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UI in the News

July, 2003

See UI in the New Archive Index

 

IEM Is Solid Nonfinancial Market (Philadelphia Inquirer, July 31)
Imagine you could make money if a suicide bomber struck in the Middle East. You could, if you bet someone that there would be an attack, and there was one. But would you do it? When the Pentagon disclosed Monday that it was setting up a futures-trading market for speculators to bet on the likelihood of terrorist acts, the outrage was so quick and intense that the plan was scuttled the next day. As planned, the terrorism futures scheme would have been used to predict -- and thwart -- acts of terrorism, the Pentagon said. With lives saved, questions of taste and morality would have melted away. Typical futures markets are used for speculating on future prices of commodities such as wheat and oil. Futures contracts are used to lock in a commodity's price months down the road. These enormous markets are a proven tool for revealing the consensus about where prices are headed. They work quite well. Futures have also been used to forecast outcomes in nonfinancial events. Since 1988, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has operated the Iowa Electronic Markets, in which traders buy and sell contracts forecasting results of presidential and other elections.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/business/personal_finance/6422415.htm

IEM Cited As Model That Works (New York Times, July 31)
The so-called terrorism futures market sounded like a hoax: investors would have been able to make money from attacks and strife. Now that the red-faced Pentagon has closed down the project, it's appropriate to ask, "What were they thinking?" The Department of Defense argued that markets "are extremely efficient, effective and timely aggregators of dispersed and even hidden information...often better than expert opinions." That's true. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has a neat system allowing bettors to establish the odds for candidates in races in America and overseas. The Iowa markets have generally done a better job than pollsters at predicting the outcomes of elections. Markets also do a great job at more traditional tasks, like matching buyers and sellers and setting prices for everything from chickens to semiconductor chips. Still, the Pentagon's concept is flawed. Markets are not very good at setting prices for rare events. Those who trade in the Iowa political exchange have the benefit of historical election results and daily polls; property insurance companies know full well when the Florida hurricane season starts. But could markets have given us a price for the odds of a shooting in the balcony of City Hall in New York? Sure, markets learn from experience. It's been a long time, though, since Aaron Burr shot Alexander Hamilton -- and that was across the river in New Jersey.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/31/opinion/31BUCH.html

Clinic Director Is UI Alumnus (Winchester Star, July 31)
A story about David S. Sims Jr. the new clinic director at Physiotherapy Associates in Winchester, notes that he earned a master's degree in biomechanics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1980. The newspaper is based in Virginia.
http://www.winchesterstar.com/TheWinchesterStar/030731/Business_physiotherapy.asp

Scuttled Pentagon Plan Was Based On IEM (WISC.com, July 31)
A project to create a financial market in geopolitical turmoil has already been scrapped only days after details were unveiled to the public. A division of the Pentagon, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) had plans to create a futures trading market for speculative trading on events in the Middle East. The plan was disclosed Monday by outraged Democratic Sens. Ron Wyden of Oregon and Byron Dorgan of North Dakota and was scrapped by Tuesday. Why all the fuss? The futures contracts that were envisioned would have allowed traders to buy financial instruments predicting the likelihood of certain events. For example, a trader could purchase a contract based on the probability of Yasser Arafat being assassinated in the 3rd quarter of 2003. The unfortunate side effect is that you could purchase such a contract, assassinate Mr. Arafat and then get paid by the financial markets for your criminal actions. The model was a futures trading program developed by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to predict presidential election results. The television station is based in Madison, Wis.
http://www.channel3000.com/money/2370016/detail.html

UI Health Care Offers Headache Tips (WBAY.com, July 31)
A story about teenagers' headaches lists information about symptoms and remedies provides by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE. The television station is based in Green Bay, Wis.
http://www.wbay.com/Global/story.asp?S=1382066&nav=51s6HCCY

UI Student Featured (Mount Prospect Times, July 31)
A story about a local miniature golf and batting range notes that one of the summer employees, Dave Grandsart is a junior computer science major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. His great-grandfather started the business and his grandfather is now the co-owner. This article also appeared July 31 in the CARY-GROVE COUNTRYSIDE. Both papers are in suburban Chicago.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/sports/current/mp/07-31-03-74135.html

Neumann Comments Information Markets (NPR, July 30)
The Pentagon has killed a controversial program to create a futures market for predicting political events and terrorist acts in the Middle East. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency had developed the idea as a potential tool for gauging political risks, but just about everyone in Washington turned their backs on the program once it was publicized. The program would have allowed traders to buy contracts on future events in eight Middle Eastern Countries just the way commodities traders bet on the future price of pork bellies. The Concept of information markets is a popular one among economists. GEORGE NEUMANN teaches economics at the University of Iowa and he loves the idea. "There's a need for more information markets in the U.S rather than less." Neumann is involved in the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, which claims to have a pretty good track record for predicting electoral results. Up until Congress killed the DARPA project on Tuesday, Neumann had been working as a contractor on that effort. He says businesses use information markets all the time to weigh opinions and plan for the future. He says it's basically a refined form of polling. "In polls, everyone is always trying to get a random sample. The last thing we want is a random sample. We want the best and the brightest traders." Neumann says the whole idea was attacked before anyone understood what was planned. This segment aired on Morning Edition.
http://discover.npr.org/rundowns/segment.jhtml?wfId=1370541

Berg, Rietz Comment On Policy Market (New Scientist, July 30)
In an extraordinary day in Washington on Tuesday, a government-backed futures market aimed at predicting terrorist attacks and other events was both revealed and then cancelled. The Policy Assessment Market aimed to predict events relating to U.S. interests in the Middle East by encouraging anonymous investors to speculate in an online futures market. Using futures markets to predict future events is not new. US presidential elections have been analysed by the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) since 1986. It claims to be twice as accurate as pundits. THOMAS RIETZ, a director of the IEM, is doubtful speculators would really have provided helpful intelligence. When betting on presidential elections, he says, people can use their network of friends, family and workmates to form an opinion - that would not be the case for terrorist activity. JOYCE BERG, also a director of the IEM, believes PAM would have been worth a try: "I think that we need more ways to gather information. This project was a possible way and the only way to find out if it can work is to test it."
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99994007

Neumann Comments On Market Effectiveness (Chicago Tribune, July 30)
There are financial markets for just about everything: the future price of coffee, the weather, barge freight rates and whom the Democrats will nominate for president. And until Tuesday, the Pentagon was ready to back creation of another market, one that would have allowed investors to speculate on assassinations and political coups in the Mideast. One of the more non-traditional uses of futures contracts has been at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where since 1988 the Iowa Electronic Markets have facilitated the buying and selling of futures in presidential election results. It's a way of taking established, proven economic theory and applying it to social and political science, said GEORGE NEUMANN, professor of economics and applied mathematics and one of the founders of the program. The markets--fueled by the incentive of people involved to prevail by using their experience and knowledge--can better predict outcomes than a poll of the general population, Neumann said. "I go out and ask a random sample of people something, I get answers from people who aren't interested, who haven't thought about the issue--and they'll still have an opinion," he said. "In the markets, you get a real selectivity principle going. Only those who think they know something about trading or about the underlying fundamental issue come in." Neumann said he is convinced the concept of a market established to gather data will be revisited. "This idea is so fundamentally interesting," he said. "They'll be back at it."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-0307300302jul30,1,1302181.story

Forsythe Comments On Pentagon Idea (Bloomberg.com, July 30)
At first blush, it seemed like a goofy idea, which is probably why it was scrapped: a Pentagon initiative allowing folks to make trading bets on terrorist attacks in the Middle East. The Defense Department planned to harness the collective wisdom of the market to tip intelligence agencies off to any brewing coups, assassinations or other terrorist machinations. What the Pentagon intended to do with such information was unclear. "My first reaction was, trade in what?'" says, ROBERT FORSYTHE co-founder of the Iowa Electronic Markets, run by the University of Iowa Henry B. Tippie College of Business, where participants have been able to make on-line bets on political outcomes (elections), company earnings and stock market returns since 1988. Had the Pentagon plan come to fruition, it would have been the first time taxpayer dollars were used to finance what Congress thought was off-track betting (in the literal sense). The Pentagon had asked for $8 million through 2005 to set up the project, known as the Policy Analysis Market (PAM), to focus on ``economic, civil, and military futures of Egypt, Jordan, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Turkey and the impact of U.S. involvement with each,'' according to the web site. "It's unfortunate that it's being labeled as a harebrained scheme,'" Forsythe says. "There may have been good reasons not to proceed, but I wish there had been a good dialogue on the pros and cons in this case."
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000039&cid=baum&sid=a48hDtqzav7

IEM Effectiveness Cited (Wired.com, July 30)
Critics blasted policy-makers Tuesday for dropping a controversial plan to create a futures market to help predict terrorist strikes. Legislators like Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) may have found the Pentagon's Policy Analysis Market, or PAM, "grotesque." But proponents of "idea markets" say PAM's quicksilver cancellation will rob the country's intelligence agencies of a tool with a strong history of accurately predicting future events. Projects similar to PAM, like the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, which speculate on election results, have been surprisingly reliable indicators of what's going to happen next. The Iowa market hasn't been perfect -- it forecast a Democrat-controlled Senate in 2002. But over the course of 14 elections, the Iowa Electronic Markets' stock prices were on average a half of a percentage point closer to the results of the actual political races than the final polls were.
http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0,1283,59818,00.html

Columnist Blasts 'Terrorism Market' (Washington Post, July 30)
Hey, want to make a killing shooting Yasser Arafat? What odds will you give me on a terrorist attack this summer on western tourists at the pyramids? No, it's not a hoax. It's all part of a scheme the Pentagon cooked up for a futures market on geopolitical outcomes in the Middle East. Yesterday's cancellation of the project is the latest political embarrassment for an intelligence establishment already accused of ignoring warnings about a terrorist attack and allowing itself to be manipulated into providing justification for an Iraq war. The plan is also the latest and loopiest manifestation of a near-religious belief within the Bush administration in the power of markets to solve all problems -- or at least those that can't be cured by tax cuts. The idea for using futures markets to predict world events originated at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Program Officer Michael Foster was intrigued with the political futures market run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that seemed to be better at predicting the outcome of presidential elections than pollsters and pundits.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A64741-2003Jul29.html

IEM Noted In Policy Market Story (San Francisco Chronicle, July 30)
Facing a hailstorm of criticism from Democrats and Republicans, the Bush administration abruptly pulled the plug Tuesday on a proposed Pentagon research project to allow investors to make bets on the probabilities of terrorist attacks, assassinations and coups in the Middle East. The program -- called the Policy Analysis Market -- was the brainchild of the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA. Supporters of the proposal, including a number of prominent economists, argue that "decision markets" such as the one proposed by the Pentagon can be very useful in using the collective knowledge of investors -- as expressed in their betting on prices -- to predict outcomes. For example, the Iowa Electronic Markets, run by the business school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, allows investors to buy and sell "shares" in candidates and has been shown in some studies to be better than pollsters at predicting election results.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2003/07/30/MN213765.DTL

Neumann Explains Futures Markets (Orange County Register, July 29)
The Pentagon dropped a controversial plan Tuesday to establish a futures market that it hoped would help predict terrorist strikes. The article notes forecasting powers of futures markets such as the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, an exchange run by the University of Iowa that invites participants to speculate on the outcome of presidential elections. Its average forecast error for the popular vote in the last four is 1.37 percentage points - about half the average error of major polling organizations. GEORGE NEUMANN, an economics professor and co-founder of the Iowa market, explains how a futures market can outperform opinion polls: "I go out and ask a random sample of people something, I get answers from people who aren't interested, who haven't thought about the issue -- and they'll still have an opinion," he said. "The principle of putting your money where your mouth is doesn't operate in traditional survey questions, but it does operate here -- when you have something at stake."
http://www2.ocregister.com/ocrweb/ocr/article.do?id=50139&section=NEWS&subsection=NEWS&year=2003&month=7&day=30

Forsythe Comments On IEM's Record (CBS News, July 28)
As part of story about a Pentagon futures market to predict political and terror attacks, ROBERT FORSYTHE, senior associate dean, says the Iowa Electronic Markets has predicted election results for the presidential market within two percent accuracy for the past 15 years. He said the IEM "takes all available information traders have individually, and brings it together so all that information is reflected in the trading price."
http://www.cbsnews.com/sections/i_video/main500251.shtml#eveningnews (see Terror Betting Nixed)

IEM Noted For Predicting Elections (CNN Money, July 30)
The Defense Department and the Bush Administration quickly stepped away from backing a futures market aimed at forecasting events, which would have allowed traders to speculate on the potential for terrorist attacks, assassinations and the like after the idea was branded as ludicrous and repugnant by Democratic lawmakers. Theoretically, futures markets are good at forecasting event outcomes first, because the traders active in them have access to far more information as a group than they do individually and, second, because new information can be quickly transmitted through the market, via price. In practice the theory holds up well. Ever since 1988 the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has run a futures exchange called the Iowa Electronic Markets, best known for its political futures markets, where traders bet on election results. In the past four presidential elections the market's election forecast was more accurate than polling data.
http://money.cnn.com/2003/07/29/commentary/bidask/bidask2/

IEM Served As Model (Australian Financial Review, July 30)

Senate Democrats are in an uproar about a new Pentagon project they're calling too bizarre to be true: an online futures exchange where the "commodities" are possible Middle East events such as the assassination of political leaders. The intent of the project, called the Policy Analysis Market, is to use "market-based techniques for avoiding surprise and predicting future events", according to a Pentagon report to Congress. One question posed in the Pentagon report: "Will terrorists attack Israel with bioweapons in the next year?" Traders would be those willing to bet their own money on when the events will occur. The effort is loosely based on the Iowa Electronic Markets, a futures exchange run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Business, that anticipates US election results and Federal Reserve decisions.
http://afr.com/articles/2003/07/29/1059244618805.html

