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UI in the News

December, 2003

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Flu Still Hitting Iowa, UI Hospitals (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 31)
The flu virus that has struck Iowa over the past month isn't loosening its grip, health officials said. "We're still seeing a lot of flu cases," said RITA LIDDELL, a spokeswoman for University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "Our emergency room is still seeing as many walk-in cases as they were before." UI Hospitals saw a 20 percent increase in patient volume in its emergency room earlier this month because of the flu.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=961377

UI Employee Union To Work For Gephardt (Boston Globe, Dec. 31)
More than a dozen international unions will airlift a combined several hundred full-time political organizers to Iowa, starting Friday, in the final push for Democratic presidential candidate Richard A. Gephardt before the Jan. 19 delegate-selection caucuses. About 30 to 40 of them will be from the Service Employees International Union, which is concentrated around Iowa City and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2003/12/31/labor_makes_push_for_gephardt/

Barkan Comments On Kenya (Daily Nation, Dec. 29)
Washington's heavy-handed policies and its lack of sensitivity to Kenyan politics may make Nairobi less willing to cooperate in the U.S. anti-terrorism campaign, warns an American expert on Kenya. Writing in the January 2004 edition of the influential journal, Foreign Affairs, Professor JOEL BARKAN says the Bush team must adopt "a more nuanced and quieter approach," if the U.S. is to maintain its historically close ties with Kenya. Prof. Barkan, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, specifically urges an end to U.S. threats to eliminate military aid to Kenya, currently worth $3 million per year. The U.S. has said it will suspend military assistance to any country that ratifies the treaty for the International Criminal Court without exempting U.S. soldiers from the court's jurisdiction. The American demand for protection under the treaty's Article 98 "is viewed as an infringement on Kenya's sovereignty," Barkan says. The Daily Nation is published in Kenya.
http://www.nationaudio.com/News/DailyNation/29122003/News/News291220030.html
An editorial noting Barkan's comments was published Dec. 30 in the Daily Nation at
http://www.nationaudio.com/News/DailyNation/Today/Comment/Editorial301220035.html
and in an opinion piece at http://www.nationaudio.com/News/DailyNation/Today/Comment/Comment301220037.html

Hawkeye Fans, Players Enjoy Beach Day (St. Petersburg Times, Dec. 30)
As the Iowa Hawkeyes Marching Band played Hey Jude, 11-year-old football fan Chris Creery of Cedar Falls, Iowa made snowballs in the sand. The Red Barons buzzed in propeller planes overhead; the Budweiser Skydivers parachuted to the shore. And University of Florida and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA players signed footballs. They were all enjoying the annual Outback Bowl Beach Day, a pep rally and beach party celebrating the match-up between the University of Florida Gators and the University of Iowa Hawkeyes on Thursday at Raymond James Stadium. "We're having a wonderful time," said Iowa fan Lynn Worrell of West Branch, Iowa. "We're just flying by the seat of our pants."
http://www.sptimes.com/2003/12/30/Northpinellas/Sand_flies_as_Gators_.shtml

Kerry Cites UI Asthma Study (New York Times, Dec. 30)
Democratic presidential hopeful John Kerry said Monday that he would combat growing asthma rates by applying clean air laws to farms and taking steps to improve indoor air quality. Applying clean air laws to farms would target operations that house thousands of animals that produce tons of manure, which fouls the air and water, critics say. To make his case, the Massachusetts senator pointed to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study that says children who live near factory farms have a much greater chance of suffering asthma attacks than children who don't. "When we hear statistics like these and when we know how to turn them around, it is flatly unacceptable and irresponsible for the president of the United States to simply look the other way," Kerry said during a visit to a community health center in Waterloo, which is in a county with traditionally high asthma rates.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Kerry.html
The Associated Press Article also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, DOW JONES NEWSWIRES, BALTIMORE SUN, PROVIDENCE JOURNAL (R.I.), ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS NETWORK, CHARLESTON GAZETTE (W.V.), SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS (Calif.), The GUARDIAN (U.K) , MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, and the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.

Roberts Talks About New Movie (Singapore Straits Times, Dec. 30)
In this interview about her new movie, "Mona Lisa Smile" actress Julia Roberts talks about how she felt about not going to college. "My best friend went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and I just remember every time I talked to her, it all sounded so fun and great. And here I was, selling tennis shoes and getting on the subway every day for the commute uptown. I was trying hard to make the rent every month and that seemed so adult and glamorous to her. And she would talk about cramming for finals and going to beer parties and I was just like, God, she's so perfect."
http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/life/story/0,4386,227539,00.html

Barkan Comments On Kenya (Xinghua, Dec. 29)
The heavy-handed policies of the United States and its lack of sensitivity to Kenyan politics may make Kenya less willing to cooperate in the U.S. anti-terrorism campaign, the Daily Nation said here on Monday, quoting an expert on Africa. According to the newspaper, JOEL BARKAN, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said the Bush team must adopt "a more nuanced and quieter approach" if the United States is to maintain its historically close ties with Kenya. Writing in the January 2004 edition of the influential journal Foreign Affairs, Barkan urges an end to U.S. threats to eliminate military aid to Kenya, currently worth $3 million per year. The United States has said it will suspend military assistance to any country that ratifies the treaty for the International Criminal Court without exempting U.S. soldiers from the court's jurisdiction. The U.S. demand for protection under the treaty's Article 98 "is viewed as an infringement on Kenya's sovereignty," Barkan says. Xinghua is a Chinese news agency.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b096570850bf488215db31a2e1359f88&_docnum=20&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVA&_md5=3ce502d8b3c6a056c71ea1f395036ff7
A similar article appeared Dec. 29 on AllAfrica.com.

Rao Discovers Fructose Difficulty (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Dec. 29)
We're a nation consuming ever-greater quantities of sweets -- and we're suffering from an epidemic of gastrointestinal distress. It turns out the two could be related. SATISH RAO, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa medical school, was puzzled by patients coming in with abdominal pain, gas and diarrhea that seemed to defy explanation. Rao suspected fructose, a form of sugar that occurs naturally in fruit. Americans' consumption of fructose, mostly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, has skyrocketed. After conducting a series of tests, he concluded that most people cannot adequately digest more than about 25 grams of fructose. A can of Coke contains 16 grams, he said, and a glass of orange juice has 15 grams. The two of those consumed within a span of a couple of hours can overwhelm a person's ability to handle fructose.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/living/7590223.htm
The article also appeared Dec. 28 in the SEATTLE TIMES.

Lewis-Beck Comments On Jobless Rate (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 29)
On Jan. 9, when the unemployment rate for December is announced, both Republicans and Democrats will assuredly again maneuver for advantage - precisely because the number isn't expected to change much. "At this point, where we don't know which way it's going but it isn't likely to be going far, both sides will try to use it," says MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. In every election since 1960, the party in the White House lost when the unemployment rate deteriorated during the first half of the year. If the rate improved, the party in the White House won. That's not a coincidence, says Lewis-Beck, who has edited several volumes on how economic conditions determine elections. "People see the president as the chief executive of the economy," he says. "They punish him if things are deteriorating and reward him if things are improving."
http://www.latimes.com/business/careers/work/la-fi-jobs29dec29,1,1045396.story?coll=la-headlines-business-careers

UI Alumnus Honored For Media Production (La Crosse Tribune, Dec. 29)
Jim Jorstad, director of educational technologies and information technology services at the University of Wisconsin -- La Crosse, was named one of the top media producers in the nation in the November 2003 AV Video Multimedia Producer magazine. This was the second year he received that honor. He also received a national Telly award in 2003 for his video, "Running With Emotion." Jorstad headed for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1982, where he worked in a video production lab and earned his master's degree. The Tribune is based in La Crosse, Wisc.
http://www.lacrossetribune.com/articles/2003/12/29/news/zz02jorstad.txt

O'Connor Letter Quoted (Townhall.com, Dec. 29)
In a column about symbolism, a letter by Flannery O'Connor is quoted. She was writing a friend of hers about a soiree she'd attended as a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.townhall.com/columnists/paulgreenberg/pg20031229.shtml

Iowa's Teacher Numbers Fall (Fairmont Sentinel, Dec. 29)
The number of new teachers in Iowa fell for the second straight year and educators say budget cuts and low pay are to blame. There were just over 1,100 new teachers this school year, down 23.5 percent from last year, a state Department of Education report said. A survey of recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA education graduates found that about half stayed in the state this year, up from about 40 percent the year before. The Sentinel is based in Fairmont, Minn.
http://fairmontsentinel.com/news/stories/122903b.html

Albrecht Comments On Ag Subsidies (Tech Central Station.com, Dec. 29)
For developing countries opposed to agricultural subsidies in Europe and the U.S., due restraint may be about to end. The World Trade Organization's "Peace Clause," which protects countries with agricultural subsidies from challenges to those handouts, is set to expire at the end of 2003. WILLIAM ALBRECHT, professor of economics at the University of Iowa, says that although he thinks the U.S. does want to move in the direction of liberalizing agricultural trade and eliminating subsidies, barriers like the Farm Bill stand in the way at the present time. "I think the U.S. really wants to go ahead," Albrecht says. "I'm not sure how we would do it. We have the Farm Bill. It's the law. We can't stop that. We could reach an agreement that would reach effect when the Farm Bill expires." He also warns that a free-for-all in launching challenges to subsidies could backfire for developing countries. "If nothing happens, they are bigger losers than we are," Albrecht says. "We're rich. Big deal, we'll be that much richer. But they are poor. It's a big deal if they don't get rich."
http://www.techcentralstation.com/122903D.html

