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UI in the News

November, 2003

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Story Cites UI Research On Giving Bad News (Salt Lake Tribune, Nov. 30)
A story about the challenges medical residents face when telling someone that a loved one has died says that a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researcher found that students did better if they first practiced on a person pretending to be a patient. There are five scenarios: telling a patient he or she has cancer; that he or she has a sexually transmitted disease; that a loved one has died; that cancer has returned to a young patient; and discussing end-of-life hospice care with a family member. The "patients" react with anger, shock, denial or sadness. The study suggested that the more empathy the students showed, the less despondent the patient was.
http://www.sltrib.com/2003/Nov/11302003/utah/115749.asp

Rao Discovers Fructose Difficulty (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 30)
We're a nation consuming ever-greater quantities of sweets -- and we're suffering from an epidemic of gastrointestinal distress. It turns out the two could be related. SATISH RAO, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa medical school, was puzzled by patients coming in with abdominal pain, gas and diarrhea that seemed to defy explanation. Rao suspected fructose, a form of sugar that occurs naturally in fruit. Americans' consumption of fructose, mostly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, has skyrocketed. After conducting a series of tests, he concluded that most people cannot adequately digest more than about 25 grams of fructose. A can of Coke contains 16 grams, he said, and a glass of orange juice has 15 grams. The two of those consumed within a span of a couple of hours can overwhelm a person's ability to handle fructose.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/northwest/chi-0311300518nov30,1,6273094.story?coll=chi-newslocalnorthwest-hed

Squire Comments On Edwards' 'Gravitas' (New York Times, Nov. 29)
A story about Democratic presidential candidate Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina says that when he began considering a presidential campaign, his relative youth was seen as positive by strategists who thought his vigor and good looks would carry some of the same appeal that Bill Clinton had when he ran for president in 1992. But the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks may have led voters to put a premium on experience, and Edwards, a one-term senator, is dogged by questions about whether his relative inexperience in government, coupled with his boyish looks, is slowing his campaign. In political circles it is known as the gravitas issue. "I think on the margins it is causing some people to ask whether he is ready," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "Some of it is just personal appearance because he looks a lot younger than the others, and the fact that he has not been on the national scene raises enough doubt."
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/29/politics/campaigns/29EDWA.html?ex=1070686800&en=d14bc777bf415114&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Author Mossman Attended Writers' Workshop (Boston Globe, Nov. 29)
A story about newly rediscovered novelist Dow Mossman, whose only novel "The Stones of Summer" was published in 1972 and went out of print until recently, says that 30 years ago Mossman was an intense graduate student at the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, grappling with his sprawling autobiographical tale of childhood, youth, family, and the state of Iowa. After years of struggle, he finished the novel, and it was published in hard-cover by Bobbs-Merrill. Despite a positive review in The New York Times Book Review and a brief paperback life, it sank from sight, and so did Mossman's literary dreams.
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2003/11/29/his_season_in_the_sun/

Marner: Parents Have Role To Play On Campus (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 29)
Parents are playing a larger role in their students' college education, including one nonprofit activist group called College Parents of America that hopes to match the growth and lobbying success of AARP. "If our parents are well-informed about policies and where to refer their children in certain situations, they can be our partners rather than our adversaries," says BELINDA MARNER, the assistant vice president for student services at the University of Iowa. Versions of the story also ran Nov. 29 on the websites of the BOULDER DAILY CAMERA in Colorado; the PORTSMOUTH HERALD, N.H.; the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Utah; the FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, Ind.; the NEW LONDON DAY, Conn.; the PROVO DAILY HERALD, Utah; the SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL, Calif.; ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, Ga.; the DETROIT NEWS, Mich.; the TUSCALOOSA NEWS, Ala.; HUNTINGTON HERALD DISPATCH, W.Va.; the ATHENS BANNER-HERALD, Ga.; WXXA, N.Y.; HERALD NEWS in Mass.; and dozens of other publications.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=675&u_sid=931266

Bowlsby Comments On Ferentz Bonuses (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 29)
While professors have long complained about football coaches' compensation, athletic directors say year-end bonuses for key victories are now standard in coaches' contracts. Some, such as the University of Iowa's KIRK FERENTZ, get a bonus for increasing athlete graduation rates. But such bonuses are rewarding coaches for simply doing what they were hired to accomplish, said William Friday, president emeritus of the University of North Carolina system and co-chair of the Knight Foundation Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics. No history professor would expect a bonus for helping to develop a Rhodes Scholar, he added. Iowa took the academic bonus a step farther, offering Ferentz incentives if he is successful both at winning football games and at graduating his players. Some of those incentives last season boosted the coach's pay to $1.8 million, from a base of $980,000, according to Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY. Ferentz earned a $500,000 bonus last year because the school's three-year winning percentage was above .500 and the graduation rate was above 60 percent. He could earn another bonus of $350,000 this season if the team's three-year winning percentage is .620 or better and the graduation rate holds steady at 60 percent. So far this season, No. 13 Iowa has nine wins and three losses. "We wouldn't want to win big without getting kids an education, nor would we want to graduate every kid and not win any football games," Bowlsby said. "These incentives make sense to Kirk, to our school and to our athletes' parents."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=931359

Iowa 4-year University Enrollment Down (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 29)
Community college enrollment growth is breaking records as students turn away from the increasingly expensive four-year universities and turn to the less costly option for college education. About 78,281 students took at least one class at Iowa's 15 community colleges this fall, an almost 6 percent increase over last year. At the same time, enrollment at Iowa's three state universities dropped for the first time in seven years. For the second straight year, more students attended Iowa community colleges than the state universities. This fall, 70,566 students started classes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa, a decrease of 955 students from last fall and the first time enrollment has fallen since fall 1996.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=931753

Khandelwal's Book Noted (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 28)
In the north of India, Haridwar is a place of sacred geography. It is the point, notes the anthropologist MEENA KHANDELWAL, where the holy Ganges descends from the Himalayas to meet the northern plains. There, Hindus come to wash away their sins and commune with the city's many ascetics. Khandelwal's own scholarly version of pilgrimage, "Women in Ochre Robes: Gendering Hindu Renunciation" (State University of New York Press), explores an unusual minority among the abstemious and offers a lively take on how Hindu laypeople distinguish "real saints from the riffraff." Sannyasinis, women who follow the path of "sannyasa," or renunciation, have turned away from conventional roles of marriage and motherhood. Through asceticism, they seek liberation from the cycle of birth, death, and rebirth. Most have been initiated by a guru, which includes exchanging their clothing for ocher robes and performing a rite of cremation that makes them symbolically dead to their old identities. However, as the University of Iowa scholar demurs, "the people I write about here are very much alive. They struggle with, and joke about, the tensions and ironies of living in the world while trying not to be of it."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i14/14a02401.htm

Grassley: UI To Benefit From Rainforest (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 28)
Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, Wednesday touted his efforts to keep alive a proposed indoor rain forest near Coralville, saying he has won promises from House and Senate leaders that the money will be included in a spending bill. Grassley has pushed hard for the Iowa Environmental Education Project, formerly known as the Iowa Child Project. Plans include a 4.5-acre indoor tropical rain forest, a 1 million gallon aquarium, a 60,000-square-foot educational center and re-created prairie. The project has been dismissed by some as a case of a powerful lawmaker delivering pork-barrel spending to his home state. Grassley defended the measure, noting that it would be built on a former industrial location that badly needs to be cleaned up. In addition, he said, Iowa project is to be operated on a not-for-profit basis. "We also need to make very clear it's a very good adjunct to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on environmental studies, and also remember it's very much a tourist attraction," Grassley said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=930096

Former UI Hacker Arrested In Madison (Chicago Sun-Times, Nov. 27)
A University of Wisconsin-Madison student disrupted Madison police radio signals and "piggy-backed" the sounds of sex acts onto police frequencies, a federal prosecutor said Thursday. Rajib K. Mitra, a 25-year-old University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student, allegedly replaced police radio frequencies with a "steady tone that jammed the transmission over a large part of the City of Madison." In his attempt to have Mitra detained, the prosecutor said the computer whiz was mentally unstable and is a danger to other police radios. In August 1997, Mitra enrolled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and allegedly broke into that university's computer system. Authorities were forced to shut down the university computer system for six hours and change 2,500 passwords.

Hitchens Reviews UI Press-Published Memoirs (Front Page Magazine, Nov. 26)
Christopher Hitchens, a contributing editor of The Atlantic and a columnist for Vanity Fair, reviews Victor Serge's Memoirs of a Revolutionary, published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The story originally appeared in The Atlantic.
http://frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=11027

Rao Discovers Fructose Difficulty (Billings Gazette, Nov. 26)
We're a nation consuming ever-greater quantities of sweets -- and we're suffering from an epidemic of gastrointestinal distress. It turns out the two could be related. SATISH RAO, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa medical school, was puzzled by patients coming in with abdominal pain, gas and diarrhea that seemed to defy explanation. Rao suspected fructose, a form of sugar that occurs naturally in fruit. Americans' consumption of fructose, mostly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, has skyrocketed. After conducting a series of tests, he concluded that most people cannot adequately digest more than about 25 grams of fructose. A can of Coke contains 16 grams, he said, and a glass of orange juice has 15 grams. The two of those consumed within a span of a couple of hours can overwhelm a person's ability to handle fructose. A version of the article also ran Nov. 26 on the website of the CONTRA COSTA TIMES in California.
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2003/11/26/build/health/65-fructose.inc

Author Collins Attended Workshop' (Silver Bullet Comicbooks, Nov. 26)
In an interview with novelist, screenwriter and comic book writer Max Allan Collins, whose graphic novel "Road To Perdition" was turned into a movie starring Tom Hanks and Paul Newman, the interviewer mentions that Collins is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. Later in the story, the interviewer notes that in 1997 Collins donated his papers to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LIBRARIES.
http://www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com/news/106982579262069.htm

Former Nursing Professor Elected To Group (Nashville City Paper, Nov. 26)
Peter Buerhaus, senior associate dean for research at the School of Nursing in Nashville, has been elected to a group of scientists called upon for independent analysis and recommendations on issues related to human health. Buerhaus has published nearly 50 peer-reviewed articles, numerous book chapters and various papers on topics concerned with the nurse labor market and changes in the healthcare system. In 1990, Buerhaus joined the faculty of the COLLEGE OF NURSING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and developed and taught courses on public policy making and the economics of health care and nursing.
http://www.nashvillecitypaper.com/index.cfm?section_id=10&screen=news&news_id=28630

UI-Michigan State Game Shutdown Recalled (San Francisco Chronicle, Nov. 26)
On a rainy morning in March 2002, three buses of African-American protesters emptied in front of the headquarters of Charter Communications Inc., a cable-TV operator, in suburban St. Louis. Soon a limousine pulled up, and the Rev. Al Sharpton stepped out to lead the demonstrators in chants of "No Justice, No Peace." Within a few weeks, Charter met the protest organizers' main demand: that the company begin carrying the Word Network, a three-year-old cable and satellite channel whose programming consists mainly of African-American church services. Backers say playing hardball was necessary to make up for the television industry's history of discrimination and negative portrayal of blacks in programming. "We were not in the shakedown business," says Sam Riddle, one of the protest's lead organizers. "We were in the shakeup business." Riddle, 57, has been a well-known activist since 1972, when he led a civil-rights demonstration that shut down a Big 10 basketball game between Michigan State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "My history is one of confronting and then exacting concessions," he says.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2003/11/26/financial0950EST0045.DTL

Judge Opens Door To Lawsuit Over UI Leave Policy (WQAD-TV, Nov. 25)
A federal judge has opened the door for a potential class action lawsuit against the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA over its parental leave policy. An employee, David Johnson, is suing the school. He claims the policy discriminates because it excludes biological fathers from using sick leave for paid time off during the birth of a child. The university's current policy grants mothers pregnancy leave, while adoptive parents get adoption leave. Both are charged against the employee's sick leave. In his ruling, Judge Ronald Longstaff says the class of potential plaintiffs includes everyone who is or may become a biological father and who may become subject to the school's policy. He has given both sides 60 days to propose ways to notify anyone who might be included. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1539589&nav=1sW7JKBt

