Tribune, Oct. 27)
In a story about how many baby boomers are making more time for leisure, BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, says that many Americans are "time hungry." But he's not convinced most people will change their habits anytime soon. "Work is the central value of our culture, and that's especially true for boomers," Hunnicutt said. "Work has become something like a modern religion, a way we establish our identity and find meaning and purpose." Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the PROVO DAILY HERALD in Utah and the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD on Oct. 27, the PITTSBURGH POST GAZETTE and the PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW (both in Pennsylvania) on Oct. 25, and the SOUTH BEND TRIBUNE in Indiana on Oct. 24.
http://www.sltrib.com/2003/Oct/10272003/monday/105833.asp

Rao: UI Fructose Intolerance Study Unique (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 27)
Irritable bowel syndrome -- a condition that causes abdominal discomfort, bloating and constipation or diarrhea in about 10 to 15 percent of Americans -- may be triggered by fructose in some people, conclude University of Iowa researchers. This is the first study of people with IBS who give up fructose, a simple sugar found in most fruits, a few vegetables, foods canned with high-fructose corn syrup, chocolates and honey, says Dr. SATISH RAO, a co-author of the study and professor of neurogastroenterology at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. This study was presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology on Oct. 13 in Baltimore.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-capsules27.2oct27,1,2984932.story

Arndt Studies Substance Abuse Programs (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 27)
Fewer than one in five substance abuse programs addresses the specific needs of older Americans, concludes a University of Iowa survey of nearly 14,000 public and private facilities. Although it's true that the rate of substance abuse is low (compared with other age groups) in people over 65, an estimated 10 percent to 15 percent are affected, usually by alcohol abuse. Those numbers are likely to increase as baby boomers age. Older people who are dependent on drugs or alcohol are more likely to have serious health problems than younger people and to have complications during withdrawal, says senior author STEPHAN ARNDT, professor of psychiatry and biostatistics and director of the Iowa Consortium for Substance Research and Evaluation. The study was published in the September issue of the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-capsules27.1oct27,1,2526179.story

UI Treats Family Members Injured In Explosion (Peoria Journal-Star, Oct. 27)
" Footsteps for Family Survival," a pledge walk for the five family members critically injured when an Oct. 11 explosion ripped through their Abingdon, Ill., home, was held Saturday. All but one of the five is currently at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL in Iowa City. The Journal-Star is based in Illinois. A version of the story also ran Oct. 24 on Eagle Publications, based in Macomb, Ill., the online presence of five newspapers: the ABINGDON ARGUS, the AUGUSTA EAGLE-SCRIBE, the AVON SENTINEL, the MACOMB EAGLE and the ROSEVILLE INDEPENDENT.
http://www.pjstar.com/news/topnews/b14splel048.html

Redlawsk Comments On Union Support (Kansas City Star, Oct. 26)
A story about how the Democratic presidential candidates are courting the working class, particularly Richard Gephardt, says that in 2000, about one-third of Iowa caucus-goers came from union households. In New Hampshire, whose first-in-the-nation primary, on Jan. 27, is the next test after Iowa, about one-fourth of primary voters in 2000 were from union households. "To some degree, the question will become whether he's got a critical mass of union households, then how hard the unions work to get those voters out," said DAVID REDLAWSK , a political scientist at the University of Iowa.

TV Producer Attended UI (Yahoo!News, Oct. 26)
A story about Barry Kemp, co-creator and executive producer of Paramount TV's "A Minute With Stan Hooper," notes that he studied theater arts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20031026/tv_nm/television_littleton_dc_1

Kelly: Many Conditions Factors In Growth (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 26)
A story about how Americans are, on average, getting taller and bigger quotes KEVIN M. KELLY, associate research scientist at the University of Iowa College of Public Health. "Public health conditions have improved, diets have [improved], and children are maturing at younger ages," said Kelly. "Because of better nutrition and better overall health, we are able to reach more of our growth potential."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/q/chi-0310260524oct26,1,582892.story

Paper Recommends Book Published By UI (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 26)
A list of books recommended by the editors of the paper includes "Bring Me Your Saddest Arizona," a collection of short stories written by Ryan Harty and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The review says the book "gives voice to fragmented families, abused children, war-weary veterans -- the people in the street. Any street, anywhere. But central Phoenix, with its shabby bungalows, blaring car alarms and unremitting heat, provides a fitting background for these gritty stories. Here, a hometown boy evokes bedraggled desert people with the authority of an eyewitness."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/10/26/RV23996.DTL

Author Tayari Jones Attended UI (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Oct. 26)
A feature on author Toni Morrison says Morrison casts a huge shadow in African-American literature and in American literature. Tayari Jones, the author of the novel "Leaving Atlanta" and now a teacher of literature at East Tennessee State University in Johnson City, says she was an "unhappy graduate student" at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA when she heard that Morrison had won the Nobel. "I had grown up in Atlanta and had never been in an environment where there were very few black people," she recalls. "I felt so marginalized, and I felt like my work wasn't being taken seriously. . . . Then I was driving on Dubuque Street in Iowa City when I heard on NPR that Toni Morrison had won the Nobel Prize. I had to pull over to the side of the road. I put my head on the steering wheel of my dilapidated Toyota Corolla and I just wept. "It was as though the world had said that Toni Morrison was the greatest writer. . . . When she won the Nobel, it made me a citizen of the world."
http://www.ajc.com/living/content/living/books/1003/26toni.html

Squire: Skipping Caucuses 'Big Gamble' (Nashua Telegraph, Oct. 26)
University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE says that bypassing the caucuses in Iowa is risky for Democratic presidential candidates Wesley Clark and Joe Lieberman. "I suspect it's a pretty big gamble, and probably a larger one for Lieberman than for Clark, who got into this so late," Squire said. "The media in all likelihood will focus on who does well in those two early contests, and I still think this race has not yet jelled here." Squire notes that in recent weeks, Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry has come within striking distance of Dean and Gephardt in independent surveys. The Telegraph is based in New Hampshire.
http://nashuatelegraph.com/Main.asp?SectionID=25&SubSectionID=354&ArticleID=92025

Rynes Comments On Salary Study (Dallas Morning News, Oct. 26)
Just how important is pay to workers in the overall scheme of things? According to a recent study of 959 managers by the University of Iowa, "surveys that directly ask employees how important pay is to them are likely to overestimate pay's true importance." Results of the study, which were published in the Academy of Management Executive, show that 56 percent of the managers agree that questions about salary have to be worded very carefully -- especially because there is a "tendency to answer surveys in socially desirable ways." The supposition is that it's more acceptable to say money doesn't matter. The Iowa researchers also cited a study in which job applicants were asked to rank 10 important job characteristics. Pay ranked fifth for men and seventh for women. But when job seekers were asked to rate the importance of these same characteristics to "someone just like yourself" (same age, gender, education), the importance of pay jumped to first among women and men. "In other words, people seem to believe that pay is the most important motivator for everyone -- except themselves," said SARA RYNES, chairwoman of the University of Iowa's department of management and organizations and lead researcher of the study. The article also appeared Oct. 26 in the SUN HERALD based in Biloxi, Miss.

Former Ball State Candidate Worked At UI (Indianapolis Star, Oct. 26)
A critique of the Ball State University's board of trustees and its decision four years ago not to pick as a new president finalist Gregory H. Williams, dean of the law school at Ohio State, says Williams "was the hometown boy who made good" and was the first choice among faculty, students and Muncie's black community. He was also a veteran of 30 years in university administration, including time at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/3/086886-8723-009.html

UI Alumnus Vies For School Board Seat (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Oct. 26)
Voters in the north suburban Mounds View School District in Minnesota will choose four school board members for four-year terms. Among the candidates is Robert Helgeson of North Oaks, who holds a doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/news/politics/7097066.htm

UI Center For Book Helps Preserve Documents (Baltimore Sun, Oct. 26)
The original 1776 copy of the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights are back on display in the Rotunda of the National Archives building after being away from public view 2 1/2 years. The building has been extensively renovated to make the documents more accessible to visitors, especially the handicapped, and the Charters have been re-encased after minute and painstaking conservation treatment. The entire project is estimated to have cost as much as $136 million. The single sheet of paper each document rests on now was custom-made at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CENTER FOR THE BOOK, which operates a research and production facility paper mill. "It's very pure fiber, non-acidic," says Catherine Nicholson, supervisory conservator in the conservation lab. "It was made from cotton textile cut-offs. It was handmade [with] very pure water. It's lovely paper, really pure paper."
http://www.sunspot.net/entertainment/galleriesmuseums/bal-as.archives26oct26,0,7738256.story?coll=bal-artslife-museums

UI, VA To Study Allergy Infections (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 25)
Researchers here received a five-year, $6.3 million grant renewal to study allergy infections. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center will use the grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to study innate immune system response to microbial infection.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=897534

Redlawsk Comments On Union Support (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Oct. 24)
A story about how the Democratic presidential candidates are courting the working class, particularly Richard Gephardt, says that in 2000, about one-third of Iowa caucus-goers came from union households. In New Hampshire, whose first-in-the-nation primary, on Jan. 27, is the next test after Iowa, about one-fourth of primary voters in 2000 were from union households. "To some degree, the question will become whether he's got a critical mass of union households, then how hard the unions work to get those voters out," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/news/7092678.htm

Play By Workshop Alumnus To Debut (Boston Globe, Oct. 24)
" Boy Gets Girl," a play of University of Iowa Writer's Workshop alumna REBECCA GILMAN, opens this weekend at the Merrimack Repertory Theater in Massachusetts.
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2003/10/24/playwright_delves_into_dark_side_of_dating_with_boy_gets_girl/

Hunnicutt Says Work Is Boomer's Religion (Everett Herald, Oct. 24)
Some baby boomers who have struggled for years to try to balance workloads and family responsibilities are advocating a new solution: working less. But BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, agrees that many Americans are "time hungry." But he's not convinced most people will change their habits anytime soon. "Work is the central value of our culture, and that's especially true for boomers," Hunnicutt said. "Work has become something like a modern religion, a way we establish our identity and find meaning and purpose." The Herald is based in Everett, Wash. The same story appeared in the Nashua (N.H.) TELEGRAPH HERALD.
http://www.heraldnet.com/Stories/03/10/24/17651572.cfm

Segura Comments On Survey (South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Oct. 24)
More than a decade after a landmark report shattered stereotypes of Hispanics, researchers were in Miami today paving the way for a current look at Latinos in the United States. "The purpose of this is to show how diverse the Hispanic population is becoming and to see if their experiences are distinct or similar," said GARY SEGURA, a lead researcher on the survey and a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "This is about expanding the body of knowledge of Latinos." When published in 1989, the Latino National Political Survey showed Hispanics as a complex group, split on immigration issues but favoring bilingual education and learning English. The household poll contradicted views that Latinos didn't put a premium on English and had little interest in political participation.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/broward/sfl-survey24oct24,0,6806860.story?coll=sfla-news-broward

Skorton Calls For Fan Civility (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 23)
A column of sports tidbits from around the country notes that DAVID SKORTON, president of the University of Iowa, isn't pleased with the "uncivil and dangerous behavior" of Hawkeye fans. "Although we have been advised by legal counsel that it would be unconstitutional to ban vulgar T-shirts from Kinnick Stadium, that does not mean that we have to condone them. In fact, we condemn them," Skorton said.
http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-briefing23oct23,1,5418784.story

UI Will Share Iowa Values Funds (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 23)
Iowa's three state universities will share in $5.7 million from the Iowa Values Fund to aid new business startups this year, board members of the fund decided Wednesday. Together, the three schools have requested that $25 million be set aside for them in the legislation that created the $503 million economic development fund. The fund aims to create 50,000 new jobs in Iowa over the next four years. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA asked for $10 million for projects at its Oakdale research park. The request includes $7 million for a new 20,000-square-foot building that would contain four laboratory suites for new biotech companies. It also includes $3 million to upgrade an existing biological production lab to federal standards for pharmaceutical ingredients. Under the plan approved Wednesday, Iowa University and Iowa State each will get $2.28 million this year, and UNI will get $1.14 million. In the next fiscal year, beginning July 1, the three schools will share $4.3 million, with Iowa and ISU each getting $1.7 million and UNI getting $869,000.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=895224

