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UI in the News

February, 2003

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IEM Is Now Open (Minnesota Public Radio, Feb. 28)
The Iowa Electronic Markets are now open. It's a real-money futures market for presidential candidates, among other things. The price of the candidate predicts the outcome of a race. The IEM has been very accurate in this regard. TOM RIETZ, associate professor of finance at the Tippie College of Business at the UI and IEM co-director, explained how traders can buy contracts for candidates in the market for the Democratic nomination for President.
http://news.mpr.org/programs/futuretense/

Conroy Accepts Medal On Workshop's Behalf (Philadelphia Inquirer, Feb. 28)
Haverford alumnus FRANK CONROY accepted the National Humanities Medal at the White House from President Bush on Feb. 27 on behalf of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, which Conroy directs. The medal is presented by the U.S. government to honor U.S. leaders in the humanities.

Workshop Gets Honor (United Press International, Feb. 28)
At a ceremony Thursday inside the White House, IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP was one of eight recipients of the National Humanities Medal for the year 2002.
http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20030227-053853-7360r
The award is also noted in the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.

Parrott Comments (Albuquerque Tribine, Feb. 28)
A search for a new president at the University of New Mexico is underway. For all its prestige and the magnitude of its salary, seeking leadership of New Mexico's biggest university has one thing in common with job searches at every level: You don't tell your current employer that you're looking for work elsewhere. That's why those with experience in these searches agree that secrecy is essential to guaranteeing a deep pool of candidates. STEVE PARROTT, a spokesman at the University of Iowa, said that if a university wants to get "top candidates" for a presidential search, then it must do all it can to keep candidate names confidential. "They're reluctant to make their names public unless they are finalists," Parrott said.
http://www.abqtrib.com/archives/news03/022803_news_unm.shtml

Herky Is A Person (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 28)
Angie Anderson who once suited up as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Herky the Hawk says people truly forget there's a person inside the suit. "People just don't make that connection," she said. "When I got hurt, it's because those people didn't make the connection that I was inside there." In October 1999, two members of the Ohio State band sneaked up on Herky at a football team and beaned the mascot with a plastic banana the size of a baseball bat. The impact fractured one of the vertebrae in Anderson's neck. Now 23 and in graduate school, she is better now, but her neck will never fully recover. In December, she won a $25,000 settlement from Ohio State.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=667062

Writer’s Workshop Gets Honor (Washington Post, Feb. 28)
The UI WRITER’S WORKSHOP was one of eight recipients of a National Humanities Medal, announced Thursday by President George W. bush. The award, which Congress established in 1988, honors those who have contributed to the nation's understanding of the humanities. The National Endowment for the Humanities presents a list of recommendations to the president, who then selects the honorees.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A14131-2003Feb27.html
A story on the same topic also appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES, BALTIMORE SUN, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, KANSAS CITY STAR and TACOMA (WASH.) TRIBUNE.

Squire Discusses Iowa (The New Republic, Feb. 28)
An article about anti-war Democrats in Iowa quotes UI political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE about the roots of the state’s conflicted internationalist bent. "The state of Iowa has these conflicting traditions of being isolationist, staying out of other people's business. At the same time, the state is pretty internationalist, especially on trade." Iowa politicians have regularly backed the free-trade alphabet soup of GATT, NAFTA, PNTR, and TPA.
http://www.tnr.com/doc.mhtml?i=20030310&s=lizza031003

Author Attended UI (San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 27)
A profile of Maine author Lewis Robinson notes that he attended graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2003/02/27/DD85189.DTL

Cisneros Attended Workshop (Idaho Statesman, Feb. 27)
A profile of author Sandra Cisneros notes that she received a bachelor´s degree from Loyola University and a master´s degree in fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS´ WORKSHOP.
http://204.228.236.37/News/story.asp?ID=34020

UI Surgeons Comment On Lipectomy (News14 Carolina, Feb. 27)
Gastric bypass surgeries have changed the lives of morbidly obese people, leading to the dramatic loss of weight. However, a new issue has cropped-up for those who have lost all that weight... unwanted and unhealthy excess skin around their mid-section. A new surgical technique, called a belt lipectomy is essentially a facelift for the body. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA surgeons say it takes three to six hours with two surgical teams working in tandem to remove the pounds of excess skin and fat. Patients require about four weeks of recuperation before they are back to their everyday activities. (This station is based in Raleigh, N.C.)
http://rdu.news14.com/content/headlines/?ArID=24267&SecID=2

Gordon Comments On Benefits (Times-Picayune, Jan. 26)
Health-care benefits, once considered an entitlement to workers, is at risk of becoming an unaffordable luxury to many job holders. Before World War II, fewer than 5 percent of workers had any health-care benefits. When they did, they usually were in the form of company clinics. And as University of Iowa public policy historian COLIN GORDON explains, employers' motivation had less to do with relieving workers' financial burdens than with good personnel practice. (The newspaper is based in New Orleans, La.)
This article also appeared Jan. 26 and Feb. 4 in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.

UI Tuition Increases (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 26)
Looming tuition increases in Nebraska, Iowa and nationally and the economic downturn are combining to make paying for college particularly tough this year, even for middle-income families. Making it even harder in Nebraska was a 15 percent decrease in three state-funded scholarship programs. Additional cuts, prompted by the state's budget problems, are proposed. Tuition increased 18 percent at Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa. An increase of nearly 18 percent is coming for next fall.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=664702

Baldus Comments On Decision (Dallas Morning News, Feb. 26)
In an 8-1 decision Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered a lower court to reconsider an appeal by Thomas Joe Miller-El, who complained of racial bias in the selection of the Dallas County jury that convicted him of murder 17 years ago. Miller-El, who is black, was convicted in 1986 of the November 1985 murder of Douglas Walker, who was shot in the back after being bound and gagged during an Irving hotel robbery. Another clerk, Donald Ray Hall, was shot and paralyzed from the chest down. He identified Miller-El as the gunman, as did a co-defendant. Lawyers for Mr. Miller-El had argued at the time of trial that Dallas prosecutors had systematically excluded qualified blacks from the jury pool through the use of race-based challenges and so-called jury shuffles. A 1986 investigation by The Dallas Morning News, cited in briefs and oral arguments, found that Dallas prosecutors excluded 90 percent of black prospective jurors from all 15 capital murder cases between 1980 and 1986. DAVID C. BALDUS, an expert on jury selection issues at the University of Iowa, said the Miller-El decision "legitimates" the use of such statistics as evidence of bias. "This is a really important decision in that respect," Baldus said.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dallas/politics/national/stories/022603dnmetmillerel.1d353.html

Damasio Discusses His New Book (The Crimson, Feb. 26)
Scientists seeking answers to some of today's greatest neuroscience questions may find inspiration in the writings of a 17th century lensmaker and philosopher, according to ANTONIO DAMASIO, the head of the Department of Neurology at the University of Iowa. Damasio discussed his new book, Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Human Brain, before an audience of 200 at the Askwith Education Forum at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (GSE) last night. The Crimson is Harvard University's student newspaper.
http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=274405

Schnoor Talks On Environment (The Clarion-Ledger, Feb. 26)
Millsaps College is celebrating its first Green Semester this spring. The concept of the Green Semester originated in the Millsaps department of performing arts. The chair of the department, Timothy Coker, was planning an environmentally-themed concert, and he wanted to make the concert part of a larger series of events. Highlights include a March 6 lecture by JERALD I. SCHNOOR, a professor in the department of civil environmental engineering at the University of Iowa. The annual Millsaps Summers Lectures will also feature an environmental theme, with religion professor Mark Wallace discussing Christian eco-theology on March 27. Lester Brown, president of the Earth Policy Institute in Washington, will speak at the College on March 28. The capstone for the series will be a presentation by Jane Goodall to take place on April 8 as part of the Millsaps Nova Series. The Clarion-Ledger is based in Mississippi.
http://www.clarionledger.com/news/0302/26/m14.html

UI Deals With Termite Infestation (Arizona Republic, Feb. 25)
The University of Iowa has a bug of a battle on its hands. Entomologist BOB SETTER works to thwart the spread of termites on the University of Iowa campus in Iowa City. Behind him is a campus map whose various colors denote areas being treated and monitored. Setter, a Canadian entomologist, was recruited by the university three years ago to devise a plan against the hordes of termites bent on destroying campus buildings.

Boyd Ends Pierce Case (Philadelphia Inquirer, Feb. 25)
The interim president of the University of Iowa said Monday that the school wouldn't punish basketball guard Pierre Pierce, who sexually assaulted a student last year. Pierce pleaded guilty in November to assault causing injury and was not given jail time. He initially had been charged with third-degree sexual abuse but struck a deal with prosecutors. President WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD said he wouldn't act because the victim didn't want to participate.

Ferguson Quoted On Peanuts As TB Treatment (UPI, Feb. 25)
Peanuts contain a potent substance that could provide a new weapon in the fight against tuberculosis, Swedish researchers reported Tuesday. The researchers, led by Dr. Thomas Schoen, a medical microbiologist at Linkoeping University, traveled to Ethiopia to study 120 patients who had active pulmonary tuberculosis, a highly contagious bacterial disease that infects the lungs and can be fatal. All the patients were HIV-negative, which Schoen said was significant because the virus that causes AIDS is rampant throughout Africa and TB is one of the most common offshoots of the disease. The team's goal was to test whether an amino acid called arginine -- found abundantly in peanuts and even sold separately as a dietary supplement -- could help fight Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes TB. Dr. J. SCOTT FERGUSON, an assistant professor in the division of pulmonary, critical care and occupational medicine at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, said the findings are promising. "I think the peanuts idea is really interesting," he told UPI.
http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20030221-115338-6236r

UI Alumnus To Give Talk (Springfield News Sun, Feb. 25)
One of the world's leaders in spinal-cord injury research will visit St. Paris next month to speak with Graham High School students. Dr. Wise Young, founding director of the W.M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience, is also a professor at Rutgers University and chairman of the school's Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience. Young, who earned his doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a medical degree from Stanford University, is scheduled to speak with Marcia Ward's human anatomy class at 7:30 a.m. March 10 and from 8:35 to 9:45 a.m. with the public. The News Sun is based in Springfield, Ohio.
http://www.springfieldnewssun.com/news/newsfd/auto/feed/news/2003/02/25/1046234316.16698.4093.4519.html

Miller Says Bush Needs U.N. Support (ABC News, Feb. 25)
U.S. support for war with Iraq may be slipping a little and opposition is growing in intensity, meaning President George W. Bush would need a quick and clean military victory to avoid political problems later. The latest polls show a substantial but not overwhelming majority of voters support Bush on Iraq. An ABC News/Washington Post survey taken Feb 19-23 found 55 percent approved of his handling of the Iraq situation with 39 percent expressing disapproval. That support was down 6 percentage points from early February. University of Iowa political scientist and pollster ARTHUR MILLER predicts a backlash if Bush goes to war without a new U.N. resolution and the campaign does not go as planned. "Bush needs to get a second resolution through the U.N. and then he needs a very quick military accomplishment," he said.
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/reuters20030225_348.html
The same article also appeared Feb. 25 on the web site of REUTERS.