Berry Comments On News Trends (Investors Business Daily, Nov. 25)
Newspapers are adapting to changing readership by launching youth-targeted dailies as a way to find growth. Newspapers are being forced to make changes. They're focusing on shorter stories rather than lengthy investigative pieces. A growing number of U.S. white collar workers have web access at their desks, letting them get breaking news and other information on a regular basis. No need to wait for a newspaper. "It's a real quick society. People don't have time anymore to read through large amounts of information," said VENISE BERRY, an associate professor at the University of Iowa School of Journalism.
http://www.investors.com/editorial/general.asp?v=11/25

Infection Could Spread In Blood Supply (ABS-CBN.com, Nov. 25)
A parasitic infection common in Latin America is threatening the United States blood supply, public health experts say. They are especially concerned because there will be no test for it in donated blood until next year at the earliest. The infection, Chagas disease, is still rare in this country. The only routine screening for Chagas now is in the standard set of questions asked of donors -- whether they come from or have visited a country where Chagas is endemic and whether they ever slept in a thatched hut. But that often isn't reliable, said DR. LOUIS V. KIRCHHOFF, a professor at the University of Iowa's medical school who researches Chagas in Guadalajara, Mexico, where the chance of getting infected blood is 1 in 126. Potential donors "are kind of leery of those questions," he said, and may not answer honestly.
The article originally appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES. ABS-CBN.com is a website of a Philippine broadcasting company.
http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/NewsStory.aspx?section=SCIENCE&oid=39060

Off-Broadway Play Opens (Playbill, Nov. 24)
Lisa Peterson's Women's Project and Productions staging of "Birdy," the Naomi Wallace adaptation of the novel by William Wharton, takes wing Off-Broadway starting Nov. 22. Naomi Wallace is a playwright, poet and recipient of numerous awards and grants, including the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship, the grant popularly known as the Genius Award. According to WPP production notes, The Women's Project's former artistic director Julia Miles first met Wallace when she was a student at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Later, WPP did the first reading of one of her plays in New York City, forming a collaboration that continues. The article appeared in YAHOO NEWS at http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/playbill/20031124/en_playbill/82907

Roche Hearing Delayed (New York Times, Nov. 24)
A plea hearing was delayed Monday for the Iowa college student accused of leaving a profanity-laced death threat on the answering machine of Kobe Bryant's accuser. John Roche, 22, was charged with making a threatening telephone call across state lines, which carries a sentence of up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Authorities said he threatened to assault the 19-year-old woman in the July 27 message and repeatedly vowed to kill her. He had been expected to plead guilty Monday in U.S. District Court, but the judge in the case was out sick. No new court date was announced. Roche was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at the time of the alleged threat but withdrew and moved to his parents' home in Davenport, Iowa. The Associated Press article also appeared in the OMAHA WORLD HERALD, TOPEKA CAPITOL JOURNAL (Kan.), San Francisco Chronicle, WQAD-TV (Ill.), BEAUFORT GAZETTE, (S.C.) RAPID CITY JOURNAL (S.D.), SANTA MARIA TIMES, LODI NEWS SENTINEL and NORTH COUNTY TIMES (Calif.), ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, THE MISSOULIAN (Mont.), BISMARCK TRIBUNE (N.D), THE STATE (S.C), ALBANY TIMES-UNION (N.Y.), MIAMI HERALD, WYOMING NEWS, FT. WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL (Ind.) and several television news websites.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/sports/AP-BKN-Bryant-Case-Threat.html

Rao Discovers Fructose Difficulty (Edmonton Journal, Nov. 24)
We're a nation consuming ever-greater quantities of sweets -- and we're suffering from an epidemic of gastrointestinal distress. It turns out the two could be related. SATISH RAO, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa medical school, was puzzled by patients coming in with abdominal pain, gas and diarrhea that seemed to defy explanation. Rao suspected fructose, a form of sugar that occurs naturally in fruit. Americans' consumption of fructose, mostly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, has skyrocketed. After conducting a series of tests, he concluded that most people cannot adequately digest more than about 25 grams of fructose. A can of Coke contains 16 grams, he said, and a glass of orange juice has 15 grams. The two of those consumed within a span of a couple of hours can overwhelm a person's ability to handle fructose. The Journal serves Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
http://www.canada.com/edmonton/edmontonjournal/story.asp?id=C3993AFA-BE6F-4732-82C5-593A6B3982B0

Former UI Student To Be Sentenced (Arizona Republic, Nov. 24)
Almost a month after basketball star Kobe Bryant was charged with sexual assault, his accuser found a profanity-laced death threat on her answering machine. On Monday, the Iowa college student charged with leaving the message was scheduled to be sentenced. John Roche, 22, is accused of making a threatening telephone call across state lines, which carries a sentence of up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Roche was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at the time of the alleged threat but withdrew and moved to his parents' home in Davenport, Iowa. A friend had said Roche is a sports fanatic who had been drinking all day at a golf tournament when he allegedly made the call. This Associated Press article also appeared Nov. 24 on the web sites of the BOSTON GLOBE, NEW YORK TIMES, MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS, MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, WICHITA EAGLE, WYOMING NEWS, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO TRIBUNE, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, OCALA (Fla.) STAR BANNER, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, ROCKY MOUNT (N.C.) TELEGRAM, KOTV (Okla.), SPRINGFIELD (Ohio) NEWS SUN, WQAD (Ill.), KFOR-TV (Okla.), and dozens of other television news web sites.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/1124BryantCaseThreat24-ON.html

Rao Discovers Fructose Difficulty (Post & Courier, Nov. 24)
We're a nation consuming ever-greater quantities of sweets -- and we're suffering from an epidemic of gastrointestinal distress. It turns out the two could be related. SATISH RAO, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa medical school, was puzzled by patients coming in with abdominal pain, gas and diarrhea that seemed to defy explanation. Rao suspected fructose, a form of sugar that occurs naturally in fruit. Americans' consumption of fructose, mostly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, has skyrocketed. After conducting a series of tests, he concluded that most people cannot adequately digest more than about 25 grams of fructose. A can of Coke contains 16 grams, he said, and a glass of orange juice has 15 grams. The two of those consumed within a span of a couple of hours can overwhelm a person's ability to handle fructose. (The newspaper is based in Charleston, S.C.)
http://www.charleston.net/stories/112403/sci_24fructose.shtml

UI Student Charged In Accident (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 24)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student has been charged with vehicular homicide and causing serious injury by a motor vehicle for a September crash that killed a passenger and injured two others. James Arthur, 18, of Iowa City is accused of driving drunk and speeding when his car crashed into a tree on Sept. 28.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=926782

Polumbaum Comments On Basketball In China (New York Times Magazine, Nov. 23)
An article about a 14-year-old Chinese basketball phenom describes the growing popularity of the sport in China. Basketball arrived in China piggybacked on the moral fervor of Y.M.C.A. missionaries like Max Exner, an ex-roommate of James Naismith and a participant in the very first peach-basket scrimmage in Springfield, Mass. The novelty found fertile soil, and its roots dug in. Exner took it to Shanghai in 1908, during the last gasp of the last imperial dynasty. According to JUDY POLUMBAUM, a China expert and journalism professor at the University of Iowa, the basketball craze lent momentum to social reform and the cutting of Manchu-style braids, which could get in the way of a two-hand set shot.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/23/magazine/23CHINABB.html?ex=1070168400&en=06754789d509fc8c&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Gronbeck: Dean Plays By Own Rules (Hartford Courant, Nov. 23)
Two months before the first primary vote is cast, Howard Dean's nomination is being painted as inevitable and unstoppable. He has more money than anyone. He's leading the polls that matter. And he has an appeal that reaches across America, into the psyches of people who would never get involved in a campaign this early in the process or even at all. "The great advantage Dean has is that he has not played by anyone's rules and he still is not," said BRUCE GRONBECK, professor of public address at the University of Iowa. "It's a phenomenal advantage."
http://www.ctnow.com/news/politics/hc-stopdean1123.artnov23,1,6137668.story?coll=hc-headlines-politics

Squire: Ads 'Politicize Everything' (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 22)
After months of attacks on President Bush, the national Republican Party is ready to introduce its first TV advertising of the 2004 presidential campaign, a spot that casts Bush as a leader in the fight against terrorism and a victim of partisan sniping. The 30-second spot, set to begin airing today in Iowa, features footage of the president's State of the Union speech in January. A few hours after the RNC announced its ad campaign, the national Democratic Party said it would broadcast an anti-Bush spot all day Monday on MSNBC, which is airing the candidates' debate. The president has yet to air any campaign advertising. Strategists have said they hope to hold off as long as possible, to try to keep the president above the election tussling to the greatest extent they can. Some observers said Friday that the Republican Party ad could have the practical effect of turning President Bush into candidate Bush in the eyes of many voters. "Once you start running commercials ... it politicizes everything," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor. This article also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, BALTIMORE SUN and the CONTRA COSTA TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-ads22nov22,1,1297237.story?coll=la-headlines-nation

UI To Burn Oat Hulls (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 22)
The Environmental Protection Agency has approved a waiver of the agency's permit review for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to burn leftovers from the Quaker Oats cereal plant in Cedar Rapids. Gov. Tom Vilsack requested the waiver, which was granted. Since January, trucks have been delivering tons of oat hulls to be used as fuel at the university's power plant. The project is expected to reduce coal use by 20,000 to 30,000 tons per year and save the university more than $500,000 a year on energy.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=925257

UI Offers Falling Advice (HealthCentral.com, Nov. 22)
There may be a good reason why penguins shuffle their feet when they walk: It's one way to guard against slipping and falling on the ice. OK, we're not really sure that's the basis for the gait of those flightless denizens of the Antarctic. But taking short steps or shuffling over slippery areas is certainly one way you can protect yourself against a potentially serious fall this winter. Your wrists and arms are especially susceptible to fractures and other injuries in such falls because your natural response is to thrust out your arms to break your fall. Instead, you should try to roll into your fall with sequential contacts at your thigh, hip and shoulder, says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This article also appeared Nov. 22 on DRKOOP.COM.
http://www.healthcentral.com/news/NewsFullText.cfm?id=509482

Coleman Gave Generously To UI (MLive, Nov. 22)
University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman and her husband have kicked off what officials anticipate will be the university's largest fund-raising campaign in history with a $500,000 gift of their own. Coleman, who arrived on campus in August 2002, confirmed Friday that she and her husband, Kenneth, would give $500,000 over five years as part of the university's upcoming campaign, officially scheduled to start in May. Jerry May, U-M's vice president for development, said the gift is one of the largest ever made by a U-M president during a capital campaign. The Colemans have historically given financially to the universities with which they have been affiliated. While at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where Mary Sue Coleman served as president from 1995 to 2002, the Colemans' cumulative donations approached $375,000. (Mlive is the web site for the ANN ARBOR NEWS.)
http://www.mlive.com/news/aanews/index.ssf?/base/news-6/1069499834168940.xml

UI Awarded Letters To Pre-Title IX Women (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 21)
Women who competed for the University of Illinois before 1974 will receive Illini varsity 'I' letters in ceremonies this weekend. Illinois' women athletes were not presented with letters until that kind of denial was prohibited by Title IX legislation passed in 1974. In recent months, the trend of honoring these pioneering athletes has gained national momentum. The University of Minnesota and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA paid tribute a year ago.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0311210373nov21,1,4607947.story