Dean Leads IEM's Nomination Market (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Dec. 28)
The Iowa Electronic Markets has been handicapping campaigns since the 1988 presidential election, and it has covered every presidential election since with great accuracy. Its director said there is a 1.7 percent average margin of error between the market value of a candidate and election tallies. The electronic market is a genuine money market organized as a research tool at the TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS at the University of Iowa. People can open an account for as little as $5 or as much as $500. The market has 4,475 participants with a total investment of more than $135,000. Last week on the Democratic side, former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean led the pack of nine candidates as the most likely to win the party's nomination. His stock was valued at just over 30 cents a share. A separate electronic market showed that investors are betting that a matchup between President Bush and Dean is the likeliest outcome next fall.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/4289536.html

Damasio Book Noted (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Dec. 27)
ANTONIO DAMASIO
's book "Looking for Spinoza" was recently released in paperback. The 17th-century philosopher Spinoza believed the mind and the body were part of a single overall entity, but not many agreed with him. Now comes Damasio, head of the neurology department at the University of Iowa, to argue on Spinoza's side - that emotions are part of a system of hard wiring geared toward ensuring the survival of the species.
http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/107252132336430.xml

Young Campaign Workers Flock To Iowa (USA Today, Dec. 26)
Twenty-something campaign staffers eager for a taste of grass-roots politics have flocked to Iowa. In exchange for long hours, little pay and an occasional bout of homesickness, they are handed significant responsibilities. They become adept at handling the media, make contacts that could last decades and learn how to be politically competitive at the highest level. "It gives a certain amount of sort of cachet to the rising young staffer to have worked a caucus campaign," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political science professor and a Democratic county chairman. "It gives you that grass-roots, on-the-ground experience that you just can't get very easily any other way."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/2003-12-26-iowa-staff_x.htm
The article also appeared in CAPITOL HILL BLUE, HARRISBURG PATRIOT NEWS (Penn.), FOX NEWS, PROVIDENCE JOURNAL (R.I.), SARASOTA HERALD TRIBUNE (Fla.), SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS (Calif.), The GUARDIAN (U.K) , ABC NEWS, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, and BALTIMORE SUN.

Bloom's 'Postville' Book Noted (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 26)
Deep green wreaths and red bows are the flash point for the newest disagreement between Postville's establishment and the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. Postville gained widespread notice after the release in 2000 of "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." The critically acclaimed book by University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM places blame for the tensions squarely on the Hasidim, also known as Lubavitchers. Bloom describes them as extremely clannish, condescending toward the locals and intent on taking over the town. Aaron Goldsmith, the only Jew on the City Council, derided as "a total fallacy" the notion that his community has sought to isolate itself. He introduces himself to visitors who have read the book as "the anti-Bloom." "There is a difference between protecting one's culture and isolating from the community," Goldsmith said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0312260206dec26,1,4874885.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed (registration required)

Columnist Praises UI Transplant Team (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 26)
A columnist writes: "Yesterday, my family celebrated two miracles: One took place in a manger in Bethlehem more than 2,000 years ago; the other last spring in a hospital in Iowa City, Iowa." He says that in the summer of 2002, his brother David suffered total renal failure after years of battling a kidney disease called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, or FSGS. The disease attacks the kidneys' filtering system, which rids the body of waste and excess fluids, and can result in kidney failure, requiring dialysis or a transplant. "David had been on a special diet for years, then steroids, then a host of medications and treatments. Eventually, however, his kidneys gave out, leaving him poisoned by his own blood. Too weak to drive, he was taken by my mother to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS, where he was immediately put on dialysis. If it weren't for the miracle of dialysis, a machine to clean his blood, he would have died within hours." He said the family considered a kidney transplant, which until recently required major surgery. "Now, thanks to the miracle ... of laparoscopic surgery, the incision is generally just a few inches wide and the donor can go home in a day or two and be back at work in just a few weeks." His brother underwent the procedure. "Thanks to the brilliant skills of the University of Iowa's transplant surgeons, Drs. STEPHEN RAYHILL and YOU MIN WU, the operation was a complete success. Thanks to the expert (and tender) care of the nurses in the transplant unit of Roy Carver West, David and I were out of the hospital in just a few days, and our recoveries were swift."
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB107239035182040800,00.html

Athlete Sought Eye Care At UI (Lawrence Journal World, Dec. 26)
Brad Harker, a Lawrence High School baseball standout had played semi-pro baseball in Columbus, Ohio, and was possibly headed for a Major League career. In 1995, he was attacked and beaten almost to death. Injuries suffered in the attack eventually ended his baseball opportunities. Harker was later examined by an eye specialist with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The doctor told Harker the eye would never regain sight and explained to him the medical reasons why and why surgery would not do any good. "As hard as it was for me to hear, at least then I knew," Harker said. "I no longer woke up every morning disappointed because I still couldn't see." The Journal-World is based in Lawrence, Kans.
http://www.ljworld.com/section/crime_fire/story/156220

Greenberg's Cystic Fibrosis Research Noted (Anchorage Daily News, Dec. 25)
Research in cystic fibrosis has come a long way since 1989, when the genetic mutation was first identified. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, in its 2002 annual report, focused on several medical experts, including Dr. PETER GREENBERG, a professor of microbiology at the University of Iowa and the father of a daughter with cystic fibrosis. He is trying to unscramble why certain bacteria in cystic fibrosis patients are resistant to antibiotics. Researchers say a cure for the disease could be found by 2010. The Daily News is published in Anchorage, Alaska.
http://www.adn.com/life/story/4552302p-4526721c.html

Peters Questions Value Of Development Tool (Minnesota Public Radio, Dec. 24)
Depending on whom you ask, Minnesota's new tax-free zones are either strong medicine for the state economy, or a slow-acting poison. In the coming years, it will fall to state officials and outside economists to measure which prediction comes closer to the truth. Even then, adversaries may never agree on just how much benefit we're getting from the zones -- and what they're costing us. "It turns out that in the United States, if you take the current research, it looks like maybe one in 10 jobs that are recipients of economic development incentives are essentially truly induced -- in other words, wouldn't exist but for those incentives," Peters says. "In fact, that's a fairly optimistic number," said ALAN PETERS, a University of Iowa associate professor of urban and regional planning. Peters concedes a few points where Minnesota's program is different. JOBZ is more generous than most predecessors in other states. At 12 years, it also lasts longer. And, in theory, the program is designed to give a leg-up to depressed areas that really are not otherwise attracting interest. All of these factors could make jobs created under JOBZ more likely to be induced. But Peters rejects the state's plan for calculating the costs and benefits of the zones, which will assume that 100 percent of the jobs are due to JOBZ. Peters believes even assuming an inducement rate of 30 percent would be giving the program the benefit of the doubt. "The problem with that is if you assume 100 percent of your economic development spending really does induce new firms, then essentially it's always going to give you a very favorable outcome using such a model," Peters says.
http://news.mpr.org/features/2003/12/26_horwichj_measuring/

UI Student Support Of Israel Cited (Forward, Dec. 24)
A story about an increase in college student support for Israel cites a pro-Israel petition at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA - where out of 30,000 students, only 800 are Jewish - was signed by more than 1,700 students, as well as two members of Congress, a lieutenant governor and two presidential candidates, who were visiting the campus while the petition was being circulated.
http://www.forward.com/issues/2003/03.12.26/oped4.html

UI Researchers Study Sunscreen Use (New Straits Times, Dec. 23)
A new study has found no evidence that sunscreen, commonly used to reduce the risk of skin cancer, actually increases the risk. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA based their findings on a review of 18 earlier studies that looked at the association between sunscreen use and melanoma. They said that they found flaws in studies that had reported associations between sunscreen use and higher risk of melanoma. The Times is based in Malaysia.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=877eba2cd11f5f48350b41f33b5d914d&_docnum=48&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkVA&_md5=9cc82f7cdbe87794e310245b7e5a53fb

UI Mentioned in Coralville Rain Forest Project Article (TownHall.com, Dec. 23)
An opinion piece critical of the federal grant now before Congress that would help build the Iowa Environmental/Education Project argues that while Sen. Chuck Grassley maintains the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will somehow benefit from the project, how exactly that will come to pass has been "unclear" since 2000 and continues to be so, according to the university's public affairs department.
http://www.townhall.com/columnists/GuestColumns/Grossman20031223.shtml

Alumnus Headed For Swimming Hall Of Fame (St. Petersburg Times, Dec. 23)
Two years ago, Paul Hutinger suffered a stroke. He recovered with no paralysis or loss of mobility, something his doctors credit to a strict aquatic regimen, a regimen that began when he was 15. Today, at 79, Hutinger is in good health and swims four or five days a week. He has won so many races, set so many records and helped so many swimmers that he'll be inducted in January into the World Masters Swimming Hall of Fame in Fort Lauderdale. He earned a bachelor's degree in physical education at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA while competing with the Hawkeyes men's swim team; he later earned a doctorate in exercise physiology from Indiana University. The Times serves St. Petersburg, Fla.
http://www.sptimes.com/2003/12/23/Seniority/Laps_count__but_so_do.shtml