UI Won’t Act In Pierce Case (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 25)
The University of Iowa won't pursue action under its conduct code against Pierre Pierce, a basketball player who assaulted a student, the interim president said Monday. Pierce, 19, of Westmont, Ill., was charged with third-degree sexual abuse following a party at his Iowa City apartment in September. The sophomore guard later pleaded guilty to a lesser charge, assault causing injury. The main reason for the decision is that the victim doesn't want to participate, said interim President WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD. "She has asked that any internal disciplinary action not involve her or disclose her identity," Boyd said in a statement. "We believe we can best honor her wish by not proceeding under the Code of Student Life."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/printedition/chi-302250191feb25,1,3366451.story

Scoliosis Prognosis Not Always Grim (Washington Post, February 25)
Failure to treat the most common form of scoliosis, or lateral curvature of the spine, with surgery or a back brace doesn't lead inevitably to disability for most patients, according to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The surprise finding came in a decades-long study tracking 117 people diagnosed with the condition 50 or more years ago, before modern treatments were available.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A50953-2003Feb22.html

UI Deals With Termite Infestation (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 25)
The University of Iowa has a bug of a battle on its hands. Entomologist BOB SETTER works to thwart the spread of termites on the University of Iowa campus in Iowa City. Behind him is a campus map whose various colors denote areas being treated and monitored. Setter, a Canadian entomologist, was recruited by the university three years ago to devise a plan against the hordes of termites bent on destroying campus buildings.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=663527

Van Allen Quoted On Space (International Herald Tribune, Feb. 25)
In the aftermath of the Columbia disaster, many scientists outside NASA have concluded that the scientific payoff, by itself, is nowhere near enough to justify the program's huge cost and risks. The weeks after the Columbia disaster are not the first time that scientists have questioned the worth of research by humans in space. In early 1986, just before the Challenger explosion, JAMES A. VAN ALLEN, a University of Iowa astronomer noted for discovering the radiation belts that surround Earth, wrote that the International Space Station would "seriously diminish the opportunities for advancing space science and technology." Unmanned spacecraft would meet those goals far more cheaply and safely, Dr. Van Allen wrote in Scientific American.
http://www.iht.com/articles/87782.html

IEM Noted In Markets Article (CBS Marketwatch, Feb. 25)
In a column about the predictive nature of futures markets, the impressive track record of the Web-based futures exchange known as the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS is noted. This real-money futures exchange, administered by the University of Iowa, has allowed for betting on the outcome of each Presidential election since 1988. Over the past four elections, this exchange's average forecast error has been about half that of the major polling organizations. Researchers who study these Web-based markets believe they do such a good job because they reflect more knowledge and wisdom than any of us individually possesses, no matter how knowledgeable and wise we may be.
http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?guid=%7BC8D604F5-D844-455D-96E2-366D87167680%7D&siteid=google&dist=google

UI Study Cited (Hartford Courant, Feb. 25)
Doctors often are unaware of the cost of a prescription drug and what the patient must pay for it out of pocket, surveys have shown. As a result, they may prescribe expensive drugs that drive up medical costs or that patients may decide not to take. In one effort to improve matters, a research team developed an eight-page pocket guide containing the average wholesale price of more than 100 drugs commonly used in primary care. The team gave the guide and a 45-minute tutorial to 146 participating physicians at four teaching hospitals in New York City and northern New Jersey. The results of the intervention and follow-up, conducted in 1998 and 1999, are reported in a new study. The effort showed modest improvements, at best, and suggests that doctors still know little about the tough choices some of their patients, particularly the elderly, face in buying prescription drugs. The new study, published last month in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, echoes previous studies regarding physician familiarity with drug prices, some of them going back at least two decades. In a survey published in 2000, researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA asked faculty and resident physicians at seven clinics in Iowa to select the price - in $10 increments up to $80 - for 50 medications commonly prescribed in outpatient family clinics. Of the 178 physicians who responded, fewer than one-quarter correctly identified the costs. Overall, the Iowa study found that two-thirds of the doctors believed they did not have sufficient information on prescription drug costs. The medications for which costs were most commonly underestimated in the Iowa study included such widely prescribed products as Prozac, Claritin and Prilosec.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/health/hc-drugs0225.artfeb25.story

Weinberger: Keep Asthma Pills On Hand (WebMD, Feb. 25)
For parents with a child who has asthma, keeping a prescription steroid pill on hand may be a valuable tool in keeping their child out of the hospital during cold and flu season. A new report shows treating a cold at the first sign of symptoms with a steroid can greatly reduce the risk of asthma-related emergencies and trips to the hospital. Researchers say major asthma attacks in children are usually triggered by respiratory infections, such as the common cold or the flu, and children under age 5 are five times as likely to be hospitalized as a result of asthma complications. A report on treating this type of virus-induced asthma in young children shows that prompt treatment with an oral steroid (corticosteroid) is key in preventing a common cold from becoming something worse. The report appears in the February 2003 issue of the Journal of Pediatrics. "It is essential that the family have the medication on hand so that, for example, on a Sunday night when the pharmacies are closed and their 3-year-old with recurrent asthma begins to cough, they can start the treatment," says researcher MILES WEINBERGER, MD, professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa.
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/61/67439.htm?z=1728_00000_1000_nb_04

Boyd Ends Pierce Case (USA Today.com, Feb. 24)
The interim president of the University of Iowa said Monday that the school wouldn't punish basketball guard Pierre Pierce, who sexually assaulted a student last year. Pierce pleaded guilty in November to assault causing injury and was not given jail time. He initially had been charged with third-degree sexual abuse but struck a deal with prosecutors. President WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD said he wouldn't act because the victim didn't want to participate.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/2003-02-24-notes_x.htm

Tomkovicz Quoted About Case (San Francisco Chronicle, February 24)
The Supreme Court agreed Monday to consider how long police with a search warrant must wait before breaking down a door, using as a test case the arrest of a Las Vegas man who was in the shower when the SWAT team stormed in. But JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a criminal law professor at the University of Iowa, said it would be hard for the court to tell law officers how many seconds, or minutes, they have to wait before entering a home. “There's no way they'll put a stopwatch on this," Tomkovicz said.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2003/02/24/state1657EST0083.DTL
A story on the same case appeared in the Reno, Nev., GAZETTE JOURNAL

Hunnicutt Speaks On Work (US News&World Report, Feb. 24)
Today, work dominates Americans' lives as never before, as workers pile on hours at a rate not seen since the Industrial Revolution. Instead of working less, our hours have stayed steady or risen--and today many more women work so that families can afford the trappings of suburbia. In effect, workers chose the path of consumption over leisure. For more than a century, a key struggle for the labor movement was reducing the amount of time workers had to spend on the job. "They were pursuing shorter hours and increased leisure. In effect, they were buying their time," said UI professor BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/030224/work/24lede.htm

Van Allen Quoted On Space Flight (New York Times, Feb. 24)
In the aftermath of the Columbia disaster, many scientists outside NASA have concluded that the scientific payoff, by itself, is nowhere near enough to justify the program's huge cost and risks. The weeks after the Columbia disaster are not the first time that scientists have questioned the worth of research by humans in space. In early 1986, just before the Challenger explosion, JAMES A. VAN ALLEN, a University of Iowa astronomer noted for discovering the radiation belts that surround Earth, wrote that the International Space Station would "seriously diminish the opportunities for advancing space science and technology." Unmanned spacecraft would meet those goals far more cheaply and safely, Dr. Van Allen wrote in Scientific American.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/24/national/nationalspecial/24NASA.html (registration required)

Unions Factor In Iowa Caucuses (ABC News.com, Feb. 24)
Unions helped Dick Gephardt win the Iowa Democratic caucus in 1988, but political supporters of the veteran lawmaker are uneasy about his chances in next year's presidential contest. Sixteen years ago, Gephardt won the caucus by telling Iowans he was a regular guy who understood that farmers and workers were hurting. He won the backing of the state's behemoth United Auto Workers union by attacking the influence of overseas automakers. But the UAW, angering many of its old hands, professes to remain neutral because other candidates in the race, notably Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio, have accumulated as many gold medals as Gephardt. "There is a feeling that's not in particular related to Gephardt, that candidates often take labor's vote for granted," said DAN HOLUB, director of the labor program at the University of Iowa. "If you hold back in terms of your endorsement, it sends a message that you need to listen to us."
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/politics/DailyNews/gephardtiowa_030224.html

Cranberg Quoted (Sarasota Herald Tribune, Feb. 24)
In a guest column, GILBERT CRANBERG, former editor of the Des Moines Register's editorial pages and George H. Gallup Professor Emeritus at the University of Iowa, claims the British government recently misrepresented the source of information it disseminated about Iraq and twisted portions of it. He says Colin Powell cited the British paper in his Feb. 5 speech to the United Nations Security Council, lauding the paper for how it described "in exquisite detail Iraqi deception activities." http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=SH&Date=20030224&Category=COLUMNIST13&ArtNo=302240368&Ref=AR

UI Battles Termites (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 24)
The University of Iowa has a bug of a battle on its hands. "It's an endless battle, really," said BOB SETTER, the university's "bug" czar. Setter, a Canadian entomologist, was recruited by the university three years ago to devise a plan against the hordes of termites bent on destroying campus buildings. The university is spending about $200,000 a year in its uphill battle against countless colonies of rhinotermitidae. That's the species of soil-tunneling termite that has targeted a growing list of buildings, including the Old Capitol, the International Center, the university's Medical Laboratories and dormitories.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=662849

Damasio Book Reviewed (New York Times, Feb, 23)
ANTONIO DAMASIO
, chief neurologist at the University of Iowa, is a leader in his developing field, having written two well-regarded books on emotions and the brain: ''Descartes' Error'' and ''The Feeling of What Happens.'' Now, in ''Looking for Spinoza,'' he sets out to explain what precisely an emotion is, and what parts of the brain give rise to emotions of different kinds. Spinoza, the enigmatic 17th-century philosopher, enters the story because of his interest in emotion and will, and his foreshadowing of the theory Damasio favors.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/23/books/review/23MCGINNT.html (registration required)

Futures Market Story Cites IEM (Houston Chronicle, Feb. 23)
A story about www.tradesports.com, a Dublin-based Web site where visitors can bet on everything from the outcome of sporting events to the Dow Jones tally on Dec. 31, 2003, says two Stanford economics professors have predicted that if war with Iraq started tomorrow share prices would drop 5 percent. The professors cite the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, a real-money futures exchange administered by the University of Iowa that allows speculating on the U.S. presidential election. Despite trading volume that has averaged just $108,000 an election, these Iowa contracts have had an excellent track record, the article states. The Herald is based in Sydney, Australia.
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/02/17/1045330541977.html
The article originally appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES.

UI Press Publishes Freedman Book (Toledo Blade, Feb. 23)
An editorial about the merits of a liberal arts education cites retired Dartmouth University President James O. Freedman's book, Liberal Education and the Public Interest, published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. In the book Freedman argues for liberal arts studies and makes clear that such an education "teaches people how to write and how to think."