Neumann Quoted On Out-Migration Of Young People (Bismarck Tribune, Nov. 21)
North Dakota and Iowa rank last in the nation in keeping young people home, Census figures show. The Hawkeye state lost 11,691 more people between the ages of 25 and 39 than it gained from 1995 to 2000, for the second-highest out-migration rate of that age group in the nation. "There is sort of an expectation that you go to college specifically so you can escape to a place with mountains or a very large city," said Tanner Beck, a 23-year-old University of Iowa computer science student. Iowa's young people move to bigger cities for jobs, training and cultural activities -- things they say Iowa lacks. People usually move back to the suburbs or rural areas when they get older, said GEORGE NEUMANN, a U of I economics professor who has studied migration in and out of Iowa.
http://www.bismarcktribune.com/articles/2003/11/21/news/state/sta04.txt

Rao Comments On Gastrointestinal Distress (Fort Wayne News-Sentinel, Nov. 21)
We're a nation consuming ever-greater quantities of sweets -- and we're suffering from an epidemic of gastrointestinal distress. It turns out the two could be related. SATISH RAO, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa medical school, was puzzled a few years ago by the many patients coming to his clinic with abdominal pain, bloating, gas and diarrhea that seemed to defy explanation. Rao suspected fructose, a form of sugar that occurs naturally in fruit. Americans' consumption of fructose, mostly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, has skyrocketed. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that between 1970 and 1997, average annual per capita consumption increased from half a pound to 62.4 pounds. The vast majority of that is contained in soft drinks, although it's also added to a variety of processed and baked foods.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/7317897.htm

Former UI Hacker Arrested In Madison (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Nov. 21)
In a high-tech cat-and-mouse game that authorities say could have had serious consequences, a University of Wisconsin-Madison student disrupted Madison police radio signals and "piggy-backed" the sounds of sex acts onto police frequencies, a federal prosecutor said Thursday. In a two-hour arraignment, Assistant U.S. Attorney Tim O'Shea said that at 7:30 p.m. Halloween night Rajib K. Mitra, a 25-year-old University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student, replaced police radio frequencies with a "steady tone that jammed the transmission over a large part of the City of Madison." In his attempt to have Mitra detained, the prosecutor said the computer whiz was mentally unstable and is a danger to other police radios. When Crocker asked the prosecutor to provide evidence of mental illness, O'Shea read from a 1998 Journal Sentinel report in which Mitra said he "just wasn't thinking" when he broke into the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's computer system.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/state/nov03/186750.asp

UI Student Compares Cost Of Studies At UI, Overseas (Chronicle, Nov. 21)
For some students, studying abroad is bound to be a money-losing proposition. Students accustomed to paying low in-state tuition at public universities, for example, usually pay much more if they enroll in their university's study-abroad program. Out-of-state students and those from private universities tend to find study-abroad program fees cheaper than or the same as what they pay in the United States. For Daniel Coapstick, the price of spending his junior year at the Albert-Ludwig University of Freiburg, in Germany, is "not much different than attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA," where he is an out-of-state student. Scholarships worth $7,000 help defray his costs.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i13/13a03501.htm

UI Space Audio Site Noted (USA Today, Nov. 19)
A listing of "hot" web sites includes a link to and description of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Space Audio site. If you have a fondness for the images of space retrieved by the Hubble and its ilk, let this offering by the University of Iowa give your ears something to enjoy as well.
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/webguide/hotsites/2003/2003-11-19-hotsites.htm

Bush Team Touts Education Law In Iowa (Education Week, Nov. 19)
U.S. Department of Education officials say that four "town hall" meetings held in Iowa in November were part of their efforts to explain the No Child Left Behind Act. But the decision to hold the sessions in Iowa on four successive nights lent political overtones to the gatherings. Observers suggested that the meetings were an attempt by the Bush administration to highlight one of its chief domestic-policy achievements in Iowa at a time when Democratic presidential contenders are barnstorming the state, with some sharply criticizing the law. The president and his administration are pointing to the No Child Left Behind law "as one of the great things they have done," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "They're concerned that the Democrats are going to turn this around on them." The administration needs to address the issue in Iowa, Squire said, because Democrats are getting attention as they vie for support in the state's crucial Democratic Party caucuses on Jan. 19. Squire said that Iowa citizens still aren't aware of the details of the law, but that they support its goal. That may change, though, he said, once people start realizing that their local school has been labeled as failing to make adequate progress under the federal law.
http://www.edweek.com/ew/ewstory.cfm?slug=12Townhall.h23&keywords=Iowa (registration required)

Solow Testifies In Price Fixing Trial (Bangor Daily News, Nov. 19)
A jury awarded Maine's 500 wild blueberry growers more than $56 million Tuesday after concluding that three Down East processors conspired to fix prices in the late 1990s. The verdict, certain to be appealed, shook processors and growers alike in a state that produces 25 percent of all blueberries, wild and cultivated, in North America. After a two-week trial, a Knox County Superior Court jury decided in favor of the growers, one of whom had initiated the lawsuit three years ago. It became a class-action lawsuit as well as an antitrust case, so the $18.68 million in damages awarded by the jury is automatically tripled -- to $56.04 million. In the four years from 1996 to 1999, growers were paid a per-pound field price of 55 cents, 43 cents, 45 cents and 50 cents, the growers' attorney said. During the trial, the growers' expert witness, JOHN SOLOW of the University of Iowa, told jurors that the growers should have been paid an additional 19 cents, 21 cents, 2 cents and 16 cents, respectively, in those years.
http://www.bangornews.com/editorialnews/article.cfm/ID/411947

Author Spencer Taught At Writers' Workshop (Poughkeepsie Journal, Nov. 18)
A feature on author Scott Spencer, whose "A Ship Made of Paper" is a National Book Award finalist, says that when two of his best-selling novels, "Endless Love" and "Waking the Dead" were adapted for the screen, Spencer became a full-time writer, with stints teaching fiction writing at Columbia University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The Journal is based in New York.
http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/today/lifeentertainment/stories/li111903s1.shtml

UI Physics Grad Says Jobs Needed In Space Industry (Florida Today, Nov. 18)
While leading space experts cited the importance of sharing the message of exploration, guests at a forum on human spaceflight Tuesday night expressed frustration that not enough people are hearing it. Kennedy Space Center Director Jim Kennedy, space expert and author Andrew Chaikin, and former astronaut and educator Norm Thagard spoke about their views and answered questions in a Community Conversation at Florida Today's Melbourne office. It followed on the heels of the newspaper's publication of a section addressing the future of human spaceflight. But Megan Ritz of Merritt Island said inspiring young people won't help if they can't find jobs in space. With a bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, "for the past two years, I've been working as a cashier in a grocery store and as an embroidery tech because there are no jobs," she said.
http://www.floridatoday.com/columbia/futurespace/spaceflightN1119SPACEFORUM.htm

UI Alumnus Heads Respironics Inc. (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Nov. 18)
Almost 30 million people in the United States are "problem sleepers," robbed of rest in varying degrees because of a potentially harmful breathing disorder caused by a blocked airway during sleep. Respironics Inc. invents products that make sleeping easier and more restful, and John L. Miclot, the company's new chief executive, says it is well-positioned to go after a rapidly growing, multimillion-dollar therapy market of people who will spend money for a good night's sleep. Miclot, who has a bachelor of business administration degree in marketing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, says Respironics still has room to grow and vows not to let himself or the 27-year-old company fall asleep at the wheel.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/business/s_165870.html

Infection Could Spread In Blood Supply (Ocala Star-Banner, Nov. 18)
A parasitic infection common in Latin America is threatening the United States blood supply, public health experts say. They are especially concerned because there will be no test for it in donated blood until next year at the earliest. The infection, Chagas disease, is still rare in this country. The only routine screening for Chagas now is in the standard set of questions asked of donors -- whether they come from or have visited a country where Chagas is endemic and whether they ever slept in a thatched hut. But that often isn't reliable, said Dr. LOUIS V. KIRCHHOFF, a professor at the University of Iowa's medical school who researches Chagas in Guadalajara, Mexico, where the chance of getting infected blood is 1 in 126. Potential donors "are kind of leery of those questions," he said, and may not answer honestly. The Star-Banner is based in Ocala, Fla. A version of the story also ran Nov. 19 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.starbanner.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20031118/ZNYT04/311180307/1017/FEATURES01

Miller Comments On Dean TV Ad (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 18)
Escalating the conflict among the Democratic presidential contenders, former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean on Monday launched a television commercial in Iowa targeting Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt for his support of the war in Iraq. ARTHUR MILLER, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said that in the almost 30 years since the Iowa caucuses became a key battleground in presidential politics, few candidates have aired television commercials that have singled out a specific opponent. "Most of the candidates in the past have tended to be critical, but have done it indirectly," Miller said. A version of the story also ran Nov. 18 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/la-na-ad18nov18233417,1,3787328.story

Miller Comments On Dean TV Ad (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 18)
Escalating the conflict among the Democratic presidential contenders, former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean on Monday launched a television commercial in Iowa targeting Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt for his support of the war in Iraq. ARTHUR MILLER, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said that in the almost 30 years since the Iowa caucuses became a key battleground in presidential politics, few candidates have aired television commercials that have singled out a specific opponent. "Most of the candidates in the past have tended to be critical, but have done it indirectly," Miller said.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-ad18nov18233417,1,5824703.story?coll=la-headlines-nation-manual(Registration required)

Lieberman Declines Debate (Hartford Courant, Nov. 18)
Joe Lieberman, who last spring proposed the series of monthly debates with his Democratic presidential rivals that is now underway, said Monday he would not appear at the next one -- a nationally televised debate in Iowa. Instead, he plans to spend that day, Nov. 24, in New Hampshire, a decision that PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa, termed a mistake. "It's a mistake anytime you're the one who's not on the stage," said Squire. "You also want to be there because that's where the action is." http://www.ctnow.com/news/nationworld/hc-joedebate1118.artnov18,1,7686368.story?coll=hc-headlines-nationworld (Registration required)

Moeller Served As Arbitrator On Delphi Case (Dayton News, Nov. 18)
One day after it reached a tentative contract with the International Union of Electronic Workers-Communications Workers of America, Delphi Corp. sued the union in federal court to overturn an arbitrator's decision that forced Delphi to rehire 500 laid-off workers at its Moraine air-conditioning compressor plant. Filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Dayton, the lawsuit asks Judge Walter H. Rice to declare arbitrator LON MOELLER's August ruling invalid and bar its enforcement. Delphi, the world's largest auto parts supplier, argues there's not enough work at the plant for the called-back workers and that it will cost the company $43.5 million this year and $50 million next year to live up to Moeller's order. Moeller, an independent arbitrator and business professor at the University of Iowa, ordered Delphi on Aug. 19 to recall the workers it laid off in January at two Moraine air-conditioning compressor plants. Delphi has since vacated a 2.2 million-square-foot plant. The Dayton News serves Dayton, Ohio.
http://www.daytondailynews.com/business/content/business/daily/1118delphi.html

Infection Could Spread In Blood Supply (New York Times, Nov. 18)
A parasitic infection common in Latin America is threatening the United States blood supply, public health experts say. They are especially concerned because there will be no test for it in donated blood until next year at the earliest. The infection, Chagas disease, is still rare in this country. The only routine screening for Chagas now is in the standard set of questions asked of donors -- whether they come from or have visited a country where Chagas is endemic and whether they ever slept in a thatched hut. But that often isn't reliable, said Dr. LOUIS V. KIRCHHOFF, a professor at the University of Iowa's medical school who researches Chagas in Guadalajara, Mexico, where the chance of getting infected blood is 1 in 126. Potential donors "are kind of leery of those questions," he said, and may not answer honestly.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/18/health/18INFE.html

Director Received Doctorate At UI (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Nov. 18)
Jean Montes, the new artistic director for the Greater Twin Cities Youth Symphonies is excited about plans at his new job. "I want to keep the kids stimulated and engaged by giving them a picture of the world," he said. "When you're having a party and you've invited people from all across the globe, you can't just serve hot dogs." In May, Montes received his doctorate under GTCYS founder William Jones at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/457/4217456.html