Missen Comments On Internet Use (AllAfrica.com, Dec. 22)
The director of the Widernet project, University of Iowa Professor CLIFF MISSEN, has said that Internet connection is not the only solution to Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in modern day business and learning. Missen told IT World that there is no evidence that Internet connection is improving the information and communication technologies in the university system or other businesses, adding that ICTs is not all about internet connection but about how to get computers connected to each other for effective communication uses. He said that the use of the Internet is all about e-mail and some browsing and that during his investigation of Internet use in Nigeria he found that most Nigerians who use the Internet for searches are looking for education and job opportunities outside the country. The Widernet Project is affiliated with the International Programs at the UI.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200312220421.html

Miller: Edwards Not Catching On In Iowa (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 22)
Independent analysts say that North Carolina Sen. John Edwards can declare a partial victory even if he loses in the Iowa caucuses. They agree that a third-place finish -- presumably ahead of Kerry -- would give him added credibility going into the New Hampshire primary eight days later. It could also help in seven other contests on Feb. 3, including primaries in South Carolina, where Edwards leads in some polls, and Oklahoma, where he's doing well. But a fourth-place Iowa finish in the single digits -- in essence, where the campaign lingers now with four weeks to go -- would not bode well. "He just has not caught on," said ARTHUR MILLER, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "He doesn't seem to be differentiating himself from the other candidates." This story also appeared Dec. 22 on the web sites of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-na-edwards22dec22,1,2902129.story?coll=la-home-politics

Black's Compulsive Shopping Research Cited (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 22)
For most of us, holiday sales and ad blitzes are so much window dressing. Lights, Sinatra music, gadgets in mall windows, catalogs of beautiful people in beautiful sweaters -- all very nice, and usually worth an impulse buy, or two, maybe more. But for a small number of adults, the season of buying and giving yields a harvest of heavy debt -- the kind that means you can't pay your utility bills or threatens a marriage -- and closets full of clothes, books, electronics and other products, some with the tags still attached. Compulsive shopping is not a widely recognized medical diagnosis and hardly merits being called a disorder, because researchers are only beginning to study it. But psychiatrists say it's a real problem for people who shop several or more times a week, bringing home things they don't need and rarely use. According to Dr. DONALD BLACK, a psychiatrist at the University of Iowa, 80 percent to 95 percent of those affected are women. The habit usually takes hold in their late teens or early 20s and usually is chronic.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-shopping22dec22,1,5092498.story?coll=la-home-health

UI Had Largest Dean Rally In December (Boston Globe, Dec. 22)
"From Mousepads to Shoeleather," the campaign of Howard Dean calls its effort to transform its technological breakthroughs into volunteers and actual votes for the Democratic presidential candidate. Turning a "Webhead" into a voter is a critical challenge, particularly in Iowa, which holds its precinct caucuses in less than a month. The Dean for America website is loaded with data that measure the activity of individuals who sign up to support the former Vermont governor. One link, which is updated continually, touted 158,878 who have signed up for the monthly "Meetups" of "Dean Supporters Worldwide." A small fraction actually attend the meetings in any given month, however. The campaign said 942 Meetups were held Dec. 3. But based on campaign and news reports, the average attendance was fewer than 20 people per meeting, about 18,000 total. In Iowa, a team of Chicago Tribune reporters checked three Meetups. One event that was supposed to be held in a rural county never occurred; a dozen people attended a session in Ames, the home of Iowa State University; and about 25 showed up for a session at the campaign's statewide headquarters in Des Moines, the newspaper reported. A campaign staffer she did not know the total attendance for the Iowa Meetups that day, but said they varied in size, the largest with about 150 in Iowa City, which is the site of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2003/12/22/dean_seeks_to_convert_net_savvy_into_votes/

UI Neuroscience Research Cited (Times of India, Dec. 22)
Self-awareness is not the preserve of homo sapiens; animals can not only think, they can also think about thought, says a recent report in the Behavioral and Brain Sciences journal. In an experiment conducted by U.S. scientists, monkeys and dolphins were given the option to express uncertainty, in addition to the conventional 'yes' and 'no' responses. The animals sprang a surprise: They exercised the "I don't know" option. If this means that animals can actually "work things out" and come to independent conclusions, then, it would appear that like humans, animals, too, have the power of metacognition. Shocking as these revelations are, they may not have entirely demolished the notion of human supremacy. Indeed, another independent study conducted by neuroscientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA maintains that humans are still Species No. 1. This is because humans have specialized neuron cells that appear to broadcast socially relevant signals to the brain. This enables us both to reach higher levels of self-awareness and feel complex emotions. This is also why we have evolved concepts like morality and free will -- unlike animals. But as a species we suffer from a delusive sense of superiority because of which we assume that all other constituents of the planet were created solely for our sustenance. Judging by the new revelations about animals, it might well be that they think likewise about humans. It is unlikely that our existence or otherwise makes a grain of difference to the rest of the planet's inhabitants. It's a humbling thought -- and one that every one of us should be mindful of.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/373098.cms

Ramkumar Calls Pill Camera A 'Marvel' (Orlando Sentinel, Dec. 22)
Doctors have used small cameras on snaking tubes for years to check patients' intestinal troubles. These days, they're asking some patients to swallow the entire camera. With a single pill loaded with technology similar to a digital camera, doctors can view more than 50,000 still images captured during the trip through the final 20 feet of the small intestine that previously was visible only on X-rays. The pill, known as the M2A Capsule Endoscopy, is about the size of a multivitamin and is swallowed with a sip of water. The camera, encased in a white plastic capsule, takes pictures that are transmitted on a radio frequency. The images are captured in a recording device worn on a belt around the patient's waist. After eight hours, the belt is turned over to the doctor. The device is a "marvel of microelectronics," said Dr. DAVID RAMKUMAR, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, where patients since the beginning of the year have been swallowing the capsules to diagnose intestinal problems. The tiny camera "provides a view of that middle portion of the digestive tract that we have not had previously," Ramkumar said.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/opinion/orl-inscamerapill122103dec21,1,2825091.story?coll=orl-opinion-headlines

Squire: Harkin Endorsement Could Help (Weekly Standard, Dec. 22)
When Al Gore endorsed Howard Dean for president, Tom Harkin, Iowa's four-term Democratic senator, was working in his office in Washington. He must have felt a little left out. Harkin had made lots of noise about how he would be the next Democratic kingmaker in next month's Iowa caucuses. He has held a number of public events to introduce the candidates to Iowans. It was expected that Harkin would endorse the candidate he liked best, and back that candidate with his considerable political organization come January. That hasn't happened. Yet. Would a Harkin endorsement even matter at this point? PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, thinks so. "Harkin would be a major player if he decided to throw around his weight," he says, noting that the senator, who has been involved in Iowa politics for over 30 years, has contacts in each of Iowa's 99 counties, as well as strong ties to Iowa's powerful labor unions.

UI Athletes Faced Sexual Assault Charges (USA Today, Dec. 21)
The newspaper researched 168 sexual assault allegations against athletes in the past dozen years and found sports figures fare better at trial than defendants from the general population. Accompanying the main article is a list of athletes who were convicted or reached plea agreements on sexual assault charges and details of each case. The list includes two UNIVERSITY OF IOWA players--Robbie Crockett, football, and Pierre Pierce, basketball.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/2003-12-22-athletes-assault-side_x.htm

Damasio's Emotion-Brain Research Cited (Toronto Star, Dec. 21)
Neuroscientists have given up looking for the seat of the soul, but they are still seeking what may be special about human brains - what it is that provides the basis for a level of self-awareness and complex emotions unlike those of other animals. Most recently, they have been investigating circuitry rather than specific locations, looking at pathways and connections central to creating social emotions, a moral sense, even the feeling of free will. There are also specialized neurons at work - large, cigar-shaped "spindle cells" that are unique to humans and the great apes. These neurons are exceptionally rich in filaments and appear to broadcast socially relevant signals all over the brain. The body, it turns out, is as important as the brain. Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO, a neurologist at the University of Iowa Medical Center and author of "Looking For Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow And The Feeling Brain," has pioneered the theory that emotions and feelings are linked to brain structures that map the body. Morality and reason have both grown, he says, from human social emotions.
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1071961807395&call_pageid=968332188774&col=968350116467

Former UI Researcher Sentenced (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 21)
A former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researcher was sentenced to three years of probation for theft and falsifying her resume. Pat J. Palmer, 53, of Coralville pleaded guilty in October to first-degree theft and falsifying academic degrees. She was sentenced Friday in Johnson County District Court. Palmer was also ordered to pay a $1,000 fine and nearly $19,000 in restitution to the university for travel money authorities say she pocketed. Palmer, who worked as a research assistant for almost 15 years, admitted to filing false mileage claims totaling $53,857 between June 1998 and March 2000. Palmer told university officials that she had a bachelor's degree from the University of Northern Iowa, two master's degrees from the University of California at Berkley and dual doctorates from the University of Iowa, records said. She later said she had only completed some college. The University of Iowa has since taken measures to more thoroughly research job candidates' résumés, including the use of an online database that provides information on current and former students from colleges and universities across the nation.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=953339