Cunningham To Speak At Boise State (Idaho Statesman, Feb. 23
Michael Cunningham, author of The Hours, will speak on "Wrestling with a Genius: My Life and Virginia Woolf's," at Boise State University's Distinguished Lecture Series on Oct. 9. Cunningham won a Michener Fellowship from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1982. The Statesman is based in Boise, Idaho.
http://204.228.236.37/News/story.asp?ID=33692

Coleman's Salary Noted (Indianapolis Star, Feb. 23)
In a story about college and university president's salaries, it's noted that Mary Sue Coleman started her $677,500-a-year job at the University of Michigan after making $275,000 as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA president.
http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/3/024718-5993-009.html

Hoch Finalist For Dean Position (Lexington Herald-Leader, Feb. 22)
University of Kentucky has announced four finalists -- three men and one woman -- to be the next dean of arts and sciences. One of the finalists is Steven L. Hoch, Russian history professor, associate provost and dean of international programs at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who will visit campus on March 3. The Herald-Leader serves Lexington, Ky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/news/local/5238327.htm

Pierce Does Community Service (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 22)
A University of Iowa basketball player sitting out this season as part of his sentence for a September assault is performing community service for the Salvation Army. "He's pleasant and civil. It seems like he's determined to do it," Capt. Deon Oliver said of Hawkeye player PIERRE PIERCE. Oliver, commander of the Salvation Army of Johnson County, said Pierce volunteers two or three hours on afternoons several times a month, usually helping with administrative work. He has done some filing, sorting and even bell-ringing as part of his sentence. Pierce, 19, of Westmont, Ill., pleaded guilty Nov. 1 to assault causing injury, based on allegations he sexually assaulted a female University of Iowa student Sept. 7 at his apartment.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=661378

Adam's Dance Troupe Reviewed (New York Times, Feb. 22)
In this review, it's said that CHARLOTTE ADAMS and Dancers brought a touch of gusto and a bit of wit to a program called "The Pathology of Love" on Sunday night at the Joyce SoHo studio in New York City. The evening took its overall title from that of a brash new duet by Ms. Adams in which Tony Orrico and Nicole Wong swung each other about in bursts of passion to recordings of raucous pieces by Jimmy Eat World and Ry Cooder. The troupe, from Iowa City, where Ms. Adams teaches dance at the University of Iowa, also made a good impression in humorous pieces.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/22/arts/22PERF.html

Officer Promoted (Cincinnati Post, Feb. 22)
Rick Kibbee, who graduated from high school in Cedar Falls, Iowa, and attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa, was recently promoted to specialist on the Cincinnati Police Department.
http://www.cincypost.com/2003/02/22/promo022203.html

Teacher Is UI Alumna (Papillion Times, Feb. 21)
Ann Danner, who has directed Papillion-La Vista School District's outdoor education program at the 4-H camp near Gretna for 28 years, was honored for 35 years of service to the district during last Wednesday's Teacher Recognition Day breakfast. Danner has a master's degree in science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Times serves Papillion, Neb.
http://www.papilliontimes.com/index.php?u_np=12&u_pg=779&u_sid=660887

Bell Comments On Coffee During Pregnancy (Pakistan Tribune, Feb. 21)
Drinking a lot of coffee during pregnancy makes it much more likely that the baby will be stillborn or die in the first year of life, a Danish study reports. "There has been concern for years about caffeine during pregnancy," says Dr. EDWARD F. BELL, director of neonatology at the University of Iowa, a spokesman for the American Academy of Pediatrics. But it's still uncertain where the line should be drawn, he says. "Is three cups better than 10, is zero better than three?" he asks. "Most of the studies don't address that. Maybe someday we will have data about complete abstention, but we don't have that data now." But, Bell says, "if it were my wife, I would settle for one or two cups a day."
http://paktribune.com/news/index.php?id=17077
The story also appeared in Health 24, South Africa and HealthCentral.com

Graduate Union OKs Contract (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 21)
A new contract that includes partial tuition scholarships for graduate student employees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has been approved by the union that represents the student workers.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=660166

Covington Comments On Kucinich (National Review, Feb. 20)
Democratic presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich’s shift from opposing a woman’s right to an abortion to supporting the right may make it difficult for him to win the Iowa caucus. “I think that would be a real stumbling block for a Democrat," said UI political science professor CARY R. COVINGTON. "The Democrats are trying to make domestic issues more prominent, so certainly if a candidate challenges one of the core constituencies of the party, that is something that would have to be resolved."
http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/comment-enrich022003.asp

Peters Comments On Incentive (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Feb. 20)
The Minnesota legislature is considering a bill to create tax-free "Job Opportunity Building Zones" which Gov. Tim Pawlenty hopes will be a centerpiece of his economic development plans. But the so-called JOBZ plan likely will face some tough questions. For instance: Is it fair that a business in a "JOB" zone gets a huge tax break while one just a few miles down a rural highway doesn't? Will JOB zones actually draw businesses from other states — a prime goal — or just reshuffle the locations of existing Minnesota businesses? And does the cost of lost taxes outweigh the benefits of such a gambit? What happens if, for example, an enterprise zone simply "poaches" a company from elsewhere in northeastern Minnesota or from the Twin Cities? There's good evidence that poaching occurs when states set up zones with tax advantages, said ALAN PETERS, an urban and regional planning professor at the University of Iowa who's extensively studied the subject. Peters said that tax-free zones in Michigan have generated investment, "but the big issue is, at what cost?" A study of state enterprise zones by Peters and Iowa colleague PETER FISHER found that each job created costs states at least $40,000 in tax credits and other tax benefits.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/5218389.htm

Squire: Gephardt Must Win Iowa (Newsday, Feb. 20)
More than a decade after his first unsuccessful try, Rep. Dick Gephardt formally announced yesterday he is running for president, again. After his kickoff rally, Gephardt flew to Iowa, site of the first caucuses next February. Gephardt depended on a large amount of support from organized labor to win there in 1988, but their clout has diminished, said University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE. "It's not dominated by labor unions and liberal activists any more," Squire said. "It's not clear unions could produce a winner on caucus night alone." Iowa, Squire said, is almost a must-win for Gephardt, a 26-year-veteran of the U.S. House. "For him it's hard to figure out a scenario where he could do well without really succeeding in Iowa first," Squire added.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/longisland/politics/ny-usgeph203139042feb20,0,5224573.story?coll=ny-lipolitics-headlines

Nelson Comments On Websites Tracking War (Fortune magazine, Feb. 19)
Several websites such as Tradesports.com, Iraq Attack Pool let people wager on political events, including whether the U.S. will seek a second UN resolution authorizing war and when hostilities will start. "Betting odds on elections generally prove more accurate than polls," notes FORREST NELSON, a University of Iowa economist and futures exchange pioneer.
http://www.fortune.com/fortune/technology/articles/0,15114,424195,00.html

Gephardt Needs "Loyalists" (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Feb. 19)
Rep. Richard Gephardt formally launched his campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination today, promising to bring a "new American prosperity" and reverse the economic policies of the Bush administration. Political strategists say Gephardt's 2004 team has some clear strengths, especially as he takes his message to Iowa - the first campaign stop today after St. Louis and the state many political experts believe is central to his political fortunes. For starters, by relying on a small group of devoted aides, Gephardt may be able to avoid some of the pitfalls that plagued former Vice President Al Gore's 2000 campaign, which critics said was bloated with overpaid hired guns who weren't personally close to Gore. "You need loyalists - people who are going to put your interests first and not be focused on [their] next campaign," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. At the same time, Squire and others said, Gephardt's set of old hands brings potential liabilities. "You have to have someone who is willing to tell you when things aren't going well, and sometimes loyalists don't have the ability to see when things are going off track," Squire said.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/News/BDCBE318A13E6FCB86256CD200181F83?OpenDocument&Headline=Gephardt+pledges+%22new+American+prosperity%22

Furner Advises On Handwriting (News14 Carolina, Feb. 20)
In a report on children learning to write, BEATRICE FURNER, Ph.D., professor emeritus of education at the University of Iowa, notes the importance of grip on the pencil. If a child stops to shake out her hand when she’s writing, she may be choking up on the pencil, which can lead to a tense grip. Furner recommends suggesting that she hold the pencil an inch from the point if she’s a righty, and an inch-and-a-half from the point if she’s a lefty. (This station is based in Raleigh, N.C.)
http://rdu.news14.com/content/Living/family/?ArID=23757

Ireland Leads Study (Doctor's Guide, Feb. 19)
Stent assisted percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (SAPTA) appears to be potential alternative to conventional treatment of symptomatic carotid occlusive disease in patients at high neurological risk. To determine the feasibility of using SAPTA as a treatment alternative, researchers at University of Iowa Medical School in Iowa City, United States, evaluated 25 men and 24 women who underwent the procedure between January 1999 and July 2002. All patients were at high neurological risk due to major stroke within 28 days, crescendo transient ischemic attacks within 7 days, new neurological deficit within 1 day, or multiple strokes, said JENNIFER IRELAND, MD, a clinical researcher at University of Iowa Medical School, who presented the study's findings at the International Stroke Conference in Phoenix. "We are at the threshold of new possibilities in the use of SAPTA," said Dr. Ireland noted. "More work among these kinds of patients needs to be done. But this study serves as a 'green light' for more investigation of this procedure for these high-risk patients."
http://www.docguide.com/news/content.nsf/news/8525697700573E1885256CD20075E3FD?OpenDocument&id=48DDE4A73E09A969852568880078C249&c=Stroke&count=10

Poremba Maps Hearing (Boston.com, Feb. 19)
A study led by a University of Iowa professor offers surprising new information about how sound is processed in the brain. The results of research led by AMY POREMBA, an assistant professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, define precisely which areas of the cortex in a primate brain are associated with hearing. The study also identifies similarities between the auditory processing system and the better-studied visual system including maps that show which areas of the brain process both auditory and visual information.
http://boston.com/dailynews/050/ascribe/_University_of_Iowa_Researcher:.shtml

UI Press Publishes Freedman Book (New York Times, Feb. 19)
Liberal education is under siege. Critics, of whom there are many, call it an overpriced indulgence for the affluent few who do not have to worry about earning a living upon graduation. Fewer and fewer of today's undergraduates are pursuing the liberal arts, with most of them studying practical subjects like finance, marketing, real estate and pharmacy. But James O. Freedman, 67, the retired president of Dartmouth, remains more committed than ever. At home in Cambridge, with his new book, "Liberal Education and the Public Interest" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2003), an ode to the value of liberal education, on the coffee table in front of him, Freedman makes his case with passion. Contrary to what critics might say, when it comes to getting a job in today's economy, Freedman says a liberal education is an important advantage.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02

Weinstein Lauded (Orange County Register, Feb. 19)
AP Medical Writer Lauran Neergaard's 16-month-old daughter was immobilized in a waist-to-ankles cast for four months to correct a birth defect called hip dysplasia. In a first-person account of the experience, Neergaard explains that merely pushing the hip into place doesn't solve the whole problem. The socket -- cartilage that gradually will turn to bone -- remains poorly formed, the wrong shape, until friction helps it remodel. Some children later need bone-cutting surgery to help that happen, and surgeons are becoming more aggressive in fixing even subtle remaining abnormalities, thanks largely to the work of Dr. STUART WEINSTEIN of the University of Iowa. He tracked how children treated at various ages fared 30 years later, and found the hip socket must turn out almost perfect to avoid DDH-spurred arthritis in middle age. The Register is based in California.
http://www2.ocregister.com/ocrweb/ocr/article.do?id=26100&section=HEALTH_FITNESS&subsection=HEALTH_FITNESS&year=2003&month=2&day=19

Students Flock To Florida (Bonita Daily News, Feb. 19)
With money to spend and time to kill, college students are already beginning to trickle into Southwest Florida on their annual search for a little midterm stress relief. Spring break arrived early this year as the first few Northeastern U.S. and Canadian universities gave their students a week off in mid-February, and the party season stretches through Easter weekend, April 19-20. The story says that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students are expected to visit the area. The Daily News is based in Naples, Fla.
http://www.naplesnews.com/03/02/bonita/d899727a.htm

Van Allen Comments On NASA (The Straits Times, Feb. 19)
Scientists like JAMES VAN ALLEN led early successes in space exploration. Today, though, NASA is dominated not by scientists and engineers who think big but by technical managers who rely largely on outside contractors who have themselves been rocked by consolidation, layoffs and lean economic times. "There's been a steady decay in the competence and the feeling that you're really dealing with scientific peers," said Dr. Van Allen, who with his group at the University of Iowa has sent instruments on mission after mission with NASA over the decades. Reliance on outside contractors has left personnel at NASA centers like the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., with little hands-on expertise. "They don't really know what's going on," Dr. Van Allen said. "They do what they are supposed to, in a very narrow sense, on a day-to-day basis." The Straits Times is based in Singapore.
http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/techscience/story/0,4386,172468,00.html

Author Opposes Disciplining (Menlo Park Almanac, Feb. 19)
Theron Alexander of Atherton has a simple message for parents, but one that some might have a hard time hearing. In a radical departure from what many pediatricians and child psychologists recommend, he wants parents to stop disciplining their children. A behavioral scientist with a lengthy career in developmental and clinical psychology at institutions such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Miami, and the National Head Start Research Center at Temple University, Alexander says he's worked with thousands of families over the years. He recommends a different way of rearing children that he calls "connectedness." The Almanac is based in California.
http://www.calmanac.com/thisweek/2003_02_19.child.html

Writers' Workshops Popular In Britain (The Guardian, Feb. 18)
Writers' workshops, a format of writing education pioneered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before World War II, is now hugely popular at universities in Great Britain.
http://books.guardian.co.uk/departments/generalfiction/story/0,6000,897543,00.html

IEM Cited (Sydney Morning Herald, Feb. 18)
A story about www.tradesports.com, a Dublin-based Web site where visitors can bet on everything from the outcome of sporting events to the Dow Jones tally on Dec. 31, 2003, says two Stanford economics professors have predicted that if war with Iraq started tomorrow share prices would drop 5 percent. The professors cite the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, a real-money futures exchange administered by the University of Iowa that allows speculating on the U.S. presidential election. Despite trading volume that has averaged just $108,000 an election, these Iowa contracts have had an excellent track record, the article states. The Herald is based in Sydney, Australia.
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/02/17/1045330541977.html
The article originally appeared Feb. 16 in the NEW YORK TIMES.