UI Student Helped Environmental Program (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 18)
Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack on Monday praised an environmental program credited with helping 22 Iowa companies save more than $5 million, simply by rethinking the use of water, energy and recycled materials. The Iowa Pollution Prevention Intern Program gives college students a chance to introduce new conservation tools that can help companies save money and bolster environmental track records by cutting pollution levels. Ori Sivan, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA engineering student, said he used his 12-week internship to help make General Electric Corp., in Burlington, more environmentally friendly. Company officials said they now save $25,000 a year by recycling and reselling silver shavings and phasing out the use of lead-based paint on the giant electrical switching units shipped to customers worldwide. "It shows that sustainable goals are not only desirable but attainable and right there in front of us," Sivan said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=920897

Rose Wanted To Handle JFK Autopsy (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 18)
Dr. Earl Rose believes many conspiracy theories surrounding the death of President John F. Kennedy might not have taken root if he had been able to do his job. As Dallas County's medical examiner, Rose was in the middle of a swirl of confusion, panic and grief after Kennedy was shot nearly 40 years ago. Minutes after Kennedy died, an emergency room debate began about what to do with the body. Texas officials saw the shooting as a state crime, subject to an autopsy by Rose's office. The Secret Service and first lady Jackie Kennedy disagreed, and Kennedy's body was flown to the Bethesda Naval Hospital, where the autopsy by pathologists James Humes and Thornton Boswell helped fuel the intrigue surrounding the crime. Today, Rose still believes he and his staff should have done the post-mortem exam. "We had the routine in place to do it... It was important for the chain of evidence to remain intact," said Rose, 77, from his home in Iowa City. Rose moved his wife and six children from Dallas in 1968 to Iowa City to take a position at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Medical School.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=921019

Gateway Founder Dropped Out Of UI (Billings Gazette, Nov. 18)
A story on Gateway flat-panel televisions says the company's founder, Ted Waitt, is a 40-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA dropout and son of a fourth-generation cattleman who set up Gateway in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1985. He moved the company to San Diego in 1998 and later to suburban Poway. The Gazette is based in Billings, Mont. The story also appeared on the website of the MEMPHIS COMMERCIAL APPEAL in Tennessee.
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?tl=1&display=rednews/2003/11/18/build/technology/35-gatewaygamble.inc

Blanck: School Helps Student With Latex Allergy (Good Housekeeping, Nov. 17)
It was a simple delivery of flowers and balloons, but the bouquet was turned away at the door of Oak Park and River Forest High School. The school's snub was the first reaction to a violation of a new ban on latex products -- from medical gloves to Band-Aids, swim caps, gym equipment and even birthday balloons -- to prepare for a freshman with a life-threatening latex allergy who will enroll in fall 2004. Disability experts said Oak Park is going beyond what's necessary to make "reasonable accommodations" as required by the federal Americans With Disabilities Act. Under the law, a qualified individual with a disability cannot be excluded from a program or activity that gets federal funds, but the program isn't required to make drastic changes to accommodate the individual, said Chicago-Kent College of Law professor Henry H. Perritt Jr., author of the Americans With Disabilities Act Handbook. "Here, it seems like the school, in a spirit that transcends the law, is seeking to allow a student who would otherwise be unable to attend the school," said University of Iowa law professor PETER BLANCK , director of the school's Law, Health Policy and Disability Center. Versions of the story also ran Nov. 17 on the websites of the BILOXI SUN HERALD in Mississippi and the CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania.
http://magazines.ivillage.com/goodhousekeeping/hb/news/article/0,,krt_2003_11_17_knigt_1719-0003-MED-LATEXALLERGY~TB~ew~xml,00.html

UI Nurses Honored (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 17)
The 2003 Best Practices Award in the Treatment of Behavioral Disorders Associated with Dementia from the American Psychiatric Nurses Association has been awarded to ANN FOUNTAIN, BSN; MERIDEAN MAAS, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.; and JANET SPECHT, Ph.D, R.N., F.A.A.N. The three nurses are faculty at the University of Iowa College of Nursing.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=46&u_sid=919183

From Now On, Skorton, Jones Are 'P' And 'D' (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 17)
A creative idea to make meetings between University of Iowa officials and students more fun quickly changed directions when jazzy nicknames chosen for top administrators were found to have undesirable multiple meanings. The goal was to make Thursday night meetings between students and President DAVID SKORTON and PHILLIP JONES, vice president of student services, more interesting. The administrators and student government leaders came up with the idea of a reality show format. Nicknames were chosen for Skorton, who was called Pizzle, and Jones, known as Dizzle. The names were meant to be a funny spinoff of the concept used by rapper Snoop Dogg, who creates words by adding an "izzle" ending to words. By Friday, however, university officials were grabbing for their dictionaries to confirm rumors that the nicknames had other meanings. It turns out that pizzle is a term sometimes used to refer to a bull's sex organs and that dizzle -- according to one dictionary on urban slang -- refers to an alcoholic redneck. "That's why we won't be emphasizing Pizzle and Dizzle anymore," said university spokesman STEVE PARROTT. "It'll just be P and D."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=919983

Gateway Founder Dropped Out Of UI (South Bend Tribune, Nov. 17)
A story on Gateway flat-panel televisions says the company's founder, Ted Waitt, is a 40-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA dropout and son of a fourth-generation cattleman who set up Gateway in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1985. He moved the company to San Diego in 1998 and later to suburban Poway. The Tribune is based in Indiana. Versions of the story also ran Nov. 15 on the websites of the RICHMOND TIMES DISPATCH in Virginia, the NORTH COUNTY TIMES in California,
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2003/11/17/business.20031117-sbt-MICH-B8-Yule_sales_will_test.sto

UI Surgeon Kernstine Uses Da Vinci Robot (Fayetteville Observer, Nov. 17)
KEMP KERNSTINE
's patients get a little nervous when they learn a robot will be operating on them. Kernstine, a cardiothoracic surgeon and an associate professor at the University of Iowa, is a Fayetteville native and a 1974 graduate of E.E. Smith High School. He uses the da Vinci robotic surgery system to operate on patients. This summer he became the first surgeon to remove and replace an entire cancerous esophagus using the system. He has since performed the operation 14 times. "When most people think about robots, their mind flips back to 'Star Trek,'" Kernstine said. "The concept of who is operating can be difficult for them to grasp." The Observer is based in North Carolina.
http://www.fayettevillenc.com/story.php?Template=features&Story=5995469

UI Press Publishes 'American Wifes' (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 16)
" American Wives," written by Beth Helms and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, is reviewed. "It takes a brave writer to create such relentlessly sad scenarios in her stories - and to use as heroines that boring and unappealing creature, the unhappy wife, genus Americanus," the reviewer writers.

Hunnicutt Comments On Time (Las Vegas Review-Journal, Nov. 16)
In a story about how many baby boomers are making more time for leisure, BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, says that many Americans are "time hungry." But he's not convinced most people will change their habits anytime soon. "Work is the central value of our culture, and that's especially true for boomers," Hunnicutt said. "Work has become something like a modern religion, a way we establish our identity and find meaning and purpose."

Edwards Attends Tailgate Party Before UI Game (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 16)
A story about the Democratic presidential candidates gathering in Iowa says that John Edwards of North Carolina began his day Saturday with supporters at a tailgate party at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football game. A version of the story also ran Nov. 16 on the websites of the DALLAS MORNING NEWS and the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-dems16nov16,1,7006955.story?coll=la-headlines-nation

Field: Glaciers Created High Radon Levels (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 16)
A story about one family's problems with radon in their home quotes BILL FIELD, an epidemiologist at the University of Iowa who studies radon and attributes the high levels of radon in the region's homes to glaciers that plowed through the Upper Midwest. The glaciers ground so many rocks into so many tiny pieces that the region has more total surface area of rock releasing radioactivity. http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=919074

Rynes Comments On Salary Study (The Day, Nov. 16)
Just how important is pay to workers in the overall scheme of things? According to a recent study of 959 managers by the University of Iowa, "surveys that directly ask employees how important pay is to them are likely to overestimate pay's true importance." Results of the study, which were published in the Academy of Management Executive, show that 56 percent of the managers agree that questions about salary have to be worded very carefully - especially because there is a "tendency to answer surveys in socially desirable ways." The supposition is that it's more acceptable to say money doesn't matter. The Iowa researchers also cited a study in which job applicants were asked to rank 10 important job characteristics. Pay ranked fifth for men and seventh for women. But when job seekers were asked to rate the importance of these same characteristics to "someone just like yourself" (same age, gender, education), the importance of pay jumped to first among women and men. "In other words, people seem to believe that pay is the most important motivator for everyone - except themselves," said SARA RYNES, chairwoman of the University of Iowa's department of management and organizations and lead researcher of the study. The Day is based in New London, Conn. A version of the story also ran Nov. 16 on the website of the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://www.theday.com/eng/web/newstand/re.aspx?reIDx=9E8C375D-0434-4A93-984C-30BC8CF1799C

Peters Comments On Subsidy Program (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 16)
A story about a new Minnesota business subsidy program called JOBZ -- under which the state will offer special incentives to businesses to locate in special, still-to-be-designated zones -- says the program could help the state lure jobs that might have gone elsewhere, but it could also simply shuffle employment from one part of the state to another. When New York started such districts in the mid-1990s only new businesses could qualify. "They got a firestorm of criticism," said Michael Wasylenko, associate dean of the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. In response, New York's legislature expanded the program to all businesses that boosted their payrolls. New York taxpayers are giving up nearly a quarter-billion dollars a year in tax revenue as a result. "They're really giving away the family silver in New York," said ALAN PETERS, a University of Iowa economist who has studied enterprise zones.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/4213963.html

Reese: Local Radio Programming Important (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 15)
Managers of public radio stations at Iowa's three state universities disagree with a suggestion that they could be replaced by one statewide station. Mary Ellen Becker, a regent from Oskaloosa, raised the possibility of one statewide public radio station during Wednesday's Board of Regents, State of Iowa meeting in Cedar Falls. DENNIS REESE, program director at the University of Iowa's WSUI radio station, said he believes in closely tailoring programming to a regional audience. "Part of what we do has an Iowa City feel to it," Reese said. "That (statewide concept) is not what anybody wants, at least not here."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=918335

Organic Farm To Sell Products Near UI (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Nov. 15)
A story about the Small Farm Show in Columbia, Mo., billed as the "largest annual small farm show in the United States," says one attendee, Sandhill Farm, plans to start selling its organic products in Iowa City, where the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is located.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/business/stories.nsf/Business/Small+Business/D66C33E52A8AF4D386256DE000036C5D?OpenDocument&Headline=Natural+concerns&highlight=2%2CUniversity%2Cof%2CIowa

Nowak Quoted On Toddlers, Bottles (American Baby, Nov. 15)
A story that seeks to answer the question, "When should a baby be weaned from the bottle," says prolonged bottle drinking can damage baby teeth. Mobile toddlers tend to tote their bottles around, drinking on the go, as opposed to infants, who are usually fed in a parent's arms, with the bottle being removed as soon as the feeding session is over. If the bottle contains anything other than water, what you have is an acidic solution that is washing over the teeth and decalcifying them, which can lead to cavities, says ART NOWAK, M.D., a professor in the departments of pediatric dentistry and pediatrics at the University of Iowa.
http://www.americanbaby.com/ab/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/ab/story/data/1259.xml

Iowa Democratic Party Chair Attended UI (New York Times, Nov. 15)
A story about Gordon R. Fischer, the Iowa Democratic Party chairman, says the Chicago area native has been politically active since his undergraduate years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he was a student government leader. Monica Fischer, who met her future husband when she interviewed him for THE DAILY IOWAN, is now press secretary to Gov. Tom Vilsack. He attended law school at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale and returned to Iowa in 1994 to be a clerk for a judge in Des Moines. The Fischers have been here since.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/15/national/15IOWA.html?ex=1069563600&en=2d7d64efcf338dd4&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Bloom's Play Called A Success (Argus & Dispatch, Nov. 14)
A review of the world premiere of "Shoedog," a play by UI journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM, notes that despite the unusual location in an art gallery, the play is a success, depicting the end of an era of independent shoe stores and their salesmen "with aplomb." The newspaper serves Rock Island and Moline, Ill.