Hunnicutt Comments On Work Stress (Indianapolis Star, July 30)
A story offering tips for dealing with stress at work says that people who expect their jobs to fulfill too many parts of their lives are bound to be disappointed. "Instead of finding Prince Charming at work, they find Dilbert," says BENJAMIN KLINE HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa. (This story originally appeared June 16 in the Arizona Republic.)
http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/6/061703-9286-031.html

UI Press Book Cited (Marin Independent Journal, July 30)
A story about the origins of the sandwich cites the book "Rare Bits: Unusual Origins of Popular Recipes" by Patricia Bunning Stevens, published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. (The publication is based in California.)
http://www.marinij.com/Stories/0,1413,234~24409~1541634,00.html

Tranel Comments On Tumor (Independent Online, July 30)
A 40-year-old man who complained to doctors about headaches couldn't stop leering at female nurses. He had been in trouble with the law for sexual advances toward his stepdaughter, and now he was talking about raping his landlady. The man had an egg-sized brain tumor pressing on the right frontal lobe. When surgeons removed it, the lewd behavior and pedophilia faded away. Exactly why, the surgeons cannot quite explain. DANIEL T. TRANEL, a University of Iowa neurology researcher, said he has seen people with brain tumors lie, damage property, and in extremely rare cases, commit murder. "The individual simply loses the ability to control impulses or anticipate the consequences of choices," Tranel said. (The publication is based in South Africa.) Versions of this story appeared July 30 on the web sites of the TORONTO STAR and OMAHA WORLD-HERALD and July 28 in the SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE.
http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?click_id=117&art_id=vn20030730094739660C646557&set_id=1

UI Research Aids Constipated Kids (Dr.Koop.com, July 30)
A recent study confirms the effectiveness of polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG) therapy, a treatment for chronic constipation in children. Constipation is common among pediatric patients. It accounts for 3 percent of outpatient visits to general pediatric clinics and 25 percent of visits to pediatric gastroenterology clinics. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE say PEG is a nontoxic and highly soluble compound that is minimally absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. This allows it to increase fecal water content and relieve constipation. Past research has studied the effectiveness of short-term PEG use, but this study is the first to monitor the long-term effectiveness of the laxative.
http://drkoop.com/template.asp?page=newsdetail&ap=93&id=8006678

UI Student's Research Cited (Online Journalism Review, July 30)
The Internet has had a sordid history of awards and pseudo-awards given for web sites. They have ranged from Point's Top 5% of the Web (later taken over by Lycos) to Cool Site of the Day to the vaunted Webbys. Add that history to the orgy of journalism awards, from local press clubs to the Pulitzers, and you can safely assume that online journalism is a rewarding field. The USC Annenberg School for Communication -- which publishes Online Journalism Review -- recently got into the act and is now a partner in the Online Journalism Awards. The bad news comes from a recent study of award-winning sites that posits they won because of eye-catching "bells and whistles" instead of great writing. The conundrum is that many top media sites use repurposed material from adjunct newspaper, television or radio content. So the best work might be jazzier versions of offline stories, with added multimedia pizazz. The modest study is the work of Erin Robinson, actually her honors thesis for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she just completed her Bachelor of Arts in Journalism/Mass Communications. A lot of her work is subjective analysis of last year's winners of the Online Journalism Awards, EPpys and Edgies. Her basic conclusion is a bit stark: Almost all sites include interactivity, video, audio, search etc., but they don't focus on writing for the medium. "Something that really seemed to be lacking on the news sites I researched was good online writing practices," Robinson wrote. "Many of the articles were written in a traditional print style, but few took into consideration the quick readers on the Web... because people come to the Web for information, it must be a quick, pleasant and useful task."
http://www.ojr.org/ojr/glaser/1059512490.php

Vandervelde's Criticism Cited (National Review Online, July 30)
A columnist takes issue with the arguments of those who criticized Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's dissenting opinion in last month's decision overturning anti-sodomy laws in Texas. "The trouble with lawyers, I often think, is that they all went to law school," he writes. "And the trouble with law schools is that their permanent population consists of law professors. Such thoughts came to mind when I read a piece by Stephen Henderson on the Knight Ridder website. Titled 'Anti-sodomy dissent mirrors justification for slavery, scholars say,' Henderson's article relied on several law professors for the proposition that 'Justice Scalia's angry dissent' in the recent Lawrence case 'echoed the reasoning used in the court's 19th-century decision that justified slavery,' the Dred Scott ruling. Henderson relies on the views of three law professors for this attempt to associate Scalia with the defense of slavery: LEA VANDERVELDE of the University of Iowa, Paul Finkelman of the University of Tulsa, and Kermit Roosevelt of the University of Pennsylvania.
http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/comment-franck073003.asp

UI Muslim Students Go Swimming (Chicago Tribune, July 30)
Women whose Muslim culture and religion keep them from donning swimsuits and jumping into the pool on hot days got a treat from the Coralville recreation center. Workers there taped over the building's windows, giving privacy to a group of women from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Association of Muslims in America. They and their children were then able to swim in privacy Sunday night in the indoor pool at the center. "There's a certain level of modesty Muslims have to follow," said Asma Haidri, who studies prelaw and political science. "Only the face, hands and in some cases, the hair are allowed to be seen in public."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/women/chi-0307300060jul30,1,892029.story

Unlicensed Nursing Home Shut Down (Omaha World-Herald, July 30)
An unlicensed nursing home that has operated for five years without state oversight has been deemed a fire risk and its residents have been ordered removed by Friday, the Des Moines Register reported in a copyright story. Iowa health officials say the 14 residents of the home in North Liberty are "at a great risk for harm and potential loss of life in a fire situation." Liberty Country Living cares for 14 elderly people with advanced Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia. The home opened five years ago and was first visited by state fire inspectors in late May. The owners are two University of Iowa nursing professors, MERIDEAN MAAS and JANET SPECHT, who say they provide top-quality care. State officials say the home has not received inspections that could verify such claims. Maas and Specht said they were preparing to vacate the home. Maas said she understands the need for fire-safety improvements but is lobbying for rule changes that would allow the home to reopen with smaller rooms and fewer bathrooms than are now required.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=811424

Chaisson-Cardenas Appointed (Omaha World-Herald, July 30)
The state has a new administrator for its Division of Latino Affairs, Gov. Tom Vilsack announced Tuesday. JOHN-PAUL CHAISSON-CARDENAS is director of the Institute of Latino Families and Communities at the University of Iowa's school of social work. He is a member of the Commission on Latino Affairs, the State Disproportionate Minority Confinement Committee and the Department of Education Diversity Steering Committee. "John-Paul Chaisson-Cardenas is extensively qualified to lead the Division of Latino Affairs," Vilsack said. "His experience with educating Latino students, his background in grant administration and acquisition, and his long history of involvement with the Iowa Latino community make him the right choice for this position."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=811410

UI Students Arrange Arabic Classes (Omaha World-Herald, July 30)
Student organizations at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are working to provide Arabic language courses taught by volunteers, saying it is unlikely the university will offer the courses as part of its Islamic Studies program. The university created a visiting professor of Islamic Studies position after the 2001 terrorist attacks, but the university does not offer Arabic language courses as part of the program. LINDA MAXSON, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, blames a shortage of funding and faculty for the lack of an Islamic language course. This fall, the University of Iowa chapter of the American Muslim Association will offer Arabic courses, said Asma Haidri, executive board member of the association. "The demand has been so high, we decided to offer a class," Haidri said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=811099

Clinton Returns To Iowa (Omaha World-Herald, July 30)
Former President Bill Clinton will be the featured speaker at Sen. Tom Harkin's 26th annual steak fry and fund-raiser in Indianola in September, Harkin aides said Tuesday. It will be Clinton's second trip to Iowa since he left office. He spoke at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last spring. It is his third trip to the steak fry, which Harkin uses to keep in touch with his large network of backers. Clinton attended in 1992 and 1996.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=811428

Lutz Is Crying Expert (Chicago Tribune, July 29)
TOM LUTZ, a professor of English at the University of Iowa, was born into the right place and time to become an expert on the subject of crying. First, there's his family: father, mother, siblings, all criers. And then there is Tom himself, who says that until recently, almost any weepie would bring tears to his eyes. "I could weep at just about any movie. Any movie that was designed to make people weep, I was a mark." Then there's the time he was born: Lutz, 50, came of age during a transition from the dry-eyed mid-20th Century into the more lachrymose post-feminist age. "I am a product of a generation that was at the center of a major historical shift in emotional styles." Lutz's past and professional training -- his primary expertise is literature, and his forthcoming book, "Cosmopolitan Vistas," is an analytic survey of American literature -- coalesced in "Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears," which was published in 1999. Since then, he has become a recognized expert on a subject with a surprising lack of experts, having been asked to respond to everything from public crying after Sept. 11 to unusual displays of emotion from male sports figures (most recently 2003 Wimbledon champ Roger Federer's tears at Centre Court).
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/chi-0307290280jul29,1,2529174.story

Kelzenberg Comments On Internships (Christian Science Monitor, July 29)
In a weakened economy with fewer jobs, competition from more experienced workers, and predictions of lower salaries, these students want to leave college with a competitive resume and an ability to hit the ground running. An internship has increasingly been seen as an important tool for students about to move into the world of real work. But those same economic realities have led some to rethink an internship's worth. Paid internships do exist. DAVID C. KELZENBERG, internship coordinator at the career center of the University of Iowa, reports that most of his students pursue paid internships, though he notes a dip in the number available this summer. "I can create a better pool of students when interns are paid," he says. "[Students] need to be making money." This story also appeared on the web site of WXXI in New York.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0729/p14s01-legn.html

IEM Was Model For Project (San Diego Union Tribune, July 29)
A San Diego company is working with the Pentagon on a futures market that would allow anonymous speculators to bet on assassinations and terrorist attacks. The online market, which is set for a trial launch on Friday, is meant to help the government predict political and economic events in eight Middle East countries. Traders would buy contracts that would pay off if, for example, the Jordanian government were overthrown in the fourth quarter of 2004. The idea of using an online futures market to predict political events is not new. Professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have run an electronic futures market since 1988 that aims to predict the popular vote in presidential elections.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/nation/terror/20030729-9999_1n29futures.html

Pentagon Futures Market Scrapped (CNNFN, July 29)
Futures markets can help predict anything from the direction of interest rates and the price of oil to election. The Pentagon has plans to set up a futures market that could help predict assassinations or terrorist attacks, but that program was dropped this morning. Several prediction markets are noted in the report, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Iowa Electronic market, used in predicting presidential races.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=08d7b065b4ce4ef7f20c816415dbc4ef&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtb-lSlAl&_md5=5ed87d05e40bc6d79a68b0de4fe6e22b

Futures Exchange Loosely Based On IEM (Wall Street Journal, July 29)
Senate Democrats are in an uproar about a new Pentagon project they're calling too bizarre to be true: an online futures exchange where the "commodities" are possible Middle East events such as the assassination of political leaders. The intent of the project, called the Policy Analysis Market, is to use "market-based techniques for avoiding surprise and predicting future events," according to a Pentagon report to Congress. One question posed in the Pentagon report: "Will terrorists attack Israel with bioweapons in the next year?" Traders would be those willing to bet their own money on when the events will occur. Critics blasted the venture. Such a commodities market is "effectively an Internet casino," said Sen. Byron Dorgan (D., N.D.). He is seeking, along with colleagues, to thwart a Pentagon effort to secure $8 million to expand the project; the Pentagon already has spent about $750,000 to cover start-up costs. The effort is loosely based on the Iowa Electronic Markets, a futures exchange run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS, that anticipates U.S. election results and Federal Reserve decisions. "You're sort of making up a form of commerce," says Charles Polk, president of Net Exchange, a 10-person firm founded by California Institute of Technology faculty members that designed the Middle East exchange and will operate it.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB105942606539789100-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%22University+of+Iowa%22%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29(subscription required)

IEM Noted In Policy Market Article (San Francisco Chronicle, July 29)
Experts say the DARPA-backed Policy Analysis Market (www.policyanalysismarket.org), used to predict terror attacks and political events, is based on a legitimate theory, the Efficient Market Hypothesis, that has a proven track record in predicting outcomes. Basically, the idea is that the collective consciousness is smarter than any single person. By forcing people to put their money where their mouths are, the wagers help weed out know-nothings and give more weight to the opinions of those in the know. Similar markets have predicted the box-office potential of movies or the future prices of petroleum. The Iowa Electronic Markets, run by the business school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, lets investors buy and sell "shares" in candidates. Some studies have showed it does better than pollsters at predicting election results.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2003/07/29/MN126930.DTL

Kelzenberg Quoted On Internships (Christian Science Monitor, July 29)
In a weakened economy with fewer jobs, competition from more experienced workers and predictions of lower salaries, these students want to leave college with a competitive résumé and an ability to hit the ground running. An internship has increasingly been seen as an important tool for students about to move into the world of real work. But those same economic realities have led some to rethink an internship's worth. Paid internships do exist. DAVID C. KELZENBERG, internship coordinator at the career center of the University of Iowa, reports that most of his students pursue paid internships, though he notes a dip in the number available this summer. "I can create a better pool of students when interns are paid," he says. "[Students] need to be making money."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0729/p14s01-legn.html?learningNav

Lewis-Beck Comments On Elections, Economy (Financial Times, July 29)
Drawing links between economic performance and elections is never easy. But MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, who has studied the interaction of the two, says his conclusions are not comforting for President George W. Bush. Lewis-Beck says that Dwight D. Eisenhower is the only postwar incumbent president to have been re-elected when unemployment rose in the year of the election. "It is the six months at the beginning of election year which seem to be the critical period," he says. "If unemployment is higher in June next year than it is in January, that spells danger for Bush. Republican strategists can say we are a long way from the election. But the critical period is getting closer." Nor, he says, do politicians have much success trying to avoid blame for a poor economy or persuading the public that things are going better than they really are.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=12b8aaa9051e01bbeec5a6cef7ab24c3&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVlb-lSlzV&_md5=9136e501088dc04e00d44effe344f44f