Van Allen Comments On NASA (New York Times, Feb. 18)
Scientists like JAMES VAN ALLEN led early successes in space exploration. Today, though, NASA is dominated not by scientists and engineers who think big but by technical managers who rely largely on outside contractors who have themselves been rocked by consolidation, layoffs and lean economic times. "There's been a steady decay in the competence and the feeling that you're really dealing with scientific peers," said Dr. Van Allen, who with his group at the University of Iowa has sent instruments on mission after mission with NASA over the decades. Reliance on outside contractors has left personnel at NASA centers like the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., with little hands-on expertise. "They don't really know what's going on," Dr. Van Allen said. "They do what they are supposed to, in a very narrow sense, on a day-to-day basis."
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/18/national/nationalspecial/18EROD.html

UI Lab Continues Work On Birth Defects (KAAL-TV, Feb. 18)
Researchers at the University of Iowa say they've made progress preventing birth defects, but cures continue to be elusive. Doctor JEFFREY MURRAY says most in the field agree that human disease is caused by a combination of genes and environment. Murray says the goal is to figure out what causes birth defects, and find better ways to treat and prevent them. Murray says a lot of money is spent in the United States on medical research, but finding cures has been very frustrating. For now, he says the important thing is to emphasize ways to prevent birth defects. KAAL is based in Austin, Minn.
http://www.kaaltv.com/article/view/7025/

Writing Courses Are Popular (The London Guardian, Feb. 18)
The prospect of writing a bestseller may not be the prime motivation for all students flooding on to creative writing courses - but it has certainly helped them find a cozy niche. Creative writing started life in the pre-war years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and proliferated to almost every other campus in the US before arriving in Britain at the University of East Anglia (UEA) in 1970. Now, creative writing is a mainstay of many UK university syllabuses, and you can sign up for any number of courses at colleges all over the country.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5ee87d42f42817246060f894376baf01&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlzV&_md5=291c9aab81b7ca7f93a51291537843d6

Barkan Comments On Kenya President (Newsweek, Feb. 17)
Kenya's new President Mwai Kibaki and Raila Odinga, his second in command, come from different tribes and are an odd political couple, but Kenya's future hinges on their rare, cross-tribal partnership. Kibaki has vowed to fight corruption and institute the economic reforms needed to revive Kenya's economy. Odinga says he supports those goals, and he told Newsweek: "We will deal with the insecurity of the country, which is scaring away investors." But some experts worry that he may drift away from the president's agenda, especially if Kibaki's health problems return. The president was hospitalized with a blood clot for a month after his election. "If Kibaki falls ill, you'll have a power vacuum and Raila will assert himself," says University of Iowa professor JOEL BARKAN. He says that Odinga "wants power for himself and a better shake for the Luo."
http://www.msnbc.com/news/870474.asp?cp1=1

Kronos’ ‘Sun Signs’ Reviewed (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 17)
For all its multimedia gadgetry, the Kronos Quartet's "Visual Music" program, in its world premiere Saturday at UCLA's Royce Hall, was uncomplicated, direct, heart-on-sleeve. Three of the 10 works played consecutively asserted an antiwar, world-peace message, and a fourth -- though pure music -- rose to the fervor of an anthem. "One Earth, One People, One Love" from Terry Riley's new "Sun Rings," composed last year for Kronos, announces the topic in its title, a line spoken repeatedly on tape by poet-novelist Alice Walker. The work incorporates imagery from NASA spacecraft and beguiling whistling-like noises from outer space recorded by University of Iowa plasma scientist DONALD GURNETT. But it is Riley's music, reminiscent of a Baroque saraband, that makes the work solemn and dignified.
http://www.calendarlive.com/music/classical/cl-et-pasles17feb17.story
The Times also lists upcoming performances at the Philharmonic Society of Orange County noting that the Kronos Quartet will team up with the Pacific Chorale in October to perform Terry Riley's "Sun Rings," which premiered at the University of Iowa in October 2002.
http://www.calendarlive.com/printedition/calendar/cl-et-musicshort17feb17.story

Schoen Comments On Sterilizations (Charlotte Observer, Feb. 17)
At least three women died from sterilization operations performed under a state-sponsored program that ended in the 1970s, a newspaper reported Sunday. The murky references to the deaths of women from intestinal problems related to the surgeries are contained in 1,400 pages of documents released from the state archives last week to the Winston-Salem Journal. North Carolina sterilized more than 7,600 people with the authority of the Eugenics Board of North Carolina, which adhered to the belief that sterilization would eliminate mental retardation and such social problems as out-of-wedlock births. Many operations were done against the patients' wishes and some were performed on children as young as 10. JOHANNA SCHOEN, a professor at the University of Iowa who has been researching the North Carolina eugenics program for 12 years, said the quality of medical care may have been below average in the sterilization program. The Observer is based in North Carolina.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/5198796.htm
Versions of the Associated Press story also ran Feb. 17 in the RALEIGH (N.C.) NEWS & OBSERVER and the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNEin Florida.

Gerken Studies Seating Arrangements (Boston Globe, Feb. 16)
Whether the issue is making sure students see the board or keeping chatterboxes in check, seating arrangements in classrooms have long been important tools. Increasingly, however, where and how students are seated is a vehicle to power learning - and more efficient use of class time. KATHRYN GERKEN, a professor in the school psychology program at the University of Iowa who has studied classroom seating, has seen a dramatic shift in seating preferences among teachers in recent years. According to her 2001 survey of seating arrangements, only 13 percent of K-5 classrooms surveyed used row seating, down from 44 percent in a similar survey she conducted in 1989. While teachers often arrange, and rearrange, seating, Gerken said a majority today use cluster seating at least some of the time, making it easy for several students to work together. ''Teachers are overwhelmingly feeling that this is the best thing,'' said Gerken.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/047/learning/Seating_moves_up_in_the_classroom_scheme+.shtml

Cleric Works With Teens (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Feb. 16)
Rev. Saleem Ghubril founded The Pittsburgh Project Place where neighborhood teens learn job skills at a coffee bar and can expect a hefty college scholarship if they complete a leadership program. Ghubril, 40, is an immigrant whose Protestant family fled war-torn Lebanon when he was 16. He married his wife, Patti, in their junior year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5ee87d42f42817246060f894376baf01&_docnum=12&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlzV&_md5=56682e523295361b30dadd83e6d21269

UI Alumnus Works With Caregivers (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 16)
A feature on Scott Boots, who spends his free time touring the country giving workshops on the importance of care for such caregivers as nurses, social workers, clergy, doctors, volunteers to terminally ill patients, says Boots received a degree in comparative literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0302160453feb16,1,3244426.story

ISU Gets UI Plant Collection (Arizona Republic, Feb. 15)
The director of the University of Iowa Herbarium is upset because school officials have agreed to send the school's extensive collection of dried and pressed plants to Iowa State University. "Moving this collection to Iowa State would mean that they have all of Iowa's collection," said DIANA HORTON, associate professor of biology and the director and curator of the herbarium. "These specimens provide so much history and have great relevance and benefit to the learning experience for students here."

UI AIDS Study Mentioned (Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Feb. 15)
A harmless virus that seems to infect millions of people without causing symptoms may help slow the deadly progress of the AIDS virus, researchers said. The virus, called GBV-C, may block one of the cellular doorways used by the AIDS virus to infect cells, researchers told a meeting of HIV experts. More study may lead to new ways to treat the virus, which infects 36-million people worldwide. The good news is that many HIV patients in the United States seem to be infected with the virus, the researchers told the 10th annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections being held in Boston. In September 2001 a team at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA reported they had found the virus in the blood of HIV patients, and said these patients seemed to resist the ravages of AIDS for longer than normal.
http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/scitech/SciTechRepublish_785244.htm

UI Alumnus Injured In West Bank Shooting (Philadelphia Inquirer, Feb. 14)
A story about the number of noncombatants killed in the West bank town of Nablus cites the case of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate Saed Abu Hijleh, 36, whose 61-year-old mother, Shaden Abu Hijleh, was shot to death on the steps of her home in Nablus when Israeli troops opened fire. Saed, who lived in the United States for 10 years and is now a politics professor at a Nablus college, was wounded in the neck by flying glass in the shooting Oct. 11.

UI Lovebirds Pick River (Chronicle of Higher Ed, Feb. 14)
A feature on the romantic hot spots around America's college campuses says of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA: "With the Iowa River running through the campus, lovebirds have developed a new term to describe their smooching sessions near the water: 'river-banking.'"
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i23/23a00801.htm

Scientists Find Virus Slows AIDS (New York Times, Feb. 14)
Infection with a common harmless virus seems to slow the progress of H.I.V. and prolong the survival of AIDS patients, according to new evidence reported by American scientists. Those doctors on the research team included Dr. JACK T. STAPLETON of the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/14/health/14IMMU.html
A story on the same topic appeared February 14 in the USA TODAY, LOS ANGELES TIMES, BOSTON GLOBE, SEATTLE TIMES, BALTIMORE SUN, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, RICHMOND TIMES DISPATCH, WASHINGTON POST, THE AGE (AUSTRALIA), THE AUSTRALIAN, SYRACUSE POST STANDARD, SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN and LAS VEGAS SUN.