Squire: Gephardt A Strong Dean Alternative (National Post, Nov. 14)
According to conventional wisdom in Washington, former Vermont governor Howard Dean has become the prohibitive favorite to win the Democratic presidential nomination and challenge George W. Bush in 2004. And yet, the more some Democratic strategists see of Dean, the more they think: Mondale, McGovern, Dukakis. Anti-Dean Democrats are now searching for an alternative. Right or wrong, that man seems to be Richard Gephardt. The 62-year-old Missouri congressman has established himself -- through a combination of sheer persistence and a focused campaign strategy -- as the candidate most likely to emerge from the polls in Iowa and New Hampshire in January with enough momentum to foil Dean. Polls show Gephardt hanging on to a narrow lead in Iowa, a state he has courted assiduously since he first sought the Democratic nomination in 1988. "He enjoys a comfort level in Iowa that probably none of the other candidates do just because he has been here so much in the past," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political scientist. "As Dean solidifies his position in the top ranks, those who are concerned about him are going to have to figure out which of the candidates they want to coalesce around to challenge him. Gephardt has a better opportunity to be the alternative to Dean here than any of the other candidates." The National Post is based in Don Mills, Ontario, Canada.
http://www.nationalpost.com/commentary/story.html?id=B995BE03-37DA-4713-A231-E57282C5DF22

Former Dallas Medical Examiner Quoted (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Nov. 14)
Dr. Earl Rose believes many conspiracy theories surrounding the death of John F. Kennedy might not have taken root if he had been able to do his job. As Dallas County's medical examiner, Rose was in the middle of a swirl of confusion, panic and grief after President Kennedy was shot. Minutes after Kennedy died at Parkland Medical Center, an emergency room debate began about what to do with the body. Rose and other Texas officials saw the shooting as a state crime, subject to an autopsy by Rose's office. The Secret Service and the first lady disagreed, and Kennedy's body was flown to the Bethesda Naval Hospital, where the autopsy by pathologists James Humes and Thornton Boswell helped fuel the intrigue surrounding the assassination. Nearly 40 years later, Rose still believes he and his staff should have done the post-mortem exam. Rose, who grew up in South Dakota and attended medical school at the University of Nebraska, moved his wife and six children from Dallas in 1968 to take a position at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MEDICAL SCHOOL. Versions of the article also ran Nov. 14 on NBC5, a TV station covering Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; WFAA in Texas;
http://www.dfw.com/mld/startelegram/news/state/7265756.htm

Article Cites Virtual Hospital (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Nov. 14)
A story about the importance of soothing pain in babies cites as a resource at the end of the article the VIRTUAL CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Versions of the article also ran Nov. 14 on the websites of WFIE-TV, Ind., and HEALTHCENTRAL.COM.
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/pain/516055.html

Edwards Attended Tailgate Party (WorldNetDaily, Nov. 14)
A story about New York senator and former First Lady Hillary Clinton's plans to attend a Democratic fundraiser in Iowa over the weekend says presidential candidate Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina was planning to join UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football fans at a tailgate party. WorldNetDaily.com is based in Grants Pass, Ore.
http://worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=35622

UI Hospitals Uses Light To Kill Germs (KETV7, Nov. 14)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS
in Iowa City is using light to help protect patients and staff from germs circulating in its ventilation system. The Board of Regents, State of Iowa approved a $282,000 project this week that involves installing ultraviolet light tubes to destroy mold, bacteria and viruses. The UV light, which acts as a germicide, also will prevent mold from growing on chilled water coils. KETV7 is based in Omaha. Neb.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/iowabureau/2638720/detail.html

Wasserman Research Shows Baboon Thinking (CBSNews.com, Nov. 14)
Baboons in laboratory experiments showed hints of abstract thinking by picking out various images on a computer screen, a surprising finding that raises new questions about evolution and what distinguishes humans from the rest of the animal kingdom. Among those who participated in the research were EDWARD WASSERMAN, University of Iowa professor of psychology.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2001/06/22/tech/main297959.shtml

Gateway Founder Dropped Out Of UI (Buffalo News, Nov. 14)
A story on Gateway flat-panel televisions says the company's founder, Ted Waitt, is a 40-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA dropout and son of a fourth-generation cattleman who set up Gateway in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1985. He moved the company to San Diego in 1998 and later to suburban Poway. This story also appeared in the MARYVILLE (Tenn.) DAILY TIMES, the WILINGTON (Del.) NEWS JOURNAL,
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20031114/1051591.asp

Schoen Comments On Privacy Rules (Baltimore Sun, Nov. 13)
A new federal patient privacy rule, which went into effect this year after Congress established it as part of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, was designed to keep patient records from falling into the wrong hands, including those of employers who might use them to discriminate. But researchers and historians are discovering that the rule applies not only to the medical records of the living, but to memos, notes and photos that concern the long dead. As a result, some worry that the privacy rule might restrict the telling of history. Some historians worry that smaller archives will either be so confused or overwhelmed by the law's requirements that they will simply close records, letting important episodes in the nation's past go untold. "There are stories in there that no one will ever hear about," said JOHANNA SCHOEN, a University of Iowa historian who used archives to document North Carolina's forced sterilization of people considered mentally ill, feeble-minded or epileptic. "The protection of that kind of privacy always carries with it a great price in terms of the kind of knowledge [suppressed]. I find it heartbreaking that this is what happens."
http://www.sunspot.net/news/bal-te.archives13nov13,0,7472257.story?coll=bal-home-headlines

Regents Approve Tuition Hike (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 13)
The State Board of Regents approved an 8.3 percent tuition increase Wednesday for resident undergraduate students attending all three public universities next fall. The regents voted to raise the cost for resident undergraduates at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State and Northern Iowa by $360, or about $1 a day, board officials said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=915895

UI Student Awaits Transplant (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 13)
A fund-raising dinner and raffle will be held Friday for 18-year-old Council Bluffs resident Tim Reedy, who is awaiting a heart transplant. The 2003 graduate of Lewis Central High, where he played basketball and tennis, enrolled this fall at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He was stricken Sept. 20 with a heart ailment similar to what caused the death of his brother, Kevin, in 2001. Tim Reedy remains at University Hospitals in Iowa City.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1636&u_sid=916278

Gateway Founder Dropped Out Of UI (Miami Herald, Nov. 12)
A story on Gateway flat-panel televisions says the company's founder, Ted Waitt, is a 40-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA dropout and son of a fourth-generation cattleman who set up Gateway in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1985. He moved the company to San Diego in 1998 and later to suburban Poway. Versions of the story also ran Nov. 12 on the websites of the WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas; PENN LIVE and the PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW, both in Pennsylvania; the FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM and the HOUSTON CHRONICLE, both in Texas; the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, the CHICAGO DAILY HERALD and the CHICAGO SUN TIMES; the HAMPTON ROADS DAILY PRESS in Virginia; the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE and the BRADENTON HERALD, both in Florida; the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL and LORAIN MORNING JOURNAL, both in Ohio; the FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL in Indiana; the SAN MATEO COUNTY TIMES, the NORTH COUNTY TIMES, the MARIN INDEPENDENT-JOURNAL, the OAKLAND TRIBUNE, the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS and the CONTRA COSTA TIMES, all in California; THE HERALD NEWS in Massachusetts; the BILOXI SUN HERALD in Mississippi; the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE; the TIMES DAILY in Alabama; SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER in Washington; the NASHUA TELEGRAPH in New Hampshire, the KANSAS CITY STAR in Missouri, the DETROIT NEWS in Michigan, the TORONTO SUN and the WINNIPEG SUN, both in Canada; the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD and many other media outlets.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/7243376.htm

Dean Blasts Bush In UI Speech (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 12)
Howard Dean accused President Bush on Tuesday of trading campaign contributions from "corporate cronies" for lucrative contracts to rebuild Iraq and contended his Democratic rivals for the presidential nomination allowed it to happen. In a major foreign policy address to the Iowa City Council on Foreign Relations, the former Vermont governor also vowed he would name former President Bill Clinton as his envoy to the Middle East if he is elected. Further, he contended the Bush administration's failure to have a domestic-based renewable energy policy and the nation's over-reliance on foreign oil have helped funnel U.S. dollars to terrorists. Dean's speech to about 300 people at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA came a day before he was expected to receive the endorsements of two key unions, the Service Employees International Union and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0311120138nov12,1,3625132.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed(Registration required)

Teen In UI Program Develops Software (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 12)
At age 18, Forrest Rogers-Marcovitz has developed a software program that may further the study of heart disease. Rogers-Marcovitz was one of 18 high school students from across the nation selected to participate last summer in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SECONDARY STUDENT TRAINING PROGRAM. The program paired students with university faculty mentors who oversaw their attempts to complete particular assignments. Forrest Rogers-Marcovitz was one of 18 high school students from across the nation selected to participate last summer in a University of Iowa training program. The teen developed computer software to help doctors better calculate the volume of blood pumped through the heart. Rogers-Marcovitz's mentor was Dr. EDWIN DOVE, an associate professor of biomedical engineering. The teen's assignment was to develop a computer method to help doctors better calculate the volume of blood pumped through the heart.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=914781

Magazine Cites Magazine That Cites Clark UI Visit (New Republic, Nov. 11)
The magazine deconstructs an article about retired Gen. Wesley Clark's bid for the Democratic presidential nomination that appeared recently in The New Yorker. It cites a passage from The New Yorker article that mentions Clark's speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Sept. 19, when he declared that chief among America's mistakes was that it had gone to war in Iraq without "the mantle of authority" bestowed by United Nations approval.
http://www.tnr.com/doc.mhtml?i=fisking&s=sullivan111103

Clark Speech At UI Cited (The New Yorker, Nov. 11)
A story about Democratic presidential candidate Wesley Clark makes reference to Clark's speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Sept. 19, when he declared that chief among America's mistakes was that it had gone to war in Iraq without "the mantle of authority" bestowed by United Nations approval.
http://www.newyorker.com/fact/content/?031117fa_fact

Hinged Goal Posts Developed At UI (Pittsburg News Tribune, Nov. 11)
West Virginia University is taking additional security measures to keep fans from joining the Backyard Brawl against Big East rival Pitt. The university will install hinged goal posts at Mountaineer Field, restrict fans from leaving and re-entering the stadium during Saturday night's game and keep them off the field afterward, WVU president David Hardesty said Monday. The hinged goal posts were developed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and are being used at Virginia Tech and Missouri. This story also appeared in the BECKLEY REGISTER-HERALD, CHARLESTON GAZETTE, and CHARLESTON SUNDAY GAZETTE MAIL in West Virginia, and NEWSDAY in New York.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/sports/s_164592.html

Peters: Public Subsidizes Private Ventures (Denver Post, Nov. 11)
A story about the risk inherent in gambling public money on corporate ventures said there is no official data on how much is distributed in subsidies across the country. ALAN PETERS, a professor of urban planning at the University of Iowa, and one or two other academics have tried to estimate the total loss of city and state tax revenue through abatements, lower income taxes, outright payments, training grants, wage subsidies and the like. Their estimates start at $30 billion a year and range up to $50 billion, with Peters putting the number somewhere in the $40 billions, based on a recent survey of tax expenditures. "It seems like almost every state is giving away grandmother, grandfather, the family jewels, you name it, everything," Peters said. The anecdotal evidence of the escalating bidding war is greater than the statistical, he said. The article also appeared in the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE and the TUSCALOOSA NEWS in Alabama.
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~26385~1758111,00.html

UI Mentioned In Story On Rainforest Project (Houston Chronicle, Nov. 11)
The latest hang-up in the oft-delayed energy bill is subsidized financing for a $220 million environmental learning center to be built in Coralville, Iowa, near Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