New Aneurysms Procedure Performed (Malaysia Straits Times, July 29)
A new procedure to treat haemorrhagic cerebral aneurysms uses MATRIX platinum coils, stimulates the growth of scar tissue into the mass, reducing the size of the aneurysm and reducing the possibility of it recurring. The procedure was recently performed on a patient by a team led by DR. JOHN CHALOUPKA, chief of interventional neuroradiology at the University of Iowa, and Dr. Adam Pany at a local medical center. It was only the third procedure of its kind in the region. Chaloupka, one of the pioneers in the use of the coiling technique, was here to help guide local doctors on the use of platinum coils. "The coiling procedure is used alongside clipping techniques by doctors throughout the world, but in some cases, coiling may prove the only method available to treat the patient," he said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=17808270527c94ca801dcfda98aa7299&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlzV&_md5=8d79772da28fa2a327b58711d3030d3e

Andrejevic Writes About Reality TV (New York Newsday, July 29)
MARK ANDREJEVIC, who teaches media studies at the University of Iowa, is author of the forthcoming book "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched." In this article, he writes about the latest round of shows such as Sci-Fi Channel's "Scare Tactics" to MTV's "Punk'd," that have "turned to a time-tested strategy for breaking through the facade: the ambush." http://www.newsday.com/news/opinion/ny-vpand293392275jul29,0,5303750.story

Tranel Quoted In Story On Tumors (CNN, July 28)
A 40-year-old man who complained to doctors about headaches couldn't stop leering at female nurses. He had been in trouble with the law for sexual advances toward his stepdaughter, and now he was talking about raping his landlady. The man had an egg-sized brain tumor pressing on the right frontal lobe. When surgeons removed it, the lewd behavior and pedophilia faded away. Exactly why, the surgeons cannot quite explain. DANIEL T. TRANEL, a University of Iowa neurology researcher, said he has seen people with brain tumors lie, damage property, and in extremely rare cases, commit murder. "The individual simply loses the ability to control impulses or anticipate the consequences of choices," Tranel said. Versions of the story also ran July 28 on the following websites: NEW YORK TIMES, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, SACRAMENTO BEE in California, NEWSDAY in New York, the BALTIMORE SUN in Maryland, the MONTGOMERY COUNTY RECORD in Pennsylvania, the HAMPTON ROADS DAILY PRESS in Virginia, the RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER in North Carolina, CENTRE DAILY TIMES, Pennsylvania, the MACON TELEGRAPH, Georgia, the COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER, Georgia, the TUSCALOOSA NEWS, Alabama, the FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, Indiana, the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, Minnesota, the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, Georgia, the WILKES BARRE WEEKENDER, Pennsylvania, the BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT, Illinois, the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, Ohio, ABC NEWS, the BILOXI SUN HERALD, Mississippi, the ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS, South Dakota, the GRAND FORKS HERALD, North Dakota, the WICHITA EAGLE, Kansas, the TIMES PICAYUNE, Louisiana, PENN LIVE, Pennsylvania, the WILMINGTON MORNING STAR, North Carolina, the KANSAS CITY STAR, Missouri, THE LEDGER, Florida, the FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL, Indiana, the TIMES DAILY in Alabama, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, the BILLINGS GAZETTE in Montana, SALON.com, MSNBC, CBS NEWS, WBBM-TV in Illinois, and WCCO-TV in Minnesota..
http://www.cnn.com/2003/LAW/07/28/brain.tumor.pedophile.ap/

UI Alumna Offers Parent Advice (The Strait Times, July 28) (CORRECTED VERSION)
A Q&A column poses a question from a parent seeking advice on how to deal with a teacher who curses in class and calls the students stupid. Her question is answered by Sita Singh, principal of River Valley Primary. A brief bio of Singh says she holds a master's degree in counseling and human development from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Previously, she had taught for eight years in a secondary school and, later, had been part of the psychological and guidance services team at the Ministry of Education. The Times is based in Singapore.
http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/singapore/story/0,4386,201905,00.html

UI Student Is Part Of Wienermobile Team (Washington Times, July 28)
Ask Julie "J-Dog" Nocella and Michelle "Mustard" Norton about their plans this summer and they'll bubble with excitement as they describe work that mixes travel and marketing into a job they can really relish: driving a 5-ton hot dog across the Midwest. The dog-loving duo will spend this year cruising through half a dozen states in the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile, an RV-sized hot dog with a V8 Chevy engine, global-positioning system and stereo that plays the company's classic jingle. Norton is trying to line up an appearance at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's homecoming parade this fall. "I really just became obsessed with becoming a Hot Dogger," said the 22-year-old University of Iowa marketing graduate. "My final year at Iowa, I just wanted to see the country, and this was a great opportunity."
http://washingtontimes.com/national/20030728-122400-5187r.htm

UI Law Alumna Given Award (Northwest Arkansas Times, July 27)
Professor Cynthia E. Nance of the University of Arkansas School of Law was recently named a recipient of a 2003 Woman of Distinction Award. Nance is being recognized as this year's recipient of the Women Strengthening Our Communities for Tomorrow Award. Nance holds a juris doctorate and a master of arts in finance from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Her teaching and research areas include labor and employment law as well as torts.
http://nwanews.com/times/story_Living.php?storyid=108838

Berg, Nelson Explain IEM (MSNBC, July 26)
The Iowa Electronic Markets allow people to invest from $5 to $500 in the candidate of their choice. JOYCE BERG, a professor in the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business, said the markets generate a lot of interest because "people are fundamentally interested in politics. This is a way for people to prove that they know more than the next guy by trading in the market and building their funds." There is an opportunity for savvy traders to make money, said FORREST NELSON, also a professor in the business college. "We've had traders who start with $500 and turn it in to $1,500 or even $2,000 in six months by carefully buying and selling the right contracts."

Ratliff Says Platelets Play Role In Immune System (Science News, July 26)
A story about the role played by platelets in stimulating the human immune system cites a study in the July issue of "Immunity." "Most immunologists ... think of platelets as these little things that induce coagulation. It will take time for them to realize the importance of platelets in modulating adaptive immunity," says study coauthor TIMOTHY L. RATLIFF of the University of Iowa.

Jones Cited In Story On Electronic Voting Problems (Spiegel, July 25)
A story (written in German) about the discovery of security flaws in the code of electronic voting machines built by Diebold quotes a company spokesman as saying that many of the flaws identified in a report have been corrected, but University of Iowa professor DOUGLAS W. JONES told The New York Times he was shocked to see the report cited flaws he had pointed out five years ago. Spiegel is based in Germany.
http://www.spiegel.de/netzwelt/technologie/0,1518,258563,00.html

Jones Criticizes Voter Software Security (MSNBC, July 25)
Some versions of electronic voting software could allow for ballot fraud on a massive scale, computer security researchers reported Thursday. The researchers made their claim based on an analysis of computer code that was purportedly taken from one of the country's top suppliers of voting equipment. But DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa computer science professor who serves on Iowa's board of examiners for electronic voting systems, said he recognized one of the encryption flaws cited by the researchers' report as one he called attention to during a board meeting at least five years ago. He's dismayed the problem hasn't been fixed.
http://msnbc.com/news/943558.asp?0sl=-42

Regents Hope To Slow Tuition Hikes (Omaha World Herald, July 25)
After two years of double-digit tuition increases, several members of the IOWA BOARD OF REGENTS hope to keep next year's in-state increase below 9 percent. At least three members of the nine-member board said they would not support an increase of more than 9 percent. The board begins discussing tuition in September and will vote on the issue no later than November.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=807099

Former UI Professor Returns To Lebanon (The Star, July 25)
Dr. ASAD RIAD SHAMMA, a former professor of surgery at the University of Iowa, is profiled as an example of a Lebanese expatriate who returned home after finding success abroad. The Star is based in Lebanon.
http://www.dailystar.com.lb/features/25_07_03_b.asp

Phoenix Resident Wins UI Alumni Award (Arizona Republic, July 25)
A Phoenix man has received a distinguished alumni award from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/0725localpeople25.html

Jones Comments On Software Flaws (New York Times, July 24)
The software that runs many high-tech voting machines contains serious flaws that would allow voters to cast extra votes and permit poll workers to alter ballots without being detected, computer security researchers said yesterday. "We found some stunning, stunning flaws," said Aviel D. Rubin, technical director of the Information Security Institute at Johns Hopkins University, who led a team that examined the software from Diebold Election Systems, which has about 33,000 voting machines operating in the United States. The systems, in which voters are given computer-chip-bearing smart cards to operate the machines, could be tricked by anyone with $100 worth of computer equipment, said Adam Stubblefield, a co-author of the paper. DOUGLAS W. JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, said he was shocked to discover flaws cited in Mr. Rubin's paper that he had mentioned to the system's developers about five years ago as a state elections official. "To find that such flaws have not been corrected in half a decade is awful," Professor Jones said. (A version of this article also appeared July 24 in the ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION.)
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/24/technology/24VOTE.html

Berg Demonstrates IEM (MSNBC, July 24)
JOYCE BERG, associate professor of accounting in the University of Iowa Tippie College of Business talks about the Iowa Electronic Markets as part of MSNBC's coverage of the campaign trail in Iowa.

Van Allen Touts Unmanned Missions(Houston Chronicle, July 24)
Only a handful of planetary scientists and space reporters stood atop a windy bluff last month to watch the ascent of the latest Mars mission from Kennedy Space Center. The payload this time was the first of two remote-controlled rovers that will roam the Martian surface for three months doing geological experiments -- the sort of project that brings NASA less by way of glory but great scientific respect. "I'm a great admirer of the astronauts and engineers in the manned space program," said JAMES VAN ALLEN, astrophysicist and renowned space pioneer. "The truth is that almost all the really substantive and significant scientific advances -- telecommunications, climate studies, astronomical observations, global positioning satellites -- all these things and many more are totally dependent on unmanned systems." Many space scientists expect the first irrefutable evidence of life beyond Earth to be found not by human explorers but their mechanical predecessors. Perhaps chief among them, at least in historical pedigree, is the 88-year-old Van Allen, who designed the instruments that went up on NASA's first satellite, Explorer 1, in 1958. Those instruments discovered the radiation belts that encircle the Earth and which now bear his name. Van Allen likes to point out, as he did in a 1992 lecture at the University of Iowa, where he is a professor emeritus, that the first of the nine objectives listed in NASA's charter is "the expansion of knowledge of the Earth and of phenomena in the atmosphere and space."
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/front/2009384

UI Reports Record Year (Omaha World Herald, July 24)
The University of Iowa reported another record year for collecting public and private research dollars, as faculty generated $352.8 million in 2003, up 4.3 percent from a year ago. Officials said the money came from a variety of federal, state and private sources to underwrite a diverse body of research, including cancer causes, bioterrorism preparedness, organic coffee production in rural Mexico and Germany's fascination with American Indians. "Using their exceptional talent and sheer hard work, our University of Iowa researchers . . . continued to earn highly competitive grants and contracts during a difficult economic period," said BILL DECKER, interim vice president for research.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=805960

UI Gets Money For Buses (Omaha World Herald, July 24)
The U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded $5.8 million to help buy buses and bus equipment in Iowa. The money will be allocated to 11 city transit systems, 15 rural systems and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA bus system. The cities that will receive money are: Cedar Rapids, Coralville, Des Moines, Dubuque, Fort Dodge, Iowa City, Mason City, Muscatine, Ottumwa, Sioux City and Waterloo.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=806103

Students Take Iowa Test (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 24)
Public school students in Washington state again scored higher than the national average on the standardized Iowa tests in 2002-03, although the state's numbers have remained relatively flat for several years, results released yesterday show. The tests, developed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the 1930s, are "norm-referenced," meaning they evaluate basic knowledge of facts and concepts, shown through quick responses to multiple-choice questions. Iowa tests have been administered in Washington state for decades, in accordance with state laws dating to the 1970s that require evaluation of students on standardized, norm-referenced tests. But their days may be numbered as the state moves to comply with the federal No Child Left Behind law, the landmark federal education reform signed by President Bush in 2002. No Child Left Behind calls for annual testing in reading and math in grades three through eight by 2005-06.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/132204_iowa24.html

UI Alumna Profiled (Riverside Press-Enterprise, July 24)
The Rev. Joanna Satorius, who is leaving St. George's Episcopal Church to take a position with the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles, is profiled. Satorius was born into an Episcopal family in Wisconsin. An avid artist, Satorius received her bachelor's degree in art from Patricia Stevens College in Missouri and attended graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. (The newspaper is based in California.)
http://www.pe.com/localnews/riverside/stories/PE_NEWS_ngeorg24.a10fd.html

UI Student Wins Crown (Daily Herald, July 24)
Meghan Cashman, 19, was named Miss Lake County Fair and received a $2,500 scholarship for her studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she is a junior.
http://www.dailyherald.com/cook/main_story.asp?intID=378268

Alumna Is Finalist For DMACC Job(Ottawa Daily Times, July 24)
Illinois Valley Community College President Jean Goodnow has been named one of four finalists for president at Des Moines Area Community College in Iowa. An Iowa native, Goodnow graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and spent the early part of her career at several Iowa community colleges.
http://www.ottawadailytimes.com/news/story.php?storyid=9001943

UI Salt Research Cited (Health24, July 24)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have identified certain proteins called ion channel proteins that play an important role in the salt-sensing ability of fruit flies, which respond to salt in a way similar to that seen in humans and other animals. (Health24 is a health news web site based in South Africa.)
http://www.health24.co.za/news.asp?action=art&SubContentTypeId=5&ContentID=23488