UI Press Bird Guide Cited (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 21)
It can be hard to identify a bird in a book in the short time it flits around your feeder, especially if you're new to the bird-watching game. Here's a handy helper: a quick-reference guide to common birds in a map-like foldout format that makes it easy to take in at a glance. "Birds at Your Feeder: A Guide to Winter Birds of the Great Plains" by Dana Gardner and Nancy Overcott (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, $9.95) may sound geographically incorrect, but the 50 illustrated birds -- from the tufted titmouse to the red-winged blackbird -- also are found in Illinois. Males and females are shown in large, detailed illustrations. The plastic-laminated foldout, handy to keep on the windowsill, also includes tips on what to feed to attract each species.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/home/chi-0312210472dec21,1,4513739.story

Presidential Forum Canceled (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Dec. 21)
Minnesota Secretary of State Mary Kiffmeyer helped lead a GOP effort to block a proposed "Young Voters Presidential Forum" at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA next month. Kiffmeyer, president of the National Association of Secretaries of State, which considered backing the Jan. 14 forum, said it would be inappropriate for a national group of state election officials to sponsor what would look like a Democratic event. "Why would we, as a non-partisan association with a broad membership, enter into an internal, partisan race," Kiffmeyer said. "You have nine [Democratic candidates] on one side, and one [President Bush] on the other . . . which is going to give an appearance of partisanship, no matter how you structure it."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/4278558.html

Jones Notes Problems With Electronic Voting (Manila Times, Dec. 21)
As the United States lurches into another election cycle, officials around the country are rushing to avert a replay of the debacle of 2000, when thousands of African American voters were rejected at polling sites, and fancifully designed ballots prompted hundreds of others to inadvertently choose a Holocaust revisionist over Democratic contender Al Gore. Having received $3.9 billion in federal aid to prevent such a spectacle from ever recurring, dozens of states are abandoning traditional paper ballots in favor of electronic systems that allow people to vote by touching a screen or flipping a switch. But many security gurus worry that the electronic systems are vulnerable to hacking, fraud and voter confusion. "With classical election technology-hand-counted paper ballots-you can always redo any part of the count if there is any question about the totals," said DOUGLAS JONES, a computer science professor at the University of Iowa and a member of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems. "With many computerized systems, there is no recourse," he added in an interview. "We know that technicians at the county level have been known to rig mechanical lever voting machines. Why should we believe that technicians or programmers will not attempt similar fixes with direct recording electronic voting systems?"
http://www.manilatimes.net/national/2003/dec/21/yehey/opinion/20031221opi4.html

Van Allen Wins Distinguished Service Award (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 19)
A University of Iowa physics professor considered to be a founding father of space exploration has been named the recipient of the 2004 National Space Grant Distinguished Service Award, the university announced Friday. JAMES A. VAN ALLEN, 89, will be honored by the National Space Grant Foundation at a banquet in March in Arlington, Va. The award recognizes individuals who have shown exceptional dedication in their efforts to support and promote aerospace technology, science and education, consistent with the goals of the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. Van Allen retired from teaching in 1985. He counsels students and researchers and publishes scientific papers.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=706&u_sid=951995

Hovenkamp Says Microsoft Takes Litigation Risks (New York Times, Dec. 19)
RealNetworks filed a $1 billion antitrust lawsuit on Thursday accusing Microsoft of using its monopoly power to restrict competition and limit consumer choice in digital media markets. Legal experts said that the lawsuit, which cites new evidence suggesting that Microsoft's business practices have remained unchanged after its landmark court battle with the federal government, indicated that its legal woes were not necessarily over despite the company's accommodation with the Bush administration and its settlement of several other lawsuits. Legal experts said that Microsoft was gambling that such lawsuits would not prevent it from continuing to integrate applications with its operating system, which still effectively monopolizes the PC market. "This is a calculated risk on Microsoft's part," said HERBERT J. HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa. "I anticipate they will continue to have to litigate every time they bundle." The same story appeared in the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL and the LAKELAND (Fla.) LEDGER.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/12/19/technology/19soft.html

Peters Says Tax Abatement Zones Don't Work (Minnesota Public Radio, Dec. 19)
Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty flew around the state Thursday to announce the locations for Minnesota's Job Opportunity Building Zones. This year, state legislators developed the jobs program known as JOBZ as an economic development tool to offer businesses incentives to relocate, expand or start up in the designated areas. Alongside the excitement of state officials and the communities involved, there are plenty of concerns and unanswered questions. State officials estimate the program will cost just $9.3 million a year in foregone tax revenue, starting in 2006. University of Iowa economist ALAN PETERS says if the zones actually attract companies, the cost is likely to be far higher. And that's the paradox of zones like this. "Either you're going to spend a lot on them -- you're going to give up a lot of revenues to get them to work -- or you're not going to spend very much and they're not going to be very effective," says Peters.
http://news.mpr.org/features/2003/12/18_horwichj_jobzones/

Shreeves: UI Libraries May Have To Reduce Acquisitions (Chronicle, Dec. 19)
A growing number of colleges in the country are rebelling against a major publishing company's rates and terms for online science journals. Some of the institutions are even cutting back on their subscriptions to avoid having to pay for a "bundle" of the publications, which university libraries on tight budgets say they can no long afford. The company, Reed Elsevier, is based in the Netherlands and sells subscriptions to a collection of 1,200 online journals that is called ScienceDirect. A bundled subscription costs far less than individual subscriptions to all 1,200 journals, but the bundled package also includes many specialized publications that comparatively few researchers use, and Elsevier does not permit institutions to create their own bundles. Since the economic downturn began, the University of Iowa's state appropriations have been cut by about $35-million a year, to about $220-million. Administrators have had to eliminate library personnel to save money, said EDWARD SHREEVES, director for collections and information resources for the institution. With further reductions looming, the university library will probably have to cut its acquisitions budget, which had been spared in previous years, he said.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i17/17a03302.htm

UI Study Examines Sunscreen Risk (International Herald Tribune, Dec. 18)
A new study has found no evidence that sunscreen, commonly used to reduce the risk of skin cancer, actually increases the risk, researchers said yesterday. Writing in Annals of Internal Medicine, the researchers based their findings on a review of 18 earlier studies that looked at the association between sunscreen use and melanoma. Some studies had suggested that using sunscreen reduced the risk of cancer, but researchers may need decades to determine whether newer, more powerful formulas do more than just prevent sunburn, the study said. The researchers, led by Dr. LESLIE K. DENNIS of the University of Iowa, said they found flaws in studies that had reported associations between sunscreen use and higher risk of melanoma.
http://www.iht.com/articles/121883.html

Andrejevic Says Timing Key In 'Idol' Success (New York Times, Dec. 18)
The first CD by Ruben Studdard, the "velvet teddy bear" champion of the second season of Fox television's "American Idol," will make its debut at No. 1 on the next Billboard Top 200 albums chart, good news for an entertainment franchise that has stumbled this year with some of its spinoffs. The next season of the show, an elimination contest in which aspiring stars sing before a panel of three judges and then submit to the votes of viewers in later rounds, begins on Jan. 19. The winner and runner-up receive one-record contracts with Bertelsmann's RCA Music Group, with options for additional releases. No clear formula for album success has emerged. There is no consensus about why the album from last year's runner-up Justin Guarini did poorly while the other "American Idol" participants have taken off, but timing could be a factor. Mr. Guarini's album was released 10 months after he was voted runner-up in the first season, which was the longest break between show finale and store arrival among the four winners. "The culture moves so fast, digests itself so fast, that you've lost quite a bit of momentum," said MARK ANDREJEVIC, an assistant professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa and author of the new book "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched."
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/12/18/arts/music/18IDOL.html?ex=1072328400&en=3db2aea57de5c8b8&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Squire: Kerry Strategy Risky (Boston Globe, Dec. 18)
Presidential candidate John F. Kerry has sharply curtailed campaign visits to states beyond Iowa and New Hampshire, betting virtually all of his political chips on success in one short month: January. So focused is the Kerry effort that the Massachusetts senator plans to stay in Iowa for the first two weeks of January, making only quick day trips to New Hampshire and staying out of other upcoming primary states almost entirely. Kerry's strategy is in sharp contrast to those of his rivals, who are moving to build firm support nationally to try to secure the Democratic presidential nomination. Political analysts say this is an enormously high-stakes strategy for Kerry, especially since he has not generated major gains in opinion polls in Iowa or New Hampshire despite his flesh-pressing, television commercials, and new staff additions in both states. "There's the potential for a January effect, but I haven't seen any sign that Kerry is gaining in popularity here to guarantee that kind of lift," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "There's also no reason to think at this point that all of those undecided voters would end up going to one candidate."
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2003/12/18/kerry_camp_pins_hopes_on_iowa_nh_success/