Writers' Workshop Graduate To Speak (Superior Daily Telegram, Nov. 10)
Anthony Bukoski, award-winning writer and professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Superior, will discuss his latest book, "Time Between Trains," at 7 p.m. on Thursday, at the Duluth Public Library. He earned a master's degree in English from Brown University, a master of fine arts degree in creative writing from the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and a doctorate degree in English from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Daily Telegram serves Superior, Wis.
http://www.superior-wi.com/placed/index.php?sect_rank=2&story_id=156868

UI Student Puts Laptop To The Test (BusinessWeek, Nov. 10)
People can go nuts over notebook computers, assigning them tasks that few thought possible a few years ago. Tony Phan, an undergraduate at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and online editor for THE DAILY IOWAN, is that kind of person. In August, he purchased a sub-notebook -- a 3.1 pound Sony VAIO TR1. Despite the laptop's small size and slightly scrunched 10.6-inch screen, Phan now does all his computing work on it, including programming tasks for the school paper and heavy-duty graphic design work. When Phan needs a change of scenery, he tucks the laptop under his arm and trudges to the library or coffee shop to continue to work sans wires. As he puts it: "Who wants to be chained to a desk?"
http://www.businessweek.com/@@7WjNxYYQTd4@BBQA/magazine/content/03_45/b3857617.htm (registration required)

UI Art Museum Piece By Davis Accompanies Article (New York Times, Nov. 10)
From the 1870's to World War I, American painters trekked to France
to study. And their belief that France was the world capital of art was reinforced when American collectors began snapping up Impressionist and post-Impressionist works. But after 1918 the relationship began to change. While Paris was now the cradle of Modern art, resistance to copying Europe was growing among American artists. There were still many Americans eager to travel to Paris to discover life after figurative art, and these explorers are the focus of an unusual exhibition at the Musée d'Art Américain Giverny, the elegant small museum owned by the Terra Foundation for the Arts, of Chicago, near Monet's Normandy home. The show, "A Trans-Atlantic Avant-Garde: American Artists in Paris 1918-1939," is here through Nov. 30 and will then travel to the Tacoma Museum of Art in Washington (Dec. 18 to March 28) and to the Terra Museum of American Art, Chicago (April 17 to June 27). The exhibition is in four sections, with the first, "The Purity of the Object," dominated by the spirit of Léger's post-Cubism. In it, Stuart Davis and Charles Demuth interpret Paris scenes in a Cubist manner. Accompanying the article is a photo of Stuart Davis's "New York-Paris No. 1," from "A Trans-Atlantic Avant-Garde: American Artists in Paris 1918-1939." The image is credited to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/10/arts/design/10GIVE.html

Redlawsk: Technology Key To Campaigning (Orlando Sentinel, Nov. 10)
The Internet was so new in 1995, DAVID REDLAWSK was the only candidate in a New Jersey city-council race who had a web site. The site attracted only a few hits, but it was such a novelty, two newspapers featured him on the front page. "The buzz was enough to help me get elected," said Redlawsk, now an assistant professor of political science at the University of Iowa. No longer. These days nearly every candidate, from those campaigning for school boards to the pack vying for the White House, has a web site. More than likely, their arsenal also includes -- or will soon -- cell phones, handheld computers and other wireless devices, all aimed at helping candidates raise money, organize neighborhood canvassing and get out the vote on election day. And the future promises even more high-tech tactics. Handheld computers have already been employed in Iowa to gather precise information at the neighborhood level. Two years ago, volunteers canvassed precincts all over the state, knocking on doors and using PDAs to record household-by-household data on strength of support for Democratic candidates and involvement in politics, Redlawsk said. The data was sent to state party headquarters and compiled into a database that was used in get-out-the-vote efforts. "Iowa is one of the few states where Democrats held their own in 2002, and the party felt technology really helped," he said. Supporting that claim, seven of the nine Democratic presidential hopefuls have each paid $65,000 for access to the voter database, with details on key issues of interest and caucus attendance, Redlawsk said.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/nationworld/orl-asec-poltech111003,0,5545488.story

Doctor: What's Difference Between UI, ISU? (Richmond Times-Dispatch, Nov. 10)
Virginia Commonwealth University's (VCU) medical school, familiar to Richmond, Va., residents as the Medical College of Virginia (MCV), is often confused with the University of Virginia Medical Center. In one USA Today story, the VCU doctors were said to be affiliated with "Virginia Medical College, the teaching arm of the University of Virginia." U.Va. is about 70 miles west in Charlottesville. And in The New York Times, the VCU was referred to as the "Medical College of Virginia Commonwealth University." To cut down on the confusion, the university has been switching to a new name for its health-care entities: the VCU Medical Center. "MCV was a better known name than VCU," argues Dr. Francis H. McMullan, a 1951 Medical College of Virginia graduate and a VCU dermatology and dermapathology clinician for 48 years. He adds that the name confusion is not unique to VCU. "I would not know the difference between Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This is a common phenomenon."
http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD%2FMGArticle%2FRTD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031772009206&path=!news&s=1045855934842

Jones: Voting Machine Technology Unproven (Newark Star Ledger, Nov. 10)
As New Jersey and other states prepare to buy thousands of computerized voting machines for next year's presidential election, experts say most of the machines are certified to technical standards set almost 14 years ago. Maryland recently opted to pay $56 million for electronic voting machines from Diebold Inc., despite security concerns. New Jersey and Connecticut are among states pondering similar purchases. "The government is dispensing money for new machines before resolving standards issues," said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer scientist from the University of Iowa. The Ledger is based in Newark, N.J.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-11/1068444786272720.xml

Peters: Public Subsidizes Private Ventures (New York Times, Nov. 10)
A story about the risk inherent in gambling public money on corporate ventures said there is no official data on how much is distributed in subsidies across the country. ALAN PETERS, a professor of urban planning at the University of Iowa, and one or two other academics have tried to estimate the total loss of city and state tax revenue through abatements, lower income taxes, outright payments, training grants, wage subsidies and the like. Their estimates start at $30 billion a year and range up to $50 billion, with Peters putting the number somewhere in the $40 billions, based on a recent survey of tax expenditures. "It seems like almost every state is giving away grandmother, grandfather, the family jewels, you name it, everything," Peters said. The anecdotal evidence of the escalating bidding war is greater than the statistical, he said. A version of the story also ran Nov. 10 on the website of YAHOO! NEWS, the LAKELAND LEDGER in Florida,
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/10/business/10STAT.html

Bloom's Play Hits Quad Cities (The Dispatch, Nov. 9)
University of Iowa professor STEPHEN BLOOM made a huge splash with the critically acclaimed best seller "Postville," about the interaction between a Hasidic Jewish group and the rest of the population of the small Iowa town where they made their home. This week marks the debut of another project with a keen eye for the way people interact and the small things in life that make a big difference. His play "Shoedog" will be performed at Quad City Arts in Rock Island. (The newspaper is based in Moline, Ill.)

Squire: Iowans Like Caucus Attention (Austin American-Statesman, Nov. 9)
With crops harvested and an early winter closing in, caucus season is hard upon Iowa. The precinct political gatherings and the campaigns leading to them have become as much a part of state culture as "The Bridges of Madison County," "The Music Man" and "Field of Dreams." The political power is a matter of some state pride. "Like most states with relatively small populations, it is easy for Iowa to get ignored on the national scene," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "Thus I suspect most Iowans enjoy the attention the caucuses generate, even those who do not participate in them. And while I do not think Iowans have developed a sense of entitlement in regard to the importance that has come to be attached to the caucuses, they are a bit defensive about challenges to their prominent role in the process."
http://www.statesman.com/news/content/shared/news/politics/04caucus1106.html

Squire Comments On Pataki's Chances In 2008 (Albany Times-Union, Nov. 9)
For a story about possible candidates for the 2008 presidential race, a reporter informally polled people at a mall in Des Moines, asking if they could name the governor of New York (it's George Pataki, by the way). When shown photographs of New York politicians -- Pataki, former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, former Democratic Gov. Mario Cuomo, state GOP Chairman Alexander "Sandy" Treadwell and state Senate Majority Leader Joseph Bruno -- Giuliani was recognized every time, though a couple of people couldn't remember his name. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, offered hope to Pataki, saying the fact that Iowans don't know his name is no big deal with the 2008 election so far away. "He doesn't need to be known by many Iowans at this point," Squire said. "He needs to raise his profile among Republican activists. If at some point in the future he seriously looks at a presidential run, having those connections in place will be useful."
http://www.timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=187803&category=CAPITOL&BCCode=&newsdate=11/9/2003

Squire: Pataki Visit May Plant Seeds (Albany Times-Union, Nov. 9)
As host of the first statewide contest on the road to the Oval Office, Iowa has become synonymous with presidential campaigns. So, it's no wonder that when the governor of a prominent state such as New York comes to town for the first time, the speculation machine cranks into high gear. Gov. George Pataki's visit here on Friday to deliver the keynote speech at the Iowa Republican Party's annual Ronald Reagan dinner led some observers to wonder whether he's testing the waters for a 2008 presidential run. "The question is always raised when out-of-state politicians come in, particularly to headline major party events," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor. "It provides the setting for people to suggest you're laying the foundation for a potential presidential candidacy down the road. You might not actually be doing it, but the mere fact that you're here plants the seed."
http://www.timesunion.com/aspstories/story.asp?storyID=187812

Jones: Voting Machine Technology Below Par (New York Times, Nov. 9)
A story about the growing push to use electronic voting booths for elections says there is a growing chorus of criticism about the reliability and safety of paperless voting systems. "There's a feeling in the computer scientist community of utter dismay about the state of voting-machine technology," said DOUGLAS W. JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa and a member of Iowa's board of examiners for voting machines.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/09/business/yourmoney/09vote.html

UI Press Poetry Anthology Cited (Dallas Morning News, Nov. 9)
In a column a professor discusses poetry inspired by illness and suffering. He writes: "Dr. Jon Mukand's skills as anthologist par excellence are in abundant display in 'Articulations: The Body and Illness in Poetry' (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS). This is the strongest collection I've discovered, with poems by some of the best poets of the last half century."

Student Quoted On Gephardt Campaign (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 9)
A story speculating on what it will take for Richard Gephardt to win the Democratic presidential nomination -- namely, backing by labor and residents throughout the Midwest -- says that conventional wisdom in Iowa holds that the January caucuses will be won by whomever brings in the most new voters. Right now that seems to favor former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean. But Gephardt's campaign is hoping to play the tortoise in the race. That hope rests on college students such as UNIVERSITY OF IOWA junior Katie Finn, who has been to four Dean rallies but remains unconvinced. "A lot of my friends are Dean supporters," said Finn, 20. "But when you ask them what it is they like about him, they can't tell you."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/352/4200485.html

Kress Comments On Helder Case (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 8)
Eighteen months after Luke Helder was accused of planting pipe bombs in rural mailboxes to create a smiley face across the Midwest, legal experts have told The Associated Press it's possible he might never be ready for trial. Helder, 22, a former University of Wisconsin-Stout student, was sent in May to a federal prison hospital in Rochester, Minn., where he has been undergoing psychiatric treatment. KEN KRESS, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, said federal law gives doctors about two years to find the right mix of treatment or drugs to get Helder ready for trial. Anything longer stretches the limits of the "reasonable period" for hospitalizing a defendant, and forces a new strategy for federal prosecutors, Kress said. A version of the story also ran Nov. 8 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/568/4200399.html