Redlawsk: Unions Critical To Election (Knight-Ridder, Oct. 23)
Rep. Dick Gephardt of Missouri is working hard for labor's support in his quest for the 2004 Democratic presidential nomination, and now many unions are poised to work hard for Gephardt. In 2000, about one-third of Iowa caucus-goers came from union households. In New Hampshire, whose first-in-the-nation primary on Jan. 27 is the next test after Iowa, about one-fourth of primary voters in 2000 were from union households. "To some degree, the question will become whether he's got a critical mass of union households, then how hard the unions work to get those voters out," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa.
http://www.realcities.com/mld/krwashington/7078098.htm

Schneider Comments On Obesity Costs (The Ledger, Oct. 23)
Because obesity is a factor in Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, pulmonary disease, certain cancers and musculoskeletal ailments, it adds significantly to the cost of health care, experts say. Obese Americans spend roughly $700 a year more on medical bills than those who are not obese, said JOHN SCHNEIDER, assistant professor of the Department of Health Management & Policy at the University of Iowa College of Public Health. That amounts to about $93 billion per year in extra medical expenses. In addition, the average taxpayer spends about $150 to $200 a year to finance obesity related medical problems for people in the public insurance programs, Schneider said. "If you are not obese, you are spending that much to cover obese people's medical expenditures," Schneider said. "You can bet the farm that most of those costs will be picked up by the public programs and the rest will be picked up by employers." The newspaper is based in Lakeland, Fla.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20031023/NEWS/310230425/1004

Renquist Cites Surgery Risks (Fort Worth Star Telegram, Oct. 23)
According to the American Society for Bariatric Surgery, 63,000 weight-loss surgeries were performed nationwide last year, and the number is expected to grow to 100,000 this year. Along with the benefits come risks, however. Three in every 1,000 people who undergo some type of weight-loss surgery die within 30 days, said KATHLEEN RENQUIST, manager of the International Bariatric Surgery Registry at the University of Iowa.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/startelegram/news/local/states/texas/northeast/7083020.htm

Riezman Comments On Dean Trade Message (Boston Globe, Oct. 23)
Across Iowa, trade is a bubbling political issue. Agriculture is king in Iowa, but union workers at construction sites and farm equipment plants are expected to account for one-third of the participants in the state's Democratic caucuses on Jan. 19. Representative Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri was supposed to have had support sewn up from voters angry about the perceived cost of free trade. He led the unsuccessful fight against the North American Free Trade Agreement in Congress in 1993, and vaulted to a resounding caucus win here in 1988 after airing a hard-line television ad in which he threatened to impose massive tariffs on South Korean cars if that country did not lower barriers to US vehicles. But in the tumble of politics, the man threatening Gephardt's lead in Iowa is the candidate who sang the praises of NAFTA not so long ago. Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean has leapt to the top of polls with a message that inverts his previous trade stance. On the stump, Dean said that he supported NAFTA in the 1990s because it was good for his Canada-bordering state. But now, he said, he believes that the trade agreement should be rewritten so that countries that trade with the United States abide by uniform labor, safety and environmental standards. Some economists say Dean's policy amounts to an antitrade message wrapped in trade-friendly language. "It's disguised protectionism," said RAYMOND RIEZMAN, professor of economics at the University of Iowa.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2003/10/23/trade_shapes_iowa_landscape/

Freyer Cited As ‘Quirky’ eBay User (Computerworld Australia, Oct. 23)
In the mid 90's, Pierre Omidyar decided that he wanted a job that would let him do "Internet things". Many people at that time were making the same decision, because they knew that the Internet was going to be important. What makes Omidyar exceptional, though, is that his "Internet thing" ended up being the greatest success story yet of the Internet, eBay. Adam Cohen's book, "The Perfect Store", tells the story of how Omidyar took eBay from its humble beginnings as Auctionweb and turned it into a multi-billion dollar corporation. It's part business guide and part insider history. "The Perfect Store" tells many quirky stories of early users. One user, John Freyer, gained fame for selling all his worldly belongings on eBay. Freyer was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and he decided to use eBay to create a type of performance art project. He did this to downsize his life, but also to explore the way we own things and how they also, in a way, own us.
http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php?id=1784409144&fp=16&fpid=0

Squire Comments On Dean Strategy (Christian Science Monitor, Oct. 23)
This year's Democratic presidential candidates are mapping out very different routes to the White House than the established path of previous cycles, adding to the unpredictability of the race, and giving a host of new states - and new constituencies - a potentially significant voice in the process of selecting the party's nominee. But the momentum generated from a surprising performance in Iowa or New Hampshire may still hold significance -- and no candidate is writing off both states. But even in those states, the electorate may wind up more diversified than in years past, as campaigns are finding new ways to target potential voters and broaden the electorate. Dean in particular is "hoping to mobilize college students and others" who have not necessarily participated in the past, notes University of Iowa political scientist PEVERILL SQUIRE. While these supporters may be less reliable than some of the longtime Democratic activists, such as union members, "there's reason to think he can probably [bring new people in] successfully," says Professor Squire.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/1023/p01s04-uspo.html

UI Graduate Appointed (Norwich Bulletin, Oct. 23)
Edward Osborn has been appointed director of university relations at Eastern Connecticut State University. He has a bachelor's degree in mass communications from the University of Vermont and a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.norwichbulletin.com/news/stories/20031023/localnews/502049.html

Former UI Student To Plead Guilty (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Oct. 23)
An Iowa college student charged with leaving a profanity-laced death threat on the answering machine of Kobe Bryant's accuser has agreed to plead guilty, federal prosecutors say. John Roche, 22, is accused of threatening to assault the 19-year-old woman with a coat hanger and repeatedly vowing to kill her in the July 27 message. He pleaded innocent on Sept. 2 but said in court papers released Tuesday he would change his plea. A hearing was scheduled for Nov. 24. Roche was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at the time of the alleged threat but withdrew and moved to his parents' home in Davenport, Iowa.

Skorton Urges Hawkeye Fans To Control Behavior (Dayton Daily News, Oct. 22)
Shirts and posters with offensive messages aimed at the opposing team are unacceptable. Tailgaters who never leave and those that carelessly hurl empty beer bottles are not welcome, University of Iowa president DAVID SKORTON said Tuesday. He said the behavior of some fans in and out of Kinnick Stadium -- specifically during the Oct. 4 game against Michigan -- has become dangerous and embarrassing. Skorton and student government president Nate Green held a news conference to urge fans to show better sportsmanship and curb dangerous and uncivil behavior on game days. Skorton also unveiled new rules governing tailgating in at least one parking lot southeast of the stadium.

Chinese Novelist In IWP (Dow Jones News Wires, Oct. 22)
Even at the semi-tender age of 43, cherub-faced Chinese novelist Yu Hua says he often feels like a 100-year-old man. "My generation seems to have experienced more than any other generation," he says, with humor and sadness in his eyes. His novel, Chronicle of a Blood Merchant, published in English this week, comes on the heels of the English translation of his highly acclaimed novel, To Live. Both novels were written in Chinese in the early 1990s. He's currently participating in the International Writing Program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and also studying 20th century Chinese history for a novel he is tackling. The story originally appeared in the FAR EASTERN ECONOMIC REVIEW.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,BT_CO_20031022_012034-search,00.html?collection=autowire%2F30day&vql_string=%22University+of+Iowa%22%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29(Subscription required)

Former UI Student To Plead Guilty (Denver Post, Oct. 22)
An Iowa man charged with leaving a profanity-laced death threat on the answering machine of Kobe Bryant's accuser has agreed to plead guilty. He is charged with making a threatening phone call across state lines, which carries a sentence of up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Roche was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at the time of the alleged threat, but has since withdrawn. A friend had said Roche is a sports fanatic who had been drinking all day at a golf tournament when he allegedly made the call. Versions of this story appeared Oct. 22 on the web sites of the WINNIPEG SUN, BOSTON GLOBE, OMAHACHANNEL.com, TORONTO STAR, FOX NEWS.com, KFMB-TV (Calif.), RAPID CITY (S.D.) JOURNAL, ARIZONA REPUBLIC, PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORDER, WRIC-TV (Va.), WSTM-TV (N.Y.), KAMC-TV (Tex.), WMC-TV (Tenn.), WKYT-TV (Ky.), WKBN-TV (Ohio), WFVS-TV (Mo.), WTVO-TV (Ill.), KVIA-TV (Tex.), KAIT-TV (Ark.), KFOR-TV (Okla.), WLOX-TV (Miss.), MODESTO (Calif.) BEE, SPRINGFIELD (Ohio) NEWS SUN, WTVM-TV (Ga.), WBAY-TV (Wis.), WSFA-TV (Ala.), KSFY-TV (S.D.), WHBF-TV (Ill.), KPLC-TV (La.), WAVY-TV (Va.), WALB-TV (Ga.) MSNBC.com, KRON4.com (Calif.), WHAG-TV (Md.), WCAX-TV (Vt.), WLUC-TV (Mich.), KSEQ-TV (Calif.), WANE-TV (Ind.), KRNV-TV (Nev.), TACOMA (Wash.) NEWS TRIBUNE, ROCKY MOUNT (N.C.) TELEGRAM, CBS SPORTSLINE, TIMES PICAYUNE (La.), MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, NEW YORK POST, NEW YORK TIMES, and DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE.
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~53~1715567,00.html

UI Water Study Cited (Minnesota Finance & Commerce, Oct. 22)
The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, begun by former Gov. Arne Carlson, aimed to set aside 100,000 acres in the valley to serve as a buffer to the Minnesota River. Similar to the Conservation Reserve Program, farmers are paid to keep lands near rivers and streams idle. The CREP program provides farmers with $105 to $397 per acre in financial incentives. But opposition to the initiative is coming from state farm organizations, primarily because of the length of time the land must be enrolled in the program. Iowa started its CREP initiative three years ago. Before the program was started, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA conducted a lengthy study of the watersheds to determine where the most critical buffer areas would be and how best to manage them.
http://www1.finance-commerce.com/recent_articles/031023b.htm

Former UI Student To Plead Guilty (Casper Star Tribune, Oct. 22)
An Iowa college student charged with leaving a profanity-laced death threat on the answering machine of Kobe Bryant's accuser has agreed to plead guilty, federal prosecutors say. John Roche, 22, is accused of threatening to assault the 19-year-old woman with a coat hanger and repeatedly vowing to kill her in the July 27 message. He pleaded innocent on Sept. 2 but said in court papers released Tuesday he would change his plea. A hearing was scheduled for Nov. 24. Roche was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at the time of the alleged threat but withdrew and moved to his parents' home in Davenport, Iowa. The Star Tribune is based in Casper, Wyo. Versions of the same AP article also ran Oct. 22 on the websites of WQAD-TV in Illinois, NEWS4COLORADO.COM in Colorado, ESPN, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, WYOMING NEWS and the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.trib.com/AP/wire_detail.php?wire_num=283869

Alumnus Named Interim Head of Health Consortium (LaCrosse Tribune, Oct. 22)
A former administrator at Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center was named Tuesday the interim executive director of the La Crosse Medical Health Science Consortium. John N. Katrana, 56, was asked by the consortium's board of directors to serve as interim director until June 30. Katrana replaces Deb Suchla, who stepped down this month to become finance director of Riverfront Inc. The consortium is made of Gundersen Lutheran, Franciscan Skemp/Mayo Health Systems, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Viterbo University and Western Wisconsin Technical College. Katrana, who has a doctorate in hospital and health administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and joined Gundersen Clinic in 1976 as an assistant administrator, said he has not ruled out applying for the permanent position. The Tribune is based in Wisconsin.
http://www.lacrossetribune.com/articles/2003/10/22/news/z03newskatrana.txt

Rynes Comments On Worker Pay Study (San Luis Obispo Tribune, Oct. 22)
Just how important is pay to workers in the overall scheme of things? According to a recent study of 959 managers, surveys that directly ask employees how important pay is to them are likely to overestimate pay's true importance. According to SARA RYNES, department executive officer of The University of Iowa's Department of Management and Organizations and lead researcher of the study, "People seem to believe that pay is the most important motivator for everyone--except themselves." Results of the study were published in the Academy of Management Executive. The Tribune is based in San Luis Obispo, Calif.