UI Alumna Taught Art At Portland State University (The Oregonian, July 23)
Claire Callaghan married while at Brown University, followed her husband as he studied, taught public school, went to Northwestern University and got her Ph.D. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Beginning in 1971, she taught medieval, modern and contemporary art at Portland State University, and she pioneered a course in women in the visual arts. She helped found Portland Center for the Visual Arts and a few years later started Northwest Artists Workshop.
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/1058961974244460.xml

UI Hypochondriasis Study Findings Reported (Healthandage.com, July 23)
A new study shows that hypochondriasis has much to do with the relationships in someone's life. In hypochondriasis, the individual fears that they have, or will develop, a serious illness, even though the doctor finds nothing wrong with them. It is a distressing and poorly understood condition. Now researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA present one of the first studies into hypochondriasis and personal relationships. They say that those who worry unduly about their health are insecure in their relationships and are looking for care and concern.
http://www.healthandage.com/Home/gm=1!gid1=4383;!527074981!174479238!7537!7002

Damasio Interviewed About Feelings (WBUR, July 22)
ANTONIO DAMASIO is interviewed on the program On Point, broadcast from Boston's NPR affiliate. He discusses his latest book, ""Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain."
http://www.onpointradio.org/shows/2003/07/20030722_b_main.asp

Former UI Faculty Member Elected To Association (Monroe Times, July 22)
A story about the election of Norman Crouch as president of the Association of Public Health Laboratories, headquartered in Washington, D.C., says Crouch's career began with an appointment to the medical school faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. The Monroe Times is based in Wisconsin.
http://www.themonroetimes.com/a0718pcr.htm

'Youth Biz' Winner To Attend UI (Journal Times, July 22)
Trischia Hall and Stacy Sommerfeld, both seniors at Burlington High School in Wisconsin, are the first winners of the Racine Small Business Development Center's "Youth Biz" competition. As winners selected from high school students from throughout the county, the girls received a $5,000 grant to launch Body Sensations Co., which will manufacture and market lip balm, solid perfumes and other products down the line. Sommerfeld is planning to pursue a chemical engineering degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which she discovered has a program in entrepreneurial engineering. The Times covers Racine and Burlington, Wis.
http://www.journaltimes.com/articles/2003/07/22/a_plus/iq_2354659.txt

Welsh, Liu Comment On Salt Study Findings (Dr.Koop.com, July 22)
Researchers at the University of Iowa have identified certain proteins called ion channel proteins that play an important role in the salt-sensing ability of fruit flies, which respond to salt in a way similar to that seen in humans and other animals. "Given that salt is essential for survival, it is not surprising that animals have developed the ability to detect salt, even at low concentrations. This sense allows them to seek out, and then consume salt. We were interested in identifying the receptors that detect small quantities of salt," researcher Dr. MICHAEL WELSH says in a statement. Fruit flies were the ideal test subjects. "In humans, the taste system is pretty much a puzzle because it is hard to study. But in fruit flies it is very easy to study and you can quickly test ideas. Also, fruit flies are a great genetic model where you can easily screen many different genes to determine what they do and how they interact," study lead author LEI LIU says.
http://drkoop.com/template.asp?page=newsdetail&ap=93&id=514077

Nelson Drops Appeal Of Manslaughter Conviction (Omaha World-Herald, July 22)
A woman convicted of voluntary manslaughter in the death of her husband has dropped her appeal, her lawyer said. Phyllis Nelson, 55, of Iowa City was convicted in March for the Dec. 12, 2001, stabbing death of her husband, Dr. RICHARD NELSON, a dean at the University of Iowa medical school. She was sentenced in April to 10 years in prison.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=803963

UI Hospitals And Clinics Ranked Highly (Omaha World-Herald, July 22)
Three Nebraska and Iowa hospitals - including one in Omaha - provide some of the nation's best patient care in certain medical specialties. That's according to the "America's Best Hospitals" rankings in the July 28 issue of U.S. News & World Report, which hits newsstands this week. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS in Iowa City placed in nine of 17 ranked specialties: cancer (36); ear, nose and throat (3); eyes (6); gynecology (50); hormonal disorders (29); orthopedics (8); psychiatry (14); respiratory disorders (25); and urology (21).
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=803878

UI Student Comments On Higher Tuition (Washington Post, July 22)

State colleges and universities in every region of the country are preparing to impose their steepest tuition and fee increases in a decade this fall. University officials voiced concern that many lower- and moderate-income students now will be pushed into community colleges or out of higher education because federal financial aid and most state aid programs are not keeping pace with rising tuition. Meanwhile, the job market for young adults is dismal, and more students need to work to afford college. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA senior Mayrose Wegmann is one of eight children of a single mother who earns the minimum wage working at a coffee shop. Wegmann already has more than $24,000 in debt, works more than 40 hours a week, doubles up with three students in a two-bedroom apartment, does without cable TV and long-distance service and walks rather than driving or riding the bus. She also receives the maximum Pell Grant of $4,000, which isn't going up, although her tuition and fees will increase almost $900 this fall -- for a combined increase of 55 percent more than when she was a freshman. She said her options are to work even more hours or go further into debt. "It's disheartening for anyone from my background to see these increases, because we know how important a higher education is," said Wegmann, a political science major. "We're all working harder and harder to pay our way, but we're not getting a better education. In fact, we're getting a worse education because the time we have to study is so limited."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A25763-2003Jul21.html

Vandervelde Comment On Supreme Court Ruling (The Advocate, July 22)

In the wake of the recent Supreme Court ruling that wiped out sodomy laws, one law professor says that parts of Justice Antonin Scalia's angry dissent echo the reasoning used in the court's 19th-century decision that justified slavery, Knight Ridder reports. "In terms of constitutional interpretation, there are uses of legal history which freeze a sense of morality in a point in time," said LEA VANDERVELDE, a University of Iowa law professor who is writing two books about the Dred Scott decision. "They don't acknowledge that liberties should be expanding with human progress." Scalia and other judges like him are proponents of that line of thinking, she said.
http://www.advocate.com/new_news.asp?ID=9336&sd=07/22/03

UI Tuition Increase Noted (Public Opinion, July 21)

In a story about increasing tuition, it's noted that Penn State early this month implemented a 9.8 percent increase, or $788 for in-state residents and as much as $1,182 for non-residents. Meanwhile, Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania had increase of about 5 percent, or $220. Universities imposing double-digit increases this school year include the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, at 19 percent. The Public Record is based in Chambersburg, Penn. http://www.publicopiniononline.com/news/stories/20030721/localnews/618443.html

Squire Comments On Iowa Voters (St. Petersburg Times, July 21)

Six months from now, about 100,000 Iowans will trudge through the January cold to gather at schools, town halls and churches and help select America's presidential choices. Already the state is crawling with Democratic contenders pumping hands in coffee shops, standing in people's living rooms and touting their affinity for working men and women in union halls. "For the most part, the candidates are going to hear the same things here that they'll hear elsewhere. Iowa is not particularly out of step with the rest of the nation," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "The economy and jobs are a very big issue here, and so is health care, perhaps more than other areas because we have a lot of seniors."
http://www.sptimes.com/2003/07/21/Worldandnation/In_Iowa__rivals_grab_.shtml

Candidates Suffer Setbacks (Boston Herald, July 21)

Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, Rep. Richard Gephardt and Sen. John Edwards each has suffered steady setbacks after beginning their campaigns at the top of the field. Last week the trio had to endure the first speculation that they might drop their bids - bowing to the burgeoning campaigns of Sen. John F. Kerry of Massachusetts and former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean. "They were the most promising candidates before and now, Lieberman has just sort of dropped off the board, Gephardt has obvious money problems and Edwards just hasn't gained any traction," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, home of the first key presidential face-off in six months.
http://www2.bostonherald.com/news/national/dems07202003.htm

Education Major Is Summer Fellow In Chicago (Chicago Tribune, July 21)
A six-week summer program, just out of its pilot phase, is one of the Chicago Public Schools' efforts to lure quality teachers into the system. All aspiring teachers, the "summer fellows" spend the summer teaching in the Chicago public schools, working with some of the city's most academically challenged pupils. Fellows represent schools as diverse as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Chicago State University, the University of Tennessee and Harvard University. One fellow is Emily Hetzer of Naperville. "It's good to go where you are needed," said Hetzer, a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "Teaching as a profession does make you feel good about what you are doing. You definitely feel that you are contributing to a greater good."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-0307210119jul21,1,3727019.story

Miller: Dean Likely Winner If Caucuses Held Now (Kansas City Star, July 21)
A poll earlier this month conducted by Planned Parenthood showed Missouri Congressman Richard Gephardt leading the group of Democratic presidential hopefuls with 21 percent, but former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean is just one point back. A month ago, Dean was in third place. Gephardt was out front with 27 percent. "Democrats are wringing their hands about everyone except for Dean," said ARTHUR MILLER, director of the University of Iowa's Heartland Poll. "'Where were they?' That's what you hear. 'Where were the Democrats when we need to have someone give us a more reasonable voice instead of just rushing to war?' I think if the caucuses were held currently, I have a feeling Dean would win."
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascitystar/news/politics/6347176.htm

Couric Exam Sparks Colonoscopy Interest (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, July 21)
The rate of people who were screened for colon cancer jumped by more than 20 percent after Katie Couric showed her colonoscopy on the "Today" show, a study published Monday found. Researchers documented what many doctors had reported anecdotally following the March 7, 2000, broadcast that Couric succeeded in encouraging others to follow her. In a survey of 400 gastroenterologists in 22 states, the number of colonoscopies rose from an average of 15 per month before Couric's test to 18.1 per month after, researchers at the University of Michigan Health System and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/search.nsf/sitesearch?openview&ch=Home&type=1&query=University+of+Iowa

Gurnett Recorded Space Sounds (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 21)
In its four-year history, the enterprising and ambitious University of Washington Summer Arts Festival has called upon the Kronos Quartet twice to give immediate name recognition to its multiplicity of events. The first time was the festival's inaugural year and the second time, Saturday night at Meany Hall. However, this summer the string quartet did not do a typical evening of freshly minted works on which it has based it reputation for the past three decades. There was only one work on the program -- Terry Riley's "Sun Rings," in its Northwest premiere. "Sun Rings" began when the NASA Art Program contacted the Kronos three years ago with the idea of taking sounds of space -- recorded some hundreds of millions miles away from Earth by University of Iowa physicist DON GURNETT -- and incorporating them into a piece of music. Because of the quartet's long association with Riley, a pioneer in minimalist music, he was considered the best candidate to realize the offer.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/classical/131605_kronos21q.html

Swisher Runs Iowa For Health Care Group (USA Today, July 20)

SARAH SWISHER, a 47-year-old registered nurse, is taking a leave from her job at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics to run a new group called Iowa for Health Care. It has a paid staff of eight and financial backing from the Service Employees International Union. Presidential candidates arriving at the Des Moines Airport can't miss the billboard the group has rented across the street from the exit. "Running for president?" it asks. "Health care better be your priority." When the candidates turned out to address the Jasper County Democrats' convention, Swisher was at the group's table outside, offering passersby free blood-pressure screening while she chatted about her cause. She expertly wrapped the pressure cuff on as she metaphorically twisted their arms. Nurses are "very skilled and we're credible and, most important, we hear the stories of the patients firsthand," she says.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/2003-07-20-power-brokers-usat_x.htm

Rinehart Book Reviewed (San Francisco Chronicle, July 20)

In a review of "Built in a Day" by Steven Rinehart, it's said that Andrew Bergman, the narrator of the work, is a recently recovering alcoholic who can't keep a job, has been a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for 12 years and is still three credits shy of graduating in two separate majors. But, as the novel begins, he's turned over a new leaf and the story hinges upon his attempts to wrestle his lesser urges and his greater flaws into submission while taking on an ever-increasing set of responsibilities.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/07/20/RV165403.DTL

Critic Reviews Novel About UI Student (San Francisco Chronicle, July 20)
A reviewer writes that Andrew Bergman, the narrator of Steven Rinehart's first novel, "Built in a Day," is a slacker's slacker. He's a recently recovering alcoholic who can't keep a job, has been a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for 12 years and is still three credits shy of graduating in two separate majors. But, as the novel begins, he's turned over a new leaf and the story hinges upon his attempts to wrestle his lesser urges and his greater flaws into submission while taking on an ever-increasing set of responsibilities.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/07/20/RV165403.DTLc

Mathis Begins Job At Florida A&M University (Tallahassee Democrat, July 20)
Alice Mathis begins Monday as Florida A&M University's new director of student activities. She will make $74,000 a year. She has been the director of the Office of Student Life at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She earned a bachelor's degree in political science from Drew University in Madison, N.J., and a master's degree in counseling and student personnel in higher education from Montclair State University in Upper Montclair, N.J.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/news/local/6342332.htm

Man In Accident Taken To UI Hospitals And Clinics (Omaha World-Herald, July 20)
A semitrailer that authorities were trying to stop rolled over on Interstate 80 Saturday morning, shutting down part of the Interstate for at least an hour. The Iowa State Patrol said the semitrailer, driven by Ernie Bernard Mills, 43, of Bakersfield, Calif., was heading west about three miles outside of Iowa City when it went into the median, hit an overpass guardrail and overturned in the eastbound lanes. Mills was transported to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. A hospital spokeswoman declined to release his condition.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=802551

Squire Comments On Iowa Political Mood (Contra Costa Times, July 20)
A story about the upcoming Iowa Caucuses says that the mood of the voters in Iowa is harder than usual to gauge amid the puzzling mix of economic news. "The mood isn't quite to the point of being sour, but it certainly is unsettled," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa and one of the best known experts on the state's electorate. "There's a feeling that things aren't quite right."
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/cctimes/news/6344418.htm

