The University of Iowa
University News Services
Archives Services Contact Us A-Z Search

UI in the News

March, 2003

See UI in the New Archive Index

Student Is Deployed (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, March 31)
A story about the hundreds of soldiers who make up the Iowa National Guard's 109th Medical Battalion, based in Iowa City and currently deployed to Fort McCoy in Wisconsin, says Spc. Soundeep Patel, 21, a junior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA whose parents live in West Branch, joined the 109th to get money for college, never dreaming he would find himself on an Army base waiting to go to war. He has learned plenty of soldiering skills, but he also has learned that he and his unit work well together as a team. He would entrust his life to the other men and women with whom he has trained, Patel said. "When you're in the military, it's like a family and you know that someone else has your back," he said.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/568/3793005.html

ISU Professor: Cut Duplication (Daily Nebraskan, March 31)
A story about budget cuts at Iowa State University quotes ISU genetics professor Jack Girton as saying that cutting down on duplicated programs throughout the state would help preserve the quality of programs at each four-year institution within the university system -- ISU, THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa - and might be the best option, especially because relief is not yet in sight.
http://www.dailynebraskan.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2003/03/31/3e87cc0e45920

Honey Comments On Iraq (News-Tribune, March 31)
Generals have learned bitter lessons of what happens when they let their armies march too far ahead of their supply lines in Iraq. U.S. Army Lt. Gen. William Wallace, senior ground commander of coalition forces in Iraq acknowledged this week that unexpected attacks on supply lines were slowing down the latest march on Baghdad. REX HONEY, a University of Iowa geography professor who studies the Middle East, said the U.S. forces are facing the same problem that earlier invading armies have faced with Iraq: an unhelpful desert geography that provides few resources for thirsty and hungry armies. "You have to carry your own water in this part of the world," Honey said. "Historically, this is one of the big issues for the military." Honey noted that technology and control of the air mean that modern armies don't have to rely solely on desert highways to bring supplies. But because of the sheer volume of material used, road transportation and what the Army calls logistics is still key to bringing ammunition, spare parts and food to the front lines of modern wars. The Tribune is based in Tacoma, Wash. A version of the article also ran March 28 on the website of KNOXVILLE NEWS-SENTINEL in Tennessee and the PEORIA JOURNAL STAR in Illinois.
http://www.tribnet.com/24hour/iraq/story/831961p-5862274c.html

Travel Writer Visits UI (Orange County Register, March 30)
The writer of a travel feature on the state of Iowa says he arrived in Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, by dark and was pleased to find the Prairie Lights Bookstore, one of the region's literary landmarks, still open. He bought a biography of Herbert Hoover, then checked into Iowa House, the student-run hotel on campus. The Register is based in California.
http://www2.ocregister.com/ocrweb/ocr/article.do?id=32028&year=2003&month=3&day=30

Nagle Is Quoted (South Bend Tribune, March 30)
A feature on Verdin Co., which was founded 170 years ago and repairs clocks, bells, carillons and glockenspiels, says that when fire destroyed the Old Capitol dome at the University of Iowa in November 2001, Verdin was called to replace the 137-year-old bell that tolled 20 times a day to signal the start and end of classes. The university wanted a bell cast in the same period as the one that was destroyed. Verdin had one in its inventory. "We looked all over the country for a replacement bell," said GARY NAGLE, the university's project manager. "We had 15 to 20 people offering bells of all sizes, but none fit as well as the one the Verdin Co. had. They cleaned it up and put an inscription on it for us ... and now it's hanging up in the bell tower." The Tribune is based in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2003/03/30/business.20030330-sbt-MICH-B4-19th_century_Ohio.sto

Book On West Cites Early Student (Seattle Times, March 30)
A review of the book Twenty Thousand Roads: Women, Movement, and the West, by Virginia Scharff, says that a reader who assumes that American college campuses were largely a Northeastern, male world until well into the 20th century will find herself with a new framework to consider. Scharff writes: "Like thousands of American women, Grace Raymond Hebard took advantage, for the first time, of the opportunity to attend college. (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; she graduated in 1882.) She was, moreover, lucky enough to come along at the intersection of unprecedented moments in American women's history and the history of the American West."
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=westwomen30&date=20030330&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

UI Cited In Story (Omaha World-Herald, March 29)
Iowa City is the sixth healthiest, safest and sexiest place to live in America, according to the May issue of Men's Journal. "If Iowa is a giant cornfield, then Iowa City . . . is not in Iowa," the article states. "The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, renowned for its writers' workshop and its teaching hospital, is the city's primary employer. "The result is a young, enlightened population, and the result of that is a civilized downtown with outdoor cafes, live music and pedestrian traffic."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=696770

Author Is Graduate (Poughkeepsie Journal, March 28)
A feature on former Marine sniper Anthony Swofford, author of "Jarhead," a bracing memoir of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, says he graduated from the University of California at Davis in 1999 and then was accepted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S PRESTIGIOUS WRITERS WORKSHOP, where he earned a masters degree. Swofford has been teaching English at Lewis & Clark College in Portland since last fall. The Journal is based in New York State.

Skorton Cited As Internal Candidate (Gainesville Sun, March 28)
Having one or more strong internal candidates for the University of Florida presidency could make it harder to attract top applicants from other schools, a consultant told UF's presidential search committee on Thursday. The reason internal candidates may scare others away, search consultant Jan Greenwood said, is that two recently concluded searches - one at the University of Iowa and another at the University of Minnesota - ended with insiders winning the job. In its search, Iowa promoted DAVID SKORTON, vice president for research and external relations; Minnesota tapped interim president and former provost Robert Bruininks for its top job.
http://gainesvillesun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=GS&Date=20030328&Category=LOCAL&ArtNo=203280346&Ref=AR&Profile=1007

UI Graduate Helps Seattle S&L Grow Nationally (Tacoma Tribune, March 28)
Kerry Killinger, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has turned Washington Mutual from a Seattle-area regional savings and loan with $6 billion in assets into the biggest S&L in the country, with $268 billion in assets. It's now the country's No. 2 mortgage lender behind only Wells Fargo & Co.
http://www.tribnet.com/business/story/2852186p-2888714c.html

Linder Explains Overtime Law (Jackson Clarion Ledger, March 28)
The Bush administration proposed sweeping changes to a federal overtime law Thursday that would help an estimated 1.3 million low-wage workers while taking money from higher paid employees by removing their eligibility for overtime pay. Eligibility for overtime is one of the most frequently litigated workplace issues, especially among occupations such as assistant restaurant managers, claims adjusters and funeral directors. The federal Fair Labor Standards Act covering overtime pay and exemptions for certain executive, professional and administrative occupations affects an estimated 110 million workers, 71 million of whom are paid by the hour and now eligible for overtime pay. Among that group, about 25 million to 30 million Americans have administrative jobs that fall into a gray area of the law, said MARC LINDER, a labor law professor at the University of Iowa College of Law. He cited one recent lawsuit where a claims adjuster for a moving company making a little more than $20,000 a year was classified as an exempt employee not eligible for overtime, despite a 50-hour workweek.
http://www.clarionledger.com/news/0303/28/b02.html

Writer's Workshop Graduate Profiled (San Francisco Chronicle, March 27)
Lately it seems as if the literary world is suddenly awash with a whole bunch of young writers, many of them never previously published, who are arriving on the scene with first books that read like the work of seasoned professionals. Among them is Lewis Robinson, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITER'S WORKSHOP.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/02/27/DD85189.DTL

Weston Speaks On War Rules (N.H. Public Radio, March 27)
BURNS WESTON, UI emeritus professor of law and director of the UI Center for Human Rights, is a guest on “The Exchange” talking about the rules of war. He says there’s no question that Iraq is in violation of the Geneva Convention regarding its treatment of prisoners. (Weston’s portion of the program begins at about the 27 minute mark in the hour-long program, which is available in Real Audio and Windows Media formats.)
http://www.nhpr.org/content/fullmonty_view.php/4603/

UI-Trained Doctor Wins Award (Arizona Daily Sun, March 27)
A profile of Dr. Jerry D. Mohr, who is receiving the Flagstaff Medical Center's 2003 Physician of the Year award, says he learned the technical skills of how to be a physician at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but it was two docs in his hometown of Hartley, Iowa, who taught him what it really meant to be a doctor. "I went into medicine because of two physicians back in my hometown, Hartley, Iowa. They were the two kindest, gentlest people I knew," he said. Mohr received his undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Iowa in 1975 and 1979 respectively. He completed surgical residencies at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minn., and at the University of South Carolina.
http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_includes/story.cfm?storyID=62566

Schnell Explains ‘Synthetic Vision’ (Wired News, March 27)
Nature accomplished earlier this week what Iraq's Republican Guard could not: Blinding sandstorms paralyzed the American air campaign, grounding helicopters and cutting bombing runs by as much as 85 percent in some areas. But an Air Force program in the works may enable pilots to plow through just about any foe -- even an Iraqi sandstorm. The solution is an onboard computer that digitally renders the pilots' surroundings when they can't rely on the real one to guide them. It's called "synthetic vision," and its backers are promising that the system will let pilots see in nasty weather, just like night-vision goggles let troopers roam around in the dark. "There's no doubt in my mind that there's a tremendous military benefit to this technology," said THOMAS SCHNELL, director of the University of Iowa's Operator Performance Laboratory, an experimental flight center. "As long as you could receive a GPS signal, you could fly using synthetic vision -- no matter what the weather."
http://www.wired.com/news/conflict/0,2100,58226,00.html

Musician Is UI Alumnus (Roanoke Times, March 27)
A profile of James Glazebrook, a music professor at Virginia Tech who will perform his last concert in Blacksburg as the orchestra's concertmaster on April Fools' Day, notes that he earned a master’s degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. (The newspaper is based in Virginia.)
http://www.roanoke.com/roatimes/news/story147119.html

UI ROTC Not In Uniform (Omaha World Herald, March 27)
The senior instructor for the University of Iowa Reserve Officer Training Corps says that because of heightened emotions about the war in Iraq, she is allowing students to skip wearing their uniforms for some classes to help lower their profile. "There are people out there who have some very strong feelings about what is happening in the world," Lt. Col. CAROL ST. JOHN said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=694835

Alumnus Is On Board (Austin Business Journal, March 26)
Richard Eyestone, who holds a bachelor's degree from Drake University and an MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is joining the board of directors of Austin's Tipping Point Technologies Inc. the computer security network company announced Wednesday.
http://austin.bizjournals.com/austin/stories/2003/03/24/daily32.html

Boy Treated At UI (Forest Lake Times, March 26)
A profile of a local boy, Mark Jankowski, notes that Medical specialists still can’t explain what caused a series of strokes when he was 4 years old — the most serious of which occurred the night before he was scheduled to see a specialist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL in Iowa City. That stroke, which affected his brain and brain stem, left Mark unable to sit, eat, walk or talk. He spent a month at the University of Iowa Hospital before becoming stable enough to be transferred to an inpatient rehabilitation program. (The newspaper is based in Minnesota.)
http://www.forestlaketimes.com/2003/March/26MarkK.html

UI ROTC Cited (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 26)
Officials at the University of Iowa, responding to vandalism and antiwar graffiti, decided on Monday to stop requiring cadets in the Reserve Officers Training Corps to wear their camouflage uniforms to class. Lt. Col. CAROL ST. JOHN, a professor of military science who oversees the university's ROTC program, said the move was meant to diminish the military presence on the campus. However, she said the physical safety of the 150 cadets in the program was not an issue. The two glass entrances to the ROTC building were found smashed early Friday, police officials said. Nothing was stolen from the building and no arrests have been made. No antiwar messages were left at the building, and police officers said they do not know if the incident was an act of protest. Messages like "Freedom dies when bombs fall" and "USA: rogue state" were found spray-painted on four other buildings on the campus the same morning, according to the police. Anjali Khosla, a representative of the campus group Campaign Against War, said the organization does not support the vandalism and denies any involvement in it.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2003/03/2003032602n.htm