MidAmerican To Move Contaminated Soil During UI Break (WQAD-TV, Oct. 22)
MidAmerican Energy, under a new order from the Environmental Protection Agency, will begin removing contaminated soil from an area near an apartment complex in downtown Iowa City. Long before the complex was built in 1983, the site was used for about 80 years as a coal-tar plant by the now-defunct Iowa City Light and Power Company. The EPA has already said that the toxic waste has contaminated the soil and groundwater. A meeting on the pollution and clean up plans was held last night in Iowa City. MidAmerican Energy assumed liability for the site in 1995. MidAmerican Energy will remove the soil in December, during the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's winter break. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1490468&nav=1sW7Idwd

UI To Get Ice Age Sloth Skeleton (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 22)
The University of Iowa's Museum of Natural History soon will get its own giant Ice Age sloth skeleton to go with Rusty, its popular replica of an Ice Age sloth that has been on exhibit since 1985. University paleontologists, working with a team of volunteers, are busy unearthing and reassembling the scattered remnants of a giant sloth discovered last summer in southwest Iowa. "There's never been a find anything like this in Iowa," museum curator DAVID BRENZEL said. "Sloths were so massive, ranking in size between a bison and a small Indian elephant," said HOLMES SEMKEN, the Iowa emeritus professor of geoscience who identified the bones discovered by Bob and Sonia Athen on land they own along the Nishnabotna River near Shenandoah.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=894081

Skorton Urges Hawkeye Fans To Control Behavior (Macon Telegraph, Oct. 21)
Shirts and posters with offensive messages aimed at the opposing team are unacceptable. Tailgaters who never leave and those that carelessly hurl empty beer bottles are not welcome, University of Iowa president DAVID SKORTON said Tuesday. He said the behavior of some fans in and out of Kinnick Stadium -- specifically during the Oct. 4 game against Michigan -- has become dangerous and embarrassing. Skorton and student government president Nate Green held a news conference to urge fans to show better sportsmanship and curb dangerous and uncivil behavior on game days. Skorton also unveiled new rules governing tailgating in at least one parking lot southeast of the stadium. The Telegraph is based in Georgia. Versions of the AP story also ran on the websites of the MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, OMAHA WORLD-HERALD and the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE in Minnesota.
http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/sports/7069335.htm

Miller Comments On Candidates' Skipping Caucuses (Yahoo! News, Oct. 21)
The only purpose of the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary is to winnow the field of presidential contenders to a manageable number. The Iowa caucuses haven't even begun and the winnowing already is under way. Democratic presidential contenders Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut and retired Gen. Wesley L. Clark of Arkansas decided this week not to campaign in Iowa. "They know they won't do well," says ARTHUR MILLER, the respected University of Iowa political scientist. "They're working to keep alive. They're avoiding embarrassment."
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=1316&ncid=742&e=12&u=/uclicktext/20031021/cm_ucds/iowabeginsthewinnowingprocessearly

Squire Questions Clark Caucuses Pass (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Oct. 21)
Campaign soundings that showed Democratic activists in Iowa having strong doubts about presidential candidate Wesley Clark's Democratic credentials probably contributed to his decision to not seriously compete in the caucuses there, said Earl Black, an expert on presidential politics at Rice University in Houston. Others second-guessed the campaign's decision not to fight it out in Iowa. "I think that's a big gamble," said University of Iowa political scientist PEVERILL SQUIRE. "The candidates that do well in Iowa are going to get a lot of national media [attention], and that will carry over to New Hampshire."
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/story_National.php?storyid=45069

Former UI Student Finalist For Design Award (The Pentagraph, Oct. 21)
When Suzanne Tick took a weaving class her freshman year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she immediately knew how she wanted to make a living. Now, the former Bloomington resident and her company are weaving a name for themselves. Suzanne Tick Inc. -- along with Antenna Design and Herman Miller Inc. -- is a finalist for the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum's National Design Awards, an honor which earned her lunch at the White House with First Lady Laura Bush. "I'm just totally happy to be a finalist," said Tick, whose parents, Irving and Joan, live in Bloomington. The Pantagraph is a daily newspaper, based in Bloomington, Ill., that services eight counties and more than 60 communities in central Illinois.
http://www.pantagraph.com/stories/102103/new_20031021043.shtml

Weber Leads Study Using Salmon Simulator (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 21)
The University of Iowa has built a salmon simulator that could help researchers determine how young salmon respond to dams as they move up and down rivers. A new $350,000 scale model of a hydroelectric dam on the Columbia River basin in Washington state is helping researchers learn more about how dams can leave salmon stressed, disoriented and vulnerable to predators. The model and computer-generated fish are the latest tools in an ongoing three-year, $6.8 million effort to determine how best to protect young salmon from dams as they return to the Pacific Ocean from upstream spawning grounds. "After studying the behavior of juvenile salmon moving downstream and seeing in the field how they respond to these dams, we've developed a fish simulator," said LARRY WEBER, the project's principal investigator and an associate professor in the University of Iowa's civil and environmental engineering department.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=892825

Merchant Cites Hog Farms, Health Problems (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 21)
There's a longstanding debate about whether hog farms -- whose foul odors have riled many a neighbor -- also contribute to respiratory problems. A new University of Iowa study suggests that it does. The study focused on Keokuk County, where the asthma rate is nearly three times the national average. "For children who live on larger livestock farms, there's reason for the family members to know this and be aware," said JAMES A. MERCHANT, dean of the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "What is not known is what is the risk to families that live in proximity to larger operations."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=892993

Tuition Cap May Deprive UI Faculty Of Raises (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 21)

The Iowa Board of Regents' efforts to keep tuition costs down may leave faculty at Iowa universities without raises, officials said. Iowa State President Greg Geoffroy said if the regents approve the smallest tuition increase in the past few years, Iowa State, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa would get about $16 million less in revenue.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=892942

Gantz: Pain Medication Abusers Need Ear Checks (Good Housekeeping, Oct. 20)
Rush Limbaugh's entry into a rehabilitation program for addiction to prescription painkillers underscores an important message to the millions of Americans who take the drugs: Chronic abuse may cause hearing loss. The link between hearing loss and high doses of painkillers like Vicodin, Lorcet and OxyContin is not yet well-known in medicine. Still, Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, chief of the University of Iowa College of Medicine's Department of Otolaryngology, urged patients who abuse prescription painkillers to be seen immediately by physicians and to get hearing tests if they develop any problem with their hearing. Warning signs include ringing in the ears, pressure and a sense of fullness.
http://magazines.ivillage.com/goodhousekeeping/hb/news/article/0,,krt_2003_10_20_knigb_1195-0120-MED-PAINPILLS-HEARING~DE~ew~xml,00.html

Mother Of UI Student Vies For Auditor Position (Pocono Record, Oct. 20)
Four candidates are looking to fill the three positions up for grabs for Pike County, Pa. auditor, including Mary Jane Strub of Milford. Strub said she is running because she is qualified for the job and because she believes in community service. "I'm a single parent and my son is in his freshman year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, so it's a really good time to get involved," she said. "It's something that I could contribute to and it would dovetail nicely with my business. It's evident from my military service that public service is important to me." The Record is based in Stroudsburg, Pa.
http://www.poconorecord.com/contact/

Houge Value Stock Fund Study Cited (Contra Costa Times, Oct. 20)
From 1965 through 2001, according to two finance professors -- TODD HOUGE of the University of Iowa and Timothy Loughran of Notre Dame -- the average value stock fund performed no better than the average growth stock fund. That tends to be the pattern over decades, but there are exceptions: Over the last three years, value stocks have significantly outperformed growth stocks, and the average value fund has beaten the average growth fund, but not in the most recent quarter. The paper is based in California.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/cctimes/business/7057697.htm

Gronbeck, Squire Comment On Clark, Lieberman Move (Boston Globe, Oct. 20)
In a move that could dramatically alter the 2004 Democratic presidential primaries, Wesley K. Clark and Joseph I. Lieberman said they will skip Iowa's caucuses and focus their money and efforts on later races. While Iowa doesn't have many electoral votes, BRUCE GRONBECK, a professor of political communications at the University of Iowa, said there is a risk to bypassing the caucuses. "You miss practice," he said. "You miss getting the phrases you need to answer questions quickly and pointedly. You don't know the range of questions... That does hurt a candidate." PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, agreed that skipping the Iowa caucuses is "a gamble." Candidates who fare well in Iowa, he said, generate publicity and momentum leading into the following week, when New Hampshire votes on Jan. 27. "What Clark is gambling is that his candidacy is somewhat unusual, and that the rules that apply to the rest of the field" don't affect him as much, said Squire, who agreed with that theory -- to a point.
http://www.boston.com/news/politics/president/clark/articles/2003/10/20/clark_lieberman_decide_to_skip_iowa_caucuses/

Futures Market Gets It Right On Recall Prediction (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 20)
The Iowa Electronic Market at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's business school got it right, predicting that California Gov. Gray Davis would be recalled and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger would be elected to replace him. The political futures market, operated by six professors at the university's business college, predicted a 54.2 percent vote for the recall - it came in at 55.4 percent. It anticipated a Schwarzenegger win with 47.2 percent - he got 48.7 percent.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-polcol20oct20,1,5122091.story

UI Press Publishes 'American Wives' (Publishers Weekly, Oct. 20)
A review of the book "American Wives" by Beth Helms says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA published the book.

Patient Educators Originated At UI (U.S. News and World Report, Oct. 20)
This article examines the value of surrogate or "professional patients" trained to be subjects for training medical students to perform sensitive procedures, such as rectal and pelvic exams. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA educators are largely credited with coming up with the idea in the early 1970s. They noticed that then current teaching methods exploited the patient, made students anxious and ignored the development of vital interpersonal skills.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a7dd7ae4f6daace7e09d8b7d00b82b0e&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=97a054ba0fd800f74f20a7ceb996897b

UI Iowa City's Claim To Fame (Dallas Morning News, Oct. 19)
A story about the 259 cities that begin with the letter "I" mentions Iowa City, Iowa, whose claim to fame includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

UI Alumna Now Planned Parenthood Development Manager (Plain Dealer, Oct. 19)
A story about Michelle Johnson, development manager for Planned Parenthood in Cleveland, says Johnson entered the nonprofit sector when she volunteered for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S ARTS COUNCIL, while an undergraduate there in the mid '90s. After returning to Cleveland, she continued to volunteer for organizations such as the Cleveland Museum of Art and Hard Hatted Women. The paper is based in Cleveland, Ohio.

Merchant Comments On Hog Farms, Respiratory Problems (Washington Post, Oct. 19)
There's a longstanding debate about whether hog farms -- whose foul odors have riled many a neighbor -- also contribute to respiratory problems. A new University of Iowa study suggests that it does. The study focused on Keokuk County, where the asthma rate is nearly three times the national average. "For children who live on larger livestock farms, there's reason for the family members to know this and be aware," said JAMES A. MERCHANT, dean of the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "What is not known is what is the risk to families that live in proximity to larger operations."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A46958-2003Oct18.html

Gantz: Pain Medication Abusers Need Ear Checks (Centre Daily Times, Oct. 19)
Rush Limbaugh's entry into a rehabilitation program for addiction to prescription painkillers underscores an important message to the millions of Americans who take the drugs: Chronic abuse may cause hearing loss. The link between hearing loss and high doses of painkillers like Vicodin, Lorcet and OxyContin is not yet well-known in medicine. Still, Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, chief of the University of Iowa College of Medicine's Department of Otolaryngology, urged patients who abuse prescription painkillers to be seen immediately by physicians and to get hearing tests if they develop any problem with their hearing. Warning signs include ringing in the ears, pressure and a sense of fullness. The Times is based in College Station, Pa.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/news/7051870.htm

Rynes Comments On Worker Pay Study (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 19)
Just how important is pay to workers in the overall scheme of things? According to a recent study of 959 managers by the University of Iowa, "surveys that directly ask employees how important pay is to them are likely to overestimate pay's true importance." Results of the study, which were published in the Academy of Management Executive, show that 56 percent of the managers agree that questions about salary have to be worded very carefully -- especially because there is a "tendency to answer surveys in socially desirable ways." The supposition is that it's more acceptable to say money doesn't matter. The Iowa researchers also cited a study in which job applicants were asked to rank 10 important job characteristics. Pay ranked fifth for men and seventh for women. But when job seekers were asked to rate the importance of these same characteristics to "someone just like yourself" (same age, gender, education), the importance of pay jumped to first among women and men. "In other words, people seem to believe that pay is the most important motivator for everyone--except themselves," said SARA RYNES, chairwoman of the University of Iowa's department of management and organizations and lead researcher of the study.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/jobs/chi-0310190263oct19,1,4498825.story

UI Testing Expert Lohman Quoted In Story On Revised SAT (Time, Oct. 19)
A story about the newly revised SAT test quotes DAVID LOHMAN, a University of Iowa psychology professor who has studied the differences between achievement and aptitude tests. The article's writer said he had seen statistical analysis of one math question that had been rewritten for the revised test to include a specialized math term. When the specialized term was added, the percentage of students who got the right answer in a field trial fell, from 68 percent to 21 percent -- a staggering decline of 47 percentage points. He asked Lohman, "Who are all those students who could do the math but didn't know the specialized language?"
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1101031027-524393,00.html

Skorton: Loyalty Keeping Faculty At UI (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 19)
Loyalty is the only thing keeping faculty members who could make more money elsewhere at the University of Iowa, said DAVID SKORTON, university president. University of Iowa faculty rank eighth among the 10 public universities in the Big Ten athletic conference. The estimated average annual salary for a U of I faculty member is about $81,600. The Big Ten's highest wages are paid at the University of Michigan, where the current average faculty salary is $93,700.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=891286

UI Press Publishes Short Story Collection (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 19)
The short story collection "Bring Me Your Saddest Arizona," written by Ryan Harty and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, Is reviewed.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/10/19/RV10136.DTL

McCracken's 'Niagra' Picked For Iowa Reads (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 18)
A book by a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP has been chosen as the latest selection for a statewide reading program. "Niagara Falls All Over Again" by Elizabeth McCracken is the 2004 choice for the All Iowa Reads program, organizers announced Thursday during the Iowa Library Association conference. The program is in its second year. Last year's selection was Leif Enger's "Peace Like a River."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=890363

Ciochon Comments On Homo Erectus (Science News, Oct. 18)
RUSSELL CIOCHON
, professor of anthropology at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, disputes the notion that Homo erectus gradually evolved into modern humanity. Instead, Homo erectus evolved in Asia and died out there while today's people originated in Africa around 200,000 years ago.