Vandervelde Comments On High Court Rulings (Charlotte Observer, July 20)
In the wake of the recent Supreme Court ruling that wiped out anti-sodomy laws, some legal scholars say parts of Justice Antonin Scalia's angry dissent echo the reasoning used in the court's 19th-century decision that justified slavery. In both cases, Dred Scott in 1857 and Lawrence v. Texas in 2003, justices faced crucial questions about constitutional liberties: Are they set in stone? Or should the court take an evolving view of the Constitution and extend rights to groups the founders left out? "In terms of constitutional interpretation, there are uses of legal history which freeze a sense of morality in a point in time," said LEA VANDERVELDE, a University of Iowa law professor who is writing two books about Dred Scott. "They don't acknowledge that liberties should be expanding with human progress." Versions of the story also ran July 20 on the websites of the SPRINGFIELD NEWS LEADER in Missouri and the CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, and July 18 on the websites of the COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER and MACON TELEGRAPH, Ga., WILKES BARRE WEEKENDER, Penn., ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS, S.D., GRAND FORKS HERALD, N.D., WICHITA EAGLE, Kan., AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, Ohio, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, Minn., SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, Calif., and the FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL, Ind.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/6343621.htm

UI Religion Major Featured (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, July 19)
The moment Lawrence Badzin stepped foot in Israel eight years ago, he felt at home. "There was just a connection to this small piece of land," said Badzin, 24, a Twin Cities native. "There's something in the air. A strong energy that drew me. It's the way people are living their life. They don't waste any time not enjoying it." The connection was so strong that eight years later he decided to become a citizen of Israel. Badzin is still a U.S. citizen, but now has dual citizenship in both countries. Badzin graduated from Hopkins High School, where he was editor-in-chief of the yearbook for two years. He had contemplated journalism, but opted for business once he enrolled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. His junior year, he changed his major to religion. "I wanted to expand my knowledge of the past and present situations, and understand what's going on a little better," he said.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/3989346.html

UI Student Teaches At Art Camp (Logansport Pharos Tribune, July 18)
A story about a summer art camp at the Logansport Art Association's Art Center in Indiana this week quotes camp teacher Kathy Snoeberger, an art major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Snoeberger said she uses her 8-year-old son, Jesse, as a guinea pig. "I try (projects) on him, and if he has the patience to do it, then I know the other kids will be able to do them," Snoeberger said. The Tribune is based in Logansport, Ind.
http://www.pharostribune.com/cgi-bin/LiveIQue.acgi$rec=8740?lp_story

Regents OK Additional Work On Old Capitol (WQAD-TV, July 18)
The Board of Regents, State of Iowa has approved nearly $3 million for more work at the Old Capitol at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The regents approved the money for interior work on the historic building that was damaged by fire in 2001. The exterior restoration, which included replacing the dome and cupola, is almost complete. The next phase includes fire alarm systems and electrical and lighting upgrades. Investigators determined the fire started accidentally when workers removing asbestos from the dome used open flame torches and heat guns. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1365888&nav=1sW7GyPP

Aslan Pens Op-Ed On U.S. Policy In Iran (New York Times, July 18)
REZA ALSAN, a University of Iowa professor of Islamic studies, writes that the student movement that has consumed Iran this summer has been interpreted by many senior American officials as a signal for the Bush administration to begin its next phase in democratizing the Middle East. But while the waves of protests and arrests - the latest came last week outside a Tehran university - may indicate the inevitable collapse of the Islamic Republic, what student leaders are calling for in Iran does not correspond with the administration's designs for the region.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/18/opinion/18ASLA.html

Casino Company CFO Attended Writers' Workshop (CFO.com, July 18)
Glenn Schaeffer, president and CFO of Mandalay Resort Group, came to corporate finance only after testing his fiction-writing skills in the MFA program at the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP in 1976. But in a class with such budding stars as T.C. Boyle, Allan Gurganus, Rita Dove and Jane Smiley, the then-21-year-old Schaeffer quickly concluded that his own talent was third-rate "at best." With a college minor in economics and a head for numbers, he quit the workshop and returned to his native Los Angeles to pursue a career in business.
http://www.cfo.com/article/1,5309,10032,00.html?f=features

UI-Bound Student Is In Math 'Boot Camp' (Chronicle, July 18)
A story about Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education (EDGE), a four-week boot camp aimed at helping women survive graduate school in mathematics, cites the experience of several women attending one such camp at Pomona College, including one who was accepted to graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i45/45a01001.htm

Hennager, Anderson Featured In Story On UI Surplus Store (Chronicle, July 18)
A story about the University of Iowa's Campus Surplus store quotes manager JOSEPH HENNAGER and GARY D. ANDERSON, the university's associate director of business services. Anderson says the goal is not to make money. "We are a nonprofit, just trying to break even," he says. "But we have lots of students and regular customers who support us. Sometimes there are up to a hundred people in line when we open the doors, all trying to find their prize."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i45/45a00902.htm

Writer Attended UI (Newton Daily News Tribune, July 17)
A story about Newton, Mass. native Amy Hassinger, whose first novel "Nina: Adolescence" was just published, notes that she attended the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and taught at the University of Iowa while her husband was pursuing a doctorate there.
http://www.dailynewstribune.com/news/local_regional/newt_book07172003.htm

Couric Exam Sparks Colonoscopy Interest (Omaha World-Herald, July 16)
The rate of people who were screened for colon cancer jumped by more than 20 percent after Katie Couric showed her colonoscopy on the "Today" show, a study published Monday found. Researchers documented what many doctors had reported anecdotally following the March 7, 2000, broadcast that Couric succeeded in encouraging others to follow her. In a survey of 400 gastroenterologists in 22 states, the number of colonoscopies rose from an average of 15 per month before Couric's test to 18.1 per month after, researchers at the University of Michigan Health System and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found. A version of this story also appeared July 16 on HEALTHCENTRAL.com.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=797926

UI Test Developers Quoted (New York Times, July 16)
A story about the challenge of writing questions for standardized tests quotes Kathleen Oberley, a veteran writer at a major test development center in Iowa City, and Stephanie Alnot, who works with Oberley as a test developer for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The story says one of the most widely used tests is the Iowa Test of Basic Skills, written by Oberley and her University of Iowa colleagues and offered at cost to all Iowa school districts. Riverside Publishing of Itasca, Ill., markets it to districts in the other 49 states.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/16/education/16EXAM.html?pagewanted=1&ei=5062&en=c30c9efb9aa97372&ex=1059019200&partner=GOOGLE

Couric Exam Sparks Colonoscopy Interest (Ottawa Citizen, July 15)
The rate of people who were screened for colon cancer jumped by more than 20 percent after Katie Couric showed her colonoscopy on the "Today" show, a study published Monday found. Researchers documented what many doctors had reported anecdotally following the March 7, 2000, broadcast that Couric succeeded in encouraging others to follow her. In a survey of 400 gastroenterologists in 22 states, the number of colonoscopies rose from an average of 15 per month before Couric's test to 18.1 per month after, researchers at the University of Michigan Health System and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found. The Citizen is based in Canada. Versions of the story also ran July 15 on the websites of the HALIFAX DAILY NEWS in Canada, DR.KOOP.COM, and the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.canada.com/ottawa/story.asp?id=831FF5E0-0926-4C71-9B9D-5DA37AF438CE

Nisly: Today's Patients Well-Informed (Forbes, July 15)
The average person visited a doctor's office three times in 2000, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Often, we're going because we want to, or at least we know we should. Dr. NICOLE NISLY, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa, says she has seen the health awareness and knowledge of her patients grow tremendously in her 20 years in medicine. "I see the baby boomer population becoming more aware of their own morbidity," Nisly says. As a result, this well-read, well-educated population is getting proactive about health. She says she sometimes has patients come in requesting a new test or a new drug before she's even heard of them.
http://www.forbes.com/execpicks/2003/07/15/cx_kf_0715health.html

Couric Exam Sparks Colonoscopy Interest (Washington Post, July 15)
The rate of people who were screened for colon cancer jumped by more than 20 percent after Katie Couric showed her colonoscopy on the "Today" show, a study published Monday found. Researchers documented what many doctors had reported anecdotally following the March 7, 2000, broadcast that Couric succeeded in encouraging others to follow her. In a survey of 400 gastroenterologists in 22 states, the number of colonoscopies rose from an average of 15 per month before Couric's test to 18.1 per month after, researchers at the University of Michigan Health System and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found. The Associated Press article also appeared on the websites of: ABC NEWS; CBS NEWS; CNN; NEW YORK TIMES; MIAMI HERALD; BALTIMORE SUN; CHICAGO SUN-TIMES; BOSTON GLOBE; ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION; GOOD HOUSEKEEPING; YAHOO NEWS; SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER; KANSAS CITY STAR; SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE; NEWSDAY in New York; TUSCALOOSA NEWS and TIMES DAILY in Alabama; BILOXI SUN HERALD in Mississippi; TIMES-PICAYUNE in Louisiana; BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT in Illinois; WILKES BARRE WEEKENDER and CENTER CITY TIMES in Pennsylvania; GRAND FORKS HERALD in North Dakota; MACON TELEGRAPH and COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia; WILMINGTON MORNING STAR in North Carolina; DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota; AKRON BEACON-JOURNAL in Ohio; FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL in Indiana; ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS in South Dakota; WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas. The wire story or a version from INTERNET BROADCASTING SYSTEMS also ran on 60 television stations across the United States.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A57750-2003Jul15.html

Reed Comments On Work/Life Balance (Mansfield News Journal, July 15)
Striking a good balance between work and personal life is a mutual responsibility between employees and management, says LAURA REED, assistant director in human resources at the University of Iowa. Workers need to be comfortable explaining to their bosses what their needs and feelings are regarding that work-life balance, says Reed, director of the university's WorkLife program. On the flip side, she says, businesses should put programs in place addressing things employees value. Reed says nowadays money isn't necessarily the main issue when it comes to employee satisfaction. "Flexibility is just as important as benefits or pay," Reed says. The paper is based in central Ohio.
http://www.mansfieldnewsjournal.com/news/stories/20030715/localnews/574635.html

UI's Male Nursing Recruitment Materials Noted (Wausau Daily Herald, July 15)
Educators are trying to curb the nursing shortage by recruiting men to their nursing programs. About 8.3 percent of students in four-year college nursing programs and about 16.1 percent in two-year programs are men, according to the National League for Nursing and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Some companies and colleges have succeeded in beginning to erase the gender issue. Johnson & Johnson began a national nurse recruiting promotion last year that featured men in nearly half of its advertising. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Oregon Center for Nursing show men prominently in nursing roles in brochures, posters and Web sites.
http://www.wausaudailyherald.com/wdhlocal/278177652773592.shtm

Redlawsk Comments On Voting (Philadelphia Inquirer, July 15)
Some people say Americans don't like to vote. Not true. They're doing it everywhere - in homes and offices, by phone and Internet. You could even say the country is obsessed with elections, so long as they don't involve government. In May, fans jammed phone lines to choose Ruben Studdard over Clay Aiken in the season finale of "American Idol." The contest drew an astounding 24 million votes, almost a quarter of 105 million cast in the 2000 presidential election. They're voting for balladeers, bachelors and brides, but won't turn out when it counts. "Trying to choose which of nine Democrats has the best health care plan is difficult. Voting for bridesmaids' dresses or singers is fun and kind of meaningless, and people don't feel they have to know very much to do it," said DAVE REDLAWSK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/front/6304167.htm

Nisly Comments On Health Awareness (Forbes.com, July 15)
The average person visited a doctor's office three times in 2000, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Americans racked up 823.5 million office visits in those 12 months, not including any kind of emergency or urgent care. Physicians say they've noted a greater increase in the interest and awareness patients have in these services than the numbers indicate. Dr. NICOLE NISLY, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa, says she has seen the health awareness and knowledge of her patients grow tremendously in her 20 years in medicine. "I see the baby boomer population becoming more aware of their own morbidity," Nisly says. As a result, this well-read, well-educated population is getting proactive about health. She says she sometimes has patients come in requesting a new test or a new drug before she's even heard of them.
http://www.forbes.com/2003/07/15/cx_kf_0715health.html

Hypochondriac Study Cited (National Post, July 15)
Once a reliable butt of jokes, people who worry excessively over their health almost certainly have a psychiatric disorder, researchers say. The condition is difficult to diagnose and treat, and can affect most parts of a person's life, especially relationships. The new study, which examined the personalities of hypochondriacs in order to better diagnose the disorder, suggests hypochondria is more prevalent than doctors realize. Up to nine percent of patients in a typical family practice may suffer from hypochondriasis, says RUSSELL NOYES, professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Iowa. By telling others of their fears and physical symptoms, these patients hope to get care and attention, Noyes says. In a study published recently in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine, the Iowa researchers found such patients tend to form weak social bonds with others. "People are securely attached or not so securely attached to people who are important in their lives," Noyes says. "What we showed was that hypochondriacal people are insecurely attached." The National Post is a Canadian newspaper
http://www.nationalpost.com/home/story.html?id=4C27C4E1-AF45-4407-B8C8-609FD2358A24

Grant Comments On Title IX Ruling (Chronicle, July 14)
Colleges and high schools will see no changes in how they determine whether they have enough women playing varsity sports, according to a "Dear Colleague" letter made public on Friday by Gerald A. Reynolds, the U.S. assistant secretary of education for civil rights. The Education Department is standing pat on guidelines that critics say have led some colleges to drop men's teams. "I think it's great," said Christine H.B. Grant, retired women's athletics director at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "Over all, the Department of Education is backing off entirely, and we've got to be really pleased."
http://chronicle.com/daily/2003/07/2003071401n.htm