Weinstein Quoted (Billings Gazette, Feb. 14)
Many adolescents diagnosed with spine curvatures can skip braces, surgery or other treatments without developing debilitating physical impairments later in life, a 50-year study suggests. "The bottom line is most patients are doing very well," said lead author Dr. STUART WEINSTEIN, an orthopedic surgery professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?tl=1&display=rednews/2003/02/14/build/health/scoliosis.inc

Professor Stages New York Dance (New York Times, Feb. 14)
CHARLOTTE ADAMS
, a modern-dance choreographer from Tucson who now teaches at the University of Iowa, has been making dances for 20 years. Her work has been described as "a wacky, wiggly delight." The dances in this New York City program, "The Pathology of Love," are performed to traditional Mexican music and scores by composers including Villa-Lobos, Max Roach and Gregorio Allegri. One dance was inspired by a Florine Stettheimer painting. Another occurs in a cast-iron bathtub.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/14/arts/music/14CLAS.html?pagewanted=3&ei=5062&en=2b68fb1993237dd3&ex=1045890000&partner=GOOGLE

Columnist Quotes Segura (Philadelphia Daily News, Feb. 14)
A Philadelphia columnist is reluctant to support a U.S.-led war against Iraq, but is also reluctant to align with the anti-war movement because of the lingering need to be loyal and patriotic in the aftermath of 9/11. And that's precisely what the government is counting on, said political science professor GARY SEGURA of the University of Iowa. "The Bush administration has worked overtime to get the American public to link September 11 with Iraq," said Segura.
http://www.philly.com/mld/dailynews/news/local/5179649.htm

ISU Gets UI Plant Collection (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 14)
The director of the University of Iowa Herbarium is upset because school officials have agreed to send the school's extensive collection of dried and pressed plants to Iowa State University. "Moving this collection to Iowa State would mean that they have all of Iowa's collection," said DIANA HORTON, associate professor of biology and the director and curator of the herbarium. "These specimens provide so much history and have great relevance and benefit to the learning experience for students here."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=653738

Staff Ready For Bioterrorism (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 14)
Health-care workers, hospitals and laboratories in Iowa are much better connected, equipped and trained to handle bioterrorism now than before the 2001 terrorist attacks, the director of the Iowa Hygienic Lab in the University of Iowa's Oakdale Hall said Thursday. Hygienic Lab staff were among the first health-care workers in the state to be vaccinated for smallpox, Dr. MARY GILCHRIST said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=653737

Foundation Posts Record Year (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 14)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FOUNDATION had its most lucrative year in 2002, with reported gifts and future commitments totaling nearly $169 million, officials said Wednesday.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=653702

Poets, Protesters Speak Out (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 14)
More than 200 protesters gathered on the University of Iowa campus to hear 14 poets, including Iowa poet laureate and UI creative writing professor MARVIN BELL, read verse in opposition to a possible war in Iraq.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=653657

Bibas Comments On Helder Case (Reno Gazette-Journal, Feb. 13)
A federal judge granted permission Wednesday for accused mailbox bomber Luke Helder to undergo a mental exam to determine whether he is competent to stand trial. Helder, 21, of Pine Island, Minn., is accused of placing pipe bombs in 18 mailboxes in rural areas of eastern Iowa and four other states during a spree that began May 3 and left six people injured before his arrest May 7 on Interstate 80 about 50 miles east of Reno. Raising the competency question is hardly a surprise considering the strategy laid out so far by Helder’s attorney, said STEPHANOS BIBAS, a University of Iowa Law School professor and former federal prosecutor. “It’s very common that a defendant claims both: I was crazy at the time of the crime and am still crazy now,” Bibas said. The standard for declaring a federal defendant mentally unfit for trial is tricky and risky for defense attorneys, Bibas said.
http://www.rgj.com/news/stories/html/2003/02/13/34393.php?sp1=rgj&sp2=News&sp3=Local+News
Versions of this story appeared Feb. 13 on the Web sites of
KOLO-TV in Reno, Nev., SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, and CHICAGO SUN TIMES

UI Graduate Profiled (Carolina Morning News, Feb. 13)
A profile of local resident Angus Cotton notes that he graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA after WWII, but did not attend on the G.I. bill because bad eyesight kept him out of the Army.
http://www.lowcountrynow.com/stories/021303/LOClittlejohn.shtml

Leicht Studies Texas (Christian Science Monitor, Feb. 12)
Under Texas's top 10 percent plan, which became law in 1998, students finishing in the top 10 percent of their graduating classes -- from public or private schools -- earn automatic admission to the Texas university of their choice. It's the state's response to a 1996 appeals-court ruling that banned affirmative action in a case known as Hopwood v. Texas. At the University of Texas, African-American students made up 3.3 percent of the enrollees after the Hopwood ruling, down from 4 percent before the ruling. And Hispanics made up 13.7 percent of UT enrollees after Hopwood, down from 15.8 percent before. "The top 10 percent plan is not producing the ethnic and racial composition that the affirmative-action plan produced, and the numbers are big enough to really be noticeable," says KEVIN LEICHT, a sociology professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City and a coauthor of the study.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0212/p03s01-usgn.html

UI Has ‘Tiniest Baby’ Registry (Post-Tribune, Feb. 12)
Michael DeSpain's progress was measured by the gram. Born three months premature at 355 grams - about three-quarters of one pound - Michael is the third-smallest baby boy worldwide to survive, according to a registry that monitors premature births. Babies born at 26 weeks are typically twice the size of Michael, who will join 42 babies worldwide who have survived when born under 1 pound, according to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S TINIEST BABY REGISTRY, which monitors birth weights. The Post-Tribune is based in Merrillville, Ind.
http://www.post-trib.com/cgi-bin/pto-story/news/z1/02-12-03_z1_news_20.html

Conroy Is In Mossman Documentary (Star-Ledger, Feb. 12)
A feature on Mark Moskowitz's documentary, "Stone Reader," based on the life of Dow Mossman, whose largely autobiographical novel The Stones of Summer was hailed by the New York Times, says Moskowitz was propelled into a two-year quest after the long-silent writer. Mossman's one-time acquaintances at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's famed WRITERS' WORKSHOP weren't even sure whether Mossman was still alive. "Stone Reader" records a roundabout search (unnecessarily roundabout, but never mind) by way of interviews with critics, teachers, agents and editors somehow connected to The Stones of Summer and its forgotten 1972 debut. In trying to explain Mossman's failure to follow up the novel with another, expert witnesses such as scholar-author FRANK CONROY home in on writers driven more by passion than professional ambition. For these creators, the act of self-expression is as anguishing as it is urgent. A compassionate Iowa professor recalls the role of "the men in white coats" in the completion of Mossman's magnum opus.
The Star-Ledger is based in Newark, N.J.
http://www.nj.com/entertainment/ledger/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/104503529892620.xml

Pierce Case Cited (Indianapolis Star, Feb. 12)
An editorial calls for the NCAA to take jurisdiction over the "local" matter of criminal conduct by athletes. The leadership of the National Collegiate Athletic Association says it plans "initiatives" in the near future to address violence, particularly sexual violence, on the part of athletes. Sports fans and society in general wait with bated breath for the specifics. The most-publicized recent incident of criminal involvement by a college athlete is still playing out at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where a faculty review committee, the athletic oversight committee and some victims' rights advocates have criticized the handling of the case of basketball player Pierre Pierce. Debate continues in Iowa City over whether Pierce may have gotten preferential treatment -- and over coach STEVE ALFORD's declaration of the player's innocence, a gesture many denounced as callous toward sexual assault victims. The NCAA insists its silence on the Iowa situation and other episodes involving players, coaches and the justice system owes itself to the fact that member schools, which determine all categories of national policy importance, have chosen to leave player discipline and coach conduct in local hands, except for designated infractions such as commercialism.
http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/9/021905-2839-021.html

Democrats Here Are Anti-War (Hartford Courant, Feb. 11)
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell's presentation to the United Nations last week on Iraq may have made headlines and moved some opinions in Congress, but it didn't do much for the crowd of Democratic activists who gathered Sunday night to hear former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean at the Prairie Lights bookstore. As Dean spoke, Tom Slockett, the county auditor, circulated a petition urging the local city council to approve a resolution opposing war against Iraq. "So far," Slockett said, as Dean finished his own broadside against a possible invasion, "the only people who've said no to signing are reporters." It's not just in liberal college towns such as Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where the candidates for the 2004 Democratic presidential nomination are still finding enormous resistance among party activists to a possible war, even after Powell's detailed indictment of the Iraqi regime.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/nationworld/la-na-dems11feb11.story

Bahls Is President Finalist (Rock Island Argus, Feb. 11)
Augustana College chose a finalist this week in its presidential search. Steven C. Bahls, dean and law professor at the Capital University Law School in Columbus, Ohio, was named the finalist from among eight candidates. He will visit the campus Feb. 18 and 19. Like Augustana, Capital University is affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Bahls received his bachelor of business administration degree with highest distinction from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1976.The Argus is based in Rock Island, Ill.
http://www.qconline.com/archives/qco/sections.cgi?met!id!144183

Weinstein Noted (Durham Herald-Sun, Feb. 11)
Dr. STUART WEINSTEIN of the University of Iowa tracked how children treated for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) at various ages fared 30 years later. He found that the hip socket must turn out almost perfect to avoid DDH-spurred arthritis in middle age.
http://www.heraldsun.com/healthmed/34-319213.html
A version of the story also ran Feb. 11 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE and the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.

Democrats Here Are Anti-War (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 11)
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell's presentation to the United Nations last week on Iraq may have made headlines and moved some opinions in Congress, but it didn't do much for the crowd of Democratic activists who gathered Sunday night to hear former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean at the Prairie Lights bookstore. As Dean spoke, Tom Slockett, the county auditor, circulated a petition urging the local city council to approve a resolution opposing war against Iraq. "So far," Slockett said, as Dean finished his own broadside against a possible invasion, "the only people who've said no to signing are reporters." It's not just in liberal college towns such as Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where the candidates for the 2004 Democratic presidential nomination are still finding enormous resistance among party activists to a possible war, even after Powell's detailed indictment of the Iraqi regime.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/la-na-dems11feb11,1,7126291.story
The story also ran Feb. 11 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.

Weinstein's Work Noted With Hip Dysplasia (ABC News, Feb. 11)
DR. STUART WEINSTEIN of the University of Iowa tracked how children treated for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) at various ages fared 30 years later. He found that the hip socket must turn out almost perfect to avoid DDH-spurred arthritis in middle age.
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/Politics/ap20030210_1575.html
The Associated Press story also appeared in NEWSDAY, N.Y., YAHOO NEWS, WMAR-TV, Md., the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, Fla.; ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS, S.D.; CANTON REPOSITORY, Ohio; ST. CATHARINES STANDARD, Canada; CANADA.COM, Canada; the BILOXI SUN HERALD, Miss.; AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, Ohio; FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, Ind.; WILKES BARRE WEEKENDER, Pa.; BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT, Ill.; DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, Minn.; WICHITA EAGLE, Kan.; the WALNUT CREEK JOURNAL, Calif.; KANSAS CITY STAR, COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER, Ga.; MACON TELEGRAPH, Ga.

Anti-War Effort Noted In Iowa City (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 11)
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell's presentation to the United Nations last week on Iraq may have made headlines and moved some opinions in Congress, but it didn't do much for the crowd of Democratic activists who gathered Sunday night to hear former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean at the Prairie Lights bookstore. As Dean spoke, Tom Slockett, the county auditor, circulated a petition urging the local city council to approve a resolution opposing war against Iraq. "So far," Slockett said, as Dean finished his own broadside against a possible invasion, "the only people who've said no to signing are reporters." It's not just in liberal college towns such as Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where the candidates for the 2004 Democratic presidential nomination are still finding enormous resistance among party activists to a possible war, even after Powell's detailed indictment of the Iraqi regime.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-dems11feb11,1,3662226.story

UI Heart Study Noted (Oakland Tribune, Feb. 10)
A new study suggests women's eagerness to return to their domestic duties, and the time of day they do their chores, is one reason women tend to have poorer outcomes after heart attacks. The study reports that while men and women took on about the same amount of work during the first six months after a heart attack, women handled most of their household work in the morning. "This has implications for how physicians and medical staff advise cardiac patients about resuming normal activities," said JERRY SULS, a professor at the University of Iowa, where the study was conducted.
http://www.oaklandtribune.com/Stories/0,1413,82~1726~1170286,00.html
The story also appeared in the ALAMEDA TIMES-STAR, Calif.

Wheaton: Many States Vie For Biotech (mlive.com, Feb. 10)
Iowa faces a tough challenge in its attempt to expand the state's biotech industry: Michigan and several other states are way ahead. On the same January day that Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack proposed using $250 million to expand biotechnsology, advanced manufacturing and information technology companies, Indiana Gov. Frank O'Bannon touted his $1.25 billion "Energize Indiana" plan to promote the life sciences and other industries. "Other states are thinking big in biotech because there is a reasonable perception that that is an area of growth and opportunity," said BRUCE WHEATON, director of the Technology Innovation Center and Oakdale Research Park, both affiliated with the University of Iowa. Mlive, a comprehensive Web site featuring news and information about Michigan, is an online division of Advance Publications, owner of 22 newspapers, including The Ann Arbor News, The Bay City Times, The Flint Journal, The Grand Rapids Press, The Jackson Citizen Patriot, Kalamazoo Gazette, The Muskegon Chronicle and The Saginaw News, all in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/newsflash/regional/index.ssf?/newsflash/get_story.ssf?/cgi-free/getstory_ssf.cgi?g6281_BC_MI--BiotechBattle&&news&newsflash-michigan
A version of the same story also ran Feb. 10 on Zwire, a website with news about technology.
A version of the story also ran Feb. 10 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.