UI Student With West Nile Back In Class (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 18)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student is back at school after becoming the first Dubuque County resident to have a confirmed case of West Nile virus. Nathan Shaw, 18, of Dubuque, believes he was bitten by a mosquito that carried the West Nile virus five weeks ago while on a walk in Iowa City. He spent five days in the hospital but has since returned to school, where is he studying medicine. "I am basically back to normal," Shaw said. "But I can still feel that I laid in bed a week." http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=890362

Alumnus Carlile Gets President's Medallion (Idaho State Journal, Oct. 18)
One of a series of articles commemorating Idaho State University's 2003 Homecoming celebration reports that Clark Carlile, who came to Idaho State College in its first year, 1947, as a speech and communications professor, is a recipient of the President's Medallion. Carlile was a varsity debater for four years before earning his A.B. degree in speech. He later earned a master's degree in speech from Colorado State College of Education and pursued a speech doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, although he did not complete his thesis.
http://www.journalnet.com/articles/2003/10/18/news/local/news15.txt

Alumnus Mickelson Gets President's Medallion (Idaho State Journal, Oct. 18)
One of a series of articles commemorating Idaho State University's 2003 Homecoming celebration reports that Dr. M.R. "Mick" Mickelson, who taught medicine at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for more than 13 years before coming to Idaho State University, is a recipient of the President's Medallion. At Iowa, he was chairman of medical student teaching for the orthopedic surgery department before becoming assistant professor and then associate professor. Mickelson received his education from the University of Colorado and the University of Paris before completing his bachelor's, master's and medical degrees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.journalnet.com/articles/2003/10/18/news/local/news16.txt

Alumni Get President's Medallion (Idaho State Journal, Oct. 18)
One of a series of articles commemorating Idaho State University's 2003 Homecoming celebration reports that James and Betty Kelly are recipients of the Idaho State University President's Medallion. Jim Kelly received his bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, his native state, a master's degree from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado. Jim and Betty Kelly finished school together at the University of Iowa in 1954.
http://www.journalnet.com/articles/2003/10/18/news/local/news17.txt

Rynes Comments On Study Showing Height-Pay Correlation (The Ledger, Oct. 18)
A new University of Florida study concludes that short people may be shortchanged in salary, status and respect when compared to taller counterparts. "Height matters for career success," said Timothy Judge, a UF management professor whose research is scheduled to be published in the spring issue of the Journal of Applied Psychology. Judge and Daniel Cable, a business professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill, analyzed the results of three studies in the United States and one in Great Britain which followed thousands of participants from childhood to adulthood, examining details of their work and personal lives. Judge's study found a direct correlation between height and earnings. Every inch of height amounted to about $789 more a year in pay. SARA RYNES, a professor in the department of management and organizations at the University of Iowa, said the research raises some interesting issues, including the decision by an increasing number of parents to give their children growth hormones. "The bias that Drs. Judge and Cable observe seems very difficult to eradicate," she said. The Ledger is based in Lakeland, Fla. Versions of the story also ran Oct. 17 on the websites of the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER and the WILMINGTON MORNING STAR, both based in North Carolina, and in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20031018/NEWS/310180359/1039

IEM Cited In Story On Making Predictions (Science News Online, Oct. 18)
A story about how economists are exploring so-called betting markets as prediction tools tells readers that to get a sense of how future-predicting markets operate they should consider the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, which is based at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Suppose two candidates, A and B, are facing off. Anyone can enter the market by putting some money into the pool; for each dollar an investor puts in, he or she receives two contracts, one of which will pay $1 if candidate A wins, and one of which will pay $1 if candidate B wins. Once contracts are in circulation, participants can buy and sell them to each other at a trading Web site. If the going rate for a candidate A contract is 53 cents, for instance, then the market as a whole thinks candidate A has a 53 percent chance of winning. Once the election results come out, participants cash in their winning contracts from the pool -- the more contracts of the winner they have, the more money they make. In addition to these winner-take-all markets, the Iowa project runs markets in which participants can bet on what share of the vote each candidate will receive.
http://www.sciencenews.org/20031018/bob9.asp

Gantz: Medication Abusers Need Ear Checks (Detroit Free Press, Oct. 17)
Rush Limbaugh's entry into a rehabilitation program for addiction to prescription painkillers underscores an important message to the millions of Americans who take the drugs: Chronic abuse may cause hearing loss. The link between hearing loss and high doses of painkillers like Vicodin, Lorcet and OxyContin is not yet well-known in medicine. Still, Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, chief of the University of Iowa College of Medicine's Department of Otolaryngology, urged patients who abuse prescription painkillers to be seen immediately by physicians and to get hearing tests if they develop any problem with their hearing. Warning signs include ringing in the ears, pressure and a sense of fullness.
http://www.freep.com/news/health/oto17_20031017.htm

Regents Poised To Raise Tuition For UI, ISU, UNI (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 17)
A Board of Regents, State of Iowa proposal to raise in-state undergraduate tuition by about a dollar a day at Iowa's three public universities was endorsed Thursday by campus administrators and student government leaders. The regents are recommending raising tuition for resident underclassmen next fall by $360, or 8.3 percent, to $4,702 - a significantly smaller increase than in the past two years. Some regents attribute a drop in freshmen enrollment to a perception that the cost of a bachelor's degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa is too expensive. Board figures show that freshmen enrollment has fallen to 9,765, down from a record of 10,763 two years ago.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=889168

Rynes Quoted in Height Bias Story (BBC News, Oct. 17)
SARA RYNES, UI professor of management and organizations, is quoted in a story about a University of Florida study that shows taller people earned more money than shorter people. That bias against short people was "difficult to eradicate" Rynes said. "I recently read that because of the widely-perceived advantages of height, an increasing number of parents are seeking growth-hormone therapy for their shorter-than-average children."
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3200296.stm

Field Quoted In Story About Explosion (Louisville Courier-Journal, Oct. 17)
The miner killed in a June 13 explosion at a Kentucky coal mine had a powerful painkiller and cough suppressant in his body, according to the state medical examiner's autopsy. Hydrocodone, a morphine-like narcotic, was detected. Codeine, which is in some over-the-counter drugs, can break down in the body and become hydrocodone, said R. WILLIAM FIELD, an epidemiologist at the University of Iowa's College of Public Health. But, he said, "it would have to be a lot of codeine for it to show up in the urine." Usually, other compounds also would be present, he said.
http://www.courier-journal.com/localnews/2003/10/17ky/met-4-mine1017-5253.html

Few Substance Abuse Programs For Elderly (Good Housekeeping, Oct. 17)
Elderly Americans with substance abuse problems have few specifically tailored treatment options, a study shows. A University of Iowa investigation finds that while substance abuse -- particularly alcoholism -- is a serious health concern among the growing U.S. population of people over 65, less than 1 in 5 treatment programs are age-specific. "Either people are not getting the necessary care or they may be receiving improper care by visiting treatment facilities without elderly specific programs in mind," said STEVEN ARNDT, UI professor of psychiatry. He added traveling long distances to receive specific treatment may prevent elderly patients from seeking treatment at all.
http://magazines.ivillage.com/goodhousekeeping/hb/news/article/0,,comtex_2003_10_16_up_0000-8841-bc-healthtips~ew~xml,00.html

Sun Rings To Be Performed At Jazz Festival (North Bay Bohemian, Oct. 16)
The Kronos Quartet will headline this year's San Francisco Jazz Festival this weekend with a performance of Sun Rings. The 85-minute multimedia piece is based on nearly 40 years of research by University of Iowa astrophysicist DONALD GURNETT, who has collected, analyzed and interpreted the strange chirps, whistles, grunts and moans gathered by sensitive instruments carried since the 1960s on unmanned spacecraft. The Bohemian is based in suburban San Francisco, CA.
http://www.metroactive.com/papers/sonoma/10.16.03/kronos-0342.html

Author Bly Attended Workshop (St. Joseph News-Press, Oct. 16)
Author Robert Bly will participate in a panel discussion on topics including the importance of writing and publishing poetic works in light of the nation's state after Sept. 11, 2001, the influence of electronic media on poetry and historical aspects of poetry writing. Bly was born in 1926 in Minnesota, where he still lives. He is a Harvard graduate and did post-graduate work at the WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He's published 40 books of poetry and prose and is responsible for translating a variety of European works into English.
http://www.stjoenews-press.com/Main.asp?SectionID=81&SubSectionID=272&ArticleID=46016

Book Award Finalist Taught At UI (Poughkeepsie Journal, Oct. 16)
Local author Scott Spencer is a finalist for the National Book Award. Spencer, nominated for his novel "A Ship Made of Paper," makes his second appearance on the list of five fiction finalists. In 1981, as a thirty-something writer, he was cited for "Endless Love." Spencer has written for The New York Times, Esquire, The Nation and Rolling Stone. He has taught writing at Columbia University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/today/lifeentertainment/stories/li101603s2.shtml

Explosion Victims At UI Hospitals (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 16)
Authorities say children playing in a basement led to a natural gas explosion that killed an infant boy and injured five other family members last weekend in the small Knox County town of Abingdon. Police Chief William Robinson said gas built up after one of the children removed a cap from a basement appliance Saturday at the home of Todd and Christine O'Halleran. Todd O'Halleran, 27, and two children -- Kienna, 8, and Kaily, 2 -- were taken to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS in Iowa City. Hospital officials have declined to release their conditions or confirm that they are patients. A version of this Associated Press story also appeared Oct. 16 on the web site of WBBM Newsradio.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/nearnorthwest/chi-0310160284oct16,1,6601880.story

UI Student Needs Heart Transplant (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 15)
The Reedy family of Council Bluffs suffered a tragedy two years ago when son Kevin, 18, died at the start of his freshman year in college. The cause wasn't determined, but his heart was inflamed. A family doesn't get over something like that. But life moved on. Kevin's brother Tim, a tennis and basketball player at Lewis Central, went off to college this fall at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. On Sept. 21, after a day of vomiting, he was admitted to University Hospitals in Iowa City. Three days later, he underwent surgery to insert pumps in his heart. His dad said it is hoped that his name will go on the heart-transplant list this week. Physicians are trying to understand what has caused Tim's heart problems. They are comparing his condition to what happened to Kevin, trying to find a genetic connection.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1636&u_sid=886655

Appeal Denied In Rape Case (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 15)
The Iowa Court of Appeals rejected an appeal Wednesday filed by a former traveling comedian who was convicted of raping a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in 1996. Vinson Champ, 41, formerly of Los Angeles, was sentenced to life in prison after his May 2002 conviction on first-degree kidnapping charges in connection with the assault. A version of this story appeared Oct. 15 on the web site of WQAD-TV, based in Rock Island, Ill.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=887301

Study: Fertility Treatment May Lead To Defects (Times of London, Oct. 15)
Children born after fertility treatment are more likely than normal to suffer from a range of birth defects, an American study has found. Congenital malformations are about 1.4 times more common among IVF babies than among those conceived naturally, according to research from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. An Australian study last year found that IVF and related therapies doubled the risk of birth defects, and a study at University College London has also shown a slightly raised incidence of abnormalities.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,8122-854822,00.html