Noyes, Stuart Study Hypochondriasis (Science Daily, July 14)
Hypochondriasis, or excessive worry over one's health, is a psychiatric disorder that can affect every aspect of a person's life -- especially interpersonal relationships. University of Iowa researchers are finding ways to study the condition and how it affects relationships, including patient-doctor interaction. RUSSELL NOYES, M.D., professor emeritus of psychiatry in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, and co-investigator SCOTT STUART, M.D., UI associate professor of psychiatry, studied the interpersonal model of hypochondriasis, which regards the condition as a care-eliciting behavior. By communicating their anxiety and distress over physical symptoms to other people, patients with hypochondriasis hope to obtain care and concern.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/07/030714092759.htm

UI Arts Alumnus Named Emeritus Professor (Ithaca Journal, July 14)
At its February meeting, the Ithaca College Board of Trustees awarded emeritus status to a retired professor and granted tenure and/or promotion to 17 faculty members, including John Keshishoglou, who retired in 2000 and was named professor emeritus of television-radio. Keshishoglou was the founding dean of the communications school, serving in that role from 1971 to 1979. He holds a master of arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Journal is based in New York.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/news/stories/20030714/localnews/565783.html

Former UI Professor Comments On Muslim Camp Plan (The Scotsman, July 14)
Proposals for a 106-acre summer camp near Cedar Rapids on the shores of Coralville Lake have divided the local community. The development would be the first specifically Muslim summer camp in the country, the first of what its organizers hope might, eventually, be many. More than 100 Iowans wrote to the Army Corps of Engineers to protest against the plan. Although many objected to the scale of the development, others also feared that the camp could foster anti-American feelings and act as a potential breeding ground for terrorism. "This is in no way to suggest that the application group is connected to terrorists," wrote JERRY KUHN, a veteran of the Second World War and a former professor of the University of Iowa. "Rather, they could easily, unwillingly and unknowingly, provide cover in an area where law enforcement is already inadequate." The Scotsman is based in the U.K.
http://www.thescotsman.co.uk/international.cfm?id=765022003

Skorton: UI To Use Iowa Values Funds For Lab (Omaha World-Herald, July 13)
The University of Iowa will use part of the money that it will get from the state's economic development fund to help replace its aging hygienic lab. That's according to a copyright story in The Gazette Saturday. The university will get $10 million from the $503 million Iowa Values Fund. University President DAVID SKORTON says up to $4 million will go toward expanding the Biosafety Level 3 facilities in the university's proposed lab building. He says a construction timeline for the estimated $25 million project hasn't been finalized. The Oakdale Research Campus building that houses Iowa's public health lab was built in 1917 as a tuberculosis hospital. Although some work areas were upgraded after the Sept. 11 attacks, the facility is the oldest state public health lab in the United States." The building was not built to be a lab building," said MARY GILCHRIST, the lab's director. "Low ceilings make it difficult to install biosafety equipment, and asbestos in the walls makes it difficult to make quick changes in order to meet new challenges." An abbreviated version of the story, one which does not quote Mary Gilchrist, ran July 14 on the website of WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=795931

Stuttering Study Cases Cited (Omaha World-Herald, July 13)
More than 60 years ago, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA speech expert Wendell Johnson set out to unravel the mystery of stuttering with a research study that sought to induce the speech disruption in orphans. Few modern speech pathologists disagree that the project, dubbed the "Monster Study," was highly unethical when viewed through the prism of modern research standards. And six of its subjects are suing the University of Iowa for lifelong emotional problems they say stem in part from their involuntary participation in the six-month study back in 1939. Yet to researchers and therapists who attended a stuttering conference on the Iowa campus earlier this month, the study and its fallout have done little to tarnish Johnson's image and achievements.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=795720

Black: Compulsive Shoppers Don't Seek Help (Omaha World-Herald, July 13)
DONALD BLACK of the University of Iowa, in San Francisco recently for a national meeting of psychiatrists gathered to better understand and treat people who buy compulsively, told colleagues that so-called "shopaholics" don't generally seek out help from psychiatrists. "They don't view this as a psychiatric problem," he said. Studies have estimated that between 2 percent and 8 percent, or even as many as 16 percent, of people in the United States are prone to shop compulsively. Most of them are women.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=793794

UI Tuition Hikes Cited (Treasure Coast Palm Network, July 13)
A story about the correlation between the state of the national economy and college tuition increases says that Iowa has not suffered state deficits thanks to carefully crafted budgets that accurately forecasted coming revenues. But tuition at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA rose from $3,204 two years ago to $4,191 this year; $4,993 has been announced for next year, one of the largest increases in the nation. The Treasure Coast Palm is a website that carries content of several newspapers in the Treasure Coast and Palm Beach portions of Florida: The Stuart News, The Port St. Lucie News, The Tribune, The Press Journal and The Jupiter Courier.
http://www.tcpalm.com/tcp/state_news/article/0,1651,TCP_1021_2106126,00.html

More Men Recruited Into Nursing (CNN, July 13)
With the ranks of nurses strained nationwide even as the baby boomer generation ages, hospital recruiters are turning to what they consider an untapped market for new nurses: men. Better pay, ample jobs, career mobility and even an emphasis on the rigorous demands of the job have combined to lure men into a realm dominated by women. The need for new nurses has spurred an attempt to lure men into the profession and some observers see signs that the push is paying off. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Oregon Center for Nursing show men prominently in nursing roles in brochures, posters and web sites. A version of the story also ran July 13 on the website of the ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH.
http://www.cnn.com/2003/HEALTH/07/13/nursing.men.ap/

UI Business Alumnus Founded Meetup.com (Chicago Sun-Times, July 13)
A story about Scott Heiferman, CEO and co-founder of Meetup.com, says his website encourages people to get off the computer and out of the house with a monthly "Meetup Day" where like-minded people get together. People vote on which restaurant, pizza joint or bar to meet at. The political potential of Meetup.com has the political community buzzing. Meetup.com executives are in conversations with the Democratic National Committee and the Republican National Committee to use Meetup.com in the 2004 contests. "A big part of our future is helping local campaigns," said Heiferman, who, in 1990, went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA where he majored in business. He finished school in 1994.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/sweet/cst-nws-sweet13.html

UI Tuition Increase Cited (Philadelphia Inquirer, July 13)
A story about Pennsylvania State University trustees' approval Friday of a $788 - or 9.8 percent - tuition increase says officials cited tuition increases at other Big 10 universities, including 19 percent at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A version of the story also ran July 11 on the website of the PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/local/6289837.htm

UI Medicine Alumna Joins Practice (Topeka Capital-Journal, July 13)
Brittani J. Roles, M.D., and Ramona Derouseau, ARNP-C, are joining the medical practice of Ronald L. Marshall, M.D., in Manhattan, Kan. Roles will join the practice Aug. 1. She is a junior fellow in the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Roles completed her residency at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha and received her medical degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE.
http://www.cjonline.com/stories/071303/bus_iyb.shtml

UI Cited In Story On Annexation Case (News Chief, July 12)
Eagle Lake, Fla., officials are suing Winter Haven to overturn the annexation of land they say falls within their city's utilities service area. Two lawsuits filed this week in the 10th Circuit Court ask a judge to void Winter Haven's recent annexation of 151 acres of land and stop the larger city from laying down utilities infrastructure in the area north of State Road 540. Eagle Lake officials want a judge to declare that Eagle Lake has exclusive rights to serve that area with water and sewer and that Winter Haven doesn't. Four of the five parcels of land in the dispute are owned by the development company, Highland Cassidy LLC, who agreed to annex inside Winter Haven. The owner of the fifth parcel of land, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, declined. The News Chief covers Polk County, Fla.
http://www.polkonline.com/stories/071203/loc_elsue.shtml

Bowlsby Criticizes Title IX Test (Washington Times, July 11)
The Bush administration announced yesterday that colleges and universities no longer must prove "substantially proportionate" participation of men and women in sports programs as the main way to comply with the federal Title IX sex-discrimination ban. In a letter to college presidents and other officials yesterday, the U.S. Education Department's Office of Civil Rights abandoned a 1996 Clinton administration ruling that "proportionality" - equal numbers of men and women in college sports programs - was the most important component of a three-part test for compliance with Title IX. Critics said inclusion of older students who were uninterested in playing sports improperly skewed the proportionality test, which has required elimination of numerous men's programs to accommodate financing of programs for women. "There are many men's wrestling, gymnastics, swimming teams that have gone away," said http://washingtontimes.com/national/20030712-120547-4081r.htm, the University of Iowa's athletics director for 12 seasons, at a Title IX review commission appointed last June by Education Secretary Rod Paige. "No one anywhere is adding men's teams."
http://washingtontimes.com/national/20030712-120547-4081r.htm

Ebert Gives Stone Reader Thumbs Up (Chicago Sun Times, July 11)
Movie critic Roger Ebert gives thumbs up to Stone Reader, the movie about an author's search for Dow Mossman, a graduate of the UI WRITER'S WORKSHOP and author of the book Stones of summer.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/ebert1/wkp-news-stone11f.html

Attack On Herky Mentioned (Pittsburgh Post Gazette, July 11)
A 1999 incident in which HERKY THE HAWK sustained a back injury after being hit with a foam banana by a member of the Ohio State University band is cited in a story about the perils of being a mascot.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/sports/s_144116.html

State Seeks Stuttering Suit Dismissal (Longview News Journal, July 11)
The state of Iowa has asked a judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed on behalf of six people who said they were taught to stutter as part of research conducted by a renowned speech pathologist in 1939. Special Assistant Attorney General Craig Kelinson and Assistant Attorney General Bruce Kemkes argued in a court document Wednesday that since the events happened before passage of the Iowa Tort Claims Act in 1965, the state is immune from such a lawsuit. The lawsuit, filed in Johnson County District Court in April, seeks unspecified damages. Only three of the six defendants are still alive. The six-month research project was led by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA speech pathologist Wendell Johnson, who tried to induce stuttering in children to prove that the speech impediment resulted from environment rather than genetics. The News Journal is based in Longview, TX. This story also appeared in the RALEIGH NEWS OBSERVER in North Carolina and the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.
http://www.news-journal.com/news/content/news/ap_story.html/National/AP.V4771.AP-Stutterers-Laws.html

Alumnus Remembers Caray's Death (Knoxville News Sentinel, July 11)
UI graduate GREG WALLACE recounts watching memorials to Harry Caray in his dorm room at the University of Iowa. This story also appeared in the BIRMINGHAM POST HERALD, the SEBASTIAN (Fla.) SUN and the CORPUS CHRISTI CALLER TIMES, http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/baseball/article/0,1406,KNS_318_2100019,00.html

State Seeks Stuttering Suit Dismissal (San Francisco Chronicle, July 10)
The state of Iowa has asked a judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed on behalf of six people who said they were taught to stutter as part of research conducted by a renowned speech pathologist in 1939. Special Assistant Attorney General Craig Kelinson and Assistant Attorney General Bruce Kemkes argued in a court document Wednesday that since the events happened before passage of the Iowa Tort Claims Act in 1965, the state is immune from such a lawsuit. The lawsuit, filed in Johnson County District Court in April, seeks unspecified damages. Only three of the six defendants are still alive. The six-month research project was led by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA speech pathologist Wendell Johnson, who tried to induce stuttering in children to prove that the speech impediment resulted from environment rather than genetics. A version of the story also ran July 10 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2003/07/10/national1041EDT0566.DTL

Lutz Comments On Tears (International Herald Tribune, July 10)
A story about the public displays of emotion -- particularly crying -- by professional athletes and sports figures quotes TOM LUTZ, the author of "Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears" (W.W. Norton, 1999), who offered some skepticism about the apparent increase in public crying. Lutz said in a telephone interview that crying by athletes "is like presidential infidelity; there's more press now." Lutz, who teaches English at the University of Iowa, said: "The crying man is fashionable. We learn what's appropriate and we kind of produce it. Sometimes we can't quite control ourselves, but, in a sense, we are acting when we display emotions. It doesn't mean we don't feel them." Lutz argued that Bill Clinton changed the public perception regarding tearful displays by political figures. This, in turn, he said, affected even the behavior Bob Dole, Clinton's Republican opponent in the 1996 presidential campaign. "Dole learned to cry in public as a necessary part of political acting," Lutz said.
http://www.iht.com/articles/102248.html

NADS To Analyze Princess Diana Crash (USA Today, July 10)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA driving simulator will help analyze the car crash that killed Princess Diana in 1997. Bob Wise of The Discovery Channel's Unsolved History said the show will try to determine whether the driver could have functioned at his alleged level of intoxication. The simulator recreates nearly every traffic scenario that computer programmers can design. The Diana episode is scheduled to air Aug. 20.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/states/iamain.htm

NADS To Recreate Accident (Omaha World-Herald, July 10)
The National Advanced Driving Simulator will be used to help analyze the 1997 car crash that killed Princess Diana, pending an agreement between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and producers of the TV show "Unsolved History." The Discovery Channel show will use the $81 million simulator to try to determine whether the driver of Diana's car could have been functional at the level of intoxication alleged, said Bob Wise, the episode's director. The driving simulator recreates the look, feel and experience of driving in nearly every traffic scenario computer programmers can design. The show contacted Iowa officials about two weeks ago after searching the Internet looking for a way to test people's ability to drive under the influence of alcohol, Wise said. WENDY MOOREHEAD, a spokeswoman for NADS, said the university has yet to sign a contract with the show's producers, but she is hopeful everything will work out.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=793102

UI To Get Values Fund Money (Omaha World-Herald, July 10)
The new $503 million Iowa Values Fund will mean more money for economic development, but just how it fits with existing programs has yet to be worked out, the state's development director says. Mike Blouin, head of the Iowa Department of Economic Development, said the state's "bigger economic toolbox" will be infused with about $250 million over the next four years. Of that total, $27 million will be used for improvements to public and private universities, with "no less than" $25 million going to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa for improvements to research facilities and laboratories and assistance to so-called business incubators and technology accelerators.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=793029