Space Travel Spark Dies (Dallas Morning News, Feb. 10)
A story about America's apparent disillusionment with the space travel says science fiction itself has changed in recent years. From the highly realistic, almost evangelical science fiction about rockets and space travel in the 1950s, with movies such as Destination Moon and stories by authors such as Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, the genre came in the 1980s to be dominated by galaxies far, far away in distant futures that bore little resemblance to our world. In 1995, Disney World's reading of the cultural barometer prompted the amusement park to replace its "Mission to Mars" attraction with "Extra Terrorestrial Alien Encounter." "It's as if some kind of imaginative spark about space travel just died out," says ROB LATHAM, an editor of science-fiction studies and an associate professor of American studies at the University of Iowa. A version of the story also ran Feb. 10 on the website of the DALLAS MORNING NEWS.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dallas/healthscience/stories/021003dnlivimaginespace.1394c.html

UI Student Fabricates Abduction Story (WQAD-TV, Feb. 10)
Police say a 19-year-old University of Iowa student made up the story of her abduction earlier this week. Tiffany Culp disappeared from Iowa City three days ago. After 24 hours hour parents reported her missing and put out fliers--and e-mails asking for help. Two days later, Culp showed up at her parents’ house with news of her frightening ordeal. She told them she'd been kidnapped with her car until she was finally able to escape somewhere off of Interstate 280 in the Quad Cities. Culp even gave police a detailed description of her kidnapper, right down to the tattoo of a snake on his wrist. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA police say Culp made up the entire story-including what she told NewsChannel 8 last night. Culp's father, Kenneth, issued a statement expressing his apologies. While Culp's motives aren't clear for making up the kidnapping story, campus police say they don't plan to press any charges. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1121144&nav=1sW7Ds26
A version of the story also ran Feb. 9 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.

Alumna Is Featured (Rockford Register Star, Feb. 10)
A feature on Connie Davis, who decided to study finance at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 13 years ago after becoming frustrated with her career in hotel management, says Davis graduated in 1985 with a bachelor's degree in personnel management. Davis is now a senior regional leader with Primerica Financial Services, Rockford, Ill.
http://www.rrstar.com/business/economy/20030210-31621.shtml

Alumnus Is On Hawaii Supreme Court (Korea Times, Feb. 10)
Chief Justice Ronald Moon, 63, of the Hawaii State Supreme Court will remain in the job until his retirement in 2010. The Korean-American retained Hawaii's top judicial position through a meeting of a state judicial committee meeting held Jan. 31, as his 10-year tenure expires at the end of March. Moon was also selected by the National Center for State Courts as ``Judge of the Year'' in recognition of his contribution to the judicial system. The son of a Korean immigrant couple at the beginning of the last century, Moon studied law at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and practiced until 1982 when he was appointed circuit court judge. He became chief justice of the Hawaii Supreme Court in 1993. The Korea Times is based in Seoul, South Korea.
http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/nation/200302/kt2003021017041811950.htm

Squire: Iowa Is Good Place To Start Race (KTVU-TV, Feb. 9)
A feature on Iowa and the political activity heating up here quotes PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor at the University of Iowa. "Candidates have a chance to become known here without having to spend great sums of money," Squire said. "They don't have to dominate the air waves." KTVU-TV covers the Bay Area of California and is based in Oakland, Calif.
http://www.ktvu.com/news/1966388/detail.html

Alumnus Vies For Seat (Alomogordo Daily News, Feb. 9)
One of five eligible candidates will be nominated to replace Stephen P. Easley on the Alamogordo City Commission in New Mexico Tuesday night. John E. Garst, Frank S. Gentile, Pamela L. Jokelainen, Marion L. Ledford, Jr. and Noel Marsh are in the running for the vacant District 1 City Commission seat. This position opened at the last City Commission meeting, Jan. 28, when Easley officially resigned. Garst's educational background includes a bachelor's degree in chemistry and a Ph.D. in pharmacy (medicinal chemistry or drug development) from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Daily News is based in New Mexico.
http://www.alamogordonews.com/Stories/0,1413,160%257E9596%257E1169162,00.html

Alumnus Runs (Manitowoc Herald Times Reporter, Feb. 9)
A story provides background information on all the candidates for the Manitowoc Public School District Board of Education, including Michael Herrity, who the article says has a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.wisinfo.com/heraldtimes/news/archive/local_8590622.shtml

Alumna Works At Charter School (Kansas City Star, Feb. 9)
A story about charter schools focuses on Gordon Parks Elementary School teacher Tysie McDowell, who the article says graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/living/5076637.htm

Ernst Comments On Drug Costs (Erie Times-News, Feb. 7)
In an article credited to NEWSDAY, the website reports on an effort by researchers to produce an eight-page pocket guide for doctors containing the average wholesale price of more than 100 drugs commonly used in primary care. The goal is to prevent physicians from mistakenly prescribing expensive drugs that drive up medical costs or that patients may decide not to take. The story cites a survey published in 2000 in which researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA asked faculty and resident physicians at seven clinics in Iowa to select the price - in $10 increments up to $80 - for 50 medications commonly prescribed in outpatient family clinics. Of the 178 physicians who responded, only 22.9 percent correctly identified the costs. MICHAEL ERNST, a clinical pharmacist and lead author of the Iowa study, said an intervention like the one described in the New York-New Jersey study makes sense. "That's a good place to start," he said. "There has to be a continual emphasis" on the cost issue. The Times-News is based in Erie, Penn.
http://goerie.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=GE&Date=20030210&Category=LIFESTYLES07&ArtNo=102100163&Ref=AR

Suit Filed In Fire (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 7)
A contractor who warned the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA about workers using torches on Old Capitol is suing an asbestos removal company for more than $120,000 for equipment lost in a fire at the historic building.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=646578

UI Study: Scoliosis Causes No Disability (Clinnix, Feb. 7)
Findings from the longest-running study of its kind show that individuals with untreated late-onset idiopathic scoliosis (LIS), a condition that causes curvature of the spine, have life expectancies and health outcomes that are similar to the general population. The findings challenge a prevailing belief that this type of scoliosis, if left untreated, inevitably leads to severe disability. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study, which has been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, followed the health outcomes of a group of 117 patients with LIS who were first seen between 1932 and 1948. The study found that, by most measures of physical and mental health, patients with untreated LIS 50 years after their diagnosis were as healthy as people without the condition.
http://www.clinnix.net/news/article.php?id=2518

Premature Births Up (New Orleans Times-Picayune, Feb. 7)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA doctors say premature births increased nearly 22 percent from 1990 to 2000. The rise is partly due to more couples using fertility drugs, causing more women to become pregnant with twins and triplets, doctors say. A pregnancy with more babies usually means they're born earlier. The Iowa numbers are similar to national ones, which show the annual rate of babies born prematurely rising 27 percent since 1981.
http://www.nola.com/newsflash/topstory/index.ssf?/newsflash/get_story.ssf?/cgi-free/getstory_ssf.cgi?a0437_BC_StateSpotlight&&news&newsflash-topstory

Bowlsby, Grant Cited (Chronicle of Higher Ed., Feb. 7)
Tempers flared occasionally, and confusion reigned often, last week as a federal commission considering gender equity in college sports wrapped up a six-month review of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. The commission endorsed a number of possible changes to the law, which bars sex discrimination at institutions receiving federal funds. Among the commission members is ROBERT A. BOWLSBY, athletics director at the University of Iowa. Many representatives of women's groups were furious with the commission's work for many reasons, but they said its ignorance was one of the biggest. "If I gave them a test on the 1996 clarification" -- the civil-rights office's last major publication on Title IX -- "they would all fail -- F's," said CHRISTINE A. GRANT, former women's athletics director at the University of Iowa.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i22/22a03101.htm

Worm Research Cited (Chronicle of Higher Ed., Feb. 7)
University of Iowa researchers are investigating an unusual treatment for two chronic diseases. It involves a method for treating inflamed-bowel disease and Crohn's disease by having patients ingest the eggs of intestinal worms. The research is being led by JOEL V. WEINSTOCK, a UI professor of internal medicine and both an immunologist and a parasitologist.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i22/22a02201.htm

UI Press Publishes Book (Chronicle of Higher Ed., Feb. 7)
Brazil's environmental activists have been anxious to learn what policies President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva's government will pursue in the rain forests of the Amazon River basin. The aspirations of many of the country's economic actors -- from landless farm laborers to multinational logging corporations -- entail the destruction, not the planting, of trees. But a recent book written by five economists scattered across the globe, The Dynamics of Deforestation and Economic Growth in the Brazilian Amazon," suggests that building roads in parts of the Amazon that are already thickly settled will strengthen local economies and reduce the pressures that send farmers into virgin forest in search of new land to clear. The government of the western Brazilian state of Acres is investing heavily in road-building, according to David Cleary, the Amazon program manager of the Nature Conservancy and the author of Anatomy of the Amazon Gold Rush (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 1990). "The difference is that they're working intensively with all the municipal governments along the new road corridors. The idea is that with appropriate regulation it will be possible to break the cycles of destruction."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i22/22a01001.htm

UI Decision Cited (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 7)
A list of the "best books on collegiate sports" includes the book Foul! The Connie Hawkins Story, by David Wolf. The book is about the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's decision to expel Connie Hawkins for "allegedly conspiring with gamblers." The summary says the charges were groundless but they prevented him from playing in the National Basketball Association until he was 27.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i22/22a00703.htm

Boyd Credited For Center (Chronicle of Higher Ed., Feb. 7)
As part of an ongoing series titled "Random Interview," the Chronicle interviewed Jane Wu, 20, who is majoring in industrial psychology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Wu says she is especially excited about the creation of a center for Asian-American students. She credits interim UI President WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD with spurring the center's creation. "Basically, we talked to him, and a week later we had our center," Wu says.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i22/22a00601.htm

Van Allen Speaks On Shuttle Science (ABCnews.com, Feb. 6)
In the aftermath of the Columbia disaster, there is renewed debate about the benefits of the shuttle program. Some researchers say the space shuttles have provided the best laboratory anywhere. Others contend that nearly all on-board experiments whether in shuttle or space station could have been scrapped or conducted on Earth. "Although there have been some fairly small-scale science results from the shuttle ... they've not been anything resembling breakthroughs," says JAMES VAN ALLEN, a retired University of Iowa physicist who was a NASA adviser.
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/ap20030206_211.html
Versions of this story also appeared Feb. 6 on the websites of the New York Times, the Times Daily (Northwest Ala.), NJ.com (a site serving 7 New Jersey newspapers), and San Francisco Chronicle.