UI Cited In Local Museum Dispute (Buffalo News, Dec. 18)
The president of the local science museum has been criticized for recent cuts in staff and hours, which were made to avoid a $500,000 budget shortfall in 2004. The president and the chairman of the museum board said the museum must come to grips with the same fiscal problems confronting natural history and science museums across the nation, largely as a result of reduced public funding. These institutions "seem to be dropping like flies," Leonard Krishtalka, director of the University of Kansas Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Research Center, wrote this summer in Museum News. The University of Nebraska State Museum, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HERBARIUM, Michigan State Museum, Virginia Museum of Natural History, Museum of Northern Arizona, San Diego Natural History Museum and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, among others, "have been closed, curtailed or threatened with cuts," Krishtalka noted. "We're seeing this around the country; it's a national discussion," the board chairman said.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20031218/1041329.asp

Regents Approve Kinnick Plan (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 18)
A divided Iowa Board of Regents has given preliminary approval to the University of Iowa's $88.5 million renovation of KINNICK STADIUM. Regents voted 5-3 on Tuesday to give the university the go-ahead for the next stage of planning for the project, which will include demolition and reconstruction of the stadium's south end zone and the press box. The project would be financed with up to $100 million in bonds that would be repaid through private donations and increased revenues the improvements would bring. University officials said they will return with detailed schematic and financial plans no later than February. At that time, the regents will consider final approval of the project. The project received a cool reception from several regents because of major budget cuts at all three state universities.
A version of this article appeared Dec. 18 on the web site of USA TODAY and the AKRON BEACON-JOURNAL in Ohio.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=950273

Harwood Heads Study Of Bacterium (Science Daily, Dec. 17)
Now that the human genome has been sequenced, sequencing know-how is turning to other organisms. A team of researchers, including some from the University of Iowa, has sequenced the genome of a highly versatile and potentially useful bacterium. The multidisciplinary effort determined the complete genetic sequence of Rhodopseudomonas palustris, a bacterium that could potentially be used for cleaning up toxic industrial waste and as a biocatalyst for producing hydrogen as a bio-fuel. The research, conducted by scientists in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine together with colleagues from Ohio State University (OSU), the University of British Columbia and the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute, appeared in Nature Biotechnology advance online publication on Dec. 14. CAROLINE HARWOOD, Ph.D., UI professor of microbiology and senior author of the study, explained that the opportunity to investigate this bacterium's genes arose from DOE interest in sequencing microbial genomes. These organisms have capabilities that could be useful in tackling environmental issues such as energy production, global warming and bioremediation of toxic waste.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/12/031216080022.htm

UI Medicine Alumnus To Head Health Center (Public Opinion, Dec. 16)
Keystone Health Center on Monday announced the opening of the new Franklin County Heart Center, which center officials say will provide state-of-the-art cardiology care at a low cost. The center staff will be led by Dr. Michael Palmer, an echocardiogram specialist who has been in practice for more than 20 years. Palmer received his medical degree in 1977 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Chambersburg, Penn.
http://www.publicopiniononline.com/news/stories/20031216/localnews/48246.html

Squire: Saddam's Capture May Hurt Dems (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Dec. 16)
PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said the capture of Saddam Hussein will have several effects on the Iowa caucuses. "First, it's going to put the Democrats on the sidelines for a couple of days," said Squire. That will hurt the candidates' efforts to reach undecided Iowa Democrats, he added. "As we get deeper into the holiday season, it's harder to reach voters. They're running out of days to reach people. The second effect is that it might give (Richard) Gephardt a little bit of an opening," he said.
http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/saddamcaptured/16saddamiowa.html

UI Study Examines Sunscreen Use, Melanoma (New York Times, Dec. 16)
A new study has found no evidence that sunscreen, commonly used to reduce the risk of skin cancer, actually increases the risk, researchers said yesterday. Writing in Annals of Internal Medicine, the researchers based their findings on a review of 18 earlier studies that looked at the association between sunscreen use and melanoma. Some studies had suggested that using sunscreen reduced the risk of cancer, but researchers may need decades to determine whether newer, more powerful formulas do more than just prevent sunburn, the study said. The researchers, led by Dr. LESLIE K. DENNIS of the University of Iowa, said they found flaws in studies that had reported associations between sunscreen use and higher risk of melanoma.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/12/16/health/16RISK.html?ex=1072155600&en=4140c70a7b80fc22&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Dennis Studies Sunscreen Use, Skin Cancer (Reuters, Dec. 16)
Although sunscreen lotions were designed to shield people from the sun's harmful rays, recent studies have hinted that sunscreen use might actually increase the odds of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. However, a new report released Monday shows that people who regularly slather on the lotion can rest easy. After reviewing the findings from 18 studies published between 1966 and 2003, investigators at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City found no convincing evidence that using sunscreen does anything to increase the risk of melanoma. All of the studies included in the analysis compared sunscreen habits of people diagnosed with melanoma to others who were cancer-free. The report responds to a handful of recent studies that showed that people who used sunscreen were more likely than people who didn't to develop melanoma. Study author Dr. LESLIE K. DENNIS explained that her review showed that most of the previous studies that reported an increased risk of melanoma among sunscreen users did not account for the fact that people who are most at risk for melanoma - such as those with fair skin who burn easily - are also more likely to use sunscreen. Consequently, many sunscreen users are more likely to develop cancer because of their skin, and not because of their use of protective lotions, she noted. "Sunscreens do not cause skin cancer," Dennis told Reuters Health.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=healthNews&storyID=3996984
The story also appeared in YAHOO NEWS.

Weinberger Questions Asthma Study (Contra Costa Times, Dec. 16)
Scientists trying to unravel why childhood asthma has reached epidemic proportions have reported that a variety of chemical exposures during infancy, including pesticides and wood smoke, can substantially increase a child's risk of developing the disease. Studying nearly 700 children in 12 communities in the Los Angeles region, a team at the University of Southern California found that children exposed to household pesticides in their first year of life were more than twice as likely to develop asthma as those never exposed. Infants exposed to wood smoke, household cockroaches and farm animals suffered considerably more asthma. Dr. MILES WEINBERGER, director of Pediatric Allergy and the Pulmonary Division at University of Iowa College of Medicine, questioned the findings. He said genetics play the major role in determining which children develop asthma. Although soot, secondhand cigarette smoke and other environmental factors exacerbate symptoms and can lead to an asthma diagnosis for young children, Weinberger said he did not believe those factors would cause the disease.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/cctimes/news/7502811.htm

Pro-Israel Petition Circulated At UI (Jerusalem Post, Dec. 16)
In this opinion piece, it's noted that student activists have circulated pro-Israel petition statements on 60 of America's most influential campuses. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA - where out of 30,000 students, only 800 are Jewish - a pro-Israel petition was signed by more than 1,700 students, as well as two members of Congress, a lieutenant governor and two presidential candidates, who were visiting the campus while the petition was being circulated.
http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1071541096036

Squire Assesses Effects Of Saddam's Capture (Pittsburg Post-Gazette, Dec. 16)
Many of the Democratic presidential candidates' campaign aides were worried yesterday about how Saddam's capture will play months from now when one of the candidates faces Bush in the general election, but experts said it was far too early to assess its political effects that far down the road. "If this is a turning point, then it's a big bonus for the president; if things continue the way they have been going before, then this has much less of an impact," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, the state where the first Democratic presidential delegates will be chosen in just over a month. "Getting Hussein is a big deal, it's a big boost for the president," Squire said, "But getting bin Laden would be a lot bigger."
http://www.post-gazette.com/election/20031216iraqdemocrats1216p1.asp

Novak Comments On Baby Bottles (American Baby, Dec. 16)
Most pediatricians recommend that parents start weaning their child off the bottle at around 12 months, for a host of reasons. One major reason is that prolonged bottle drinking can damage baby teeth. Mobile toddlers tend to tote their bottles around, drinking on the go, as opposed to infants, who are usually fed in a parent's arms, with the bottle being removed as soon as the feeding session is over. If the bottle contains anything other than water, what you have is an acidic solution that is washing over the teeth and decalcifying them, which can lead to cavities, says ART NOWAK, MD, a professor in the departments of pediatric dentistry and pediatrics at the University of Iowa.
http://www.americanbaby.com/ab/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/ab/story/data/1259.xml

Ault Comments On Urinary Tract Infections (American Baby, Dec. 16)
Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common infection among women, behind colds and flu. And for many women, they're as painful as they are prevalent. Pregnancy and childbirth can leave women more susceptible to UTIs. The enlarged uterus and increase in the hormone progesterone prevent the bladder from emptying completely, explains KEVIN AULT, M.D., assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa.
http://www.americanbaby.com/ab/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/ab/story/data/21285.xml

Student Develops Testing Software (WQAD-TV, Dec. 16)
A Bettendorf high school student has created an electronic grading system that could make teachers' red ink pens obsolete. Sean Schwabenlander is a sophomore at Rivermont Collegiate. His system, the Computer Test, instantly evaluates true-or-false and multiple-choice test responses. Schwabenlander learned to write software programs in classes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The director of technology at Rivermont says the teenager's work is advanced and his program is efficient.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1566180&nav=1sW7JhZE