State Seeks Suit Dismissal (San Francisco Chronicle, July 10)
The state of Iowa has asked a judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed on behalf of six people who said they were taught to stutter as part of research conducted by a renowned speech pathologist in 1939. Special Assistant Attorney General Craig Kelinson and Assistant Attorney General Bruce Kemkes argued in a court document Wednesday that since the events happened before passage of the Iowa Tort Claims Act in 1965, the state is immune from such a lawsuit. The lawsuit, filed in Johnson County District Court in April, seeks unspecified damages. Only three of the six defendants are still alive. The six-month research project was led by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA speech pathologist Wendell Johnson, who tried to induce stuttering in children to prove that the speech impediment resulted from environment rather than genetics.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2003/07/10/national1041EDT0566.DTL

UI Salt Study Cited (Confectionery News, July 10)
A top heart charity has launched a 'pinch of salt' consumer awareness campaign in the UK to tackle salt consumption, while scientists in the U.S. investigating the link between salt and taste foresee new healthy salts in the future. The British Heart Foundation is concerned that too many of us are consuming too much salt which can raise blood pressure, leading to a greater risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. But new research published this month suggests that the human body could be fully aware when the levels of salt, after all essential for survival, reach a potentially harmful level. Researchers at the University of Iowa, interested in identifying the receptors that detect small quantities of salt and understanding salt-sensing mechanisms, published their findings in the 3 July issue of Neuron. "Given that salt is essential for survival, it is not surprising that animals have developed the ability to detect salt, even at low concentrations. This sense allows them to seek out, and then consume salt," said researcher MICHAEL WELSH.
http://www.bakeryandsnacks.com/news/news.asp?id=298

UI Fights Termites (PCTonline, July 10)
The University of Iowa is experimenting with a non-chemical way to stop termite infestations on campus buildings. The university has been researching a new method in which crushed limestone is used to prevent termite infestations. According to University of Iowa Entomologist BOB SETTER, before a building is constructed, the university will be placing a six-inch layer of crushed limestone under concrete and up sidewalls, creating a physical barrier.
http://www.pctonline.com/news/news.asp?ID=1963

Lutz Comments On Rise In Crying Among Athletes (New York Times, July 9)
A story about the public displays of emotion - particularly crying -- by professional athletes and sports figures quotes TOM LUTZ, the author of "Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears" (W.W. Norton, 1999), who offered some skepticism about the apparent increase in public crying. Lutz said in a telephone interview that crying by athletes "is like presidential infidelity; there's more press now." Lutz, who teaches English at the University of Iowa, said: "The crying man is fashionable. We learn what's appropriate and we kind of produce it. Sometimes we can't quite control ourselves, but, in a sense, we are acting when we display emotions. It doesn't mean we don't feel them." Lutz argued that Bill Clinton changed the public perception regarding tearful displays by political figures. This, in turn, he said, affected even the behavior Bob Dole, Clinton's Republican opponent in the 1996 presidential campaign. "Dole learned to cry in public as a necessary part of political acting," Lutz said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/09/sports/othersports/09crying.html?ex=1058328000&en=c5effb9383f1ba14&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

EPA Doesn't Object To Use Of Dye In Ponds (Omaha World-Herald, July 9)
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency doesn't object to the city using blue dye in four storm-water detention ponds to make them look better. After a complaint about Coralville's use of a chemical dye called Aquashade, the Iowa Department of Agriculture investigated runoff at the ponds. The action followed a complaint last month by LARRY ROBERTSON, a University of Iowa toxicologist who owns a home overlooking one of the ponds. Robertson is concerned about the environmental impact of the dye. He said the pond has enough overflow to preclude the use of Aquashade. The EPA restricts the use of the dye to ponds and lakes "with little or no overflow."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=791905

More Men Recruited Into Nursing (Arizona Central, July 8)
With the ranks of nurses strained nationwide even as the baby boomer generation ages, hospital recruiters are turning to what they consider an untapped market for new nurses: men. Better pay, ample jobs, career mobility and even an emphasis on the rigorous demands of the job have combined to lure men into a realm dominated by women. The need for new nurses has spurred an attempt to lure men into the profession and some observers see signs that the push is paying off. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Oregon Center for Nursing show men prominently in nursing roles in brochures, posters and Web sites. Arizona Central is a website that provides content from the Arizona Republic and Arizona Business Gazette newspapers. Versions of the story also ran July 8 on the websites of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE and CBS NEWS.
http://www.azcentral.com/business/articles/0708Nursing-Recruiting-ON.html

UI Tuition Hikes Cited (Knoxville News Sentinel, July 8)
A story about the correlation between the state of the national economy and college tuition increases says that Iowa has not suffered state deficits thanks to carefully crafted budgets that accurately forecasted coming revenues. But tuition at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA rose from $3,204 two years ago to $4,191 this year; $4,993 has been announced for next year, one of the largest increases in the nation. The Sentinel is based in Knoxville, Tenn. A version of the story also ran July 9 on the websites of the TIMES RECORD NEWS in Texas and SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE.
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/national/article/0,1406,KNS_350_2094200,00.html

More Men Recruited Into Nursing (ABCNews.com, July 8)
With the ranks of nurses strained nationwide even as the baby boomer generation ages, hospital recruiters are turning to what they consider an untapped market for new nurses: men. Better pay, ample jobs, career mobility and even an emphasis on the rigorous demands of the job have combined to lure men into a realm dominated by women. The need for new nurses has spurred an attempt to lure men into the profession and some observers see signs that the push is paying off. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Oregon Center for Nursing show men prominently in nursing roles in brochures, posters and Web sites. The article also appeared on the web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES; BALTIMORE SUN; SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION; KANSAS CITY STAR; TUSCALOOSA NEWS in Alabama; DAYTON DAILY NEWS in Ohio; NEWSDAY in New York; ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS in South Dakota; FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL in Indiana; ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM in North Carolina; NEWS JOURNAL in Texas; GUARDIAN in the United Kingdom; BILOXI SUN HERALD in Mississippi; MACON TELEGRAPH and COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia; WILKES BARRE WEEKENDER and CENTER CITY TIMES in Pennsylvania; BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT in Illinois; WILMINGTON MORNING STAR in North Carolina; GRAND FORKS HERALD in North Dakota; DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota; and YAHOO NEWS.
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/ap20030708_101.html

Welsh Studies Body's Salt Receptors (Foodproductiondaily.com, July 7)
New research published this month suggests that the human body could be fully aware when the levels of consumed salt, after all essential for survival, reach a potentially harmful level. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, interested in identifying the receptors that detect small quantities of salt and understanding salt-sensing mechanisms, published their findings in the July 3 issue of Neuron. "Given that salt is essential for survival, it is not surprising that animals have developed the ability to detect salt, even at low concentrations. This sense allows them to seek out, and then consume salt," said researcher MICHAEL WELSH. Food Production Daily, based in Montpellier, France is a website that provides news and expert information on plants, processing and packaging equipment, packaging materials, analysis and control instrumentation for the food and drink industries. A version of the story also ran July 7 on the website of the Food Navigator website, also based in France.
http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/news/news.asp?id=3107

Baldus Mentioned in Death Penalty Profile (Time, July 7)
A profile of Travis County, Texas District Attorney Ronald Earle found that he has asked for the death penalty only 17 times out of a total of 63 capital-murder cases - or 27 percent of the time. By comparison, according to DAVID BALDUS, professor of law at the University of Iowa, Philadelphia prosecutors seek the death penalty in about 70 percent of eligible cases. The figure is roughly 60 percent in Lincoln, Neb., and 45 percent in Georgia and New Jersey.
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1101030714-463094-1,00.html

McLeod Work In Art Exhibit (Wired News, July 7)
"Illegal Art," which opened last week at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's Artists Gallery, showcases a variety of works that push the restrictions of current trademark and copyright laws. The exhibit is intended to illustrate the limits that such laws impose on artists' freedom of expression, said Carrie McLaren, editor of Stay Free! magazine and the show's organizer. "(The show) is our own little act of civil disobedience," KEMBREW MCLEOD, artist and University of Iowa professor, said at a panel discussion here Thursday night. McLeod holds a trademark on the phrase "freedom of expression," and it's framed for the exhibit. McLeod started a magazine called Freedom of Expression. Then he had a friend launch another 'zine with the same name and hired an unwitting lawyer to sue the "rival" publication for copyright infringement. Recently, he sued AT&T for using the phrase in an advertisement for their wireless services.
http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,59501,00.html

UI Helps Build Digital Libraries In Africa (USA Today, July 7)
A University of Iowa project that recently got more than $225,000 in federal grants will help African universities expand their educational opportunities through Internet and satellite technology. Rep. Jim Leach, R-Iowa, presented the WiderNet Project's co-director, CLIFF MISSEN, with about $236,000 in grants last week. The funding will pay for the construction of the African digital library project called "eGranary: Storing the Seeds of Knowledge." The project, over the next two years, will expand and update digital libraries and deliver educational materials using satellite technology. It will include technological training and will provide computers, Internet and e-mail access at the African universities.
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2003-07-07-digital-library-africa_x.htm

Author Tayari Jones Attended UI (Arizona Republic, July 7)
A story about novelist Tayari Jones, whose first novel, "Leaving Atlanta," was a critical and commercial success when it came out last year, says that Jones went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to work on a doctorate in literature. At a writing conference in Portland, Ore., she met writer and Arizona State University Professor Jewell Parker Rhodes, who persuaded Jones to leave the doctorate program in Iowa and come to Arizona for a more hands-on master's of fine arts, to do her own writing instead of researching others' work.
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/arizonaliving/articles/0707tayari07.html

UI Study: Neck Braces Alter Driving Performance (Health Central, July 7)
If you have a hurt neck and need a brace, you may want to consider putting away your car keys. A new study finds neck braces alter driving performance. The study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA shows acceleration, turning to look and checking the blind spot are all altered when a brace is worn. Researchers set out to study this topic because thousands of Americans are prescribed neck braces each year for a variety of reasons. The purpose of the braces is to restrict motion, and the researchers feared that might affect driving. There are currently no restrictions on driving while wearing a brace. A version of the article also ran July 7 on IVANHOE.
http://www.healthcentral.com/news/NewsFullText.cfm?id=8006511

Leach Seeks Funds For Hygienic Lab (Omaha World Herald, July 6)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY needs up to $30 million in extra federal and state funds to help protect against bioterrorism and emerging diseases, a congressman said. "Iowa has one of the best laboratories in the country," U.S. Rep. Jim Leach, R-Iowa, said Wednesday after a tour of the facility. "But we have the oldest facility, and it's truly in need of reconstitution physically." Last year, the lab received a $1 million grant to help become the Midwest's leading laboratory in the national effort to prevent bioterrorism. Some of the money was expected to help pay for a new hygienic lab, which would help scientists consolidate research efforts and improve security.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=789521

Author Mossman Attended Writers' Workshop (Chicago Sun-Times, July 6)
A story about author Dow Mossman, whose novel, "The Stones of Summer," was published in 1972, says Mossman wrote the book after graduating from the acclaimed UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. He never published anything again. Mark Moskowitz, who tried to read the book as a teenager but gave up after 20 pages, picked up again in 1997 and read the entire novel. When he couldn't find more information about the author, he began a quest to learn what had happened to him. The result is the documentary "Stone Reader."
http://www.suntimes.com/output/entertainment/sho-sunday-dow06.html

Hospitals Face Limits On Residents' Hours (New London Day, July 6)
For the nation's bleary-eyed doctors-in-training, life gets a little easier Tuesday, when new regulations go into effect to limit their hours to 80 per week. The new rules are a response to growing evidence that exhausted young doctors burn out and make too many mistakes and will help them get some much-needed shuteye. Hospitals have been preparing for the guidelines for more than a year, so no sudden changes are expected Tuesday. The guidelines have already changed how teaching hospitals operate. Georgetown University, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE and Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are among those to implement or expand "float" systems, where a team of doctors arrives at night so others can leave. The New London Day is based in Connecticut. A version of the article also appeared July 5 on the website of the DURANGO HERALD in Colorado.
http://www.theday.com/eng/web/newstand/re.aspx?reIDx=8D1A6218-5A71-4E5F-8514-6ED66FDA0CEA

Artist Sampson Attended UI (Grand Forks Herald, July 6)
A story about North Dakota native and artist Frank Sampson says that in 1950 he entered the graduate program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. While attending college, he learned the art of intaglio printmaking from an instructor named Mauricio Lasansky. Sampson said the graphic qualities of the etching medium still influence his work today, even though he works primarily with paint. He earned his master's degree in fine arts.
http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/news/6242317.htm

UI Alumnus To Head Youth Symphonies (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, July 6)
A story about Jean Montes, the new artistic director of Greater Twin Cities Youth Symphonies, says that in May Montès received his doctorate in conducting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he often heard his teacher, Dr. William Jones, reminisce about his 25 years as co-founder and artistic director of GTCYS.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/3964375.html

UI Public Health Alumnus To Teach In College (Tallahassee Democrat, July 6)
A story about the upcoming retirement of Duncan Moore as CEO of Tallahassee Memorial Hospital in Florida says that this fall he'll teach at the COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he got his master's degree. After that he'll return to Tallahassee.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/6241638.htm

Author/UI Writing Instructor McPherson Pens Essay (Washington Post, July 6)
A note accompanying an essay by author JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON says that he teaches at the WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A260-2003Jul2.html

Liu, Colleagues At UI Identify Salt-Sensing Genes (Science News, July 5)
People's fondness for salty snacks reflects a fundamental biological imperative. "All cells, in order to survive, need salt," says the University of Iowa's LEI LIU of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. To keep themselves supplied with this critical nutrient, animals have developed ways for sensing sodium chloride and other salts. By creating mutant fruit flies with an impaired capacity to taste salt, Liu and his colleagues have now identified several genes that contribute to this crucial sensory system in insects. Liu suggests that the fly research could provide insights into how people taste salt and may even lead to an effective salt substitute to fight high blood pressure and other conditions exacerbated by today's salt-rich diets, he speculates.