Segura: Bush Is Unclear (Portland Press-Herald, March 26)
During a time when Americans seem to expect few casualties in a war, will their patience for the war in Iraq end as the reality of its human toll hits home? Analysts say Americans will support a war, even one with high casualties, if they believe strongly enough in the cause. The real question, they say, is whether the Bush administration has made a convincing enough case to the public that ousting Saddam Hussein is worth the cost in American lives. In the months leading up to the invasion, President Bush has linked the war with al-Qaida terrorists, weapons of mass destruction and the brutality of Saddam toward his own people. "This is one of the difficulties that the administration has had," said GARY SEGURA, an associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa, who studies the relationship between war casualties and public opinion. "It sold the war with multiple sale strategies, and so I'm not sure the vast majority of Americans would agree on what the goal is. Everyone knows that the goal is to get rid of Saddam, but the question is why?" The Press-Herald is based in Portland, Maine.
http://www.pressherald.com/news/state/030326public.shtml

Couple With UI Ties Profiled (Prague Post, March 26)
A story about Gail Ann Van Walleghen, president and CEO of the National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library since September 2002, says her husband, Dennis Naughton is an attorney who in 1993 co-founded the Wild East's first Tex-Mex restaurant, Buffalo Bill's, on Vodickova street in downtown Prague, and a Vienna branch (now defunct) two years later. The story says Naughton sold his share of Buffalo Bill's in 1997 and resumed his law practice in Dubuque. At the beginning of 2001 he moved to Iowa City, to work as associate director of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S JOHN PAPPAJOHN ENTREPRENEURIAL CENTER and Gail enrolled in a University of Iowa higher-education administration program. The Post is based in the Czech Republic.
http://www.praguepost.com/P03/2003/Art/0326/pprofile.php

Alumnus Runs For Council (Stevens Point Journal, March 26)
Candidates in the contested District 3 and District 9 races for Stevens Point (Wis.) Common Council recently responded to a questionnaire from the Stevens Point Area League of Women Voters. Among the District 9 candidates is Troy Brophy, who tells the paper he graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a bachelor's degree. The Journal is based in Wisconsin.
http://www.wisinfo.com/journal/spjlocal/280458985904812.shtml

Segura Comments On War Support (Boston Herald, March 25)
As the number of U.S. soldiers killed or captured in Iraq mounts, hopes for a short war are fading - yet Americans are still firmly behind President Bush, according to several polls released yesterday. Some 62 percent of those surveyed in a USA Today-CNN-Gallup Poll said the war was going well on Saturday. But that dropped to 44 percent Sunday, when the battle turned more gruesome and pictures of captured POWs were all over the news. "We are trained to expect a fairly low level of casualties," said GARY SEGURA, a University of Iowa associate professor of political science. Noting America counted fewer than 300 combat and noncombat deaths in the 1991 Gulf War, Segura said U.S. public opinion is likely to quickly sour if American casualties climb beyond the approximate 20 soldiers now believed dead or captured in the current war. "Vietnam war polls in the summer of 1965 showed extremely high levels of support," Segura said. "But support declined because the war became much bloodier, especially in the 1968 Tet offensive, when thousands of Americans died."
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=db08904b280adfbc410ceef2b0a5c9e1&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlzV&_md5=e5a0cc99690923d89e5d6bb0b9fcda70

Parents Advised on War TV Coverage (ABCNews.com, March 25)
Many parents are vigilant when it comes to monitoring the movies their kids watch and the video games they play. But now that coverage of the war in Iraq has redefined "reality television," how can parents best shield their children from the violent images? Shielding older children from graphic war imagery is significantly more difficult than with younger children, short of locking them in their bedrooms until the end of the war. Still, television should not be the primary way that kids learn about the war; parents should mediate. "Kids in the pre-teen years should have their television time limited more to network news, which is a bit more 'sanitized,'" said SCOTT TEMPLE, associate professor of clinical psychiatry at the University of Iowa.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/living/2020/kidsandwar_020325.html

Porter Book Reviewed (Christian Science Monitor, March 25)
"The Making of a Black Scholar: From Georgia to the Ivy League" published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, is reviewed. It's noted that HORACE PORTER worked his way through graduate school and teaching posts at some of the country's most prestigious schools. He eventually left Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, however, for the less-competitive University of Iowa in Iowa City, feeling that the sense of kindness and human values at the state school were closer to those imparted to him by his African-American family.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0325/p16s01-lepr.html

War Protests at UI (WHBF-TV, March 25)
About 100 students from Knox College in Galesburg, Ill. gathered together on Monday - some for and others against Operation Iraqi Freedom. There were also protests on Monday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City and in Chicago. WHBF is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.whbf.com/Global/story.asp?S=1197512&nav=0zGoEoK7

Large Freshman Class Expected (Omaha World Herald, March 25)
An effort by the University of Iowa to reduce the size of its ever-larger freshman class means 200 out-of-state applicants won't get in, but the number of freshman arriving this fall is still expected to surpass last year's record. The university's strict enforcement of admission standards this spring led to the rejection of the 200 - who probably would have been accepted in previous years. "We upheld a tougher standard this year than we've done in the past, but even with that, we still have an exceedingly strong group of nonresident students and a great increase in the number of resident students," said LOLA LOPES, associate provost for undergraduate students.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=692429

'Sun Rings' Reviewed (Daily Telegraph of London, March 25)
In a review of Kronos Quartet's performance of Terry Riley's "Sun Rings" it's noted that the audience heard montage of "space sounds", culled from the archives of the University of Iowa's 40-year space research program. "Astrophysicist DON GURNETT gave a fascinating pre-concert talk, which allowed us to hear the true sound of cosmic waves in all their mysterious pregnancy," noted the reviewer.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ae8424b2a2b2a1f3611a8cafccdea2df&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVlb-lSlzV&_md5=805a69a70a33d89cac68cb22e7030eb4

UI Student Visas Delayed (The Scientist, March 24)
Concerns are growing that new immigration policies enacted in the wake of Sept. 11, 2001, could - or already have - put foreign students at such a competitive disadvantage that their failure to come to this country will put the United States at a disadvantage as well. The story says that at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA this past fall visas were delayed for four Middle Eastern students because they wished to study "sensitive" science fields such as physics and biochemistry.

UI Doctors Comment On Oil Fire Risks (Reuters Health, March 24)
Despite reports of burning oil wells that are sending black plumes of smoke into the skies of Iraq, the majority of participants in the latest war are unlikely to be in immediate or long-term danger of respiratory problems as a result, according to a U.S. expert. According to Dr. PETER THORNE of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, firefighters and military personnel close to the source of a fire use respiratory protection as a precaution. But for people who are farther away--a distance that depends on the amount of the fumes and the weather conditions--the risk is likely insignificant. "As you're further away and, particularly, if you're further away and upwind, it probably doesn't pose a significant hazard," Thorne told Reuters Health. Dr. GREGORY C. GRAY, also of the University of Iowa, agreed. "All of the available data...suggest there have been no long term effects from such oil well fires in the past," he said in an interview with Reuters Health.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=2438619
The story also appeared in YAHOO NEWS.

NADS Used For Military Simulations (WQAD-TV, March 24)
The driving simulator at the University of Iowa is helping American troops in the war against Iraq. Hundreds of battle tanks and Humvees now rolling across the Iraqi desert were engineered with the help of the NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR. Since 1998, the university has been conducting research under contracts with the Army. The research has helped the Army design its main battle tanks and other vehicles so that they perform well on rugged and uneven terrain. To date, the contracts have been worth more than one and a-half million to the school. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1195247&nav=1sW7EmS

UI Students Plan Peace Camp (WQAD-TV, March 24)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
students and others involved with local groups opposed to war in Iraq are planning nonviolent acts of civil disobedience, along with a "peace camp." Protesters are planning a "peace camp" to accommodate every day, around-the-clock demonstrations against the war. Organizers say they'll probably camp out on a lawn or in a park. Students hoped to have the camp up and running early this week. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1195249&nav=1sW7EmS8

Nagle Is Quoted (Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, March 24)
A feature on Verdin Co., which was founded 170 years ago and repairs clocks, bells, carillons and glockenspiels, says that when fire destroyed the Old Capitol dome at the University of Iowa in November 2001, Verdin was called to replace the 137-year-old bell that tolled 20 times a day to signal the start and end of classes. The university wanted a bell cast in the same period as the one that was destroyed. Verdin had one in its inventory. "We looked all over the country for a replacement bell," said GARY NAGLE, the university's project manager. "We had 15 to 20 people offering bells of all sizes, but none fit as well as the one the Verdin Co. had. They cleaned it up and put an inscription on it for us ... and now it's hanging up in the bell tower." The Journal-Gazette is based in Fort Wayne, Ind. Versions of the story also ran March 24 on the website of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, March 23 on the website of the INDIANAPOLIS STAR and March 22 on the website of the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/5468984.htm

Campaigns Continue (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, March 24)
Despite the potential political land mines, the phalanx of Democratic presidential hopefuls has not retreated from the campaign trail while the U.S. military wages war in Iraq. The decision to forge ahead with retail politics and fund-raising soirees alike has put the Democratic contenders in a delicate spot as they try to persuade voters to send them to the White House, while also refraining from slamming the current commander in chief. The kinder, gentler tone illustrates the delicate situation Democratic hopefuls find themselves in as they try to keep their campaigns humming. "They can't toss out much red meat to the die-hard Democrats because it might not look particularly good," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "... It may seem a bit unseemly to some people to be campaigning during the outbreak of war. It suggests that these candidates put their ambitions ahead of other sorts of values that people are concerned with now."
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/news/975C1AA26DD99B7786256CF400129858?OpenDocument&highlight=2%2CUniversity%2Cof%2CIowa&headline=Democratic+hopefuls+press+on,+despite+war+blazing+in+Iraq

VanderVelde Examines Suits (Seattle Times, March 23)
The stories and voices of slaves who attempted to use the U.S. court system to win their freedom are now emerging as Missouri state archivists sort through 4 million court documents that had been stashed away in metal cabinets, untouched since the Civil War. Among heaps of musty affidavits about contract disputes and unpaid debts, the archivists have uncovered 283 "freedom suits" filed in St. Louis from 1806 to 1865. "This is a stunning find. It's just phenomenal," said LEA VANDERVELDE, a law professor at the University of Iowa who is writing a book on the freedom suits. A version of the story also ran March 23 on the website of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=slaves23&date=20030323&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

Segura Comments On Rallies (Baltimore Sun, March 23)
A story on a rally for U.S. troops by students at Mount Hebron High School in Ellicott City, Md., says that separating support for the troops from views on policies that led to the war appears to be a distinction being made by many in the Iraqi conflict. "There's this sort of bizarre assumption in the U.S. that protest during war is unheard of or unpatriotic," said GARY SEGURA, assistant professor of American politics at the University of Iowa. "All of America's other wars had significant protests." In this climate, "supporting our troops and agreeing with the policy that puts them there in the first place have to be fundamentally different things," Segura said.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/local/howard/bal-ho.rally23mar23,0,145061.story?coll=bal-local-howard

Student Writes About Pierce (Chicago Tribune, March 23)
Sixteen Chicago-reared college students were asked what issues are important to them on campus. Kelley Casino, a junior majoring in journalism and English at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, writes about her thoughts on the Pierre Pierce sexual assault case and its impact on the campus community. "Basketball isn't getting the attention that it's supposed to at the University of Iowa," Casino writes in part. "Bars, coffeehouses, offices and classrooms are full of talk about the team's star player, Pierre Pierce, and date rape, and every attempt by the university to stifle the outrage and stem the emotional fallout seems to have failed."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/magazine/chi-0303230415mar23,1,662153.story

Author Is Graduate (Salem Statesman Journal, March 23)
A feature on former Marine sniper Anthony Swofford, author of "Jarhead," a bracing memoir of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, says he graduated from the University of California at Davis in 1999 and then was accepted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S PRESTIGIOUS WRITERS WORKSHOP, where he earned a masters degree. Swofford has been teaching English at Lewis & Clark College in Portland since last fall. The Journal is based in Salem, Ore.
http://news.statesmanjournal.com/article.cfm?i=58858
A version of this article also appeared march 23 in the OTTAWA CITIZEN.