Latham: Spark Died (International Herald Tribune, Feb. 6)
America's enthusiasm for the space program had begun to wane well before Saturday's shuttle disintegration, which killed the seven astronauts on board. After reaching its peak around the time of the first moon landing, in 1969, polls show interest immediately declining, rising when the Challenger shuttle was launched in the 1980s and during the aftermath of its explosion. But that interest did not last, dropping again in the early 1990s and remaining flat ever since. One expert notes that rather than paying attention to practical science or even science fiction, people get more and more enthralled with fantasy. Even science fiction has changed. From the highly realistic, almost evangelical science fiction about rockets and space travel in the 1950's, with movies like "Destination Moon" and stories by authors like Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, the genre came in the 1980's to be dominated by galaxies far, far away in distant futures that bore little resemblance to our world. "It's as if some kind of imaginative spark about space travel just died out," said ROB LATHAM, an editor of science fiction studies and an associate professor of American studies at the University of Iowa. (This article originally appeared in the Feb. 4 New York Times.)
http://www.iht.com/articles/85736.html

Weinstein: Scoliosis Patients Doing Well (CNN.com, Feb. 5)
Many adolescents diagnosed with spine curvatures can skip braces, surgery or other treatments without developing debilitating physical impairments later in life, a 50-year study suggests. Previous research presented a grim prognosis and led to mandatory school screening programs in 26 states, based on the misperception that spine deformities inevitably lead to severe, even life-threatening disabilities. Untreated patients did have more back pain and more body-image concerns than study participants with normal spines and three deaths were considered possibly linked to the deformity. But untreated patients had similar death rates and were just as functional and likely to lead productive lives 50 years after diagnosis as people with normal spines. "The bottom line is most patients are doing very well," said lead author Dr. STUART WEINSTEIN, an orthopedic surgery professor at the University of Iowa. The study's results are based on 50 years of follow-up information on 117 patients diagnosed with scoliosis between 1932 and 1948. They appear in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association.
http://www.cnn.com/2003/HEALTH/02/05/spine.curvature.ap/
Versions of this story also appeared Feb. 5 on the Web sites of the San Antonio Express-News, the Sun-Sentinel (South Florida), MSNBC, The State (S.C.), the San Francisco Chronicle, and the Baltimore Sun.

Weinstein: Scoliosis, Death Not Linked (YahooNews, Feb. 5)
Curvature of the spine, or scoliosis, may lead to chronic back pain for many but it is not a serious threat to health, researchers said on Tuesday. Previous studies have suggested that scoliosis, in which vertebrae bend to the side and the spine sometimes forms an S-shape, may pinch internal organs such as the lungs or create an over-large cavity for the heart to fill, leading to early death. But a follow-up survey of 117 people--104 of whom were women--who had been diagnosed with scoliosis between 1932 and 1948 and who had not been treated surgically found a half-century later that their mortality rate was no higher than average. Over the past decade only three of 36 deaths in the study group might have been attributable to scoliosis, said study author STUART WEINSTEIN of the University of Iowa. "We did not find evidence to link untreated (scoliosis) with increased rates of mortality in general or from cardiac or pulmonary conditions potentially related to the curvature," said the report appearing in this week's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&cid=571&ncid=751&e=2&u=/nm/20030205/hl_nm/spine_curvature_dc

Weinstein: Lives Are Productive (Phila. Inquirer, Feb. 5)
Scoliosis, an abnormal curvature of the spine, causes few health problems as people age, according to a 50-year study in today's Journal of the American Medical Association. For decades, adolescents and their parents have been told that scoliosis leads to back pain, disability and impaired heart and lung function. As many as 3 percent of children age 10 to 16 have some abnormal curving of the spine, though most need no treatment. Researchers at the University of Iowa compared the health and self-image of 117 people with scoliosis and 62 people without the condition, all born in the 1930s and 1940s, when no treatment for the disorder was available. Scoliosis patients were more likely to have chronic, though not debilitating, back pain and be less satisfied with their appearance. "Otherwise these patients led very productive lives," said STUART L. WEINSTEIN, lead researcher and professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Iowa. "They married, had children, had careers, and were able to enjoy recreational activities."
http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/living/health/5106498.htm

Bridge Named For Grad (Philippine Daily Inquirer, Feb. 5)
Local officials from the Philippine city of San Fernando on Tuesday unveiled the marker of the renovated Baluyut Bridge to start efforts to create a cultural and historical heritage district in this city. Between 1925 and 1931, then-Pampanga Gov. Sotero Baluyut, who finished civil engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, not only built the first concrete highways going to Tarlac and Bulacan but also replaced the Puente Colgante with a reinforced concrete arch bridge. The bridge was eventually named after Baluyut who, as a senator, pushed for the law creating the National Power Corp.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=423aee4c203ec70f0557cb55f8bf4a6f&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlb-lSlzV&_md5=21b529cb01c1195e0692b796cad8c166

Weinstein Leads Scoliosis Study (Health24, Feb. 5)
Other than back pain and cosmetic concerns, people with the most common form of scoliosis, or curving of the spine, can lead normal, productive and long lives. That's the conclusion of a study spanning 50 years, the results of which appear in the Feb. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The individuals in the study all had LIS, or late-onset idiopathic scoliosis, a condition that is usually diagnosed after age 10 and has no known cause. This study sets itself apart by distinguishing LIS patients from other scoliosis patients. "It puts things in perspective and gives physicians treating scoliosis a benchmark to make intelligent treatment decisions," says study author Dr. STUART WEINSTEIN, a professor of orthopaedic surgery at the University of Iowa. Health24 is a comprehensive health information provider and is part of the Media24 (Naspers) Group, based in Cape Town, South Africa.
http://www.health24.co.za/news.asp?action=art&SubContentTypeId=39&ContentID=20810

Weinstein: Much Scoliosis Misinformation (Newsday, Feb. 5)
The long-held belief that a curvature of the spine should be aggressively treated to prevent a lifetime of pain and disability is often wrong, according to results from a new study. Doctors at the University of Iowa have been following untreated scoliosis patients for 50 years - before bracing and surgery became popular - and their final report found little evidence of suffering. "There is a lot of misinformation in the literature," said Dr. STUART WEINSTEIN, an endowed chairman of orthopedic surgery at the Iowa medical school and lead author of the study that appears today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. "Patients have been told that they will be crippled by scoliosis. For the majority of patients, this is not so. Most children never need treatment."
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/ny-hsback053117390feb05,0,4904711.story?coll=ny-health-headlines

Weinstein Studies Scoliosis Treatments (CBS News, Feb. 5)
Many adolescents diagnosed with spine curvatures can skip braces, surgery or other treatments without developing debilitating physical impairments later in life, a 50-year study suggests. Previous research presented a grim prognosis and led to mandatory school screening programs in 26 states, based on the misperception that spine deformities inevitably lead to severe, even life-threatening disabilities. Untreated patients did have more back pain and more body-image concerns than study participants with normal spines and three deaths were considered possibly linked to the deformity. But untreated patients had similar death rates and were just as functional and likely to lead productive lives 50 years after diagnosis as people with normal spines. "The bottom line is most patients are doing very well," said lead author Dr. STUART WEINSTEIN, an orthopedic surgery professor at the University of Iowa. The study's results are based on 50 years of follow-up information on 117 patients diagnosed with scoliosis between 1932 and 1948. They appear in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/02/04/health/main539341.shtml
A version of the story also ran Feb. 5 in:
NEWSDAY.
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/wire/sns-ap-spine-curvature0204feb04,0,1780055.story?coll=sns-ap-health-headlines
KANSAS CITY STAR in Mo.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/breaking_news/5104206.htm
MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1556/3634876.html
WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A26963-2003Feb4.html
The TIMES-PICAYUNE New Orleans, La.
http://www.nola.com/newsflash/topstory/index.ssf?/newsflash/get_story.ssf?/cgi-free/getstory_ssf.cgi?a0416_BC_SpineCurvature&&news&newsflash-topstory
The BOSTON GLOBE.
http://boston.com/dailynews/036/nation/Study_suggests_youths_diagnose%3A.shtml
WCCO-TV in Minnesota.
http://wcco.com/health/health_story_035142622.html
The FORT FRANCES TIMES and RAINY LAKE HERALD in Ontario, Canada.
http://www.fftimes.com/index.php3/6/2003-02-04/12990
WALNUT CREEK JOURNAL in California.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/bayarea/news/5104206.htm
ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS in South Dakota.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/5104206.htm
AKRON BEACON JOURNAL in Ohio.
http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/5104206.htm
WILKES BARRE TIMES LEADER in Pennsylvania.
http://www.timesleader.com/mld/timesleader/news/5104206.htm
WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/news/5104206.htm
GRAND FORKS HERALD in N.D.
http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/news/5104206.htm
FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/fortwayne/news/local/5104206.htm
MACON TELEGRAPH in Georgia.
http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/news/5104206.htm
BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT in Illinois.
http://www.belleville.com/mld/newsdemocrat/5104206.htm
BILOXI SUN-HERALD in Mississippi.
http://www.sunherald.com/mld/sunherald/news/breaking_news/5104206.htm
COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia.
http://www.ledger-enquirer.com/mld/ledgerenquirer/news/5104206.htm
SARASOTA HERALD TRIBUNE in Florida.
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20030204&Category=APA&ArtNo=302040936&Ref=AR
KTUL-TV in Tulsa, Okla.
http://www.ktul.com/news/stories/0203/72718.html
SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN.
http://santafenewmexican.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=2144&dept_id=385202&newsid=6932081&PAG=461&rfi=9

UI Scoliosis Study Noted (Ivanhoe, Feb. 5)
New research shows adolescents with late-onset scoliosis who did not have surgical treatment can go on to productive and active adult lives. They also appear to experience little physical impairment other than back pain and cosmetic concerns, researchers report. Scoliosis is a curvature of the spine diagnosed after age 10. Late-onset idiopathic scoliosis affects 60,000 adolescents in the United States. The 50-year study involved 444 patients diagnosed with scoliosis between 1932 and 1948. The follow-up was started in 1992 and compared 117 of those patients who were not treated for their condition to people without scoliosis who where similar in age and gender. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found 22 patients out of 98 complained of shortness of breath during everyday activities compared to eight participants out of 53 in the control group. About 66 scoliosis patients out of 109 reported chronic back pain compared to 22 out of 62 control participants. Among patients with pain, 48 out of 71 scoliosis patients and 12 out of 17 control participants reported only little or moderate back pain. Ivanhoe is a web site covering medical breakthroughs, family health and issues important to women. It is based in Winter Park, Fla.
http://www.ivanhoe.com/channels/p_channelstory.cfm?storyid=5415

UI Completes 50-Year Scoliosis Study (WRAL-TV, Feb. 5)
A 50-year study suggests that many teenagers with spinal curvature can avoid treatments without developing severe impairments later. Late-onset idiopathic scoliosis, or LIS, affects about 60,000 adolescents in the United States. Previous research led to the idea that these spine deformities inevitably lead to severe disabilities. Those findings had led to mandatory school screening programs in 26 states. Treatment can include braces and surgery. In the new study, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers looked at 444 patients diagnosed as having LIS between 1932 and 1948. They followed up with the patients in 1992. They found that untreated and treated patients had similar death rates. They also were as functional and likely to lead productive lives 50 years after diagnosis. Untreated patients did have more back pain and more body-image concerns. The study is published in Wednesday's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. WRAL-TV covers Raleigh, Durham and Fayetteville, N.C.
http://www.wral.com/health/1956842/detail.html
Versions of the story also ran Feb. 5 on the websites of:
WCVB-TV in Boston, Mass.
http://www.thebostonchannel.com/sh/health/stories/health-195684220030204-160247.html
KERO-TV in Bakersfield, Calif.
http://www.thebakersfieldchannel.com/health/1956842/detail.html
WCAX-TV in Burlington, Vt.
http://www.wcax.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
WLUC-TV in Upper Michigan.
http://www.wluctv6.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
WKYT-TV in Lexington, Ky.
http://www.wkyt.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
KAMC-TV in Lubbock, Texas.
http://www.wkyt.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
WECT-TV in Wilmington, N.C.
http://www.wect.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
WBAY-TV in Green Bay, Wis.
http://www.wbay.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
KSFY-TV in Sioux Falls, S.D.
http://www.ksfy.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
WHBF-TV, which covers the Quad Cities from Illinois.
http://www.whbf.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
KESQ-TV in Palm Desert, Calif.
http://www.kesq.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
WALB-TV in south Georgia.
http://www.walb.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
WOOD-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.
http://www.woodtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
WAVY-TV in Portsmouth, Va.
http://www.wavy.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
KRNV-TV in Reno, Nev.
http://www.krnv.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
KFOR-TV in Oklahoma City, Okla.
http://www.kfor.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
WISH-TV in Indianapolis, Ind.
http://www.wishtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245
KTVO in Kirksville, Mo.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/Global/story.asp?S=1114245