Squire: Clinton Endorsement Tops Harkin's (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 15)
The calls, the pleas, the prodding. They come from everywhere these days to Tom Harkin. It's like Surroundsound, the way people are lobbying Iowa's veteran Democratic senator to endorse one of the Democratic presidential candidates. The volume especially rose last week after former Vice President Al Gore endorsed Howard Dean's candidacy. Harkin had indicated he might remain neutral in the contest, but U.S. Rep. Dick Gephardt's labor supporters have stepped up their focus on Harkin after news reports last week suggested he might be leaning a bit more toward Dean. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political scientist, contends that an endorsement by Harkin might help a candidate attract only a day or two of added media buzz. Two endorsements looming out there, he said, would outweigh Harkin's: those of former President Clinton and his wife, Sen. Hillary Clinton.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=947062

Jones On Voting Machine Confab: 'Trust No One' (Newark Star-Ledger, Dec. 15)
For two days last week, computer experts, election officials and vendors of electronic voting machines from around the country gathered in Maryland. The conference was titled, "Building Trust and Confidence in Voting Systems." Election officials, eager to skip a repeat of the 2000 debacle, were left wondering how to prepare for next year's presidential election. The only certainty is that new voting machines and other reforms mean big business for manufacturers and software makers looking to cash in on $3.9 billion earmarked last year in the Help America Vote Act. Professors from Stanford and Johns Hopkins universities predicted dire abuses of computerized voting machines; they insisted that old-fashioned paper receipts offer the best defense. DOUGLAS JONES of the University of Iowa summed up the mood during a panel discussion. "Trust no one," the computer scientist intoned.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-12/1071471027115520.xml

Jones: Computers No Quick Fix For Election Woes (CommonDreams, Dec. 15)
The role of technology in U.S. elections has become the center of a curious fight in which the forces aren't lining up at all the way you might think. On one side, state and local elections officials, often thought to be technological troglodytes, are the most enthusiastic fans of the latest in computerized voting systems. On the other is a group of computer scientists and other academics who are deeply suspicious of the technology and believe the best answer is, of all things, paper ballots. This split was on display Dec. 10-11 at a conference called "Building Trust and Confidence in Voting Systems" at the National Institute of Standards & Technology in Gaithersburg, Md. "When we find problems with elections, we jump for the quick technical fix," said DOUGLAS JONES of the University of Iowa. "We have to defend against the machine itself."
http://www.commondreams.org/headlines03/1213-06.htm

UI Alumnus Receives Honor (Stephenville Empire Tribune, Dec. 15)
Dr. Samuel Dodson, associate professor of English and languages at Tarleton State University, was named as the 2003 recipient of the Barry B. Thompson Service Award at the university. A graduate of the University of Nebraska and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Dodson received his Doctorate from the University of Nebraska. He began his teaching career in public and private schools in Iowa and Nebraska and later taught at Dana College and the University of Nebraska at Omaha. The paper is based in Texas.
http://www.empiretribune.com/EMPIRETRIBUNE/sites/EMPIRETRIBUNE/1104edition/myarticles901924.asp?P=901924&S=425&PubID=14848

Fifth Provost Candidate On UI Campus (WQAD-TV, Dec. 15)
Another candidate for the University of Iowa's top academic post will visit the campus today and tomorrow. Michael Hogan is the fifth of six candidates for the position of provost. He is professor of history and executive dean at Ohio State University. University President DAVID SKORTON has the final decision. The new provost will succeed Jon Whitmore, who went to Texas Tech University. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1564418&nav=1sW7Jg3D

Estin Comments On Divorce Granted Lesbian Couple (Men's News Daily, Dec. 15)
A judge in Iowa last month granted a stealth divorce to a lesbian couple who entered into a civil union in Vermont last year, renewing the national debate over the highly-charged gay marriage controversy. Although civil unions between gay people were declared illegal in the state of Iowa in 1997, Kimberly J. Brown and Jennifer S. Perez were allowed to have a legal divorce by Woodbury District Judge Jeffrey Neary on Nov. 14. The two gay women had received a legal civil union on March 25, 2002, in Bolton, Vermont, after Democrat presidential candidate and then-Gov. Howard Dean signed midnight legislation into law that granted same-sex legal unions. Legal experts say the divorce may not be allowed in Iowa since it is one of the 37 states that has completely banned gay marriage. ANN ESTIN, a University of Iowa family law professor, said modern events are happening so fast that the law has not had time to catch up yet. "History is moving faster than the law," remarked Estin to the Des Moines Register. "There are so many unknowns here. This is at the early stage in the process of sorting all this out in court."
http://mensnewsdaily.com/archive/newswire/nw03/talonnews/1203/121503-gay.ht

Squire: Saddam Capture Political Boost For Bush (Hartford Courant, Dec. 15)
The capture of Saddam Hussein, while a potential short-term boost for Joe Lieberman and other war supporters among the Democratic presidential candidates, is striking evidence of how hard it will be for any Democrat to beat George W. Bush next fall. "This is a big, big boost for Bush," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/politics/hc-pres1215.artdec15,1,7271189.story?coll=hc-headlines-politics

Finalist For UNC Vacancy Is UI Alumnus (Herald-Sun, Dec. 14)
UNC has identified six candidates -- all from within the university -- who are finalists for the vacant leadership post in the College of Arts and Sciences. Among them are Richard Soloway, a history professor and current interim dean of the college. Soloway holds the Eugen Merzbacher professorship and is a senior associate dean in the college. He holds a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and two advanced degrees from the University of Wisconsin. His primary teaching and research interests are in modern British social history. The paper is based in Durham, N.C.
http://www.herald-sun.com/orange/10-424914.html

UI Student: 9/11 Spurred Young People To Politics (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 14)
A story about how the war in Iraq, the Internet and other factors have drawn young people to politics says that at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Mike Reinking, a 27-year-old senior from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, majoring in history, said Sept. 11 "got people thinking a lot more about politics," especially during the debate over trade-offs between civil liberties and national security in the wake of the attacks. A version of the story also ran in the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0312140455dec14,1,5464483.story?coll=chi-news-hed

UI Press-Published Book Among The Best (San Francisco Chronicle, Dec. 14)
The paper says that among the best books of 2003 is "Bring Me Your Saddest Arizona," by Ryan Harty (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS).
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2003/12/14/RVGUN3GAMA1.DTL

Talbott: Polls Not Good Predictor Of Caucus Behavior (Newsday, Dec. 14)
A story about the role unions will play in the Democratic presidential nomination say that polls all year in Iowa showed Dick Gephardt leading in the race, but the latest surveys indicated that former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean has a slim lead. Those polls were taken before former Vice President Al Gore threw his unexpected support to Dean last week. BASIL TALBOTT, a professor of journalism at the University of Iowa who teaches a course on the caucuses, said polls aren't a good predictor of caucus behavior, because saying who you are for in a poll is different than going to a neighborhood caucus, standing around for two hours and publicly declaring your candidate preference.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/longisland/politics/ny-usiowa143584033dec14,0,2742306.story?coll=ny-lipolitics-headlines

Playwright Holds UI Master's Degree (Louisville Courier Journal, Dec. 14)
A story about the 2004 Humana Festival of New American Plays, Feb. 29-April 10, says that one play scheduled for performance is "Sans Culottes in the Promised Land" by Kirsten Greenidge, who has a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This satire about seeking success in America looks at an upper middle-class African-American couple. The wife is a lawyer who is bumping against the glass ceiling; the husband is an architect who is showing too much interest in the hired help. The paper is based in Kentucky.
http://www.louisvillescene.com/arts/performing/2003/20031214humana.html

Skorton, Jones 'Izzle' Session Fizzled (Toronto Star, Dec. 14)
If, as 2003 winds inconsequentially down, there's one trend for whom the death knell is sounding, it's the popular usage of hip hop's "Izz Latin" slang, writes a columnist for the paper. With all due respect to Snoop Dogg, who first popularized the practice of dropping izz-es, izz-os, izz-as and the like into the middle of words on 1993's "Tha Shiznit," it's over. The biggest laugh is awarded to the University of Iowa, which tried to reach out to its students last month by hosting an open meeting modeled on a reality-TV show format - and during which school president DAVID SKORTON and an underling named PHILLIP JONES adopted the nicknames Dizzle and Pizzle. The meaning of such slang is flexible, granted, but let's just say the genital and urinary connotations, respectively, won out in the eyes of the student body. http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1071315705256&call_pageid=968867495754&col=969483191630

IEM's Successes Cited (New York Times, Dec. 14)
A story about successful futures markets says the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a futures exchange run by the University of Iowa business school, proved better at predicting the results of the last four presidential elections than 75 percent of the 600 polls conducted during that period.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/12/14/magazine/14FUTURES.html?ex=1071982800&en=702562106eea19eb&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Regents Consider More Cuts At UI, Other Schools (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 14)
The Board of Regents, State of Iowa are planning to discuss cutting programs such as the Iowa State University Extension Service, laying off employees and increasing fees for cultural and athletic events when they meet Tuesday. The options were among several outlined by the regents staff after discussions with university presidents and regents. In addition to the cuts, the regents could ask the Legislature for authority to borrow $120 million for building projects, according to documents prepared in advance of the meeting. Regents executive director Greg Nichols noted in documents released Friday that even though the state this week forecast a slight increase in revenues, it will face an estimated $300 million budget gap for the fiscal year beginning July 1. That deficit could mean further cuts for the universities, he said. Nichols discussed options with the presidents of Iowa State University, the University of Northern Iowa and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA regents before outlining options to manage additional budget cuts.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=946237