Squire Comments On Protests (Los Angeles Times, March 22)
A story about anti-war protests in San Francisco said the estimated 10,000 participants in a massive "first day" antiwar demonstration Thursday shut down dozens of streets and halted work at a major defense contractor. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said the rest of America might write off the actions as the work of California extremists, adding that pictures of protesters he's seen on TV "really looked more like a Deadhead reunion than a mass movement." Squire added: "It probably doesn't suggest to most people this is a really broad-based movement."
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-war-sf22mar22,1,2691821.story

Boyle's Daughter Is At UI (Rocky Mountain News, March 22)
A story about author T.C. Boyle and his latest novel, Drop City, says Boyle's daughter has just published her first short story in McSweeney's and is enrolled in the WRITER'S WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, as her father was nearly 30 years earlier.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/entertainment_columnists/article/0,1299,DRMN_84_1828014,00.html

VanderVelde Examines Suits (Salt Lake Tribune, March 22)

The stories and voices of slaves who attempted to use the U.S. court system to win their freedom are now emerging as Missouri state archivists sort through 4 million court documents that had been stashed away in metal cabinets, untouched since the Civil War. Among heaps of musty affidavits about contract disputes and unpaid debts, the archivists have uncovered 283 "freedom suits" filed in St. Louis from 1806 to 1865. "This is a stunning find. It's just phenomenal," said LEA VANDERVELDE, a law professor at the University of Iowa who is writing a book on the freedom suits. A version of the story also ran March 23 on the website of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.sltrib.com/2003/Mar/03222003/nation_w/40618.asp

Poet Gives Reading At Ole Miss (Clarion-Ledger, March 22)
A story about an upcoming reading by poet Andrew Hudgins, the author of five volumes of poetry and the forthcoming collection Ecstatic in the Poison, says Hudgins received a degree in English and history from Huntingdon College in 1969, a master's in English from the University of Alabama in 1976 and a master of fine arts in creative writing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1983. The Clarion-Ledger is based in Mississippi.
http://www.clarionledger.com/news/0303/22/m13.html

Moss Worked At UI (Lexington Herald-Leader, March 22)
A bio on Barbara Robinette Moss, author of Change Me Into Zeus's Daughter, says the Iowa City resident has been a full-time author since 1997 and was director of project art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL AND CLINICS from 1993-1994. The Herald-Leader is based in Lexington, Ky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/news/local/5454580.htm

UI Lab Won’t Test Punch (Omaha World-Herald, March 22)
A federal laboratory will help state investigators determine who accidentally poisoned 60 wedding guests in Ankeny earlier this month. Dr. PATRICIA QUINLISK, the state epidemiologist, said the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY can't perform the necessary tests on punch mix suspected in the sicknesses. A spokesman for the Iowa Department of Inspections and Appeals said a federal lab in the Kansas City area will perform the tests. David Werning said the Food and Drug Administration lab specializes in food, while the Iowa lab focuses on infectious diseases. The incident happened March 8 at Ankeny Baptist Church, where Erin and Mark Davis had just been married. Guests who drank the punch became dizzy and nauseated. Several passed out. About 60 people were taken to hospitals for treatment, and doctors said it was fortunate that no one died.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=690154

Bell On Sextuplets (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 21)
The first set of sextuplets ever born in Pittsburgh stand a good chance of survival, according to Dr. EDWARD BELL, director of neonatology at the University of Iowa. He said the babies were good-sized and spent enough time in the womb to give them a good chance -- more than 90 percent of babies born in the 28th week survive, Bell said. "So, that means that each baby has a very good chance of surviving," he said. "What you have to figure, though, is that even though it doesn't take a large amount of luck in the case of any particular baby, you've got to be lucky six times to get them all home."
http://www.post-gazette.com/healthscience/20030321sextuplets2.asp

UI Alumnus Profiled (Contra Costa Times, March 20)
Tom Meschery's life is a lot like a saga, divided into three distinct books. The early years involved a childhood touched by political upheaval and cultural change. The middle years encompassed more than 15 years in basketball, taking him from Lowell High School in San Francisco to St. Mary's College, the Warriors and the Seattle SuperSonics. Then there's the latter years, the ones he's enjoying now, filled with teaching high school, writing poetry and living a relatively quiet life with his wife, Joanna, in Truckee. While playing in Seattle he met Mark Strand, an avid poet and visiting professor at the University of Washington. A few trips to Strand's classes cemented Meschery's interest in poetry and earned him a new nickname from teammates, who replaced "the Mad Russian" with "the Renaissance man." After three years as a coach, he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, earned his master's degree at Iowa, owned a short-lived bookstore in Truckee, traveled to Africa and eventually went back to school, this time as a teacher. Since 1984, he has taught English and creative writing at Reno High School.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/cctimes/sports/5436714.htm

Aslan: Iowa Muslims Oppose War (Newhouse News Service, March 20)
American Muslims are bracing for an Iraq war, deeply concerned that fellow Muslims will be killed overseas and that they could become victims of harassment at home. While a majority of the American public supports military action against Iraq to remove Saddam Hussein, "there's almost universal opposition to this war in the American Muslim community," said Ibrahim Hooper, a spokesman for the Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations. REZA ASLAN, visiting professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, said, "As a Muslim American, you belong to two communities. Your first allegiance is as an American citizen. You belong to the community of the United States. However, Muslims also belong to a second community as well, the community of worldwide Muslims. So the vast majority of Muslims in Iowa that I've spoken to are totally against this war in Iraq." Aslan often takes the role of spokesman for Iowa Muslims.
http://www.newhousenews.com/archive/okeefe031903.html

Spill Evacuates UI Building (Omaha World Herald, March 20)
A University of Iowa building was evacuated late Wednesday after a chemical spill resulted in a pungent odor that traveled through the ventilation system. University officials said a postdoctoral student was taken to University Hospitals and Clinics to determine if treatment was necessary. JIM PYRZ of the university's Health Protection Office said the student apparently was trying to open a bottle of trimethyl acetyl chloride when he spilled about an ounce of it from its two-ounce container at the Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=687434

Author Is Workshop Alumna (Times Daily, March 20)
Best-selling author and Birmingham native Sena Jeter Naslund, recipient of the Harper Lee Award, will be at the University of North Alabama in a program sponsored by the school's women's studies. Naslund wrote "Ahab's Wife: Or, The Star-Gazer: A Novel," one of Time magazine's five best novels of 1999. At UNA, she will speak, read from her work and answer questions. Naslund is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. (The paper covers Northwest Alabama.)
http://www.timesdaily.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=FT&Date=20030320&Category=NEWS&ArtNo=303200303&Ref=AR&Profile=1004

UI Alumnus Promoted (Marietta Daily Journal, March 20)
Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc., based at 901 Sawyer Road in Marietta, announced that Anil Salpekar, Ph.D., has been named vice president of marketed products development and support. After completing his undergraduate degree in pharmacy at Saugar University in India, Salpekar earned his master’s in pharmaceutics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a doctorate in pharmaceutics from the University of Maryland and master’s in business administration from Washington University. (The paper is based in Georgia.)
http://apt.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?pnpID=7&CategoryID=90&StoryID=10097880&show=localnews

UI Graduate Is Candidate (Evanston Review, March 20)
In anticipation of upcoming elections, the paper profiles local school board candidates including Michael Phillips, a local art dealer and custom framer who is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. (The weekly paper covers in Evanston, Ill.)
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/ev/03-20-03-31292.html

UI Professor's Son Is In Marines (Newsday, March 19)
A feature on the Marines in Kuwait says that Lance Cpl. Luther Cassell enlisted in Iowa, where his father is a professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but he grew up in England in Hastings, and is essentially an English youth. The 20-year-old has a thick accent. His favorite sports team is Chelsea of the English Premier Soccer League, and he says he can count among his relatives a man who worked for the notorious London gangsters, the Krays, and served 11 years in prison. Two years ago, he moved to live with his father and, incredibly, joined the Marines after watching a Discovery channel special on boot camp. "I was leading what you might call an unproductive life," he said. "I just needed a change ... "
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/world/ny-womoti193180062mar19,0,6285805.story?coll=ny-worldnews-print

UI Student Quoted About Protest (Daily Illini, March 19)
Thirty-two hours after senior Jordan Harris first stepped onto the small third-floor balcony of Lincoln Hall to protest the looming war against Iraq, he left Tuesday night. Harris set up camp on the outside balcony, which overlooks the Quad, at 10 a.m. Monday, and only left to go to class. Harris said University police told him to come down before sundown Tuesday, or he would be removed by force. Harris hung a flag of corporate America, with logos of major companies in place of the stars, from the balcony as a symbol of his protest of capitalist democracy. He was equipped with blankets, a drum, a flag with Bob Marley's face on it, in addition to friends bringing him food. A few students lounging on the Quad in front of Lincoln Hall on Tuesday did not know what the protest was about, and some were unaware that the protest was even taking place. "I don't think he's making clear what he is protesting. It looks like he's just looking for attention," said Monica Elden, a visiting student from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Illini is the student newspaper of the University of Illinois-Champaign-Urbana.
http://www.dailyillini.com/mar03/mar19/news/stories/news_story03.shtml

Nagle Commends Bell Company (Mlive.com, March 18)
A feature on Verdin Co., which was founded 170 years ago and repairs clocks, bells, carillons and glockenspiels, says that when fire destroyed the Old Capitol dome at the University of Iowa in November 2001, Verdin was called to replace the 137-year-old bell that tolled 20 times a day to signal the start and end of classes. The university wanted a bell cast in the same period as the one that was destroyed. Verdin had one in its inventory. "We looked all over the country for a replacement bell," said GARY NAGLE, the university's project manager. "We had 15 to 20 people offering bells of all sizes, but none fit as well as the one the Verdin Co. had. They cleaned it up and put an inscription on it for us ... and now it's hanging up in the bell tower." Mlive is a website with news and other information about Michigan. Versions of the story also ran March 18 on the websites of the MIAMI HERALD, KANSAS CITY STAR, WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas, BOSTON GLOBE, WCPO in Ohio, and the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.mlive.com/newsflash/regional/index.ssf?/newsflash/get_story.ssf?/cgi-free/getstory_ssf.cgi?g7694_BC_MI--Profile-Verdin&&news&newsflash-michigan

UI Burns Oat Hulls for Fuel (Boston Globe, March 18)
Oat hulls from the Quaker Oats cereal plant in Cedar Rapids are being burned at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and used as a replacement for coal. Versions of the story also ran March 18 on the websites of KTUL in Oklahoma, the TIMES-PICAYUNE in Louisiana, the SPRINGFIELD NEWS SUN in Ohio, the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, the KANSAS CITY STAR, the WICHITA EAGLE, the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, the LAKELAND LEDGER in Florida, the WILMINGTON MORNING STAR in North Carolina, the TIMES DAILY in Alabama, the AUSTIN AMERICAN STATESMAN in Texas, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE and WSET in Virginia.
http://boston.com/dailynews/077/economy/FARM_SCENE_Twelve_horses_found%3A.shtml

Nelson Found Guilty (Arizona Daily Sun, March 18)
The widow of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA medical school dean was found guilty of voluntary manslaughter for fatally stabbing him in the heart during an argument. Phyllis Nelson, 55, had been charged with first-degree murder in the December 2001 death of her husband, Dr. Richard Nelson, 54. Versions of the story also ran March 18 on the website of the GWINNETT DAILY POST in Georgia.
http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_includes/story.cfm?storyID=61957

Physicians Diagnose Nerve Disease (Miami Herald, March 18)
For the past several years, Debbie Buck, the mother of Heat guard Eddie House, thought she was just a klutz, constantly tripping or losing her balance. Buck has since learned she has Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the same disease that has likely ended the career of Philadelphia 76ers center Todd MacCulloch. CMT is a neurological disease that causes damage to the peripheral nerves, in some cases wasting those nerves. It's not life threatening. ''I don't have much feeling below my knees,'' Buck said. Buck's main concern, though, after she was diagnosed by doctors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was that the genetic disease had been passed on to her sons. ''I wanted to make sure because I have three sons who are breadwinners in their family,'' she said. ``And one plays professional ball and depends on his legs. I can't have him going through what I'm going through.''
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/sports/5417198.htm

Ex-Student Is In Real Estate (Chicago Sun Times, March 18)
Shanna Truelove developed a liking for the real estate business early in her 20s, but recognized an obstacle. She was working in Iowa. Iowa has real estate, but not a lot that's sellable. So with little more than a lone friend as a connection in Chicago, she set her course for the big city, landing here nearly four years ago. "You could say I came here on a whim," she said. Truelove got a job quickly and has been impressing her co-workers since. At age 26, she's NAI Hiffman's property manager for three office buildings: a seven-story building at 180 N. Wacker, Fairfield Plaza at 500 E. 22nd St. in Lombard and Covington Corporate Center at 887-1000 Deerfield Pkwy. in Buffalo Grove. The properties came under her watch in a promotion last June. A native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Truelove spent much of her childhood in foster homes. She attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but left before graduating to work with a small real-estate firm, where she eventually managed a small shopping center.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/lifestyles/cst-ftr-30below18.html

Nelson Found Guilty (Minneapolis Star Tribune, March 18)
The widow of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA medical school dean was found guilty of voluntary manslaughter for fatally stabbing him in the heart during an argument. Phyllis Nelson, 55, had been charged with first-degree murder in the December 2001 death of her husband, Dr. Richard Nelson, 54.
http://startribune.com/stories/484/3761536.html
The same story appeared in the KANSAS CITY STAR, the AUSTIN AMERICAN STATESMAN, NEW YORK TIMES, BALTIMORE SUN, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, OMAHA WORLD HERALDand the WASHINGTON TIMES.