ISU Athletic Director: Skorton Values Athletics (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 8)
Iowa State Athletic Director Bruce Van De Velde told members of the university's Athletic Council on Friday he would spare sports programs this year as part of his plan to cut $560,000 from the current budget, but things may change next year. The cuts may be more severe next year as Van De Velde said the department will cut teams' operating budgets. Other considerations include deeper cuts to non-sport units and an analysis of non-revenue teams. Of ISU's 18 sports, only football and men's basketball are profitable. Van De Velde said this year he will cut other units in his department such as marketing, buildings and grounds, academic services and media relations, and he will freeze current staff searches and stop construction projects. ISU President Greg Geoffroy ordered the department to make the cuts as part of his plan to cut the entire university's budget by $8.3 million. The cut was a result of revenue shortages and Gov. Tom Vilsack's October order that all state agencies trim their budgets by 2.5 percent. Van De Velde insinuated that administrative support for athletics is higher at the University of Iowa because UI President DAVID SKORTON ordered a smaller cut -- $170,000 -- to the school's athletic department. "They value athletics," Van De Velde said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=911385

Merrill To Speak At Playwright Festival (Portland Press-Herald, Nov. 8)
The Portland Stage Company will host a festival of international plays on Monday. The problem is, none of the playwrights could get clearance to travel in the United States to attend. Hoping to turn a regrettable situation into something positive, the theater company will use the festival as a forum to discuss curbs on basic freedoms in times of national crisis, as well as the role of art in the formation of national and cultural identity. Phyllis O'Neil, executive director of the Center for Cultural Exchange, will be a panelist at Monday's discussion, as will CHRIS MERRILL, director of the Iowa Writing Program. The title of Monday's program is "From Away: Plays without Playwrights." Now in its seventh year, the festival is produced in collaboration with the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which assembles writers from around the world. Typically, these writers come to Portland to participate in "From Away." The Press-Herald is based in Maine.
http://www.pressherald.com/news/local/031108politics.shtml

Blanck: School Helps Student With Latex Allergy (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 8)
It was a simple delivery of flowers and balloons, but the bouquet was turned away at the door of Oak Park and River Forest High School. The school's snub was the first reaction to a violation of a new ban on latex products -- from medical gloves to Band-Aids, swim caps, gym equipment and even birthday balloons -- to prepare for a freshman with a life-threatening latex allergy who will enroll in fall 2004. Disability experts said Oak Park is going beyond what's necessary to make "reasonable accommodations" as required by the federal Americans With Disabilities Act. Under the law, a qualified individual with a disability cannot be excluded from a program or activity that gets federal funds, but the program isn't required to make drastic changes to accommodate the individual, said Chicago-Kent College of Law professor Henry H. Perritt Jr., author of the Americans With Disabilities Act Handbook. "Here, it seems like the school, in a spirit that transcends the law, is seeking to allow a student who would otherwise be unable to attend the school," said University of Iowa law professor PETER BLANCK, director of the school's Law, Health Policy and Disability Center.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0311080049nov08,1,2661589.story

UI Graduate Rates Cited (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 7)
All three of Iowa's public universities continue to graduate and keep students in school at rates above the national average, according to a new report. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and University of Northern Iowa graduated more than 64 percent of full-time freshmen within six years, compared to 59 percent among all NCAA Division I schools, according to the report prepared for the State Board of Regents. All three campuses also top the national average in keeping students once they enroll. More than 80 percent of full-time freshmen returned for their second year, compared to the national average of 72 percent. The University of Iowa had the highest rate of students who graduated in four years. The report found that 37.7 percent who enrolled in 1999 graduated this year, compared to 31.4 percent at Iowa State and 33.5 percent at Northern Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=910261

UI Unveils Budget Cut Plans (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 7)
Iowa's three public universities will cut teachers and staff, cut budgets for athletics and libraries and defer maintenance another year to meet state ordered budget cuts. The blueprint for how campus administrators will meet the 2.5 percent cuts -- about $15.5 million -- ordered last month by Gov. Tom Vilsack was released by the office of the State Board of Regents Thursday. In addition, administrators at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and University of Northern Iowa announced an additional $3.3 million in cuts, largely to offset declines in tuition revenue because of lower enrollment, according to the proposal. The UI will cut $9.9 million from its budget. UI President DAVID SKORTON has outlined a plan to make ends meet in Iowa City by projecting a loss of 90 jobs, including 38 faculty spots that will be reached through retirement or by leaving positions vacant. Individual colleges on campus have been asked to cancel new faculty searches. The UI Athletic Department will lose about $170,000, about 15 summer courses may be canceled and the hospital's indigent care program will be cut by $700,000, according to the plan.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=910352

UI Press Publishes Book On Quilts (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 7)
In "Patchwork: Iowa Quilts and Quilters," Jacqueline Schmeal celebrates the lives of Iowa quilters and the enduring beauty of Iowa quilts. Drawing on written records by and interviews with living quilters, many of them in their 80s and 90s, Schmeal tells the artists' stories of impoverished childhoods, hardscrabble work and strong families. More than 70 color photos chronicle quilts that date from the early 1800s to the 1950s. Schmeal, who has homes in Story County, Iowa, and Santa Fe, N.M., is a founder and president of the Iowa Barn Foundation. The book, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS is available at bookstores or from the publisher.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=57&u_sid=909854

Union Endorsement Unlikely To Help Dean In Iowa (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 7)
Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean's expected endorsement by the Service Employees International Union is not expected to have much impact in the Iowa caucus. The SEIU has only about 1,200 members in the state, most of them nurses at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS in Iowa City. The same story appeared in the BILOXI (MS) SUN HERALD,
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0311070200nov07,1,2379946.story

Redlawsk: Prescription Drugs Are Hot-Button Issue (Good Housekeeping, Nov. 7)
Tapping into a deep well of anger and anxiety over prescription drug prices, especially among seniors, candidates in the Democratic presidential primary are taking shots at big drug companies and extolling the idea of importing lower-cost medicine from Canada. Questions about prescription drug prices invariably come up as the candidates stump at senior centers in the early primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire. The issue is on the minds of voters in Michigan, a border state with early caucuses where seniors travel to Canada by the busload to buy drugs. In Iowa, where two-thirds of the caucus goers are expected to be over 50, Democrats are contrasting U.S. and Canadian drug prices in an attempt to vanquish Republicans and industry in the debate over a Medicare prescription benefit. "The focus is very specific to prescription drug costs, which are known to be a hot-button issue with seniors," said DAVID REDLAWSK, assistant professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "The fact that they can beat up on big drug companies at the same time is seen as an added benefit."
http://magazines.ivillage.com/goodhousekeeping/hb/news/article/0,,nytsyn_2003_11_07_medic_5576-0005-pat_nytimes~ew~xml,00.html

Columnist Proposed To Wife At UI Library (Vineland Daily Journal, Nov. 7)
A columnist remembers when he proposed to his wife on the steps of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Library. The Daily Journal is in New Jersey.
http://www.thedailyjournal.com/news/stories/20031107/localnews/595695.html

UI Alumnus Plays Fight Song On Phone (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 7)
If hearing the college fight song after every touchdown annoys you, imagine hearing it every time a cellphone rings. That's now possible, thanks to web sites like Schoolfightsongs.com and Zingy.com, which offer proud alumni and school-spirited students the opportunity to download their favorite college songs for use as ringtones, as the tuneful interruptions are called. Charlie Card, who sells more than 400 songs for $5 a pop at Schoolfight-songs.com, says he got the idea for the site after programming the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's fight song into his cellphone to show his support for his alma mater and for his daughter, a member of the Hawkeye marching band. He has attracted only 5,000 customers in his first year of business, but he expects the idea to take off.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i11/11a00602.htm

Redlawsk: Prescription Drugs Are A Hot-Button Issue (Boston Globe, Nov. 6)
Tapping into a deep well of anger and anxiety over prescription drug prices, especially among seniors, candidates in the Democratic presidential primary are taking shots at big drug companies and extolling the idea of importing lower-cost medicine from Canada. Questions about prescription drug prices invariably come up as the candidates stump at senior centers in the early primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire. The issue is on the minds of voters in Michigan, a border state with early caucuses where seniors travel to Canada by the busload to buy drugs. In Iowa, where two-thirds of the caucus goers are expected to be over 50, Democrats are contrasting U.S. and Canadian drug prices in an attempt to vanquish Republicans and industry in the debate over a Medicare prescription benefit. "The focus is very specific to prescription drug costs, which are known to be a hot-button issue with seniors," said DAVID REDLAWSK, assistant professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "The fact that they can beat up on big drug companies at the same time is seen as an added benefit."
http://www.boston.com/business/globe/articles/2003/11/06/democrats_embracing_drug_imports/

Judge Blocks Law From Applying To UI Doctor (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 6)
President Bush signed into law the most far-reaching abortion restrictions in three decades Wednesday, an emotionally charged measure already challenged in three federal courts. Less than an hour later, a federal judge in Nebraska called the law "highly suspect" and issued a temporary order blocking it from applying to four abortion-rights doctors, including Dr. Jill Vibhakar, who practices medicine at Emma Goldman Clinic for Women and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine Hospital in Iowa City, Iowa. The judge stopped short of prohibiting the new law from being enforced nationwide. He said his order would apply only to the four doctors who filed the lawsuit in Nebraska and their "colleagues, employees and entities ... with whom plaintiffs work, teach, supervise or refer" patients. The four are: Dr. William Knorr, medical director and co-owner of the Savannah Women's Medical Clinic in Savannah, Ga., who also is licensed in Alabama, South Carolina and New York; Dr. LeRoy Carhart, who practices in Bellevue, Neb., and also is licensed in Iowa, Indiana, Kansas, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Wisconsin; Dr. William Fitzhugh, who is licensed to practice in Virginia; and the UI's Vibhakar. The Post & Courier is based in Charleston, S.C. Versions of this Associated Press story also appeared Nov. 6 in the BIRMINGHAM (Ala.) NEWS, SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD TRIBUNE, MONTGOMERY (Ala.) INDEPENDENT, and CHARLESTON (S.C.) POST & COURIER.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=54&u_sid=908391

UI Alumnus Could Revolutionize Dentistry (Times-Picayune, Nov. 6)
An associate professor at Tulane University involved in stem cell research has received a four-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. YiPing Chen, also director of the Division of Developmental Biology in Tulane's Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, has been able to grow tooth buds in mice and believes such research could one day revolutionize the world of dentistry. Educated in China and the United States, Chen has bachelor of science and master of science degrees in biology from Fujian Normal University, and a doctorate in biology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nola.com/news/t-p/index.ssf?/base/news-1/1068103943110210.xml

UI Sues Over Old Capitol Fire (Aberdeen American News, Nov. 6)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has sued a construction company over a 2001 fire that caused over $5 million damage to the golden-domed Old Capitol, a state landmark. The newspaper is based in Raleigh, N.C. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared Nov. 5 and 6 on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, NEWS JOURNAL (Tex.), ROCKY MOUNT (N.C.) TELEGRAM, KANSAS CITY (Mo.) STAR, DAYTON DAILY NEWS, THE GUARDIAN (U.K.), TIMES-PICAYUNE (La.), CENTRE DAILY TIMES (Pa.), PENN LIVE (Pa.), NEWSDAY, WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT, RALEIGH (N.C.) NEWS & OBSERVER, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, TIMES DAILY (Ala.), FORTY WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, WILKES BARRE (Pa.) WEEKENDER, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, OREGON LIVE, BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIAN, and SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/7192189.htm

Holub Comments On Union's Role (National Public Radio, Nov. 5)
This segment examined the role of labor support in the 2004 Presidential race and why some unions might be holding back endorsements. According to DAN HOLUB, director of the University of Iowa's Labor Center, unions provide a critical get-out-the-vote effort. "They'll help people get rides if they need it. They'll remind people that January 19th is the caucus day. You need to go to your caucus. They'll provide them with information as to the location of the caucus sites," he said. Dick Gephardt's campaign will lean heavily on that labor organization in Iowa and elsewhere and has lined up the endorsements of 20 unions. Getting the nod of the AFL-CIO would not only give him a big boost in Iowa, but would give him legs in many other states, too. He needs to win two-thirds of the member unions to get the endorsement of the entire AFL-CIO, and his failure to do so thus far has led some to question Gephardt's viability. Holub says some labor leaders just aren't ready to endorse Gephardt or anyone else out of fear of backing a losing candidate and looking weak. Holub says some unions want to stay neutral and get all of the prospective nominees to address their core issues, like trade and health care.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7b79607ef8a267d8b6131e31762a1556&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVA&_md5=746d24761894d9f78959addee4cd99b9