Poet/Author Hampl Is Graduate Of Workshop (Leaf-Chronicle, Oct. 15)
A story about author Patricia Hampl says the poet and writer of fiction and non-fiction is a graduate "of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's prestigious WRITERS' WORKSHOP" and has won dozens of awards for her writing. The Leaf-Chronicle is based in Clarksville, Tenn.
http://www.theleafchronicle.com/news/stories/20031015/localnews/454524.html

Squire Comments On Lieberman Tax Plan (Hartford Courant, Oct. 14)
In an article analyzing the 73-page tax plan put forth this week by presidential candidate Joe Lieberman, UI political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE comments: "It's a little bit different from what the others are saying, and it's more specific."
http://www.ctnow.com/news/politics/hc-joetax1014.artoct14,1,6385909.story?co

UI Finds Few Alcoholism Treatment Options For Elderly (KETV, Oct. 14)
A new study shows older Iowans who need help with alcoholism have few treatment options. The study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that fewer than 1 in 5 existing programs in the country offer services specifically designed for older adults. It suggests substance abuse in the older population is a particularly serious health concern. Researchers surveyed all known public and private centers in the country listed as providing substance-abuse services. Of the 14,000 programs, only 2,400, or about 18 percent, reported specialized treatment for seniors. KETV is based in Omaha.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/iowabureau/2553244/detail.html

Choi, Colleagues Study Fructose Intolerance (Reuters Health, Oct. 14)
Findings from two separate studies suggest that both fructose and fat in the diet may contribute to symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The results of both studies were presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. YOUNG K. CHOI and associates at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City previously found that 30 percent to 58 percent of patients with IBS symptoms, particularly those with diarrhea, were fructose intolerant. In the group's latest study involving 80 patients with IBS, 30 were found to be fructose intolerant.
http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsArticle.jhtml?type=healthNews&storyID=3611370&section=news

Enrollment Down At Iowa Universities (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 14)
Enrollment at Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa has declined for the first time in eight years, and education experts say the rising cost of tuition may be to blame. There was a 1.3 percent drop in all students -- from 71,521 to 70,556 -- according to enrollment figures released last week by the Iowa Board of Regents. "One concern is (decreasing enrollment) may be a reflection of people's perception of cost," said Greg Nichols, executive director of the Board of Regents. The University of Iowa was the only school to report an increase in enrollment -- 48 more students.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=885735

Thorne Studied Incidence Of Asthma (AgriNews, Oct. 14)
A new University of Iowa study says children who live on hog farms in Keokuk County have a much higher incidence of asthma than those who live elsewhere. Children on farms with more than 100 hogs had a higher incidence of asthma than those with fewer hogs, the Des Moines Register reported in a copyright story Tuesday. Raising hogs posed the highest apparent asthma risk to the children studied, said the UI's PETER THORNE, one of the lead researchers. Approximately 16 percent of Keokuk County children have asthma or have taken medicine for wheezing in the past year. That's far higher than the 7 percent statewide rate reported in the state's Healthy Iowans 2010 report. Many people avoid a diagnosis because they fear a stigma or possible problems getting on sports teams, so the disease is underreported, Thorne said. Keokuk County's asthma rate is triple the national average of about 5 percent, he added. AgriNews is an independent agricultural newspaper published in Rochester, Minn.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/379664450074558.bsp

Bergman Comments On Medical Anomalies (Newsday, Oct. 14)
The writer of this story found she was born without a second kidney, but this was just the start of her search about medical anomalies. Many thousands of people are walking around with other oddball configurations: extra vertebrae, duplicated or oddly placed blood vessels, absent or multiple muscles, little supernumerary spleens, bladders shaped like hourglasses, even 12-lobed livers. Often, they are never discovered -- secrets that crumble to dust with their owners. It is a lesson all good surgeons take to heart: None of us are possessed of Gray's Anatomy perfection -- we are all variations on a theme. But it is still hard to accept when you are the anomaly. "We are all amazed when we discover that no two humans are exactly the same. Sometimes we have extra parts and sometimes we were shortchanged," said RONALD BERGMAN, professor emeritus of anatomy at the University of Iowa, who has been diligently cataloging human anatomical variations for decades. "No two faces are alike -- it's the same inside." (This story originally appeared in the LOS ANGELES TIMES.)
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/ny-3494495oct14,0,2437223.story?coll=ny-health-headlines

Kraft Studies Causes Of Disorder (HealthCentral.com, Oct. 13)
Two new studies suggest fat and fructose, a sugar found in many fruits and honey, play key roles in causing gastrointestinal disorders. Both studies were presented Oct. 13 at the American College of Gastroenterology annual meeting in Baltimore. In the first report, NANCY KRAFT, a clinical dietitian from the University of Iowa, and her colleagues say patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who are fructose-intolerant can achieve a significant improvement in symptoms by following a diet that restricts fructose intake. Kraft says fructose intolerance is an often overlooked component of IBS. Her colleague, Dr. YOUNG CHOI, adds in a statement that "a fructose-restricted diet significantly improved symptoms in patients with IBS and fructose intolerance. Fructose intolerance is yet another piece of the IBS puzzle, whose treatment when adhered to confers significant benefit." The story also appeared on DRKOOP.COM, websites of the ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, the GLOBE AND MAIL of Canada
http://www.healthcentral.com/news/NewsFullText.cfm?id=515488

UI Graduate Co-Stars On Show (Syracuse Post-Standard, Oct. 13)
John D. Freyer, a native of Syracuse, is co-star of "Second Hand Stories," a 30-minute reality show about two men riding around the country looking for rare and unique items at garage sales, thrift stores and other places. WCNY-TV (Channel 24) airs the show's pilot at 9:30 p.m. Tuesday as part of a nationwide test by PBS. If the program is well-received by viewers, PBS will consider seeking corporate funding to make "Second Hand Stories" a regular series as early as January 2005. "They (PBS executives) don't have a pile of money, so they need to demonstrate that the program has legs," Freyer says. "So they'll show it and figure out the feedback, and then go out and do the underwriting." The idea for "Second Hand Stories" originated with Freyer and documentary-maker Christopher Wilcha a couple of years ago while Wilcha was a visiting artist and Freyer was a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.syracuse.com/search/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-6/1065862674206042.xml?syrenent

Choi, Colleagues Study Fructose Intolerance (Times Of India, Oct. 13)
Two new studies suggest that both fructose and fat can contribute to gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia. Although lactose intolerance is well-known, fructose intolerance is just beginning to be recognized. For several years, University of Iowa researchers have been investigating how fructose, the simple sugar found in honey and many fruits, may play an important role in some of the symptoms of IBS, a leading cause of referral to a gastroenterologist. YOUNG K CHOI and his colleagues from the university, previously found that one-third to one-half of patients with IBS symptoms, were fructose intolerant. "A fructose-restricted diet significantly improved symptoms in patients with IBS and fructose intolerance," said Dr Choi. " Fructose intolerance is yet another piece of the IBS puzzle, whose treatment -- when adhered to -- confers significant benefits."
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/cms.dll/html/uncomp/articleshow?msid=231320

UI Hospitals Cited In Story On House Explosion (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 13)
Authorities have not yet identified an infant who died Saturday in a house explosion in the Knox County, Illinois, town of Abingdon. The blast also left five other family members injured. Authorities say they believe natural gas is to blame, although the cause of the incident remains under investigation. Authorities say two-year-old Kaily O'Halleran, eight-year-old Kienna O'Halleran and their father, 27-year-old Todd O'Halleran, were all flown to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS in Iowa City, but a spokeswoman would not confirm the two were there. Versions of the story also ran Oct. 13 on the website of the PEORIA JOURNAL STAR, WLS-TV, WBBM-TV, WQAD-TV, and WEEK-TV all in Illinois.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/north/chi-0310130276oct13,1,414917.story

Students Test Biofilm Samples Sent By UI (Arizona Daily Sun, Oct. 13)
To Northern Arizona University undergrads may have made the breakthrough doctors need in combating deadly colonies of bacteria called biofilms that attack open lacerations made for medical implants, such as catheters. Alyssa Jeffers and Carey Willson, both microbiology majors, have found a mutation of the bacteria that appears susceptible to white blood cells, the body's immune system. The students set up several experiments each week testing biofilm samples sent by researchers at Dartmouth Medical School and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. The experiments pitted different mutations of biofilms against white blood cells to see if any would be susceptible. The students had an idea they had found success, but tried not to get excited until they could repeat the experiment several more times, Willson said.
http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_includes/story.cfm?storyID=74831

Florida President Attended UI (The Ledger, Oct. 13)
A story about the new University of Florida President Bernie Machen says that while he soon will oversee the education of 35,000 undergraduates, Machen himself doesn't have a bachelor's degree. He attended two years at Vanderbilt University before going for his dental degree, not uncommon in those days, he said. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA waived the need for an undergraduate degree when Machen sought his master's. The Ledger is based in Florida.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20031013/NEWS/310130336/1004

Survey: UI MBA Grads Recoup Costs In 2.5 Years (Forbes, Oct. 13)
A survey by the magazine showed that despite a shaky economy and job market, an M.B.A. still pays for itself. The typical five-year M.B.A. gain at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S TIPPIE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, for instance, was $93,000. But it took just 2.5 years for Tippie grads to recoup their investment compared with an average of 3.1 for all schools.
http://www.forbes.com/work/careers/forbes/2003/1013/078.html

UI Muslim Group Organizes Conference (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 13)
A University of Iowa-based Muslim organization is seeking donations and volunteers for its fourth annual Iowa Conference of Islam. The University of Iowa Association of Muslims in America and the Iowa Muslim Students Association are seeking help for their March 26-28 conference on the university campus in Iowa City. About $5,300 is needed, organizers said. Organizer ASMA HAIDRI of the Association of Muslims in America said the goal of the gathering is to promote peace and unity and to help eliminate stereotypes about Muslims and Islam.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=884863

Coleman's UI Presidency Cited (Herald Sun, Oct. 12)
A feature on University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman, who recently returned to her alma mater the University of North Carolina to speak at the school's 210th University Day celebration, says she was provost at the University of New Mexico and president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before taking over as Michigan's president in 2002. The Herald-Sun is based in Durham, N.C.
http://www.herald-sun.com/orange/10-401767.html

UI Alumnus Recalls Vietnam War Opposition (Aberdeen American News, Oct. 12)
An editorial writer says that during the Vietnam War, while he was attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on the G.I. Bill, war opponents accosted him when they saw his Army-issue overcoat. "One young woman spit at me in contempt," he writes. "Although not a veteran of the Vietnam war, I was attending graduate school on the G.I. Bill. I learned to be very discreet about revealing my veteran status." The News is based in South Dakota.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/6996720.htm

Book Review Cites Dubus‚ Time At UI (Times-Picayune, Oct. 12)
A review of the book "Leap Of The Heart: Andre Dubus Talking" says editor Ross Gresham has collected 24 of the 38 interviews Dubus gave in his life. The first interview in the collection is from The Quill, the Bradford College literary magazine. Dubus joined the faculty of Bradford College in 1966 and taught creative writing and contemporary prose. The interviewer, a student at Bradford,
notes about Dubus, "He feels the free exchange of ideas must be promoted as an integral part of education. Very simply he is a person who values and respects the opinions of others." The book reviewer says that what is interesting about the student writer who conducted the interview was his attempt to create a picture of Dubus that goes deeper than his service in the Marine Corps and his
time at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in New Orleans.
http://www.nola.com/entertainment/t-p/index.ssf?/base/living-0/106593638334800.xml

Jazz Singer Attended UI (Pittsburg Morning Sun, Oct. 12)
Joan Bender set out to be a jazz singer, but she's been getting rave reviews from the likes of Scott Yanow of the "L.A. Jazz Scene" and the "Village Voice." Pittsburg audiences will get a chance to judge for themselves at 7:30 p.m. Monday when she sings with the Pittsburg State University Jazz Ensemble in the Crimson and Gold Ballroom, Overman Student Center. Bender said she went to the
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to study theater. "After I graduated, I moved to New York, still wanting to pursue acting," she said. "But I became involved in a wonderful jazz club scene and I sat in and sang for fun. Eventually, I found I enjoyed singing more than acting." The Sun is based in Kansas.
http://morningsun.net/stories/101203/lif_20031012011.shtml

PR Director Is UI Master's Candidate (Jefferson City News Tribune, Oct. 12)
Brian Graves, a former News Tribune education reporter, is the new director of public information and university affairs at Lincoln University. A native of Waterloo, Iowa, Graves has a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Northern Iowa and he is a candidate for a master's in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://newstribune.com/stories/101203/bus_1012030006.asp

Clark To Return Fee, Critics Not Satisfied (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 11)
Even though Wesley Clark has agreed to return speaking fees since announcing his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination, three college students are filing a complaint with the Federal Elections Commission. The complaint, mailed Wednesday by two UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students and a third from Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids, alleges that Clark's Sept. 19 speech on American foreign policy at Iowa's law school violated rules that prohibit candidates from accepting payment for speaking at campaign-related events. Clark was invited in March, long before his political ambitions were announced, to deliver the 2003 Levitt Lecture, said William Hines, dean of the Iowa Law School.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=8833487. Florida President Got UI Degree (Salt Lake 7.