VanderVelde Examines Slave Lawsuits (L.A. Times, March 18)
The stories and voices of slaves who attempted to use the U.S. court system to win their freedom are now emerging now as Missouri state archivists sort through 4 million court documents that had been stashed away in metal cabinets, untouched since the Civil War. Among heaps of musty affidavits about contract disputes and unpaid debts, the archivists have uncovered 283 "freedom suits" filed in St. Louis from 1806 to 1865. "This is a stunning find. It's just phenomenal," said LEA VANDERVELDE, a law professor at the University of Iowa who is writing a book on the freedom suits.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-slaves18mar18,1,6023915.story

UI Burns Oat Hulls for Fuel (New York Times, March 18)
Oat hulls from the Quaker Oats cereal plant in Cedar Rapids are being burned at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and used as a replacement for coal. (second item)
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/business/AP-Farm-Scene.html
This story also appeared in the BALTIMORE SUN, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, OMAHA WORLD HERALD and the MIAMI HERALD.

UI Students Study Abroad (Omaha World Herald, March 18)
Seven percent fewer students from Iowa's three state universities signed up to study abroad during the 2001-2002 school year, a consequence of the weak national economy. However, according to a report prepared for the State Board of Regents, the number of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students studying abroad reported a slight increase, from 859 to 970.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=685372

T.C. Boyle Offers Q&A (St. Louis Post Dispatch, March 18)
Author T. Coraghessan Boyle, who received his master’s and doctoral degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, explains where “Coraghessan” comes from.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/Entertainment/Books/2C33263D1542A97186256CEB00757B50?OpenDocument&Headline=Author+T.C.+Boyle+dropped+out,+turned+on+and+is+still+tuning+in

Student Celebrates St. Patrick (Alton Telegraph, March 18)
Corned beef, cabbage and a goodly amount of yeast-borne libation were in order Monday as revelers celebrated the official St. Patrick’s Day. ERIC SHEA is a junior at the University of Iowa and stayed the weekend in St. Louis to partake in the many activities the region has to offer. “Every year, I know I’m not going to be in class. I don’t go to school on St. Patrick’s Day," Eric Shea said. "I could do without the cabbage, though. The corned beef is great, but I don’t care for cabbage." The Telegraph is based in Alton, IL.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=7407430&BRD=1719&PAG=461&dept_id=25271&rfi=6

Iowa Market Trades On News (Chicago Tribune, March 17)
Most Americans say the beginning of war with Iraq is only a matter of time and Saddam Hussein's reign will soon collapse. But are they willing to bet on it? Some are doing just that at flourishing Internet sites where winners can hit the jackpot by correctly predicting what comes next in global, life-and-death matters. The Iowa Electronic Market, operated by professors at the University of Iowa since 1988, is perhaps the best known effort to apply futures market principles to political events. "People can lie to pollsters," said TOM REITZ, an IEM director and professor of economics at the University of Iowa. "The participants in our market put their money where their mouth is. If they're wrong, they have to pay."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/chi-0303170019mar17,1,7912307.story
The same story appeared in the BALTIMORE SUN.

UI Graduate Creates New Banking Model (Fortune, March 17)
Washington Mutual specializes in turning the accepted banking model upside down. Led by ambitious CEO and UI alumnus KERRY KILLINGER, this Seattle thrift bank has grown from a relative unknown into a $268 billion banking powerhouse in just under a decade. It has vaulted ahead of the competition as the nation's largest thrift and sixth-largest bank overall. And it has done so in part by aggressively snapping up rivals in a calculated buying spree. But what is really turning heads, it seems, is the company's unorthodox retail approach. Washington Mutual has been not only dogged in its pursuit of customers but creative as well.
http://www.fortune.com/fortune/investing/articles/0,15114,433191,00.html

Stuart-penned Play in L.A. (Los Angeles Times, March 17)
“ Murder and Mayhem,” a play written by UI playwriting professor KELLY STUART Kelly Stuart, is performed in Los Angeles.
http://www.calendarlive.com/cl-ca-boehm16mar16,0,3401510.story?coll=cl-home-more-channels

Nelson Quoted (Minneapolis Star Tribune, March 16)
Want to know the odds that Saddam Hussein will be dead by June? One-and-a-half to one, according to BETonSPORTS.com, an Internet gambling site. What about the odds that he will be ousted by the end of March? Two to one, according to TradeSports.com. And the likelihood of him in exile, smoking Cuban cigars with Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi? Five to one. Betting schemes can be such good predictors that the Pentagon "has inquired about the possibility of using these markets to provide advanced warning of future events," said FORREST NELSON, a professor at the University of Iowa who co-founded an experimental "political stock market." These markets could help the military evaluate the risks of "everything from the overturn of some government to terrorist attacks," Nelson said.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1762/3756644.html

Wendell Johnson Profiled (New York Times, March 16)
A story in the New York Times Sunday Magazine profiles the late UI speech pathologist Wendell Johnson, his research about the causes of stuttering, and the so-called “Monster Study,” in which one of Johnson’s researchers attempted to teach non-stuttering children at a Davenport orphanage to stutter.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/03/16/magazine/16STUTTERING.html

Old Cap Bell Maker Profiled (Kansas City Star, March 15)
When fire destroyed the Old Capitol dome at the University of Iowa in November 2001, the Verdin Co., based in Cincinnati, OH, was called to replace the 137-year-old bell that tolled 20 times a day to signal the start and end of classes. The university wanted a bell cast in the same period as the one that was destroyed. "We looked all over the country for a replacement bell," said GARY NAGLE, the university's project manager. "We had 15-20 people offering bells of all sizes, but none fit as well as the one the Verdin Co. had. They cleaned it up and put an inscription on it for us ... and now it's hanging up in the bell tower. We can't wait to hear it ringing again." The nearly 170-year-old company has grown from a clock repair business to bringing in about $20 million a year installing bells, tower clocks, street clocks, carillons and glockenspiels.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/business/5401420.htm
The same story appeared in the LOUISVILLE (KY) COURIER JOURNAL.

Man Held in UI Sexual Assault (Omaha World Herald, March 16)
A man has been charged with sexually assaulting a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in a dorm, police said. Richard Adam Roberts, 34, of Coralville has been charged with third-degree sexual abuse. He was arrested Thursday. Roberts allegedly assaulted the female student in a hallway in Burge Hall early Wednesday. Roberts was being held Saturday in the Johnson County Jail on $15,000 bail.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=683790

Shenkin Opposes ADA Deal With Coke (Omaha World Herald, March 16)
In one of the more unlikely industry-health partnerships, Coca-Cola will give about $1 million to an organization dedicated to the health of children's teeth to promote health education and research. However, Dr. JONATHON SHENKIN, a second-year resident at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Iowa, said, "Such an arrangement presents a clear conflict of interest."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=54&u_sid=682517

UI Student Competes for Miss Illinois Title (The Daily Herald, March 15)
24 young women who Sunday will compete simultaneously for the Miss DuPage County, Miss Kane County and Miss Western Suburbs titles Sunday. Contestant KELLY SANTEFORT of Oak Brook, a junior at the University of Iowa, said the scoring allows the women to be judged on their appearance but also their minds. "I am a major proponent of youngsters staying healthy and making smart choices by avoiding drugs and alcohol," Santefort said. "No one would really know that if we were judged only on our swimsuits and evening gowns." The Herald is based in Arlington, Ill.
http://www.dailyherald.com/search/main_story.asp?intid=3769573

UI Study Of Veterans Cited (FoxNews.com, March 14)
An article about the potential health risks if Saddam Hussein sets any of the 1500 Iraqi oil wells on fire in response to war notes that while there's no question the 1991 Kuwaiti oil well fires produced much pollution, virtually all published studies of people exposed to those emissions haven't reported significant health effects. One of the studies cited is a November 2002 study published in Environmental Health Perspectives. It considered 1,560 Gulf War veterans, 94 percent of whom were in the Gulf theater during the oil well fires and 21 percent who remained for more than 100 days during the fires. "These findings do not support speculation that exposures to oil fire smoke caused respiratory symptoms among veterans," concluded the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers.
http://foxnews.com/story/0,2933,81045,00.html

Artist Influenced By Wood At UI (Seattle Times, March 14)
A local gallery that specializes in resurrecting the work of under-recognized artists puts up monthly shows, often selected from its inventory, and represents a few living artists. Much of the available work is from estates or storage rooms, by artists who once made news but never achieved star status. One intriguing artist in the current show, William Ashby McCloy (1913-2000), was working in the heartland of American regionalism in the first half of the 20th century. After spending part of his childhood in China, McCloy studied art at the State UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and then shared a studio with Grant Wood, the artist who gave us the dour-faced duo of "American Gothic." You can easily see Wood's influence in McCloy's 1944 egg tempera painting "The Phrenologist." McCloy gives us the same full-front, head and torso portrait that Wood used in portraits like "American Gothic," revealing the person's character with a few symbolic objects and telling details of their environment.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/artsentertainment/134653041_visart14.html

Black Comments On Shopping (Bankrate.com, March 14)
Studies estimate that as many as 17 million Americans, better than one in 20 of us, can't control our urge to shop, even at the expense of our job, our marriage, our family and our finances. Not only is compulsive shopping tacitly condoned by our materialistic society, it is just as widely misunderstood. For starters, according to DONALD BLACK, M.D., a University of Iowa psychiatry professor who specializes in obsessive-compulsive disorder, compulsive shopping isn't a true compulsion at all, but instead an impulse control disorder. "A compulsion is a behavior that is produced to counteract an upsetting thought; for example, I'm contaminated or dirty, therefore I will deal with that anxiety by washing my hands more," he says. "There is no upsetting thought prompting compulsive shopping. It is a very pleasurable impulse and people act on those impulses." Nor is compulsive shopping a modern-day "designer disease." According to Black, a German psychiatrist published the first clinical description of the disorder in 1915. Bankrate.com is a consumer finance Web site.
http://www.bankrate.com/brm/news/advice/20030314a1.asp