Squire Comments On Dean, Gephardt (Knoxville News-Sentinel, Dec. 12)
Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, displaying a feisty manner and an Upper West Side accent rarely heard in this proudly Midwest state, has emerged as the frontrunner in the upcoming Iowa Democratic caucus, thanks to a bottomless checkbook and an uncommon zeal for attacking the man he wants to replace in the White House, President Bush. The contender best positioned to spoil Dean's march is Rep. Dick Gephardt of Missouri, who won the caucus in his first presidential bid way back in 1988. "Dean and Gephardt have clearly separated themselves from the others," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa and longtime caucus watcher. "Dean, in particular, has been able to build on his frontrunner status and he seems to be the strongest candidate taking on the Bush administration." Gephardt was expected to show well. The surprise has been Dean, who started the campaign with modest name recognition but now appears to have a clear lead. The secret to the New Englander's success, according to Squire, is an unmatched political organization coupled with his sturdy opposition to the war in Iraq. "At the beginning of the caucus process, I don't think anyone expected Dean to finish in the top tier," Squire said. "It's rooted in the fact that he spent a great deal of time here early on, organized well and identified himself with an issue that gave him a particular niche." This article also appeared Dec. 12 on the web sites of the ABILENE (Tex.) REPORTER NEWS, ANCHORAGE (Alaska) DAILY NEWS, CORPUS CHRISTI (Tex.) CALLER TIMES, and TCPALM.com.
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/politics/article/0,1406,KNS_356_2499333,00.html

Estin Comments On Lesbian Divorce Granted In Iowa (New York Times, Dec. 12)
A county judge approved a divorce for a lesbian couple who obtained a civil union in Vermont, saying he didn't realize he was signing a settlement for a same-sex couple, but ultimately decided to let his decision stand. Iowa is one of 37 states whose law bans same-sex marriage. Judges in Texas and Connecticut have rejected requests for civil union divorces, said University of Iowa law professor ANN ESTIN. "You can go to Vermont and have a civil union, but you can't, until now, go to another state and have a civil union divorce," she said. The same story appeared in the BALTIMORE SUN, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, NEWSDAY, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, DAYTON DAILY NEWS, NORTHWEST DAILY HERALD (ILL.), ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, THE GUARDIAN (UK), FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, ABCNEWS.COM, FOXNEWS.COM and numerous other media outlets.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Gay-Divorce.html

Weinberger Questions Childhood Asthma Findings (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 12)
Scientists trying to unravel why childhood asthma has reached epidemic proportions have reported that a variety of chemical exposures during infancy - including pesticides and wood smoke - can substantially increase a child's risk of developing the disease. However, Dr. MILES WEINBERGER, director of Pediatric Allergy and the Pulmonary Division at University of Iowa College of Medicine, has joined others in questioning the findings. He said genetics - whether parents have asthma or allergies - play the major role in determining which children develop asthma. Although soot, secondhand cigarette smoke and other environmental factors exacerbate symptoms and can lead to an asthma diagnosis for young children, he said he did not believe those factors would cause the disease. This story also appeared in the ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS and DETROIT NEWS.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-asthma12dec12,1,7584046.story

Redlawsk Explains Caucuses To Australians (The Australian, Dec. 12)
If you build it, he will come," a voice tells Iowa corn farmer Kevin Costner in the movie Field of Dreams. Howard Dean has followed that advice, constructing an insurgent political campaign to challenge for the White House - and this week Al Gore came. DAVID REDLAWSK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, says the polls showing Dean eight percentage points ahead in Iowa may not be right. "Far more people say they will go to the caucuses than do," he says. Getting out on a cold winter's night for several hours is a test of who has the most committed supporters. A Democratic official, Redlawsk is staying neutral, but he says many people are telling him that more than anything they want to pick a candidate who can beat Bush. If Gore helps people believe that Dean is electable, he says, that will be a boost. But the other important test for Iowans is whether they have met the candidate. "I will tell you, I've had Dick Gephardt and John Edwards to my house and they've spoken on my back porch to about 100 people each," Redlawsk says.
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,8143510%255E28737,00.htm

Jones Questions Computerized Voting (BusinessWeek, Dec. 12)
The role of technology in U.S. elections has become the center of a curious fight in which the forces aren't lining up at all the way you might think. On one side, state and local elections officials, often thought to be technological troglodytes, are the most enthusiastic fans of the latest in computerized voting systems. On the other is a group of computer scientists and other academics who are deeply suspicious of the technology and believe the best answer is, of all things, paper ballots. This split was on display Dec. 10-11 at a conference called "Building Trust and Confidence in Voting Systems" at the National Institute of Standards & Technology in Gaithersburg, Md. And the division isn't as improbable as it seems at first glance. "When we find problems with elections, we jump for the quick technical fix," said DOUGLAS JONES, University of Iowa associate professor of computer science. "We have to defend against the machine itself."
http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/dec2003/tc20031212_6990.htm

Jones Comments On Electronic Voting (Morning Edition, Dec. 12)
University of Iowa Computer Science Professor DOUG JONES was interviewed on NPR's "Morning Edition" as part of a comprehensive report on the issues of privacy, security and accuracy with respect to electronic voting.

Laughter Is Good Medicine, Says Nisly (Albany Democrat Herald, Dec. 11)
In a story about laughter as medicine, a Yahoo search brings up numerous references to "laughter as medicine." Included is one from Dr. NICOLE NISLY, associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa. "Researchers announced at an American Heart Association meeting ... that heart-healthy people are more likely to laugh frequently and heartily than those with heart disease. "They are also more likely to use humor to smooth over difficult situations. Exactly how laughter contributes to your health isn't entirely understood, but evidence suggests that laughter may result in a reduction of stress hormones, leading to a reduction in blood pressure." The Democrat Herald is in Oregon.
http://www.dhonline.com/articles/2003/12/11/people/people03.txt

UI Employees Comment On Gore, Dean (American Prospect, Dec. 11)
For months, the Howard Dean campaign has run on the fuel of those on the fringe. His supporters defend their man in the manner of math-team members closing ranks around their captain as he faces off against the football squad. The fact that much of Dean's early support has come from outsiders, geeks and techies has been both its great strength (witness, for instance, the success of its Internet fundraising) and its putative Achilles heel (some have worried that the campaign is not mainstream enough). While the former governor's presidential bid has been widely praised for energizing the apolitical, no one is quite sure if Dean has enough broad appeal to win in November 2004. On Tuesday, Dean's campaign added one of the most mainstream geeks in American politics to its ranks -- former Vice President Al Gore. "We need to be passionate," Gore said, and the irony of the former vice-president repeating the advice that he had failed to take four years ago wasn't lost on the crowd of Dean supporters. Creating excitement and enthusiasm among new voters was "the thing that was lacking when Gore ran for president," said Dean supporter ROBIN ROSEMAN, a retired biologist from the University of Iowa. She agreed with Gore's praise of Dean's ability to energize nonvoters. It's not just young people who are passionate about Dean, she said; older people who haven't participated in politics for a long time are excited by his candidacy as well. DAVE TINGWALD, a secretary at the University of Iowa, predicted that in addition to finishing off the candidacy of Gore's former running mate, Joe Lieberman, the announcement would provide Dean with "added establishment legitimacy.
http://www.prospect.org/webfeatures/2003/12/ganeshananthan-v-12-11.html

Damasio's Neuroscience Work Noted (International Herald Tribune, Dec. 11)
Neuroscientists have given up looking for the seat of the soul, but they are still seeking what may be special about human brains, what it is that provides the basis for a level of self-awareness and complex emotions unlike those of other animals. Most recently they have been investigating circuitry rather than specific locations, looking at pathways and connections that are central in creating social emotions, a moral sense, even the feeling of free will. There are specialized neurons at work, as well -- large, cigar-shaped cells called spindle cells. The body, it turns out, is as important as the brain. Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO, a neurologist at the University of Iowa Medical Center and the author of the book "Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow and the Feeling Brain," has pioneered the argument that emotions and feelings are linked to brain structures that map the body. From human social emotions, he said, both morality and reason have grown.
http://www.iht.com/articles/121011.html

Gronbeck: Candidates Need New Tactics (Christian Science Monitor, Dec. 11)
On a crowded stage at the University of New Hampshire Tuesday night, all nine Democratic presidential candidates vied to distinguish their voices in this, the last debate of 2003. But it was the echo from Al Gore's bold endorsement of Howard Dean hours earlier that reverberated loudest, transforming the contest into a referendum on relevancy. For his opponents, the question is no longer "Who can stop Bush?" but "Who can stop Dean?" As they enter the pre-primary homestretch, the Democratic field must either change tactics or hope that Dean stumbles. Given the front-loaded primary season, candidates are already looking beyond Iowa and New Hampshire, moving political resources to other contests, notes BRUCE GRONBECK, Director of the University of Iowa Center on Media Studies and Political Culture. And they must make a move soon. "They have to get in now some pretty decisive punches that will allow them to distinguish one from the other," he says.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/1211/p25s01-uspo.html