Florida President Got UI Degree (Salt Lake Tribune, Oct. 11)
Bernie Machen, recently selected to be the University of Florida's new president, received a doctorate in education psychology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sltrib.com/2003/Oct/10112003/utah/100833.asp

School Hall Of Fame To Induct UI Alumnus (Hillsboro Banner, Oct. 11)
The Hillsboro Public School Hall of Fame will induct its first three members Oct. 25, including Lars Grant, who was born and raised in Kindred, N.D., where he graduated from high school. He received his bachelor's degree in 1929 from Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, and his master's degree in 1932 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in North Dakota.
http://www.hillsborobanner.com/10_11_03/halloffame.htm

Cisneros Attended Writers' Workshop (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Oct. 11)
A story about author Sandra Cisneros' latest book, "Mango Street," says Cisneros attended Loyola University in Chicago and the WRITERS' WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.jsonline.com/enter/books/oct03/176182.asp

Damasio Interviewed About Consciousness (NPR Science Friday, Oct. 10)
ANTONIO DAMASIO, adjunct professor at The Salk Institute and the Van Allen distinguished professor and head of the department of neurology at the University of Iowa, was interviewed about what the science of neurology is telling us about consciousness. He was joined by former UI Writers' Workshop faculty member Jorie Graham, winner of Pulitzer Prize for poetry and Boylston professor of oratory and rhetoric at Harvard University, who talked about how the process of writing a poem is also the process of constructing a conscious experience.
http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=1461612
Transcript is available at: http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=c83d9fbf07db01f3c84180050e516e5c&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=4fdfc49f285c4cf2b4e63977d155816d

Clark To Return Lecture Fees (Boston Globe, Oct. 10)
After controversy swirled around reports that his paid speeches could violate campaign finance laws, retired Army General Wesley K. Clark has decided to return fees he collected and will not deliver any more paid speeches during his campaign. One of his speeches was at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.boston.com/news/politics/president/clark/articles/2003/10/10/clark_says_hell_return_forgo_speech_fees/
UI To Use Grant For Cycstic Fibrosis Research (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 10)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA plans to use a $5.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for its research for a cystic fibrosis cure.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=882163

UI Researchers Help With Fruit Fly Study (Science Daily, Oct. 10)
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin Medical School have found genetic evidence linking humans and fruit flies in a new way: through their hearing. The link offers the future possibility that the insect's auditory system may serve as a model for understanding human deafness and other hearing disorders. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA collaborated in the study.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/10/031010071926.htm

Blumberg Reluctant To Embrace New Research (Toledo Blade, Oct. 10)
MARK BLUMBERG, UI psychology professor, is uncomfortable with new studies that say emotional pain resonates in the brain as severely as physical pain, using in part research that argues animals have feelings. "I'm not comfortable projecting my feelings onto my spouse; so I'm sure not comfortable projecting them onto a rat,'' says Mark Blumberg, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa. He is one of many neuroscientists reluctant to speculate on animal feelings.
http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20031010/NEWS08/110100129

Damasio To Participate In Conference (Salt Lake Tribune, Oct. 9)
Physicists and philosophers rarely gather to discuss problems that may cross their respective disciplines. The University of Utah is hosting the Science and Literature Symposium, tonight through Saturday. The program's theme is "The Passionate Mind: Emotion, Cognition and the Construction of Self." For the second year of the symposium, the invited speakers include: Jorie Graham, a poet at Harvard University who has written on topics ranging from math to painting; and ANTONIO DAMASIO, a University of Iowa College of Medicine neurologist whose books include Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain.
http://www.sltrib.com/2003/Oct/10092003/thursday/100082.asp

New U Of Florida President Is UI Alumnus (Gainesville Sun, Oct. 9)
The University of Florida on Wednesday named its new president, Bernie Machen, a 59-year-old dentist with a casual style who has been president of the University of Utah since 1998. Machen, who grew up in St. Louis and in high school worked for an uncle who was an orthodontist, earned his undergraduate degree at Vanderbilt University. After dental school, he joined the Army and worked two years as a pediatric dentist in Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He also earned a doctorate in educational psychology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A similar story was published Oct. 9 in the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times.
http://gainesvillesun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20031009/LOCAL/210090348/1007

Critics Question Clark Speech Fee (Financial Times, Oct. 9)
The latest stumbles in the fledgling campaign of General Wesley Clark, the former NATO commander, have underscored the perils of being a late-coming novice in the hardball world of presidential politics. The angry resignation of his campaign manager, coupled with revelations that the retired army general might have broken campaign finance laws by giving paid speeches after he announced his bid for the Democratic nomination, have left Clark supporters scrambling to regain their footing. Gen Clark, who receives up to $30,000 per speech, was paid for recent speeches at three college campuses. One at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA came two days after he announced his presidential bid.
http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1059480453691

UI Wins Grant To Study Finances Of Disabled (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 9)
The University of Iowa has received a federal grant to study the finances of people with disabilities and how tax policy affects their ability to accumulate assets. The goal of the five-year project is to improve the lives of individuals with disabilities, said PETER BLANCK, a professor of law and director of the University of Iowa Law, Health Policy and Disability Center. The National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research of the Department of Education awarded the $1.5 million grant.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=880771

Columnist Cites IEM (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 8)
A columnist writing about California's recall election notes that the current hot market in the Iowa Electronic Markets -- the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA business college's "real-money futures markets in which contract payoffs depend on economic and political events such as elections" -- is California's recall election. The IEM opened for recall trading on Aug. 27 in two markets: one on the recall itself and the second on a possible new governor. It's a benign, business-school spin on the now-defunct Pentagon online futures market for betting on Middle Eastern developments that was advertised as a vehicle for profiting on assassinations and other terrorist acts. Unlike Iowa's program, the Pentagon's was not promoted as a possible part of a college curriculum.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-polcol8sep08,1,4520787.story

Kutcher Tries To Attend UI Homecoming (NBC5.com, Oct. 8)
Homecoming weekend at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA featured a lot more than just football. Iowa native Ashton Kutcher and girlfriend Demi Moore were hoping to take in the Iowa homecoming game against Michigan over the weekend, but that was scrapped when paparazzi started showing up outside Kutcher's mother's house. According to Internet Movie Database, Kutcher's mother threatened to "call the law" on the photographers staked out in front of her home. The couple stayed close to home instead of going to the game. They rode four-wheelers and spent quiet time with family. Kutcher briefly attended the University of Iowa where he studied engineering. NBC5.com is the web site for channel 5 news in Chicago. Versions of this story appeared on more than 45 other television news web sites in states including Ohio, California, Wisconsin, Texas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Georgia, Missouri, Nebraska, Florida, Washington, North Carolina, Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Oklahoma, Illinois, Nevada, Mississippi, and Louisiana.
http://www.nbc5.com/entertainment/2541003/detail.html

Kutcher Tries To Attend UI Homecoming (Washington Post, Oct. 8)
Ashton Kutcher and girlfriend Demi Moore left their glamorous Hollywood life for a down-home homecoming weekend with all the Iowa fixings -- pork, Hawkeye football and chitchat about children. Kutcher, the 25-year-old co-star of the Fox sitcom "That '70s Show," grew up in Iowa and briefly attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The couple flew in Friday hoping to attend the Hawkeyes' homecoming game Saturday against Michigan, but scrapped those plans when paparazzi showed up outside the Homestead, Iowa, home of Kutcher's mother, Diane Portwood. Versions of this story also appeared Oct. 8 on the web sites of the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, POST & COURIER (S.C.), MSNBC, FOXNEWS, REDLANDS (Calif.) DAILY FACTS, FORT LAUDERDALE SUN SENTINEL, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW, ARIZONA REPUBLIC, ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, USA TODAY, PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORDER, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, CJAD.com (Canada), WICHITA EAGLE, ATTLEBORO (Mass.) SUN CHRONICLE, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, RAPID CITY JOURNAL, MIAMI HERALD, and NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A56200-2003Oct7.html

Clark Speeches May Be Problematic (Washington Post, Oct. 8)
Retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark may have violated federal election laws by discussing his presidential campaign during recent paid appearances, according to campaign finance experts. Clark, a newcomer to presidential politics, touted his candidacy during paid appearances at DePauw University in Indiana and other campuses after he entered the presidential race on Sept. 17. Under the laws governing the financing of presidential campaigns, candidates cannot be paid by corporations, labor unions, individuals or even universities for campaign-related events. The Federal Election Commission (FEC) considers such paid political appearances akin to a financial contribution to a candidate. Clark has been paid for speeches at DePauw, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Midwestern State University. If the FEC reviews the matter, it would look at how much of each appearance was campaign-related. Clark's appearance on Sept. 23 at DePauw appears most problematic for the candidate. Throughout his speech to the DePauw audience, some of whom waved "Draft Clark" signs they were handed on the way in, Clark blasted Bush's Iraq policy and outlined how he would handle foreign affairs differently. During the Q&A that followed, Clark talked in detail about his qualifications and ideas for the presidency. This story also appeared Oct. 8 on the web site of the CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A58717-2003Oct7.html

UI Researchers Study Immune Abnormalities (Omaha World Herald, Oct. 8)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Nebraska have received a $6.3 million grant to study immune system abnormalities caused by the abuse of alcohol. The five-year grant, awarded by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, will also subsidize research into the effects alcohol has on immune system responses to infectious diseases, university officials say. Iowa researchers were awarded the majority of the grant, $4.85 million. Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center will get nearly $1.5 million to fund their portion of the project, university officials said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=879366

UI Greeks May Have To Install Sprinklers (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 7)
Fraternities and sororities at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA say a plan to install sprinklers in all Greek system houses will be expensive and could close some of them. The city is considering requiring sprinklers under an updated building code. Fire officials couldn't point to any fatal fires in fraternities or sororities but cited some close calls.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2003/10/07/national0133EDT0437.DTL

Nelson Explains IEM (North Gate News, Oct. 7)
Pollsters, talk-radio pundits and party strategists aren't the only ones who have weighed in heavily during this unusually high-profile election. Bookies are also giving their two cents, gambling that their predictions will ultimately earn them a few more cents. However, betting on non-sporting events in the United States is illegal, and legitimate Las Vegas sports books don't publish odds for election races. So when media outlets refer to Las Vegas odds makers in their election coverage, invariably they're referring exclusively to America's Line, which is essentially a column that's syndicated to 125 newspapers. FORREST NELSON, a professor of economics at the University of Iowa, said his school's 15-year-old research project, the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM), which allows people to bet money on election results, avoids the self-interest found in traditional odds making. Participants-including anyone who signs up on the IEM web site-set the odds in the IEM. Nelson said IEM traders "operate a futures market in which a 'contract' may pay $1.00 or $0.00 depending on the election outcome." IEM traders buy and sell these contracts, and their prices "represent the consensus beliefs of traders regarding the probabilities of the election outcomes," said Nelson.
http://journalism.berkeley.edu/ngno/stories/001195.html

Dean Draws UI Crowd (Knoxville News-Sentinel, Oct. 7)
On the final stop of presidential hopeful Howard Dean's four-day drive to attract younger voters, the line stretched all the way out the door in the University of New Hampshire Student Center and down a long hallway. Welcome to the Generation Dean tour, where the old rules that young voters don't vote and don't care just don't seem to apply anymore. It's a movement where a plainspoken former Vermont governor can draw a crowd of 1,000 college students to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA gathering, as he did Sunday afternoon, or inspire a group of devoted volunteers to use up 73 buckets of colored chalk to advertise a University of Wisconsin rally in Madison, which drew some 5,000 young adults later Sunday. The newspaper is based in Tennessee. This article was published originally Oct. 6 in the Pittsburg Post-Gazette and also appeared Oct. 7 on the web site of SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE.
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/politics/article/0,1406,KNS_356_2327979,00.html

Dean Draws Thousands To UI Event (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Oct. 7)
A story about Democratic presidential hopeful Howard B. Dean campaign says his Generation Dean tour drew 1,000 college students to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA gathering this past Sunday.
http://www.post-gazette.com/election/20031007dean1007p1.asp

Jones Discusses Voting Technology (WOSU, Oct. 7)
DOUGLAS JONES, professor of computer science, was interviewed on this NPR affiliate about the complexity of counting votes in U.S. elections, the technology of electronic voting, and the significance of election integrity for democracy
http://www.wosu.org/am/openline.php

IEM Called Recall Win (Bloomberg, Oct. 6)
Arnold Schwarzennegger was favored to win the California governor race among the 4,400 people who have taken out contracts in the Iowa Electronic Markets, a futures market run by University Of Iowa business school professors. A contract that Schwarzennegger would win sold in the Iowa market for 89 cents to pay $1. A contract that Gray Davis would lose the recall sold for 85 cents. "Our market participants clearly think the most likely outcome is that Davis will not win the recall," said THOMAS RIETZ, an associate professor of finance at Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business. "It's not a sure thing, but it's pretty strong possibility that Schwarzennegger will win.