Bloom's 'Postville' Cited (Lincoln Journal-Star, March 13)
A meatpacking plant in Gordon, Neb., will reopen this summer under new ownership that plans to produce kosher beef. And the northern Panhandle community of 1,756 mostly white Christians will soon become home to members of an ultra-Orthodox Jewish sect, whose similar plant in Postville, Iowa has been a source of both jobs and tension. The new owners, the Rubashkins, belong to the Lubavitch sect of Hasidic Jews, who live in strict compliance with commandments in the Torah. The laws dictate their dress, prayer, study, diets and gender roles. The sect began in Lubavitch, Russia, in the 1700s. It claims a worldwide population of more than 200,000; an estimated 25,000 live in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Crown Heights, according to "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," a 2000 book by STEPHEN BLOOM, a journalism professor at the University of Iowa. "The Rubashkins can't grow anymore in Postville," Bloom said Tuesday. "They're at their limit; the plant is old. They have become extraordinarily successful and they need, if they are going to continue to prosper, more facilities."
http://www.journalstar.com/local.php?story_id=30596

Davidson Comments on Discovery (New Scientist, March 13)
Using gene therapy to switch off genes instead of adding new ones could slow down or prevent the fatal brain disorder Huntington's disease. The method, which exploits a mechanism called RNA interference, might also help treat a wide range of other inherited diseases. It involves a natural defense mechanism against viruses, in which short pieces of double-stranded RNA (short interfering RNAs, or siRNAs) trigger the degradation of any other RNA in the cell with a matching sequence. If an siRNA is chosen to match the RNA copied from a particular gene, it will stop production of the protein the gene codes for. Huntington's is caused by mutations in the huntingtin gene. The resulting defective protein forms large clumps that gradually kill off part of the brain. Studies in mice have shown that reducing production of the defective protein can slow down the disease, and BEVERLY DAVIDSON at the University of Iowa thinks the same could be true in people. "If you reduce levels of the toxic protein even modestly, we believe you'll have a significant impact," she says. Late in 2002, her team showed that it is possible to reduce the amount of a similar protein by up to 90 per cent, by adding DNA that codes for an siRNA to rodent cells engineered to produce the protein.
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99993493
Versions of this story appeared March 13 on EUREKALERT, a science news Web site; YAHOONEWS; CLINNIXPRO.net, and BBC NEWS.

Artist Is UI Alumna (Rocky Mountain News, March 13)
A story about a local art exhibition notes that artist Sandy Skoglund attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.insidedenver.com/drmn/arts/article/0,1299,DRMN_55_1804911,00.html

UI Alumnus Wins Award (Rockford Register Star, March 13)
P.E. teacher Brian Sewell, who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and earned a master’s in elementary education from National-Louis University, is one of five Golden Apple award winners in the Rockford public schools. He attributes his success to “the love of what I’m doing.” The Golden Apple is awarded to exceptional teachers and was started by the Golden Apple Foundation, a community organization made up primarily of volunteers, in 1997. http://www.rrstar.com/localnews/your_community/rockford/20030313-36412.shtml

Newlin Refutes Criticism (Omaha World Herald, March 13)
State Board of Regents President Owen Newlin said state lawmakers are mistaken in thinking that Iowa's three public universities have used tuition increases to circumvent Legislature-imposed funding restrictions. As lawmakers begin budget negotiations for the coming fiscal year, Newlin said he wanted to set the record straight on the hard, fiscal realities of the past three years at Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa. "Recently, a few state legislators have incorrectly said that tuition revenues have exceeded state funding reductions imposed on the regent institutions," Newlin said during a board meeting Wednesday. "The tuition increases were significant, but they have fallen far short of covering these state reductions and unfunded mandates. State support at the public universities has been reduced more than support for other education sectors as a result," Newlin said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=680672

Report: Dropouts Cite Money (Omaha World Herald, March 13)
Freshmen who left Iowa's three public universities blamed rising tuition and fees and the lack of a campus connection as the main reasons for not coming back, a new survey shows. However, most freshmen at Iowa State, the University of Northern Iowa and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA stay in school and earn a degree, according to the State Board of Regents. Board figures show that over the last 14 years, the average one-year retention rate is 82 percent. But two years ago, the regents asked each campus to query freshmen from the 2001 class who did not enroll the next year to get a better sense of why they left and what can be done to keep more enrolled. The report presented Wednesday is the first attempt to answer those questions.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=680572

Author Attended UI (Sarasota Herald-Tribune, March 13)
Dow Mossman poured his energy into the dream of writing the Great American Novel for eight years, finally producing a hefty, autobiographical work that won glowing reviews - and then he vanished. Mark Moskowitz, who was captivated by Mossman's 552-page book, "The Stones of Summer." Moskowitz set out to find the elusive novelist. His quest is chronicled in the documentary "Stone Reader," which opened in select theaters this month to much acclaim. William Cotter Murray, Mossman's mentor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, recalled Mossman struggling with the anxiety, exhaustion and the ambition inherent in writing such a novel. "I remember he was pretty strung out, and a couple of times he just had to stop to save his sanity," Murray said. "Being a mentor on that book was one of the toughest assignments I ever had." It's not uncommon for writers to break down after finishing a book or to quit after writing just one, said FRANK CONROY, an author and director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop. The fiction world is filled with one-hit wonders, like Harper Lee, Margaret Mitchell and John Kennedy Toole. "People think writing is easy," Conroy said. "But it's extremely difficult work, a very hard, unforgiving discipline. It takes intense concentration."
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20030312&Category=APE&ArtNo=303120846&Ref=AR
A version of this story also appeared March 13 in the WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR.

Arrested Artist Attended UI (Washington Post, March 13)
The Michigan couple arrested at the U.S. Capitol last week after strapping objects to their bodies with duct tape say they were engaged in performance art and never expected that their actions would be seen as dangerous. Reena Patel and Olabayo Olaniyi, 32, were chanting and dancing inside the Capitol on March 6 when police noticed their strange costumes, handcuffed them and evacuated parts of the building, thinking that they might be strapped with suicide bombs. Olaniyi had covered most of his face with a ceramic mask. Olaniyi was artist-in-residence last year at the University of Michigan's School of Art and Design. He is a dancer, a drummer and a visual artist. He has degrees from the College of Santa Fe and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and has received numerous grants and fellowships, according to biographical material supplied by his attorney. His parents are well-known artists in his native Nigeria. Patel, who graduated from Michigan's School of Art and Design last year, is a visual artist and performance artist.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A18105-2003Mar12?language=printer

Alumna Runs Paper (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, March 13)
The monthly newspaper run by Mehrdad Dalamie and Jon Anne Willow is a lot like their cafe in Milwaukee's Riverwest area. Both appeal to the many artists and musicians who live in the neighborhood. Both carry a hip attitude. And neither the newspaper, Vital Source, which is free, nor the restaurant, Bremen Cafe, where a generous mug of coffee will set you back $1.25, is a budget buster. The owners of the newspaper and restaurant, which operate in adjacent storefronts, hope to prevail over the long odds that are lined up against small businesses - one-third of which fail within their first two years of existence, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration. Willow, 36, grew up in Des Moines, Iowa, and earned a bachelor's degree in communications at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.jsonline.com/bym/news/mar03/124892.asp

Author Won Simmons Award (Nashville Scene, March 13-19)
A feature on author Charles Wyatt, whose latest book is Falling Stones: The Spirit Autobiography of S.M. Jones, a chilling diary of spiritual possession and witchcraft in the 19th century, says the Nashville native's first book, Listening to Mozart, won the 1995 John Simmons Short Fiction Award, given out by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.nashscene.com/cgi-bin/textonly.cgi?story=This_Week:Arts:Books

Sadler Leads Study On Military (Boston Globe, March 12)
Violence towards women in the military has identifiable risk factors, according to a study by Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) and University of Iowa researchers. The study, involving more than 500 female veterans, found that workplace factors, such as the behavior of superiors, were highly associated with military women's risk of sexual assault during their military service. "While violence towards working women is commonplace, surprisingly little is known about predictors of workplace sexual violence," said ANNE SADLER, Ph.D., a researcher at the Iowa City VAMC who led the study. "Our findings suggest that if sexual harassment is allowed in the workplace, women in those environments have a significantly increased risk of being raped." Sadler conducted the study with Brenda Booth, Ph.D., a former UI and Iowa City VAMC researcher now at the University of Arkansas and VAMC in Little Rock; BRIAN COOK, D.O., UI professor of psychiatry; and BRADLEY DOEBBELING, M.D., UI professor of internal medicine, and epidemiology. Cook and Doebbeling are also researchers and staff physicians at the Iowa City VAMC. The study results appear in the March issue of the American Journal of Industrial Medicine.
http://boston.com/dailynews/070/ascribe/_University_of_Iowa_Veterans_A%3A.shtml

Griffith Studies Gene Therapy (Greenwich Time, March 12)
The Stamford-based Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy, or ACGT, the country's first organization dedicated exclusively to funding gene therapy research, recently awarded $1.5 million in grants to three researchers. One of the grant recipients, THOMAS GRIFFITH, an assistant professor of urologic oncology at the University of Iowa, will study the benefits of gene therapy for prostate cancer patients. Griffith will focus on the development of Ad5-TRAIL, an agent that is believed to induce death in tumor cells. Greenwich Time is based in Greenwich, Conn.
http://www.greenwichtime.com/news/local/scn-gt-cure5mar12,0,4456477.story?coll=green-news-local-headlines

Alumna Fights Adult Businesses (Advocate News, March 12)
More than anyone else, Kathryn Goppelt is responsible for Ascension Parish's controversial new ordinance regulating adult or sexually oriented businesses. To achieve her ends, she has conducted research, attended seminars, lobbied politicians, buttonholed lawyers, formed an organization and spoken forcefully at public meetings. Goppelt, a 1972 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate, said she sees the clubs as having a negative secondary effect on the morals and well-being of the community. Among the growing number of Republicans who have moved into the Democratic bastion of Ascension Parish -- Republicans have grown from 13 percent of the registered voters in 1992 to 23 percent today -- Goppelt and her husband, Lou, a chemical engineer, are the parents of five children. The family arrived in the parish in 1994. The Advocate News is based in Baton Rouge, La.
http://www.theadvocate.com/stories/031203/new_crusade001.shtml

Miller: Clark Must Hurry (Business Week, March 12)
As the field of Democrats jockeying for the chance to take on President George W. Bush in 2004 grows, party activists have an eye on one prospective candidate who hails from Arkansas, is a former Rhodes Scholar, and grew up humbly in an adoptive home: retired U.S. Army General Wesley K. Clark, the 58-year-old former Supreme Allied Commander of NATO. If he does enter the race, Clark faces an uphill battle, however. Waiting much longer will put him at a distinct disadvantage against a field that's already organized and collecting cash. "If someone doesn't raise a significant amount of money before the process begins, they have little hope of enduring the rapid set of early primaries," says University of Iowa political scientist ARTHUR MILLER. A Feb. 21-23 Zogby poll of New Hampshire voters found Clark running second to last -- ahead of only Florida Senator Bob Graham -- with just 0.5 percent of the vote in Democratic voter preference.
http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/mar2003/nf20030312_0999_db015.htm

Dane Family Donates To UI (WQAD-TV, March 11)
A family has donated the proceeds from the sale of their Clinton County farm to the University of Iowa for nerve deafness research. The gift from John and Allie Dane will support the research of Doctor BRUCE GANTZ. The university says Gantz and his team have made major strides in stimulating auditory nerve growth and improving hearing through ear implant surgery. The Danes have five children and four of them suffer some hearing loss due to genetic auditory nerve problems. John Dane says he was inspired to help the Gantz team because of the great personal significance their work has had to his family, and the potential to help millions of people with hearing loss. The Dane family donated part of the farm near Clinton to the university in December. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill., and covers the Quad Cities.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1171974&nav=1sW7ETbT