Ernst Comments On Drug Cost Study (Newsday, Feb. 5)
Doctors often are unaware of the cost of a prescription drug and what the patient must pay for it out of pocket, surveys have shown. As a result, they may prescribe expensive drugs that drive up medical costs or that patients may decide not to take. In a survey published in 2000, researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA asked faculty and resident physicians at seven clinics in Iowa to select the price -- in $10 increments up to $80 -- for 50 medications commonly prescribed in outpatient family clinics. Of the 178 physicians who responded, only 22.9 percent correctly identified the costs. MICHAEL ERNST, a clinical pharmacist and lead author of the Iowa study, said an intervention like one described in a more recent New York-New Jersey study makes sense. "That's a good place to start," he said. "There has to be a continual emphasis" on the cost issue.
http://www.newsday.com/news/printedition/health/ny-dsdrug3115659feb04,0,2339881.story?coll=ny-discovery-print

Workshop Cited In Story On Author (CalendarLive, Feb. 5)
A feature on up and coming fiction writer Tim Johnston -- whose first book, a young-adult novel called "Never So Green," was released late last year by Farrar, Straus & Giroux and got great reviews in publications including Publishers Weekly -- says that back home in his native Iowa City Johnston, as an undergraduate at the University of Iowa, was part of the vibrant literary scene propelled by the university's famous graduate program, the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. He now lives in Los Angeles. CalendarLive is a calendar within the Los Angeles Times web site.
http://www.calendarlive.com/books/cl-et-tawa5feb05,0,7363805.story?coll=cl-home-more-channels

Paper Cites UI Minority Efforts (Michigan Daily, Feb. 5)
The Michigan Student Assembly, noting a lack of female and minority faculty at the university and at institutes of higher education nationwide, agreed to vote next week on a resolution to lobby for change. They will ask the university to seek methods of "recruiting and maintaining minority and women faculty members," the resolution says. The assembly proposal points out that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA increased its tenure for minority faculty more than 2 percent and its tenure for female faculty by more than 7 percent over the past decade. MSA hopes the University will seek similar strategies in creating a diverse staff.
The Daily is the University of Michigan's student-run newspaper.
http://www.michigandaily.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2003/02/05/3e40baebf17bf

Council Mulls Ordinance (Omaha World-Herald, Feb. 5)
The Iowa City City Council will consider a 21-and-over ordinance as it continues to fight underage drinking downtown. The decision to consider the ordinance, earlier proposed by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was made Monday after the council tabled a proposal to limit the number of bars in the downtown area through zoning.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=644091

Student Hopes To Be Astronaut (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 5)
A columnist, writing in the wake of the space shuttle Columbia disaster, talks about Nate Munsterman, 17, a straight-A student in Springville, Iowa, who hopes one day to work in space. The columnist quotes an email sent to him by Munsterman's father: "My son Nate, now a high school senior, has planned to be an astronaut since he was eight. Everything he has done, everything he is, has been guided by his passion for space. In the fall he will continue striving for that goal when he begins studying physics at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with the goal of earning his PhD. Following that, he will apply for astronaut candidacy."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/printedition/chi-0302050386feb05,1,4295391.story

Weinstein Examined Untreated Scoliosis (Reuters, Feb. 4)
Curvature of the spine, or scoliosis, may lead to chronic back pain for many but it is not a serious threat to health, researchers said on Tuesday. Previous studies have suggested that scoliosis, where vertebrae bend to the side and the spine sometimes forms an S-shape, may pinch internal organs such as the lungs or create an over-large cavity for the heart to fill, leading to early death. But a follow-up survey of 117 people, all but 13 of them women, out of the 444 who had been diagnosed with scoliosis between 1932 and 1948 and who had not been treated surgically found a half-century later that their mortality rate was no higher than average. Over the past decade only three of 36 deaths in the study group might have been attributable to scoliosis, said study author STUART WEINSTEIN of the University of Iowa. "We did not find evidence to link untreated (scoliosis) with increased rates of mortality in general or from cardiac or pulmonary conditions potentially related to the curvature," said the report appearing in this week's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
http://asia.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=scienceNews&storyID=2168779
Versions of this story also ran Feb. 4 on the websites of:
ABC NEWS.
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/reuters20030204_539.html

NADS Readies For $5.1 Million Study (Newsday, Feb. 4)
Iowa drivers will soon do something that would ordinarily be ill-advised and illegal: Get behind the wheel after guzzling vodka-laced fruit juice. Researchers will test volunteers' performance and reaction times in the world's most sophisticated driving simulator. The final touches are being put on software and instrumentation at the National Advanced Driving Simulator in preparation for a three-year, $5.1- million study. The simulator is owned by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. The payoff for researchers - and taxpayers who covered most of the cost - is the promise of reducing crashes and deaths.
http://www.newsday.com/news/printedition/health/ny-dsdata3115662feb04,0,7338991.story?coll=ny-discovery-print

Latham Comments On Space Travel (New York Times, Feb. 4)
In this story, changes in science fiction are compared to interests to space exploration. From the highly realistic, almost evangelical science fiction about rockets and space travel in the 1950's, with movies like "Destination Moon" and stories by authors like Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, the genre came in the 1980's to be dominated by galaxies far, far away in distant futures that bore little resemblance to our world. "It's as if some kind of imaginative spark about space travel just died out," said ROB LATHAM, an editor of science fiction studies and an associate professor of American studies at the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/04/science/space/04CULT.html

Student Wants To Attend UI (Chicago Daily Herald, Feb. 3)
Lissette Castro's journey toward college is very different from her peers'. Unlike her classmates' parents, Castro's mother asks her why she must go away to school. Her mother, who emigrated from Mexico, doesn't have a degree and knows nothing about the process of applying or planning to pay for college. Castro also is trying to determine how she can afford to attend Chicago's Loyola University or the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to study nursing. Castro is the kind of student the Sallie Mae Fund is trying to help with its national Project Access program. The program's goal is to make low-income and minority students aware of opportunities for financial aid through nationwide workshops and a toll-free number to field questions.
http://www.dailyherald.com/kane/main_story.asp?intID=3765559

McLeod Has Freedom Of Expression (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 3)
In the days before Napster helped transform esoteric copyright discussions into a pop cultural debate, KEMBREW MCLEOD remembers "hanging around my adviser's office in college back in '91, talking about trademark and copyright issues. Wouldn't it be funny, I joked, if someone trademarked the phrase `freedom of expression'?" McLeod, now a professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa, says he toyed with the idea until 1998 when he "actually went out and did it." Intended as an argument against what he perceives as Draconian intellectual property laws, the unassuming 32-year-old wants to spark some debate. "I'm here today to announce formally that I'm pursuing legal action against AT&T," McLeod deadpans during a recent visit to Chicago. "They are using my trademarked phrase, `freedom of expression,' as their slogan for an ad campaign targeting college students and I take offense to that."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/chi-0302030018feb03,1,4574541.story

UI May Hire Advertising Help (Omaha World-Herald, Feb. 3)
Iowa's three public universities have spent at least $2 million since 1998 on outside help to boost their images, despite having public relations and marketing employees on the payroll. The goal is exposure, which university officials say the schools need to attract bright students and talented faculty. Fees for the efforts, which included public opinion surveys and television commercials and reports, have been as small as $1,000 or as large as $40,000. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA wants to hire a consultant to start an advertising campaign for its hospitals and clinics.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=641716

Gordon Comments On Benefits (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 2)
Health-care benefits, once considered an entitlement to workers, is at risk of becoming an unaffordable luxury to many job holders. Before World War II, fewer than 5 percent of workers had any health-care benefits. When they did, they usually were in the form of company clinics. And as University of Iowa public policy historian COLIN GORDON explains, employers' motivation had less to do with relieving workers' financial burdens than with good personnel practice.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0302020074feb02,1,4233071.story

Coleman's UI Presidency Cited (WOTV, Feb. 1)
More women are holding top spots in education. Take for example Mary Sue Coleman. This is her first year as president at the University of Michigan, making $475,000 a year -- more than twice the governor's salary. She's also the first female university president. Coleman has a history if being the first woman in a position. Her last job was the first female president at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. WOTV covers Battle Creek and Kalamazoo, Mich.
http://www.wotv.com/index.php?goto=story&RecordID=925

Alumnus Part Of TV Bureau (St. Augustine Records, Feb. 1)
First Coast News has established a television news team for its St. Johns County, Fla., bureau in The St. Augustine Record building. Reporter Maria Tsataros and photojournalist Brian Buss will report on local news in one of the largest counties in the First Coast News' coverage area. It's a continuation of the bureau created in March 2000, said News Director Mike McCormick. Buss worked for WJBF TV in Augusta, Ga., before moving to First Coast News in 2002. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and has been working in the television industry since 2000. The Record is based in Florida.
http://www.staugustine.com/stories/020103/new_1296304.shtml

UI Experiment Was On Shuttle (Omaha World-Herald, Feb. 1)
Regional universities have played an important role in Space Shuttle research. Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA participated eight years ago in a joint experiment involving the melting and solidification of an alloy during a mission of the shuttle Endeavour.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=640779

Skorton: No ‘Bellyaching’ (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 1)
New University of Iowa President DAVID SKORTON said Friday that one of his first chores would be to rebuild ties with a Legislature that has slashed spending for the state's universities deeply. "One feature of my presidency that I hope I will be able to make good on is I don't intend for us to bellyache about whatever the state is able to share with us," Skorton said. Skorton spoke during a taping of this weekend's Iowa Public Television's "Iowa Press" program. He was selected by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa as the 19th president at the university and will be installed March 1.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=640141

BOOK CITED (Kiplinger's Personal Finance, February, 2003)
A new genre--the personal-finance memoir--may have been born in Currency of the Heart (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, $25). Writer Don Nichols, former director of communications for the U.S. Mint, tracks how he took charge of his mother's finances after his father's death from cancer. Nichols gives a clear, numbers-free explanation of the changes he made to the family portfolio--and to his family relationships--while shuttling between D.C. and his native Iowa.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=4b4fb96efe57980fc6c44dcf5135b362&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVlz-lSlzV&_md5=a7ac3ad33c1d054be47c291a3c0c618f

DAMASIO'S RESEARCH CITED (Reason Magazine, February 2003)
Philosopher Patricia Churchland Churchland points out that neuroscientific research by scientists like the University of Iowa's ANTONIO DAMASIO strongly shows that emotions are an essential component of viable practical reasoning about what a person should do.
http://www.reason.com/0302/fe.rb.the.shtml

Lutgendorf: Journaling Heals (Delicious Living, Feb. 2003)
University of Iowa researchers found in a recent study that journaling helps people work through dire incidents. The key to success is not just describing the event or your emotions, but including your thoughts as you process the experience. "Engagement of both thoughts and emotions while journaling about a stressful or traumatic experience can raise awareness of the benefits of the event," say study authors Philip M. Ulrich and SUSAN K. LUTGENDORF, whose work was published in the Annals of Behavior Medicine.

Bloom's Book Reviewed (The Writer, Feb. 2003)
A review of UI journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM's new book "Inside the Writer's Mind," notes, "With this wonderfully readable textbook, Bloom lets other writers explore his brain. It is a worthwhile journey for nonfiction writers from novice to accomplished veteran."
http://www.writermag.com/WRT/html/departments/writestuff/200212_744.asp

Skorton Named UI President (University Business, February 2003)
After a five-month search, the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, selected DAVID SKORTON to fill the vacancy created when University of Iowa President Mary Sue Coleman left to head up the University of Michigan.

Coleman Doubled Salary At Michigan (University Business, February 2003)
A story examining the salaries of university presidents cites the case of Mary Sue Coleman, whose $475,000 salary as president of the University of Michigan is nearly double what she earned in her previous post at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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