Students Face Higher Tuition (ABC News Nightline, Oct. 6)
In a story about increasing college tuition, it's noted that 80 percent of college students in this country attend public institutions, where many now face dramatic tuition increases. The University of Arizona raised fees 39 percent, after the state cut it's funding by $26 million. Other examples included University of California at Berkeley, a 30 percent increase; University of Virginia, 30 percent; and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 19 percent.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=c83d9fbf07db01f3c84180050e516e5c&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=8840bea7f68f336cee2e9ba1de6a30dc

Democrats Lead In IEM (CNNMoney.com, Oct. 6)
In the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a University of Iowa-run exchange that has been trading political futures since 1988, it appears Democrats are in the pole position. Tradesports, (a commercial political futures trading website), the Dublin outfit that came up with the Saddam futures, President Bush is shown as having 62 percent chance of winning. In this commentary, writer Jason Lahart contends that while trading on Tradesports "is dominated by Wall Street types -- who tend to be aligned with the right -- there is an academic (i.e., lefty) skew in the Iowa Electronic Markets."
http://money.cnn.com/2003/10/06/commentary/bidask/bidask/index.htm

IEM Futures Showed Schwarzenegger Victory (Las Vegas Review-Journal, Oct. 6)
Futures players using the Iowa Electronic Market are betting almost six-to-one Davis will be recalled and about 10-to-one Arnold Schwarzenegger will be picked to succeed him. Buyers are predicting the recall will succeed by a margin of 55 percent to 45 percent. In the last week before the election, 2,700 individuals have bought futures contracts, or wagered legally, on the election's outcome at the Iowa Electronic Market. Interest has been small compared with other major elections, even though it may have been on a par with the average gubernatorial election, said University of Iowa finance professor TOM RIETZ. The average margin of error on Iowa Electronics Markets, a nonprofit web site operated by faculty at the University of Iowa Tippie College of Business, has been three percent since the site was founded in 1988, and is lower than many public opinion surveys' margins of error. The fundamental reason for the accuracy is that people tend to be more thoughtful when "they're putting their money where their mouths are," Rietz said.
http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2003/Oct-07-Tue-2003/news/22314756.html

Barron Comments On Admissions Policies (Chronicle of Higher Ed, Oct. 6)
Officials of the National Association for College Admission Counseling are worried that Congress might soon propose legislation limiting the use of early-decision admissions and controlling other college-admissions policies. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, a Democrat from Massachusetts, reportedly is considering proposing legislation, as part of Congress's current work to renew the Higher Education Act, that would reduce federal support for colleges that employ early-decision policies. The admissions-counselors group has recently waffled on its position on what boundaries colleges should set on early-admissions options, causing confusion among prospective students and irking many of the group's members. In August, the group decided to stop enforcing a two-year-old restriction on early-action admissions programs, after several colleges openly ignored the rule. The admissions-counselors association has formed a committee that will reconsider the rule, along with many other policies and practices, but officials say those deliberations will take at least two years. MICHAEL BARRON, director of admissions for the University of Iowa, which does not have early decision, spoke out against the group's recent actions during a general-membership meeting at the conference. "Dare we equivocate on our principles at the time when we have experienced and we are likely to continue to experience a legislative and Congressional onslaught on the ways we do business?" he asked. "We may be giving away the ability to police ourselves by establishing a moratorium" on policing early-admission options, he added.
http://chronicle.com/prm/daily/2003/10/2003100601n.htm

Dean Campaigns At UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Oct. 6)
Presidential candidate Howard Dean was in Iowa City Sunday rallying UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students to his campaign. Dean closed a seven-city "Raise the Roots" tour with an appearance at the University of New Hampshire Monday.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/4137929.html

UI's Whitman Quarterly Publishes Find (Washington Post, Oct. 6)
In the warrens of the Library of Congress, the National Archives and George Washington University's libraries, economist and Walt Whitman aficionado Martin Murray probes for the bits of paper that reveal a city in which the great poet toiled by day as a clerk in the attorney general's office, while by night he wrote his soaring odes to Abraham Lincoln and a strapping young nation. Earlier this year, while reading through the pages of the Washington Evening Star from the winter of 1872, Murray found two articles whose style and content sang out to him as the work of Whitman, a sometime journalist who had written about the Civil War for the New York Times and regularly contributed pieces to the Star and other Washington papers. But Murray needed proof. He traveled to Yale University, where Whitman's papers are held, and found manuscript sheets containing almost verbatim drafts of the Star articles. Scholars had always assumed that the pieces in the Yale archives had been published somewhere, but it took Murray's ramblings through the old newspapers to find them. Murray had been down this road before, having discovered a newspaper piece that Whitman wrote about the visit to Washington of a delegation of Sioux Indians. Murray's findings have now been published in the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, a literary journal based at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A53690-2003Oct6.html

Alumnus Recalls Presidential Yacht (Washington Times, Oct. 6)
There were no presidents aboard Presidential Yacht USS Sequoia, but that did not keep a deck full of visitors and former crewmembers from reminiscing yesterday about the days when Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman and John F. Kennedy were on board the vessel. The Sequoia has not been a presidential yacht since 1935, and most of the families and retired crew were from the ship's successor, Presidential Yacht USS Williamsburg. Jim McDonald, 76, of Chicago, and a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said President Truman roamed the yacht and visited with the crew. But once, he was seasick.
http://washingtontimes.com/metro/20031005-111131-7734r.htm

Fire Sprinkler Ordinance Considered (USA Today, Oct. 6)
City officials are considering an ordinance that would require fraternities and sororities at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to install fire sprinklers within five years. The proposal will be presented to the City Council as part of a series of building code revisions, Fire Marshal Roger Jensen said.
http://www.usatoday.com/usatonline/20031006/5562555s.htm

Houge Examines Stock Funds (New York Times, Oct. 5)
From 1965 through 2001, according to finance professors -- TODD HOUGE of the University of Iowa and Timothy Loughran of Notre Dame -- the average value stock fund performed no better than the average growth stock fund. That tends to be the pattern over decades, but there are exceptions: Over the past three years, value stocks have significantly outperformed growth stocks, and the average value fund has beaten the average growth fund, but not in the most recent quarter. The professors also found that both kinds of funds had much higher expense ratios than more diversified funds.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/10/05/business/yourmoney/05stra.html?ex=1066410753&ei=1&en=4c72600284e5fb7d

Dean Campaigns At UI (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 5)
Presidential candidate Howard Dean was in Iowa City, Iowa, on Sunday rallying UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students to his campaign. Dean closes a seven-city "Raise the Roots" tour with an appearance at the University of New Hampshire on Monday. The Associated Press story also appeared in the PROVIDENCE JOURNAL BULLETIN in Rhode Island, the NEW YORK TIMES, OMAHA WORLD-HERALD and in YAHOO NEWS.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2003/10/05/national2237EDT0622.DTL

Illinois Provost Interviewed At UI (News-Journal, Oct. 5)
Two senior administrators at the University of Illinois are candidates for the presidency of the University of Florida. Richard Herman, provost of the UI's Urbana campus, and Sylvia Manning, chancellor of the Chicago campus, will interview early this week for the top job at Florida. Herman was one of six finalists for the president's job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in December 2002. The newspaper serves Champaign, Ill.
http://www.news-gazette.com/story.cfm?Number=14662

School Newspaper Wins Journalism Award (Wausau Daily Herald, Oct. 5)
The Warrior's Word, the Wausau West High School newspaper, is continuing its winning ways. Two national scholastic press associations recognized the paper with their highest honors. Quill and Scroll, an international journalism society based at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, granted the paper the George H. Gallup Award. The paper had to meet criteria for a "first class" rating and submit evidence of "extraordinary achievement, overall superiority, exceptional service to the school and community and sustained editorial leadership." The Daily Herald serves Wausau, Wis.
http://www.wausaudailyherald.com/wdhlocal/283298595004370.shtml

IEM Cited Election Market Story (Oakland Tribune, Oct. 5)
A story about web sites that let people speculate on world events by imitating the futures and options trading pits says such are most accurate when the players have a stake in the question at hand and the result is determined by a large number of people. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, for instance, collect small bets made with real money on the outcome of elections. They report that the prices of futures contracts pegged to the results of elections are often better predictors than most polls. (Data from the Iowa markets, run by the faculty of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's business school, are used to study trading behavior and as a teaching tool to introduce students to real-world markets.) The Oakland Tribune serves Oakland, Calif. The article, which originally appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES, also appeared on the website of the SAN MATEO COUNTY TIMES in California.
http://www.oaklandtribune.com/Stories/0,1413,82~10834~1678168,00.html.

Alumna Honored (Amarillo Globe News, Oct. 5)
Charlene Trekell was inducted into the Randall High School Raider Hall of Fame Friday in Amarillo, Texas. Trekell graduated from Shamrock High School and received a bachelor's degree from West Texas State University. She earned a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with an emphasis in library science. She taught school for 40 years, the last 15 at Randall, having been the only librarian for RHS up until her retirement last year. She was instrumental in the planning and implementation of the school's new library in 1988 when Randall opened. The GlobeNews serves Amarillo, Tex.
http://www.amarillonet.com/stories/100503/new_randallhall.shtml

Dean Campaigns In Iowa (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Oct. 4)
Presidential candidate Howard Dean had scheduled stops Sunday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Iowa, and the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wis., said Ginny Hunt, a coordinator for Generation Dean, the campaign's official youth outreach organization.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/aplocal_story.asp?category=6420&slug=WA%20Dean%20Seattle

Baldus Comments On Murder Rates (Washington Times, Oct. 4)
Murder in America has fallen into a historic slump, and that's a fact more people can live with. Murder rates have dropped to levels not seen since the mid-1960s, punctuating the end of a bloody 20th century where more than twice as many died in American homicides as U.S. troops did in wars. "No one has a good theory that explains the drop," says DAVID BALDUS, a University of Iowa law school professor and recognized expert on murder prosecutions. "Police take credit for it, but we don't know the answer," says Baldus, who is among several analysts citing a decline in drug-related shootings.
http://washingtontimes.com/specialreport/20031005-120017-7049r.htm

Alaskan Alumnus Runs For City Council (Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Oct. 4)
Anytime North Pole drivers see a red 1977 Chevrolet truck with UNIVERSITY OF IOWA stickers on the streets, they know Preston Smith is back in town. Smith, who grew up in North Pole, has been away at the University of Iowa the last seven years studying physical therapy and sports medicine. He's kept the same lifted truck since high school, parking it while away at college and driving it during the summers when he returns. Having graduated with a master's degree last spring, Smith, 26, is back in North Pole for good and immediately wants to get involved in local politics. He is running for city mayor against four other candidates in Tuesday's municipal election. "I grew up here, I went to school and now I'm coming back," he said, sampling the breakfast special at Dallman's Family Restaurant in North Pole during a recent interview. "I think I'm well-informed and I'm a hometown boy." The well-mannered man said he's considered becoming North Pole mayor since his involvement in student government in high school and college. In the politically saturated environment of Iowa, Smith met politicians ranging from Bill Clinton and Al Gore to Sen. Tom Harkin.
http://www.news-miner.com/Stories/0,1413,113~7244~1676683,00.html

Squire Comments On Graham Campaign (Orlando Sentinel, Oct. 4)
From the time Bob Graham launched his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination earlier this year, he has faced two hurdles that have proved insurmountable -- a lack of charisma on the campaign trail and no clear and unique message as a candidate. "At the time he came in, I thought there was a possibility for him," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "But Graham hasn't managed to generate much excitement." The article also appeared in the LAKELAND LEDGER in Florida.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/nationworld/orl-asecgraham04100403oct04xx,0,269205.story?coll=orl-news-headlines

UI Helps With Scanning Of Famed Runestone (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Oct. 4)
Its authenticity may forever be in question, but the Kensington Runestone is on its way to Sweden, where a group of scientists will study it and lend their opinion to the question of whether the rock is really a centuries-old artifact or a 200-pound hoax. Scientists working with the Runestone Museum in Alexandria, Minn., are traveling with the stone, and say they have new geologic findings that suggest it was buried far longer than anyone was settled in western Minnesota. The stone was purportedly found in 1898 by a Minnesota farmer near Kensington, under a tree he uprooted to prepare his fields for plowing. It's thought by some to carry an inscription from Norse explorers in the 14th century. If it's authentic, experts say it would be one of the most important artifacts discovered in North America. Scientists working with the Alexandria museum say that for the past three years, they've conducted the first geological studies on the stone itself, and weathering shows it's been buried at least 200 years. That's still several hundred years short of the 14th century, but they say it proves that the stone wasn't created by the farmer who found it, which was long suspected. Scott Wolter, a Chanhassen geologist who owns a material forensic business, led the study. Researchers used scanning electron microscope equipment at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to help them date the rocks.