Mossman's Book, Life Profiled (Times-Picayune, March 11)
Dow Mossman poured his energy into the dream of writing the Great American Novel for eight years, finally producing a hefty, autobiographical work that won glowing reviews - and then he vanished. Mark Moskowitz, who was captivated by Mossman's 552-page book, "The Stones of Summer." Moskowitz set out to find the elusive novelist. His quest is chronicled in the documentary "Stone Reader," which opened in select theaters this month to much acclaim. William Cotter Murray, Mossman's mentor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, recalled Mossman struggling with the anxiety, exhaustion and the ambition inherent in writing such a novel. "I remember he was pretty strung out, and a couple of times he just had to stop to save his sanity," Murray said. "Being a mentor on that book was one of the toughest assignments I ever had." It's not uncommon for writers to break down after finishing a book or to quit after writing just one, said FRANK CONROY, an author and director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop. The fiction world is filled with one-hit wonders, like Harper Lee, Margaret Mitchell and John Kennedy Toole. "People think writing is easy," Conroy said. "But it's extremely difficult work, a very hard, unforgiving discipline. It takes intense concentration." The Times-Picayune is based in New Orleans, La. A version of the story also ran March 11 on YAHOO! NEWS and on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, the BALTIMORE SUN and the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.nola.com/newsflash/entertainment/index.ssf?/newsflash/get_story.ssf?/cgi-free/getstory_ssf.cgi?a0636_BC_Film-StoneReader&&news&newsflash-entertainment

Gruca Comments On IEM (CNNMoney, March 11)
If you want a market to be an accurate forecast mechanism, you have to make traders put their money where there mouth is, points out University of Iowa associate professor of marketing TOM GRUCA. Iowa has developed something called the Iowa Electronic Markets, an all-or-nothing futures market where academics use real cash to trade on events. It's best known for its political futures markets, which are widely watched by Washington types and have given good reads on election odds, but lately it's also offered an occasional movie future. The Iowa movie futures have proven to be just as accurate in forecasting 4-week box office returns as HSX has even though it has far fewer participants. Theory says if you have less participants in a market, you have less inputs, and are therefore less accurate. The difference, said Gruca, is money. "We have real money and HSX doesn't," he said. "When people are using real money, they have a motivation to be right versus a motivation to express their opinion."
http://money.cnn.com/2003/03/05/markets/oscars_trading/

Alumna Heads Wellspring Acquisitions (indieWIRE, March 11)
In a changing of the guard at Wellspring, Marie Therese Guirgis has been promoted to head of acquisitions, while Krysanne Katsoolis is leaving the company. Guirgis will be responsible for acquisitions and programming for the company's U.S. theatrical and home video releases. She will also handle some duties for the company's sales unit, which separately handles co-productions. Guirgis has a master's in film studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a B.A. from Vassar. She taught film studies and French at the University of Iowa and joined Wellspring in 1999.
http://www.indiewire.com/biz/biz_030311wellspring.html

UI Releases Graduate Employment Figures (KETV, March 11)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA released figures Tuesday showing how many recent graduates found jobs last year. Despite a national economic downturn, 79 percent of students with business degrees and 87 percent with education degrees found jobs after graduating last May. Both figures are an increase of 1 percentage point from 2001. The numbers were not as good for engineering graduates. About 42 percent accepted jobs last year compared with 70 percent in 2001. The percentage of Iowa graduates who stayed in the state dropped for education students from 52 percent in 2001 to 43 percent this year. Engineering graduates who stayed at home also dropped from 33 percent in 2001 to 27 percent last year. For business graduates, 37 percent took jobs in Iowa last year, an increase from 29 percent in 2001. KETV is based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/education/2033031/detail.html

Websites Speculate On Hussein Fate (Boston Globe, March 11)
In an era of frenzied speculation about a war in Iraq, for-profit websites have taken in millions of dollars in wagers on Saddam Hussein's fate. Betting schemes can be such good predictors that the Pentagon "has inquired about the possibility of using these markets to provide advanced warning of future events," said FORREST NELSON, a professor at the University of Iowa who co-founded an experimental "political stock market." These markets could help the military evaluate the risks of "everything from the overturn of some government to terrorist attacks," Nelson said.
http://www.globe.com/dailyglobe2/070/metro/On_the_Internet_betting_on_Hussein_s_fate_is_heavy+.shtml
A similar article appeared in Internet Magazine (United Kingdom).

Chaisson-Cardenas Comments On Immigrants (Boston Globe, March 11)
A robbery and shooting case where Latinos were wrongfully accused has ignited a debate about immigration in Hull, Iowa, a town of about 2,500 in Sioux county. The Latinos come to work in agricultural industries. Along with valuable labor, immigrants also bring vitality to small rural towns on the decline, said JOHN-PAUL CHAISSON-CARDENAS, director of the Institute for the Support for Latino Families and Communities at the University of Iowa's School of Social Work. "The communities where Latinos are coming in tend to be vibrant communities," he said. "They bring an influx of money, they bring purchasing power with them, and many times they're more likely to go to the small downtown shops than out to the big Wal-Marts."
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/070/nation/Iowa_town_is_riven_by_Latino_presence+.shtml

NBA Player Treated At UI (Toronto Star, March 11)
Lamond Murray of the NBA's Toronto Raptors will have the screws holding his injured foot together removed and will not play for the rest of the season, Raptors officials said yesterday. Murray, a California native, accompanied his teammates on a west coast trip that begins tonight in Denver. At the end of the trip, the forward will travel to Iowa City, Iowa, to visit DR. NED AMENDOLA, an orthopaedic surgeon at the University of Iowa. Amendola will remove the screws he inserted during surgery last fall to repair a ligament.
http://waymoresports.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=waymoresports/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1035778986633&call_page=WM_Home&call_pageid=979619472127&call_pagepath=Home/Home

Baldus Study Cited (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 11)
In an editorial about racial discrimination being a factor in defendants facing the death penalty, a study by Professor DAVID C. BALDUS of the University of Iowa is cited. The study concluded that African-American defendants are at a higher risk of receiving the death sentence than are "similarly situated" non-African-American defendants. Using regression analysis, Professor Baldus concluded that one-third of African Americans on death row in Philadelphia would have received life sentences had they been of another race.
http://www.post-gazette.com/forum/20030311eddeath0311p1.asp

Michigan State Students Protest Ads (State News, March 11)
Five student groups at Michigan State University have joined forces to speak out against the ads that, they say, incite racism and negative sentiments toward Palestinian students. Beginning in late February, The State News, MSU's student newspaper, published two different ads from campustruth.org in four issues. The pro-Israeli organization created the ads to convey its message. State News Editor in Chief Kevin Hardy said other newspapers have printed the ads without inciting violence in the community, but students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will be staging a sit-in. The university's student newspaper also ran the ads.
http://www.statenews.com/article.phtml?pk=16209

Hip Hop Teacher Has UI Ph.D. (Los Angeles Times, March 10)
Todd Boyd's persona -- the tenured professor as hip-hop artist -- is irresistible. Boyd is a professor in the School of Cinema-Television at the University of Southern California, and has 150 USC students in his "Hip-Hop Culture" class. Boyd, 38, has a PhD in critical studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.calendarlive.com/cl-et-baker10mar10.story

Texas Writer Attended Workshop (Fort Worth Star Telegram, March 9)
Beginning this week, folks in far South Texas who shop at HEB grocery stores will be able to purchase milk, bread, cold cuts -- and "Brownsville: Stories," Oscar Casares' first collection of short fiction. Utilizing grocery stores as marketing tools is a unique approach to literary fiction, but then nothing about Casares' writing career is typical. Until 1996, he was an advertising copywriter in Austin who made lots of money but didn't read more than one or two books a year. Yet, within a few years he'd garnered a slot in the renowned UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/startelegram/living/5352665.htm

Porter Book Is Reviewed (Chicago Tribune, March 9)
A new book "The Making of a Black Scholar: From Georgia to the Ivy League" by HORACE A. PORTER, chair of African-American world studies and professor of English at the University of Iowa, is reviewed. The book, published by the University of Iowa Press, traces Porter from his Georgia home, to his distinguished academic career.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/booksmags/chi-0303080077mar09,1,595515.story(registration required)

Lost Mossman Book Noted (Erie Times News, March 9)
Dow Mossman published his novel, "The Stones of Summer," to critical acclaim in 1972 and was hailed as the voice of his generation. Then he disappeared. Filmmaker Mark Moskowitz wanted to know why. His documentary, "Stone Reader," chronicles his search for the forgotten author, a journey that fuels more questions about the value of reading. Without Mossman or anyone else who knew the book, Moskowitz turned to other writers and critics. He scheduled interviews in Maine, New York, Florida and Colorado around his work producing political campaign commercials. Moskowitz filmed FRANK CONROY, head of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Robert Gottlieb, editor of "Catch-22," and critic Leslie Fiedler without telling them about Mossman's book. The newspaper serves Erie, Penn.
http://goerie.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=GE&Date=20030309&Category=NEWS06&ArtNo=103090368&Ref=AR
The story also appeared in the NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA TIMES and PENNLIVE.COM, serving newspapers in Allentown, Easton and Harrisburg, Penn.

Mossman's Book, Life Profiled (Erie Times News, March 9)
Dow Mossman poured his energy into the dream of writing the Great American Novel for eight years, finally producing a hefty, autobiographical work that won glowing reviews - and then he vanished. Mark Moskowitz, who was captivated by Mossman's 552-page book, "The Stones of Summer." Moskowitz set out to find the elusive novelist. His quest is chronicled in the documentary "Stone Reader," which opened in select theaters this month to much acclaim. William Cotter Murray, Mossman's mentor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, recalled Mossman struggling with the anxiety, exhaustion and the ambition inherent in writing such a novel. "I remember he was pretty strung out, and a couple of times he just had to stop to save his sanity," Murray said. "Being a mentor on that book was one of the toughest assignments I ever had." It's not uncommon for writers to break down after finishing a book or to quit after writing just one, said FRANK CONROY, an author and director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop. The fiction world is filled with one-hit wonders, like Harper Lee, Margaret Mitchell and John Kennedy Toole. "People think writing is easy," Conroy said. "But it's extremely difficult work, a very hard, unforgiving discipline. It takes intense concentration." The newspaper serves Erie, Penn.
http://goerie.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=GE&Date=20030309&Category=NEWS06&ArtNo=103090366&Ref=AR
The story also appeared in the NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA TIMES; PENNLIVE.COM, serving newspapers in Allentown, Easton and Harrisburg, Penn.

Eldred Funded Lights For Field (South Florida Sun-Sentinel, March 9)
A feature on pitcher Cal Eldred says the Iowa native and his wife donated $250,000 so lights could be installed on the field he played on at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He made the gift when he was on the disabled list in 2000 and his big league career was in doubt. The Hawkeyes now have night games at Duane Banks Field, named for Eldred's college coach.

Doctor Speaks (Bluefield-Princeton Daily Telegraph, March 9)
Dr. Sakib M. Najjar, of Bluefield Regional Medical Center, will talk about women and heart disease at a women's conference. Najjar is an American cardiologist, who is a native of Jordan. Najjar received his medical training at American University of Beirut, Lebanon, specialized in Internal Medicine at the University of Illinois in Chicago, and sub-specialized in cardiology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Iowa. The newspaper is located in West Virginia.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=2088&dept_id=387611&newsid=7297380&PAG=461&rfi=9

Shenkin Criticizes Coca-Cola Grant (San Antonio News Express, March 8)
Coca-Cola Co. is giving a $1 million grant to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry in a deal critics say conflicts with the group's efforts to fight tooth decay. The arrangement is a conflict of interest, said Dr. JONATHAN SHENKIN, a pediatric dentistry resident at the University of Iowa. Shenkin led research published in January suggesting that the sugar and acidic content in soft drinks wear down tooth enamel.
http://news.mysanantonio.com/story.cfm?xla=saen&xlb=110&xlc=960292

Writers' Workshop Noted (Entertainment Weekly, March 7)
In this article, the Iowa Writers' Workshop is compared to Yale University's Law School, which is producing so many big-name authors. FRANK CONROY, head of the Writers' Workshop says eight of the 25 prose-writing 2001 grads had book deals by 2002.
http://www.ew.com/ew/report/0,6115,427442~5~0~howyaleisturning,00.html