Author Smiley's Daughter Attends UI Law School (The Age, July 5)
A story about novelist Jane Smiley says that her eldest child, age 24, is at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LAW SCHOOL, where her teachers include Smiley's first husband. The Age is based in Australia. http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/07/05/1057179202439.html

Actor Ashton Kutcher Attended UI (The Mirror, July 5)
A story about actor Ashton Kutcher says that his twin brother, Michael, spent three months in an incubator after birth and was found to be suffering from mild cerebral palsy. At age 13, he suffered cardiomyopathy, a chronic disorder of the heart muscle that can be fatal. For a time Kutcher wanted to try to work to find a cure for his brother. He enrolled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to study biochemical engineering, aiming to become a geneticist. But when he was spotted in a college bar by a modeling agent, the lure of fame proved too great. The Mirror is based in London.
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/allnews/content_objectid=13144866_method=full_siteid=50143_headline=-Demi-s-toyboy-was-a-good-kisser----so-gentle-and-sweet-with-lovely-eyes-name_page.html

Dean Meets With Supporters On UI Campus (Washington Times, July 4)
Democratic presidential hopeful Howard Dean began an Internet turnout drive Wednesday, trying to build ties among his backers as well as persuade them to help him win Iowa's leadoff caucuses in January. Dean joined more than 200 backers packed into a sweltering UNIVERSITY OF IOWA meeting room to also urge them to join his Iowa "Dean Corps," where his supporters take part in community-service programs.
http://washingtontimes.com/national/20030703-114702-3555r.htm

UI Building's Cornerstone Set In 1840 (Chronicle, July 4)
A story about Independence Day celebrations and commemorations on campuses across the country says that the cornerstones of major buildings at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and at Hardin-Simmons University were laid on the Fourth in 1840 and 1891, respectively, while a central building at Northwestern University was dedicated on July 4, 1867.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i43/43a00801.htm

Dean Speaks At UI (Boston Globe, July 4)
Exactly where Democratic presidential hopeful Howard Dean lies on the ideological spectrum is a persistent question, one that his advisers say is impossible to answer. Dean, they argue, cannot be pigeonholed. He has taken stands across the spectrum, supporting abortion rights, supporting some rights to gun ownership, demanding a balanced budget, approving civil unions for gays and lesbians. But the vast majority of his early grass-roots support has, in fact, come from liberals, and a number of the 130 or so supporters who attended a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA appearance said they believed that Dean is the most left-leaning candidate in the race. ''He is, in my opinion, a little more liberal than the other Democratic candidates,'' said Megan Thompson, 25, a research assistant who supports Dean.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/185/nation/Dean_s_new_challenge_proving_wider_appeal+.shtml

Watson: Creative People Recall Dreams (Farm and Dairy, July 3)
People who are creative, imaginative and prone to fantasy are more likely to have vivid dreams at night and to remember them when they wake up, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research shows. David Watson, a professor of psychology in the University of Iowa College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said that the more bizarre a dream was the more likely his subjects were to remember it. Most significantly, Watson found individuals who are prone to absorption, imaginativeness, daydreaming and fantasizing are particularly likely to remember their dreams. "There is a fundamental continuity between how people experience the world during the day and at night," he said. "People who are prone to daydreaming and fantasy have less of a barrier between states of sleep and wakefulness and seem to more easily pass between them." Farm and Dairy is based in Ohio. This story is not available online.

Dean Launches Internet Drive At UI (FoxNews.com, July 3)
Democratic presidential hopeful Howard Dean launched an Internet turnout drive Wednesday, trying to build ties among his backers as well as persuade them to help him win Iowa's leadoff caucuses in January. Dean aides around the country are trying to persuade volunteers to write two letters to uncommitted Iowa voters asking them to support the former Vermont governor's bid for the Democratic nomination. Dean joined more than 200 backers packed into a sweltering UNIVERSITY OF IOWA meeting room to also urge them to join his Iowa "Dean Corp," where his supporters take part in community service programs. "It's public service," Dean said. "It's how I got started in politics." Versions of this Associated Press article appeared July 3 on the Web sites of NEW YORK TIMES, BALTIMORE SUN, THE GUARDIAN (UK), TIMES-PICAYUNE (La.), SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, NEWSDAY, PENNLIVE, WCCO-TV (Minn.), and SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,91003,00.html

Alumnus Named Superintendent (Munster Times, July 3)
The Highland School Board on Wednesday appointed Renner Ventling as its new superintendent. Ventling has a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a master's degree in secondary school administration from Northeast Missouri State University and a doctorate in educational administration from the University of Missouri-Columbia. (The newspaper is based in Indiana.)
http://www.thetimesonline.com/articles/2003/07/03/news/lake_county/cc1b63070a55803486256d580005a2c3.txt

UI Gets Federal Grant (Omaha World Herald, July 3)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA received $900,000 from the Department of Health and Human Services to study heart disease, drug abuse, oral diseases and cancer.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=787214

Iowa Is Affordable For Biotech (Duluth News Tribune, July 3)
A biotechnology business consultant said the Ames and Des Moines areas are among the most affordable places for an average-sized biotechnology company to do business. John Boyd, president of Princeton, N.J.-based The Boyd Company Inc. said growth in the biotech industry is likely to happen in Iowa. The Ames-Des Moines corridor needs to advertise itself as an area with a high volume of educated life-science workers coming out of Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a luxury that other states don't have, he said. This Associated Press article also appeared July 3 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/6225087.htm

Author Wideman Talks About Writers' Workshop (NPR, July 2)
In the wake of the publication of The Writing Life, a collection of essays from more than 50 contemporary authors, NPR's Morning Edition held a salon with three of the writers included: Michael Chabon, Jane Smiley and John Edgar Wideman. Wideman recounts how he took a job teaching at the University of Pennsylvania in 1967, the year he published his first novel, A Glance Away, a story based on his uncle, a self-cured drug addict. He says: "It was, in many ways, a story about me -- about being caught up in an alien culture and wending my way back to reality. I hadn't thought much about racism. I was too busy trying to swallow the world in one gulp. I was struggling to make sense of a world that was far away from the world I'd grown up in -- Penn, Oxford, the writing workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. I was the living exception in these places. There was something charmed and wrong about that. I felt at any moment a bell would ring, fingers would snap, all of it would fall apart and I would stumble, leaving an ugly handprint in the nice white cake."
http://www.npr.org/display_pages/features/feature_1304643.html

New Iowa Judge Received Law Degree From UI (Omaha World-Herald, July 2)
Shelby County Attorney Jeff Larson was appointed Tuesday as a judge in the state's 4th Judicial District, Gov. Tom Vilsack said. "I believe he will be a fair and effective judge who will serve the 4th District well," Vilsack said. Larson, who earned his law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has practiced law in Harlan since 1985, mainly in the areas of real estate, banking, estate planning, probate and civil litigation.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=786125

Hospitals Face Limits On Residents' Hours (WJXX-TV, July 1)
For the nation's bleary-eyed doctors-in-training, life gets a little easier Tuesday, when new regulations go into effect to limit their hours to 80 per week. The new rules are a response to growing evidence that exhausted young doctors burn out and make too many mistakes and will help them get some much-needed shuteye. Hospitals have been preparing for the guidelines for more than a year, so no sudden changes are expected Tuesday. The guidelines have already changed how teaching hospitals operate. Georgetown University, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE and Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are among those to implement or expand "float" systems, where a team of doctors arrives at night so others can leave. WJXX-TV is based in Jacksonville, Fla. Versions of the article also ran July 1 on the websites of the IDAHO STATE JOURNAL, SALON, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, the CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING NETWORK, the BALTIMORE SUN, WTOL in Ohio.
http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/news-article.aspx?storyid=5446

Whitmore Was Candidate For Houston Post (KTRK, July 1)
The University of Houston System will announce today that Jay Gogue, president of New Mexico State University, will become the next head of the UH system and main campus, according to people close to the process. Other finalists were Gregory Williams, president of the City College of the City University of New York; and JON WHITMORE, the provost at the University of Iowa. KTRK is an ABC News affiliate in Houston, Texas. Versions of the article also ran July 1 on the website of CLICK2-TV in Houston.
http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/news/70103_local_chancellor.html

UI First To Perform Gastric Bypass Surgery (Newport Daily News, July 1)
A story about one woman's decision to undergo gastric bypass surgery at Roger Williams Medical Center in Providence, R.I., to lose weight, says the now popular and medically accepted treatment for obesity was first performed in 1966 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.newportdailynews.com/articles/2003/07/01/news/news3.txt

UI Is Subcontractor On Fuel Cell Project (Solar Access, July 1)
FuelCell Energy, Inc. the manufacturer of Direct FuelCell (DFC) stationary power plants, has been selected for four U.S. government small business program contract awards totaling $1.45 million to support continued fuel cell development. Among these is a two-year, $500,000 contract with the U.S. Army. The selection is based on promising results obtained in a Phase 1 program that demonstrated improved carbon monoxide tolerance when magnetic particles are introduced into the fuel cell anode. The objective of the Phase 2 research is to further develop this process and to test complete membrane electrode assemblies with a variety of techniques to define performance limits and favorable operating conditions. FuelCell Energy will be working with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as a subcontractor. The overall goal of this multi-phase project is to enhance carbon monoxide tolerance and performance of PEM fuel cells that will result in widespread use for portable, transportation and stationary applications.
http://www.solaraccess.com/news/story?storyid=460

Hospitals Face Limits On Residents' Hours (ABC News, July 1)
For the nation's bleary-eyed doctors-in-training, life gets a little easier Tuesday, when new regulations go into effect to limit their hours to 80 per week. The new rules are a response to growing evidence that exhausted young doctors burn out and make too many mistakes and will help them get some much-needed shuteye. Hospitals have been preparing for the guidelines for more than a year, so no sudden changes are expected Tuesday. The guidelines have already changed how teaching hospitals operate. Georgetown University, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE and Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are among those to implement or expand "float" systems, where a team of doctors arrives at night so others can leave. The Associated Press Story also appeared on websites of the: NEW YORK TIMES; BALTIMORE SUN; CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING NETWORK; SEATTLE TIMES; DETROIT NEWS; KANSAS CITY STAR; YAHOO NEWS; BSTON GLOBE; RAPID CITY JOURNAL and ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS in South Dakota; TIMES DAILY TUSCALOOSA NEWS in Alabama; AKRON BEACON JOURNAL and CANTON REPOSITORY in Ohio; ALBANY TIMES UNION and NEWSDAY in New York; ALBANY DEMOCRAT HERALD in Oregon; BECKLEY REGISTER-HERALD and CHARLESTON GAZETTE in West Virginia; WILMINGTON MORNING STAR in North Carolina; DUNN COUNTY NEWS in Wisconsin; FREE LANCE-STAR in Virginia; DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota; SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE in Florida; WILKES BARRE WEEKENDER; PENN LIVE and CENTER DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania; PORTERVILLE RECORDER; NAPA VALLEY REGISTER and LONG BEACH PRESS TELEGRAM in California; BILLINGS GAZETTE in Montana; NEWS JOURNAL in Delaware; GRAND FORKS HERALD in North Dakota; BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT in Illinois; BILOXI SUN HERALD in Mississippi; WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas; FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL in Indiana; TIMES PICAYUNE in Louisiana; MACON TELEGRAPH and COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia; WMAR-TV in Maryland; ARIZONA BUSINESS GAZETTE; WCVB-TV in Massachusetts.
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/Living/ap20030701_496.html

UI Surplus A Gold Mine For Some (Omaha World Herald, July 1)
Each Thursday morning, a group of men arrives at a warehouse on South Gilbert Street, waiting for a sale to begin. A chemistry professor. An 87-year-old retired electrician. A self-employed enzyme researcher. Their quarry is used scientific equipment, and they hunt it with a passion. "There's been, I don't want to say fisticuffs," said Joe Hennager, the office manager. "But there has been pushing and shoving. Imagine a girdle sale at Macy's." This drama has been transpiring at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Campus Surplus office since it opened more than 30 years ago. Each Thursday, the office has a public sale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=784775

Whitmore Was Candidate For Houston Post (Houston Chronicle, July 1)
The University of Houston System will announce today that Jay Gogue, president of New Mexico State University, will become the next head of the UH system and main campus, according to people close to the process. Other finalists were Gregory Williams, president of the City College of the City University of New York; and JON WHITMORE, the provost at the University of Iowa.
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/printstory.hts/metropolitan/1974328

Black Comments On Compulsive Shopping (Dallas Morning News, July 1)
As part of a national meeting in San Francisco last month, psychiatrists gathered to better understand and treat people who buy compulsively. Studies have variously estimated that between two and eight percent, or even as many as 16 percent, of people in the United States are prone to shop compulsively. Most of them are women. "By the way, they generally don't come to psychiatrists," Dr. DONALD BLACK of the University of Iowa told his colleagues. "They don't view this as a psychiatric problem."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=acda0b9a5885c334a7a666f580f4b051&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVtz-lSlzV&_md5=67381459c5700c6c9fb2391f9330d41f

UI Study On Intuition Cited (Readers Digest, July 2003)
A story about intuition cites a study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE that revealed that our bodies are smarter than we think, since one of the ways our intuition warns us of trouble is through physical sensations. The researchers lent volunteers $2,000 (in play money) and asked them to turn over cards from four decks, marked with sums the person had won or lost. Two of the decks offered larger wins and losses, but ultimately left players in the red, while the other two had smaller rewards and penalties, but resulted in a profit. After playing about 10 cards from one of the losing decks, subjects who were hooked up to skin sensors like those on a lie detector started getting bad vibes. By the time they'd played 50 cards, they began to avoid those decks, even though they couldn't explain why.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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