Author Earned MFA At UI (Capital Times, Oct. 3)
Generally editors choose books they love and want to promote. They work on them for the entire production process -- shepherding the fledgling manuscript from rough to finished draft, helping the author choose cover art, and defending the book. Sometimes, the editor can't finish this parenting process, thereby leaving the book and its author "orphaned." It's every author's worst fear, and it's something Madison writer Judith Claire Mitchell has experienced. Her forthcoming novel, "The Last Day of the War," (due out in spring 2004) was originally handled by Jenny Minton at Pantheon. Minton discovered Mitchell's writing in 1998, just as the author was finishing her MFA at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Minton kept asking Mitchell to finish the novel, and she purchased it after seeing the first third of the manuscript. The Capital Times is based in Madison, Wis.
http://www.madison.com/captimes/books/topic/author/58076.php

Alumnus Named U.S. Ambassador To Barbados (Barbados Advocate, Oct. 3)
An Iowa legislative leader is set to become the United States' new ambassador to Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean. President George Bush has nominated Mary Kramer, who is currently president of the Iowa State Senate, to become ambassador to Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean. The former teacher and school administrator earned her bachelor and master's degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.barbadosadvocate.com/NewViewNewsleft.cfm?Record=15131

Former UI Nursing Dean Donates Nightingale Writings (The Examiner, Oct. 3)
Evelyn B. Barritt, former professor and dean of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Nursing, has donated a collection of books, pamphlets, photographs and other items relating to nursing history, including a collection of writings by 19th century nurse Florence Nightingale, to the Independence, Mo. campus of Lamoni, IA-based Graceland College. The Examiner is located in Blue Springs, MO.
http://www.examiner.net/stories/100203/new_100203006.shtml

Alumnus Owns Minneapolis Record Label (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct. 3)
Clint Simonson got his start in the music industry in the late '80s while a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, releasing cassettes by sound-collagists the Tape Beatles. Today he is the owner of DeStijl Records, a small Minneapolis record label that specializes in odd and obscure vinyl-only releases by experimental new bands such as Wolf Eyes. It also reissues obscure old albums like Michael Yonkers' 1968 guitar-rattled, free-form rock album, "Microminiature Love," which was re-released in May by major indie Sub Pop Records. This weekend he is co-sponsoring the DeStijl/Freedom-From Music Festival in Minneapolis.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/919/4125295.html

IEM Cited (New York Times, Oct. 2)
A story about web sites that let people speculate on world events by imitating the futures and options trading pits says such are most accurate when the players have a stake in the question at hand and the result is determined by a large number of people. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, for instance, collect small bets made with real money on the outcome of elections. They report that the prices of futures contracts pegged to the results of elections are often better predictors than most polls. (Data from the Iowa markets, run by the faculty of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's business school, are used to study trading behavior and as a teaching tool to introduce students to real-world markets.)
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/10/02/technology/circuits/02mark.html?ex=1065672000&en=6133560d44392a77&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE


UI Among Schools Restricting Romance (International Herald-Tribune, Oct. 2)

The University of California is beginning the academic year under a new policy that bans professors from engaging in "romantic or sexual" relationships with students. Schools that have adopted such policies include Duke, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Stanford, Yale, the University of Virginia and Ohio Wesleyan. The strictest policy, put in place at William and Mary College two years ago, forbids consensual relationships between all faculty members and undergraduate students.
http://www.iht.com/articles/112145.html

Antidepressants Studied As Stroke Treatment (Heart Center Online, Oct. 2)
Whether you're depressed or not, antidepressants may be good for you after a stroke. New research suggests that stroke patients who receive these drugs for just a few weeks live longer than their peers who don't. Moreover, this benefit was noted in patients with and without depression, according to findings reported in the American Journal of Psychiatry. Dr. ROBERT G. ROBINSON and colleagues, from the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City, assessed the outcomes of 104 patients who were treated with one of two antidepressants--fluoxetine (Prozac) or nortriptyline (Pamelor)--or with inactive "placebo" pills for 12 weeks during the first 6 months after a stroke. The patients were followed for nine years. Fifty patients died during the study period. Almost 68 percent of patients treated with antidepressants were still alive at follow-up compared with only 36 percent of patients given placebo, the authors note.
http://www.heartcenteronline.com/myheartdr/home/research-detail.cfm?reutersid=3850

Turow, Crier Discuss Death Penalty At UI (WQAD-TV, Oct. 1)
An attorney-writer and a judge-turned-television host say their opinions about the death penalty changed as they learned more how capital cases were applied, investigated and argued before juries. Scott Turow, a former federal prosecutor turned novelist, was at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last night for a lecture. He was joined by Catherine Crier, a former Texas state judge and host of a show on Court TV. Turow says while Americans consider the death penalty socially and morally appropriate for the most heinous crimes, no system is free of mistakes. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1464894&nav=1sW7II8h

UI Alumna Appointed Barbados Ambassador (Longview News-Journal, Oct. 1)
President Bush on Wednesday nominated the president of the Iowa State Senate, a moderate Republican with close ties to the Bush family, to be U.S. ambassador to Barbados and a string of nearby Caribbean islands. Mary Kramer, who was an early supporter when the president had serious competition in Iowa's leadoff precinct caucus in 2000, was sworn in as president of the state Senate in January 1997. A former teacher and school administrator from Des Moines, Kramer earned bachelor's and master's degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The News-Journal is based in Longview, Texas. A version of the story also ran Oct. 1 on the websites of the ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM in North Carolina, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, the COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia, WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas, the BILOXI SUN HERALD in Mississippi, the ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS in South Dakota, the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, NEWSDAY and the KANSAS CITY STAR in Missouri.
http://www.news-journal.com/news/content/news/ap_story.html/Washington/AP.V3376.AP-Bush-Ambassador.html;COXnetJSessionID=18nXZJMM5PaROEc6l2LqTOYET0V1znMQedynfcCOuBa7uPWVXaN3!-1914444172?urac=n&urvf=10651012717500.6478639338528789

UI Helps With Scanning Of Famed Runestone (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Oct. 1)
Its authenticity may forever be in question, but the Kensington Runestone is on its way to Sweden, where a group of scientists will study it and lend their opinion to the question of whether the rock is really a centuries-old artifact or a 200-pound hoax. Scientists working with the Runestone Museum in Alexandria, Minn., are traveling with the stone, and say they have new geologic findings that suggest it was buried far longer than anyone was settled in western Minnesota. The stone was purportedly found in 1898 by a Minnesota farmer near Kensington, under a tree he uprooted to prepare his fields for plowing. It's thought by some to carry an inscription from Norse explorers in the 14th century. If it's authentic, experts say it would be one of the most important artifacts discovered in North America. Scientists working with the Alexandria museum say that for the past three years, they've conducted the first geological studies on the stone itself, and weathering shows it's been buried at least 200 years. That's still several hundred years short of the 14th century, but they say it proves that the stone wasn't created by the farmer who found it, which was long suspected. Scott Wolter, a Chanhassen geologist who owns a material forensic business, led the study. Researchers used scanning electron microscope equipment at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to help them date the rocks.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/468/4130787.html

UI Quill And Scroll Society Award Student Papers (Buffalo News, Oct. 1)
The student newspapers at Brocton and Fredonia high schools were the only publications in New York State selected as winners of a George H. Gallup Award for the 2002-03 school year. This is the top award presented by THE QUILL AND SCROLL INTERNATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY FOR HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. To receive the Gallup, a publication must achieve a point total above 925 (of 1,000 possible points) and earn a superior achievement rating in each of five categories (coverage, policy guidelines, business practices, writing and editing, and display and design). The News is based in Buffalo, N.Y.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20031001/1004425.asp

UI Among Schools With Campus Romance Restrictions (New York Times, Oct. 1)
The University of California is beginning the academic year under a new policy that bans professors from engaging in "romantic or sexual" relationships with students. Schools that have adopted such policies include Duke, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Stanford, Yale, the University of Virginia and Ohio Wesleyan. The strictest policy, put in place at William and Mary College two years ago, forbids consensual relationships between all faculty members and undergraduate students. A version of the story also ran Oct. 1 on the website of the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER in North Carolina
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/10/01/nyregion/01ROMA.html?ex=1065672000&en=0463c695a19c6e8a&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Former Poet Laureate Dove Attended UI (Akron Beacon Journal, Oct. 1)
A brief bio on Rita Dove, the first black U.S. poet laureate, says she was born in Akron in 1952, graduated from Buchtel High School and received an undergraduate degree from Miami University of Ohio and a master of fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. In 1987, she won a Pulitzer Prize in poetry for her book Thomas and Beulah. The Beacon Journal is based in Ohio.
http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/6903796.htm

UI To Share In Grant Award (Omaha World-Herald, Oct. 1)
The University of Kansas has won a five-year, $17 million federal grant to fund an engineering center for research on environmentally friendly ways to speed chemical reactions, the school announced Monday. Additional funding sources and donated facilities are expected to bring the total financial package to $30 million. The $17 million grant from the National Science Foundation is KU's largest single federal research award ever. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Washington University in St. Louis will serve as core partners in the Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=872140

Soap Opera Star Attended UI (Atlanticville Independent, Oct. 1)
A story about Gloria Monty, one of the former stars of the soap opera "General Hospital," says the actress left her Allenhurst, N.J. home at 18 years of age to study drama and speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, New York University and later Columbia University. She landed a job as a teacher of speech and drama at The New School in New York, where she trained cinema giants like Marlon Brando, Demi Moore and Tony Curtis - before they became famous. The Independent is based in New Jersey.
http://independent.gmnews.com/news/2003/1001/Front_Page/054.html

UI Nurse Chats With Edwards (The Progressive, Oct. 2003)
Senator John Edwards of North Carolina, the Democratic fund-raising dynamo, is scrambling to catch up with his rivals for the Presidential nomination after spending the first few months of his campaign focused entirely on accumulating the most cash. With polls showing him near the back of the pack in Iowa and New Hampshire, Edwards is suddenly meeting with as many voters as possible. On the Real Solutions Express -- a red, white, and blue campaign bus with "John Edwards, President" emblazoned on the side -- Edwards worked small crowds in Iowa. At a Perkins restaurant in Cedar Rapids, Edwards chatted with Mary Schlichte, the president of local 199 SEIU and a nurse at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA hospital. She has been meeting all the candidates in Iowa, wearing her "I'm a Health Care Voter" T-shirt.
http://www.progressive.org/oct03/rc1003.html

UI Radiation Project Cited (Structural Engineering, October 2003)
When the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL in Iowa City decided to expand its image-guided radiation therapy facilities, the available space was sandwiched tightly between the school's football stadium and two heavily traveled streets. The proximity of the project to the existing hospital demanded a minimal amount of disturbance.

Company Puts Gold Leaf On New Dome (Milwaukee Lifestyle West, October 2003)
A story about construction of a replacement dome for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S OLD CAPITOL BUILDING, which was damaged in a November 2001 fire, says a New Berlin, Wis. Company did the gold leaf work on the new dome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The University of Iowa All rights reserved copyright 2006