Tracking Stock Study Cited (Wall Street Journal, March 7)
Sprint may promise crystal-clear service for its customers. But deciphering Sprint's financial health can be complicated for shareholders, thanks to an increasingly rare stock structure that also raises potential conflict-of-interest issues. Those issues result from the peculiarities of Sprint's two tracking stocks. A Wall Street creation whose popularity surged during the late 1990s, tracking stocks are less prevalent nowadays. At Sprint, one stock tracks the performance of the traditional business, called FON Group, and the other its wireless business, PCS Group. Over the past two years, PCS's stock is down 83 percent, more than the decline of its peer group, while FON's 44 percent decline isn't quite as bad as its peers. Generally, tracking stocks have underperformed peers, say University of Iowa business school professors MATTHEW T. BILLETT and ANAND M. VIJH.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB104699971768830900,00.html?mod=mkts%5Fmain%5Ffeatured%5Fstories%5Fhs(subscription required)
This story also appeared March 7 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2003/03/07/financial1041EST0062.DTL

Enrollment Sets Record (Omaha World Herald, March 7)
Enrollment at Iowa’s three public universities this semester, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is 67,040 - a record high for the spring term, officials said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=673886

Iowa Poison Center On Guard (Omaha World Herald, March 7)
In old quarters or new, the Iowa Statewide Poison Control Center is one of the least visible but most important soldiers on the front lines of homeland security, emergency information and medical efficiency. The center, located in Sioux City, is a partnership between Iowa Health Systems and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=673930

Coleman Faces Cuts At U-Michigan (Detroit News, March 7)
A budget-cut veteran at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which lost $60 million in a three-year period, former UI president Mary Sue Coleman must now cut $36 million from the University of Michigan’s budget. "This is not the end of the game," Coleman said. "What we have to do is to try to shore up all the areas that we can get support from."
http://www.detnews.com/2003/politics/0303/07/a10-102416.htm

McLeod Tests Trademark (Chronicle of Higher Ed., March 7)
Corporations, beware: KEMBREW MCLEOD is packing a trademark certificate, and he's not afraid to use it. After a student showed him a recent AT&T advertisement using the phrase "Freedom of Expression," Mr. McLeod says he fired off a "cease and desist" letter to the communications giant. Mr. McLeod, an assistant professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa and an expert on intellectual-property law, trademarked that constitutional phrase in 1998 for his anticorporation periodical Freedom of Expression, which he publishes three times a year.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i26/26a00803.htm

Bowlsby On Misbehavior (Chronicle of Higher Ed., March 7)
At a summit convened by the Southeastern Conference and the National Collegiate Athletic Association last month more than 100 college administrators, athletics officials, and members of the news media served on panels to discuss the growing problem of misbehavior associated with college sports, mostly among fans but also among coaches and players. Fans feel entitled to scream at opponents and referees, and to swarm the field after games, said many participants. Representatives from several colleges recommended "fan-proofing" their goal posts, either by strengthening them or by retrofitting them so that stadium workers could take them down before fans get to them. "It's no fun tearing them up if they're already on the ground," said ROBERT A. BOWLSBY, athletics director at the University of Iowa, whose fans uprooted a goal post in Minneapolis last fall after the Hawkeyes clinched a share of the Big Ten Conference title.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i26/26a04301.htm

Throgmorton Notes Protest (Omaha World Herald, March 6)
Students on college and high school campuses across Iowa led anti-war rallies, skipped class or walked out early in a show of unity with classmates demonstrating nationwide Wednesday. More than 150 students and professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA gathered for a noon rally outside the Old Capitol at the heart of campus. Although the University of Iowa historically has been a hotbed of student activism, anti-war sentiment is not widespread and has been trumped - at least for the moment - by the desire to trust the Bush administration, said JIM THROGMORTON, an urban planning professor. "My sense is there is a huge amount of anxiety and a desire to trust the administration for a while," said Throgmorton, who witnessed similar campus activity during Vietnam and the Persian Gulf War. "How much things will stay that way is completely unpredictable. If there is a war, the big unknown is how long it will last and how it will unfold," he said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=672869

UI Graduate Taylor Dies (New York Times, March 5)
Pete Taylor, the radio voice of Iowa State football and basketball for 32 years and an associate athletic director at the school, died Wednesday after being hospitalized for a stroke. He was 57. A 1967 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate, Taylor is survived by his wife, Judy, and two children, Jill and David.
http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/sports/5325843.htm
Versions of this story also appeared March 5, 6 on the Web sites of FOX SPORTS, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, BALTIMORE SUN, MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, GAINESVILLE (Fla.) SUN, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, KANSAS CITY STAR, WICHITA EAGLE, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, SAN LUIS OBISPO TRIBUNE, SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, SEATTLE TIMES, BOSTON GLOBE, TIMES DAILY (Ala.), MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, COLUMBIA (S.C.) STATE, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, FLORIDA TIMES UNION, HARTFORD (Conn.) COURANT, BISMARCK (N.D.) TRIBUNE, FORT LAUDERDALE SUN SENTINEL, HAMPTON ROADS DAILY PRESS (Va.) and YAHOO NEWS

Baldus Study Questioned (NEPA.com, March 5)
Gov. Ed Rendell and Attorney General Mike Fisher, who helped write Pennsylvania's death penalty law 25 years ago, are opposed to a Supreme Court committee's proposed moratorium on executions, their spokesmen said Wednesday. The high court's Committee on Racial and Gender Bias in the Justice System issued a report Tuesday urging the state to stay all executions until it can ensure the death penalty is administered fairly, regardless of the race of the defendant. In calling for a moratorium, the report cited studies of Philadelphia's courts that said black defendants are more likely to be sentenced to death than defendants of other races. Annmarie Kaiser, executive director of the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association, questioned the committee's use of the studies--particularly two conducted by University of Iowa Law School Professor DAVID C. BALDUS--which she said were authored by "well-known death penalty opponents." The committee's chairman, Duquesne University's School of Law Dean Nicholas Cafardi, defended the use of Baldus' work. The group that worked on capital punishment issues was made up of attorneys and judges who believed the research was trustworthy, Cafardi said. (NEPA.com is a news Web site for Northeast Pennsylvania.)
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=7271670&BRD=2212&PAG=461&dept_id=465812&rfi=6
A version of this story also appeared March 5 on PhillyBurbs.com, a news Web site for suburban Philadelphia

UI Workshop Wins Medal (Humanities Magazine, March 5)
An article about this year's Humanities Medal winners, including the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, notes that Three walls of the office of FRANK CONROY, director of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, contain floor-to-ceiling bookcases, and they are completely full. They are filled with the works of the writers who have graduated from this prestigious creative writing and poetry program begun at the University of Iowa in 1936. “The program is the humanities,” says Conroy. “The basis of the humanities is the written word as represented by books and poetry.” The success of the program is evident at the bookstore as a force in American literature. Conroy notes that twenty-five prose students graduated from the program in 2001. “By 2002, seven had serious books of literature in bookstores,” he says. He adds that a recent graduate, Adam Haskell, was just nominated for a National Book Award for his collection of stories, You Are Welcome. “In the face of popular culture, the Workshop helps keep alive literary culture,” he says.
http://www.neh.fed.us/news/humanities/2003-03/medalists.html

Shenkin Criticizes Coca-Cola Grant (Detroit News, March 5)
Coca-Cola Co. is giving a $1 million grant to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry in a deal critics say conflicts with the group's efforts to fight tooth decay. The arrangement is a conflict of interest, said Dr. JONATHAN SHENKIN, a pediatric dentistry resident at the University of Iowa. Shenkin led research published in January suggesting that the sugar and acidic content in soft drinks wear down tooth enamel. Versions of the article also ran March 4 on the websites of the SEATTLE TIMES, CHICAGO TRIBUNE; the MONTANA STANDARD, based in Butte, Mont.; WRAL-TV in North Carolina; ST. CATHARINES STANDARD in Canada; WBBM-TV in Illinois, KERO-TV in California, WSB-TV in Georgia, the AUSTRALIAN FINANCIAL REVIEW; NEWSDAY in New York; KOCO-TV in Oklahoma; THE SYDNEY (Australia) MORNING HERALD; KRQE-TV in New Mexico; WBAY-TV in Wisconsin; WHNS-TV and KESQ-TV in California; WTVM-TV in Georgia; WHAG-TV in Maryland; KSFY-TV in South Dakota; WKRN-TV in Tennessee; WECT-TV in North Carolina; WKBN-TV in Ohio; WAFF-TV in Alabama; WTEN-TV in New York; WRIC-TV in Virginia; WLUC-TV in Michigan; WALB-TV in Georgia; KTVO-TV in Montana; NEWS 14 CAROLINA in North Carolina; THE OTTAWA CITIZEN in Canada; CANADA.COM; WKYT-TV in Kentucky; KRON4.COM in California; WJXX in Florida; KFVS in Montana; WLOX in Mississippi; KFOR-TV in Oklahoma; KAIT-TV in Arkansas; WPMI in Alabama; WISH-TV in Indiana; WOOD-TV in Michigan; WSTM-TV in New York; WAVY-TV in Virginia; WHNT in Alabama; KRNV-TV in Nevada; WHBF in Illinois; WCAX in Vermont; KPLC-TV in Louisiana; THE BILLINGS GAZETTE in Montana; KTUL in Oklahoma; WSET in Virginia; YAHOO NEWS; KATU.COM in Oregon; THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS in Alabama; the FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE in Indiana; THE AKRON BEACON JOURNAL in Ohio; THE BILOXI SUN HERALD in Mississippi; THE BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT in Illinois; the DULUTH NEWS-DEMOCRAT in Illinois; the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota; the ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS in South Dakota; THE KANSAS CITY STAR in Missouri; the WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas; the BOSTON GLOBE; the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE; the MACON, Ga., TELEGRAPH; ABCNEWS.COM; TIMES DAILY in Alabama; the WILKES BARRE, Penn., WEEKENDER; the GRAND FORKS HERALD in North Dakota; THE SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE in Florida; the CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania; ATHENS (Ga.) BANNER-HERALD; JEFFERSON CITY NEWS TRIBUNE; TALLAHASSE DEMOCRAT; and NDTV, a news Web site in India
http://www.detnews.com/2003/business/0303/05/b03-100364.htm

Lewin Writes on Adoption (New York Times, March 4)
In a letter to the editor ELLEN LEWIN, a UI professor of women's studies, responds to a March 2 news article, "Gay Couple Challenges Florida Ban on Homosexual Adoptions." She writes: "The cruelty that underlies Florida's law banning adoptions by gay people but not foster care or permanent guardianship has proliferated around the country, a reaction to the increasing visibility of gay and lesbian families, many formed by adoption. The "evidence" that opponents of gay and lesbian adoption cite is based on images of two-parent families as durable reservoirs of parental wisdom. Yet a substantial body of work has shown that gay mothers and fathers are no different in their parenting abilities from heterosexual parents and that their children are indistinguishable in later life from other children."
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/03/04/opinion/L04GAYY.html

DiCarlo Comments On Debt (Omaha World-Herald, March 4)
An increasing number of college students throughout Iowa are racking up credit card and student loan debt. Experts say the rising cost of tuition at Iowa colleges and universities, more reliance on student loans and the ease of getting credit cards puts students deeper in debt than ever before. A free financial counseling clinic for students is available at the University of Iowa. "I think we're talking about skills one needs for a lifetime," said MONIQUE DICARLO, director of the Women's Resource and Action Center who started the program. "We need to make sure as an educational institution that we're providing them with that life skill."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=670644

UI Student Won Tylenol Scholarship (UPI, March 4)
This year the makers of Tylenol will award scholarships totaling $250,000, including 10 grants of $10,000 each, to 160 outstanding students in undergraduate and graduate programs in a variety of health-related fields. Among last year's $10,000 scholarship winners was Angela Bollman, from Lena, Ill., a freshman pharmacy major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Bollman says she loved chemistry in high school and was advised to consider pharmacy as a career. At the beginning of her senior year, she was profiled as student of the week in her local newspaper, which led to a job offer as a pharmacy technician. "I really enjoyed working at the pharmacy," she said.
http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20030304-073907-8857r

Alumnus Killed (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, March 4)
William "Bill" Hyde, a Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary graduate killed Tuesday after a bomb exploded at a Philippine airport, was described at the Fort Worth institution as a bighearted servant. Hyde, a 24-year missions veteran, was at the Davao city airport to meet Southern Baptist missionaries as they returned from a family trip to Manila. He was among 19 people killed in the explosion. The Southern Baptist Convention's International Mission Board in Richmond, Va., said Hyde suffered severe head and leg injuries and died in surgery. Hyde was born Feb. 3, 1944, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. According a mission board statement, he received bachelor's and master's degrees in music from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA during the early 1970s and a master of divinity degree at Southwestern in 1991. The Star-Telegram is based in Texas.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/startelegram/news/local/5315786.htm

Griffith Wins Grant (Memphis Business Journal, March 4)
THOMAS GRIFFITH, an assistant professor of urologic oncology in the department of urology at the University of Iowa, is one of three gene therapy scientists included in a three year, $1.5 million grant from the Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy, Inc. The Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy is a foundation based in Stamford, Conn. The Journal is based in Memphis, Tenn.