Stuttering Suit Against UI Moves Forward (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 5)
A judge has refused to dismiss a lawsuit filed against the state by six former orphans who took part in a 1939 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA stuttering experiment. In his ruling, Johnson County District Judge Thomas Horan said the six have "claims upon which relief could be granted." Assistant Attorney General Bruce Kempkes said the state probably would appeal Horan's ruling. The decision, released Monday, followed a hearing last week in which Craig Kelinson, assistant attorney general, argued that the state could not be held liable for something that occurred in 1939. He said it was not until 1965 that state law allowed Iowans to sue the state.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=907826

Kelly: Many Conditions Factors In Growth (News-Sentinel, Nov. 5)
A story about how Americans are, on average, getting taller and bigger quotes KEVIN M. KELLY, associate research scientist at the University of Iowa College of Public Health. "Public health conditions have improved, diets have [improved], and children are maturing at younger ages," said Kelly. "Because of better nutrition and better overall health, we are able to reach more of our growth potential." The News-Sentinel is based in Fort Wayne, Ind.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/7180829.htm

UI Apologized For Stuttering Experiment (Chronicle, Nov. 5)
The dean of Wake Forest University's medical school apologized on Tuesday for the school's support of a state-sponsored program that sterilized mentally ill and mentally retarded people in the 1940s and 1950s. Wake Forest is not the only major university to apologize recently for unethical activities by long-dead researchers. In 2001, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA said a 1930s experiment in which researchers attempted to induce stuttering in orphans had been wrong.
http://chronicle.com/prm/daily/2003/11/2003110501n.htm

UI Announces Budget Cuts (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 4)
The University of Iowa will cut $9.9 million from its budget and Iowa State University will cut $8.3 million, the presidents of the two schools announced Monday. Some employees at both the UI and ISU will likely be laid off, although university officials didn't yet know how many people ultimately will be affected. Up to 90 Iowa jobs -- including 34 faculty positions -- could be eliminated, mostly through attrition and reassignment, Iowa President DAVID SKORTON said. University of Iowa athletics will be cut $170,000. "The general-fund allocation is a relatively small percentage of our overall budget," said Athletic Director ROBERT BOWLSBY. "However, we are just like other general-fund-supported areas of campus in that repeated reductions force us to re-evaluate programmatic offerings as well as to identify areas where services and personnel can be reduced."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=907089

UI Student Made Bid For City Council (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 4)
There's a surge in the political involvement of college students, who aren't just helping out with local campaigns. Now, they've become the candidates. At least five Iowa college students statewide were running for city offices in today's elections. Rachel Hardesty, 24, a senior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, said recent decisions made by the city to combat underage drinking led to her run for a council seat. Hardesty, who said the city should step up its enforcement of bar owners, lost in last month's primaries despite a campus drive that registered more than 500 students to vote.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=906827

Former UI Student Writes Book On Investing (Plano Star Courier, Nov. 3)
Thinking that men between the ages of 25 and 45 could use some sound investment advice, Neil Rinehart set out to write a book on the subject. Two years later the book, "It's all in the Game: The Sports Fan's Guide to Success in the Stock Market," is out and available at Borders Books in Plano, Texas. Rinehart, senior vice president of investments at Smith Barney in Plano and lifetime baseball fan, decided to combine the two interests and make them the subject of his book. After growing up on a farm near Mount Ayr, Iowa, he went on to study business management and finance at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=10452351&BRD=1426&PAG=461&dept_id=186027&rfi=6

Krajewski, Colleagues Explore Rainfall Prediction Techniques (WQAD, Nov. 3)
Researchers at the University of Iowa are studying rainfall monitoring systems in hopes they can develop a way to accurately predict the amount of rain from a storm. With a two-year, $300,000 grant from NASA, researchers have created a network of rain gauges over a 300-square-mile area in northern Johnson County. The data provides an accurate statistical snapshot of how much rain actually falls. One researcher, WITOLD KRAJEWSKI, says scientists can compare that information with computer models to refine their mathematical equations that help accurately predict rainfall. Weather radar can pinpoint where rain is falling, but is inaccurate when it comes to predicting how much rain is falling. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill. A version of the story also ran Nov. 4 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1509299&nav=1sW7ItKc

Freedman Comments On BU Presidency (New York Times, Nov. 3)
At an emergency meeting on Friday, Boston University trustees agreed to pay former NASA administrator Daniel Goldin $1.8 million to forfeit the presidency. Insiders say the trustees had grown increasingly uncomfortable with reports that Goldin planned to fire many of the university's top administrators. Some say that the presence on the search committee of John R. Silber, the chancellor and former president who had dominated the university for more than three decades, may have been part of the problem from the beginning. It is highly unusual for a former president to sit in on interviews for his former job, experts in higher education say. It makes it impossible for candidates to be candid, said James O. Freedman, a former president of Dartmouth and of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Freedman added, "It upsets faculty members who will believe that the former president had more persuasive authority in picking the new president than the faculty members on the search committee."
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/03/education/03BOST.html

Gurnett Records Solar Flare Sound (Space.com, Nov. 3)
Often erroneously described as empty, space is full of unexpected stuff. Like the one-sided shouting match the Sun had with its nine planets last week, a four-hour, hissing diatribe delivered to all who would listen and might need a reminder of who was boss around here. When the solar system suffered a powerful and invisible storm kicked up by the Sun Oct. 28, the Cassini spacecraft eavesdropped on the Sun's hidden message. Cassini picked up radio emissions from the outburst, waves that had made their presence known at our planet and were on their way to Saturn and beyond. University of Iowa physicist DONALD GURNETT and his colleagues scaled the radio recording down to audible sound, reducing the frequency of the data. The Oct. 28 solar storm's radio emission, recorded by Cassini, is visualized: Frequency is shown on the vertical axis and time runs along the horizontal axis. "That's an admitted distortion, Gurnett said, "but it's nothing different than what your car radio does." The scientists also compressed the four hours of noise into 15 seconds, so impatient humans could enjoy the whole cosmic utterance. It sounds like a military jet winging low and fast overhead, yet with a creepy techno hiss that smacks of some alien invasion. "It's the most intense by far we've ever seen," Gurnett said of the radio burst, whose signature was also converted into a visual form. The radio burst, he said, is an indicator of the intensity of a solar flare. He explained how the unique emission is generated.
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/mystery_monday_031103.html

Gronbeck Comments On Reagan Admiration (The Times, Nov. 3)
Fourteen years after Ronald Reagan left office, Republicans are circling the wagons round their best-loved postwar icon to fend off an ambush from Hollywood. Tens of thousands of Americans have heeded a call to arms over a television miniseries on the Reagans before it has even aired, denouncing it as a vicious attack on a dying hero and his stalwart wife. A web-based campaign calling for a boycott of the CBS network for producing the biopic drew 40,000 responses in three days last week. While Democrats blame Mr. Reagan for passing on a policy of tax cuts and deficits, Republicans remember him as the man who defeated Communism and ended two terms with the highest outgoing approval rating since that recorded on the death of Franklin Roosevelt. BRUCE GRONBECK, a professor who has lectured on presidents at the University of Iowa for decades, said: "After Reagan, you have the ineffectual George Bush and the rocky road of the Clinton years with sex and scandal. So the Reagan era becomes one of pleasantness in style and a kind of nobility. Anyone working through that period would tell you that was not actually the way things were, but we've got 20 years between then and now." The Times is based in London. This article also appeared Nov. 3 in the Ottawa Citizen.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=25435a3ba9a6c22483c26b94024b6ada&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVb&_md5=6c6c9dcf82df90570123d9f22329c22b

UI Workers Appear Outside 'Today' Studio (Providence Journal, Nov. 3)
A story about the fans who gather outside NBC studios in New York each morning to catch a glimpse of Today show personalities says crowd members clutch homemade signs, with many people wearing funny hats or outfits as if they were queuing up for "Let's Make a Deal." A group of young women, for example, was recently clad in identical shirts that say "UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE, BLOOD DONATION CENTER," with "I Bleed Black and Gold" (the school's colors) on the back
http://www.projo.com/tv/content/projo_20031103_todayshow.12048.html

UI Student Gets Dad A Film Role (The Oregonian, Nov. 3)
An article about Gus Van Sant's new movie "Elephant," which is his take on the massacre at Columbine High School, notes that Alfred Ono, who plays the school librarian got the part through a remote connection to Van Sant. A friend of Ono's daughter Sarah, who is writing her doctoral dissertation on the anthropology of Hollywood at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, put Van Sant's casting director in touch with Ono.
http://www.oregonlive.com/living/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/exclude/1067778039324940.xml

Hunnicutt Comments On Time (Long Beach Press-Telegram, Nov. 2)
In a story about how many baby boomers are making more time for leisure, BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, says that many Americans are "time hungry." But he's not convinced most people will change their habits anytime soon. "Work is the central value of our culture, and that's especially true for boomers," Hunnicutt said. "Work has become something like a modern religion, a way we establish our identity and find meaning and purpose." Versions of this story also appeared Nov. 3 in the HOUSTON CHRONICLE
http://www.presstelegram.com/Stories/0,1413,204~21478~1740099,00.html

Workshop Graduate Wins Award (Portland Press-Herald, Nov. 2)
An article about local author Lewis Robinson who won the Whiting Writers' Award, notes that he received a master of fine arts degree in creative writing from the Iowa Writers' Workshop program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.pressherald.com/audience/stories/031102lewisrobinso.shtml

UI Alumna Teaches In Kansas (Topeka Capital-Journal, Nov. 2)
Among Washburn University's new faculty members for the 2003-04 academic year is Catherine Mallett, assistant professor, music and director of music education. She received a bachelor's degree from Millikin University, Decatur, Ill., a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a doctorate from the University of Nebraska.
http://www.cjonline.com/stories/110203/bus_iybnf.shtml

Paper Recommends Book Published By UI (San Diego Union-Tribune, Nov. 2)
A list of books recommended by the editors of the paper includes "Bring Me Your Saddest Arizona," a collection of short stories written by Ryan Harty and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

Workshop Graduate: Is 'Buttocks' Plural? (The Atlantic, November 2003)
In its Word Count column, the magazine responds to a question from Stephen D. Marlowe of Phoenix. Question: "When I attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP, I took part in an intense debate about whether the word buttocks is plural. Is there such a thing as a buttock?" Answer: Yes, there is, and if you're like most of us, you have two of them.
http://www.theatlantic.com/issues/2003/11/wallraff.htm

UI Graduate Shackled By Debt (Reader's Digest, November 2003)
More and more college students are mortgaging their futures by accumulating heavy debt -- both student loans and credit card debt. With tuition increases outpacing inflation, public university students have been hit hard in recent years. For some time colleges have insisted that their steep tuition hikes are needed to pay for cutting-edge technologies, faculty and administration salaries and rising health care costs. Now there's a new culprit: shrinking state support. Caught in a severe budget crunch, many states have sharply scaled back their funding for higher education. Beth Foster graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last December with $1,500 in credit card debt and $18,000 in student loans. Wanting to work for a nonprofit, she was prepared for money to be tight. But she hadn't factored in a terrible job market. Now, to stay afloat, she's working two jobs -- as a cashier at Target and an apartment cleaner.

Black Comments On Compulsive Shopping (Money, November 2003)
A Stanford University study, while suggestive, is hardly definitive proof that compulsive shopping can be cured with a pill. DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and a pioneering researcher in the field, suggests that for most compulsive shoppers, tough love may be far more effective than pills. His advice for those in the grip? "Cut up your credit cards, get rid of your checkbook, don't shop by yourself."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=66216b3ba96f1a6c2e716da5108087b0&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVA&_md5=9bb974a4c514736cf2e945d330cedb3f

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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