UI Noted For Research (Omaha World-Herald, March 4)
A $20 million incentives package aimed at keeping a biotech company in Iowa was approved Monday by a House subcommittee. TransOva Genetics, based in Sioux Center in northwest Iowa, has become a symbol of the state's goal of becoming a serious player in the emerging field of biotechnology. The company is developing a process in which the blood and milk of specially bred cattle can be used to develop proteins and other products used by the pharmaceutical industry in manufacturing drugs and dietary supplements. Rep. Clarence Hoffman, R-Charter Oak, one of the architects of the incentive package, said the incentive package makes sense because it dovetails with groundbreaking protein research being done at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=670318

Dental Resident Quoted In Story (New York Times, March 4)
In one of the more unlikely industry-health partnerships, a soft drink company will give about $1 million to an organization dedicated to the health of children's teeth to promote health education and research. The story quotes Dr. JONATHON SHENKIN, a second-year resident at the department of pediatric dentistry at the University of Iowa, as being concerned about the partnership. "Such an arrangement presents a clear conflict of interest," he said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/03/04/national/04DENT.html

Skorton Takes Charge (Omaha World Herald, March 4)
The University of Iowa's new president wasted little time in making an impact, announcing Monday that his office would oversee athletics. DAVID SKORTON, installed as the university's 19th president on Saturday, also ordered a campus-wide review of diversity programs and the reorganization of several departments.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=670656

Workshop Wins Medal (Chronicle of Higher Ed., March 3)
President Bush has presented National Humanities Medals for 2002 to six people and two organizations. The winners were recognized for their contributions to the nation's understanding of and engagement with the humanities. The awards were presented in a ceremony at the White House on Thursday. Among the recipients was The Iowa Writers' Workshop of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. In 1936, it became the first creative-writing degree program offered by an American university. It has since served as a model for similar programs.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2003/03/2003030306n.htm

Developer Is UI Alumnus (Palm Desert Sun, March 3)
In this profile of real estate developer Richard Oliphant, it’s noted that he studied engineering and chemistry at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where his father helped run a heating plant. The Palm Desert Sun serves the Coachella Valley in Southern California.
http://www.thedesertsun.com/news/stories/business/1046570063.shtm

UI Student Decries Proposal (Chicago Tribune, March 2)
Landlords and tenants say the city's proposed rules cracking down on problem renters is too heavy handed. The proposed rules would allow city officials to suspend or revoke a landlord's rental permit for properties identified as a nuisance. The rules were recommended by officials who were frustrated by problem rental properties. They would require landlords to evict tenants charged with trespassing, public intoxication, illegal alcohol possession, animal neglect or indecent exposure, two or more times in a year. Tenants could also be evicted for three or more nuisance citations. Jessica Gissal, 20, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sophomore and renter, said landlords, not the city, should decide who should stay and who should go. "I think the landlords should have their own set of standards of when tenants should be kicked out, they shouldn't be told by the city," Gissal said. "I don't think behavior reflects how good of a tenant you are."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/realestate/realestate/chi-0303020390mar02,1,6857155.story

Segura Comments On War (Los Angeles Times, March 2)
Like the political differences that divided the country in the 2000 presidential election between George W. Bush and Al Gore, public opinion about a war in Iraq is again showcasing America's fissures. This time the split is less even and voters in the middle -- those whose support for war is conditioned on U.N. Security Council blessings or projections about costs and casualties -- hold the balance of power. A recent survey by the Pew Research Center for People & the Press shows a third of the country is not paying particular attention to impending war, and one political scientist argued that these voters are likely in the president's camp. "Those without a lot of knowledge historically defer to presidential leadership on international affairs," said GARY SEGURA, a political scientist at the University of Iowa.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-wartalk2mar02,1,172849.story

Weinstein Studies Scoliosis (Seattle Times, March 2)
Many adolescents diagnosed with spine curvatures can skip braces, surgery or other treatments without developing debilitating physical impairments later in life, a 50-year study suggests. Previous research presented a grim prognosis and led to school-screening programs in 26 states. Untreated patients did have more back pain and more body-image concerns than study participants with normal spines. But 50 years after diagnosis, untreated patients had similar death rates and were just as functional and likely to lead productive lives as people with normal spines, said the study's lead author, Dr. STUART WEINSTEIN of the University of Iowa.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=healthvitals02&date=20030302&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

Nygren Named Manager (New Orleans Times-Picayune, March 2)
Ian Nygren has been named nurse manager of the emergency room at River Parishes Hospital in LaPlace. Nygren received a paramedic certificate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS and a bachelor's degree in nursing from William Carey College.
http://www.nola.com/news/t-p/index.ssf?/base/news-0/1046588114138012.xml

Skorton Is Installed (Omaha World Herald, March 2)
DAVID SKORTON was installed Saturday as the president of the University of Iowa with a commitment to help restore the state's economy and to keep the university "nothing less than a jewel." "I stand today in awe of the task that we must share. No less a task than steering this university to the future," he said. Skorton, 53, had been the university's vice president for research and external affairs. He was hired for the top spot in January after a five-month nationwide search. Skorton was installed as the university's 19th president in front of about 700 people during a ceremony at Iowa's Hancher Auditorium.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=669111

Alumnus Launches Online Group (Hindustan Times, March 2)
In a story about an online community called Pantoto, it’s noted that it was launched by the Bangalore, India-based T.B. Dinesh, who completed his Ph.D in computer science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Hindustan Times is an Indian newspaper.
http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_201806,0003.htm

Author Attended Workshop (Brownsville Herald, March 2)
For Oscar Casares, the art of telling stories runs thick through his veins and now through the pages of his first published collection of nine short stories titled "Brownsville." In 2001, Casares completed the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and Master of Fine Arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.brownsvilleherald.com/sections/archive/topstoryjmp/3-2-03/News3.htm

Mossman Story Told (Omaha World Herald, March 2)
An author whose weighty first novel was heralded in 1972 as "burning with generational fire" and who was compared favorably to James Joyce, Mark Twain and J.D. Salinger never published another. Steven Dow Mossman's 1972 novel, "The Stones of Summer," was heralded by the New York Times review. He virtually disappeared. The mystery led filmmaker Mark Moskowitz on a yearlong journey to find author Steven Dow Mossman, now retired and living in Cedar Rapids. Moskowitz's film, "Stonereader," has opened to rave reviews in New York. Mossman studied at the IOWA WRITER’S WORKSHOP.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=666766

Nelson Comments On Markets (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, March 2)
Tradesports.com had a futures market open for when Saddam Hussein will leave office. Tradesports CEO John Delaney says his firm is not a bookmaker, it's a futures market, and odds here are more reliable than "experts" because it is a consensus of worldwide opinion from people putting their money where their mouth is. There's something to that, says FORREST NELSON, a University of Iowa economics professor and a pioneer in political futures trading modeled after the markets that trade winter wheat and hog bellies. His markets have focused on presidential elections, and he says they have been more accurate than polls since 1988. About $150,000 changed hands during the 2000 election, said Nelson. He said the Commodities Futures Trading Commission 10 years ago ruled that his markets were not legal but were "not against the public interest." He said they allowed him to continue if he did not charge commissions. "There's a very fine line between what is gambling and what is not," he said, adding that the markets have a certain "social benefit." "One may argue that it's important to know when we go to war," he said. Nelson said the Department of Defense has talked to him about performing studies to see if markets can predict wars or other geo-political events better.

UI Tours Are On Video (Omaha World Herald, March 2)
Checking out colleges with your teenager can be costly, but Cliff Kramon has come up with a quick, cost-effective way to tour schools nationwide and worldwide without leaving your home. Kramon works as an independent college adviser in Tenafly, N.J., helping students decide what college is right for them. As part of that business, he regularly videotaped tours at colleges across the country for his clients to watch. Once his library became large enough, he decided it might be a business of its own. Called Collegiate Choice Walking Tours, it offers videos of student tours at 410 colleges nationwide and 11 in five foreign countries. Included in his clips file are videotapes of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Creighton University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University, Iowa's Drake University and three Iowa colleges: Grinnell, Cornell and Coe.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=1458&u_sid=666836

Nixon Battles Ice (Washington Post, March 1)
The rock salt crystals crunching under tires around Washington came from quarries and mines and massive pools of evaporating seawater. Tomorrow's ice-melters might come from a different source: farmers' fields. In the battle to find the perfect way to eliminate dangerous ice, scientists are experimenting with all sorts of seemingly oddball ingredients: sugar beets, soybean husks and the soupy "steep water" that remains after tons of corn have been parboiled. They're also employing satellites, computers and high-tech road surfaces that can dispense ice-melting chemicals with the regularity of gigantic nicotine patches. They have a simple-sounding aim in mind: "The goal behind this is to stop the snow from sticking to the road," said WILFRID A. NIXON, a University of Iowa engineer who started his career by studying glaciers. In the end, the best solution may come from more specific forecasts. "The key thing is to begin with a forecast that works, that will tell you 12 hours before a storm begins when it's going to start and how it's going to progress," Nixon said. He said there's one final element: motorists who simply drive too fast. He's given the issue some thought. "How do you persuade the average driver to go a little slower when there's snow on the road? One thing that seems to have a great effect is if they see a car in the ditch, they slow down. The thought arises, why don't you put cars in the ditch before it starts snowing?" He admitted that liability problems would probably preclude such a technique.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A18574-2003Feb28.html

Nelson On Markets (Atlanta Journal Constitution, March 1)
Tradesports.com has a futures market open for when Saddam Hussein will leave office. Tradesports CEO John Delaney says his firm is not a bookmaker, it's a futures market, and odds here are more reliable than "experts" because it is a consensus of worldwide opinion from people putting their money where their mouth is. There's something to that, says FORREST NELSON, a University of Iowa economics professor and a pioneer in political futures trading modeled after the markets that trade winter wheat and hog bellies. His markets have focused on presidential elections, and he says they have been more accurate than polls since 1988. About $150,000 changed hands during the 2000 election, said Nelson. He said the Commodities Futures Trading Commission 10 years ago ruled that his markets were not legal but were "not against the public interest." He said they allowed him to continue if he did not charge commissions. "There's a very fine line between what is gambling and what is not," he said, adding that the markets have a certain "social benefit." "One may argue that it's important to know when we go to war," he said. Nelson said the Department of Defense has talked to him about performing studies to see if markets can predict wars or other geo-political events better than analysts. "What if we had a market for terrorist attacks in existence in September 2001?"
http://www.accessatlanta.com/ajc/news/iraq/0303/01iraqside.html

UI Studies Senior Internet Use (Senior Times, March 2003)
A story about the growing number of older adults who are relying on the Internet to obtain medical information cites a study published in the February issue of Chest, the peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Chest Physicians. The study, conducted by researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, found that patients with lung cancer are increasingly using the Internet as a major resource for information about their disease and that patients tend to overrate the quality of medical information they find on the Internet.

Former UI Athlete Featured (Readers Digest, March 2003)
The magazine's "Everyday Heroes" section features Brad McCorkle, a former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA track star who used his speed to chase and catch a bank robber.

Former UI Athlete Featured (Readers Digest, March 2003)
The magazine's "Everyday Heroes" section features Brad McCorkle, a former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA track star who used his speed to chase and catch a bank robber.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The University of Iowa All rights reserved copyright 2006