UI Prepares For Kinnick Renovations (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 11)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
football fans could be paying more to see the Hawkeyes if a remodeling project for Kinnick Stadium gets the green light. The university unveiled plans Tuesday for an $88.5 million renovation of the 74-year-old stadium. The project, which would include the demolition and rebuilding of the south end zone stands and the stadium press box, would be built in two phases, according to documents released by the Iowa Board of Regents. The first phase would begin at the end of the 2004 season, and the second would begin after the 2005 season. Everything would be completed for the 2006 season. Athletic department officials will seek approval of the plan from the regents, who meet next week in Ames. The renovation would be paid for through the issuance of 25-year revenue bonds. The bonds would be repaid through a five-year, $10 million to $15 million fund-raising campaign, premium seating revenues, a required gift payment from season ticket purchasers in most areas of the stadium and new advertising revenues. Officials also said they will contemplate a ticket surcharge on all tickets, if necessary. "There is no contemplation of using any state money for this project," said DOUGLAS TRUE, the university's vice president for finance and operation. Iowa Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY acknowledged that "there probably is no good time for a project like this," but he said renovation was necessary. A faculty member said even though the project would be paid by private donations, there is legitimate concern that such projects convey the wrong message about the university and its financial strength. "What it might tell legislators is that the University of Iowa has a lot of money and that our academic mission isn't being hurt by their reductions," said MARGARET RAYMOND, a law professor and the president of the faculty senate.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=943314

Holub To Vilsack: Raise Taxes (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 11)
Gov. Tom Vilsack was urged to fight for improved state funding for education, health care and public safety during a public hearing Wednesday night on his coming budget. Some even suggested they would support new taxes to raise money for public schools and universities, health care for senior citizens and children and local police and fire departments. DAN HOLUB, a teacher at the University of Iowa, said he is indebted to the state for providing him with an excellent education, career opportunity and instilling the value of providing quality health care for elderly. "I'm here to tell you: Raise my taxes," said Holub, whose remarks triggered a chorus of applause from the audience. "I owe this state and am willing to pay more."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=943288

UI Grad Considered For Superintendent (Middletown Press, Dec. 11)
One of the finalists for a local superintendent position is Richard Johns, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who earned a master's degree at Northern Missouri State University and a doctorate in education at the University of Northern Iowa.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=10646296&BRD=1645&PAG=461&dept_id=33198&rfi=6

Ramkumar Calls Pill Camera A 'Marvel' (Baku Sun, Dec. 11)
Doctors have used small cameras on snaking tubes for years to check patients' intestinal troubles. These days, they're asking some patients to swallow the entire camera. With a single pill loaded with technology similar to a digital camera, doctors can view more than 50,000 still images captured during the trip through the final 20 feet of the small intestine that previously was visible only on X-rays. The pill, known as the M2A Capsule Endoscopy, is about the size of a multivitamin and is swallowed with a sip of water. The camera, encased in a white plastic capsule, takes pictures that are transmitted on a radio frequency. The images are captured in a recording device worn on a belt around the patient's waist. After eight hours, the belt is turned over to the doctor. The device is a "marvel of microelectronics," said Dr. DAVID RAMKUMAR, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, where patients since the beginning of the year have been swallowing the capsules to diagnose intestinal problems. The tiny camera "provides a view of that middle portion of the digestive tract that we have not had previously," Ramkumar said. (Baku Sun is a newspaper in Azerbaijan.)
http://www.bakusun.az:8101/cgi-bin/ayten/bakusun/show.cgi?code=4957

Heistad Comments On Heart Study (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Dec. 10)
An exquisitely detailed study of tissue from people who died suddenly of coronary disease reveals an unexpected mechanism of death -- one that could be manipulated to reduce the risk of those deaths, pathologists say. Sudden death can occur when one of the fatty deposits called plaques that build up in artery walls ruptures, spewing debris that blocks the blood vessel and stops blood flow to the heart or brain. Analysis of plaque from 24 people who died suddenly of coronary causes shows fatal ruptures can occur when tiny blood vessels that have grown into the plaque burst, researchers at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology report in the Dec. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The new study links the buildup of fats inside a plaque to the tiny blood vessels that invade the plaque, says Dr. DONALD D. HEISTAD, professor of cardiology at the University of Iowa, who wrote an accompanying editorial. "When these blood vessels burst, they release red blood cells into the plaque," Heistad explains. "Red blood cells themselves have lots of fat in their membranes. So, a lot of the fat in the core of a plaque before it ruptures may come from these blood cells."
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/hrtm/516434.html

UI Center For Youth Performing Arts Cited (Courier-Journal, Dec. 10)
A story about artist Ed Vinson, who considers himself to be an architectural sculptor who works in whatever material a piece demands, said he moved to southern Indiana 20 years ago from Garrison, Iowa, where he started by purchasing a former brick and tile factory in the late 1960s and operating it as a learning space and display studio for artists. Several years later, he bought an old canning factory nearby. That building was converted to a theater, where the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S CENTER FOR YOUTH PERFORMING ARTS gave performances. The paper is based in Kentucky.
http://www.courier-journal.com/localnews/2003/12/10iweek/J1-vinson1210-7658.html

Greenberg Quoted In Story On Bacteria (Newark Star-Ledger, Dec. 10)
Overuse of antibiotics during the past half-century has allowed mutant germs to survive and thrive, giving rise to increasingly virulent and pathogenic bacteria that no longer respond to traditional antibiotic therapy. Today, 70 percent of all bacteria are resistant to at least one of the drugs most commonly used to treat infection. For the first time since the advent of the golden age of antibiotics in the 1940s, healthy people are becoming seriously ill -- and dying -- from what once were highly treatable diseases. PETER GREENBERG has been studying the how, when and why of bacterial communication since the late 1970s when he worked with Hastings at Woods Hole, Mass. In the mid-1990s, Greenberg, a professor of molecular pathogenesis at the University of Iowa, was at a conference where he met with a colleague, Bill Costerton, from the Center for Biofilm Engineering at Montana State University. "We went out to dinner after meeting all day and talked about what we do and we realized that we had a lot in common," says Greenberg. "We were both thinking about how microbes work together as groups and we got to wondering immediately whether my signaling had anything to do with his biofilms." Biofilm is made up of cellular communities that congregate on seemingly everything -- from the lungs and urinary tract to ship hulls and heating ducts. The research by Greenberg, who runs the university's Microbial Communities and Cell Signaling Lab, has personal implications. His 17-year-old daughter, Barbara, has cystic fibrosis, an incurable, inherited disease. The Star-Ledger is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-12/107103930585800.xml

Damasio's Neuroscience Work Noted (Taipei Times, Dec. 10)
Neuroscientists have given up looking for the seat of the soul, but they are still seeking what may be special about human brains, what it is that provides the basis for a level of self-awareness and complex emotions unlike those of other animals. Most recently they have been investigating circuitry rather than specific locations, looking at pathways and connections that are central in creating social emotions, a moral sense, even the feeling of free will. There are specialized neurons at work, as well -- large, cigar-shaped cells called spindle cells. The body, it turns out, is as important as the brain. Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO , a neurologist at the University of Iowa Medical Center and the author of the book "Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow and the Feeling Brain," has pioneered the argument that emotions and feelings are linked to brain structures that map the body. From human social emotions, he said, both morality and reason have grown.
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2003/12/10/2003079090

Publisher Of Satire News Site Attended, Taught At UI (Macon Daily, Dec. 9)
In response to an unexpected surge in traffic, an Internet news satire site operated from a northeast Georgia trailer has been redesigned as a humorous news portal with a serious attitude. While there are hundreds of news satire sites, and even more news portals and discussion groups, RealStupidNews.com combines a satirical look at current events with critical evaluation of the world's premiere online news outlets. Each satirical article, for example, includes links to related "real" news. Publisher Preston Coleman holds a master's degree in journalism and a doctorate in mass media, making him a natural choice to guide Internet news junkies to the web's best news organizations. He holds advanced degrees in journalism (University of Georgia) and mass media (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA) and he has taught at the University of Georgia, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Kennesaw State University. The paper is based in Macon, Ga.
http://www.maconareaonline.com/news.asp?id=5055

UI Medical Report Leads To Suspension Of Sheriff's Trial (KETV, Dec. 9)
A surprise development in the trial of the former Webster County sheriff charged with misusing county money. A judge stopped the trial Tuesday morning after declaring Charles Griggs incompetent to stand trial. Judge Michael Moon received a medical report by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS in Iowa City. The report found that Griggs is cognitively impaired as a result of cerebral vascular disease and is unable to defend himself. All proceedings were suspended. Griggs, 64, had a serious stroke in 1992. The report showed his health has been deteriorating. The former sheriff is accused of improperly spending more than $10,000 in county money over a six-year period. Griggs resigned from office Sept. 30, 2003. KETV is based in Omaha, Neb.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/iowabureau/2693320/detail.html

Damasio's Neuroscience Work Noted (New York Times, Dec. 9)
Neuroscientists have given up looking for the seat of the soul, but they are still seeking what may be special about human brains, what it is that provides the basis for a level of self-awareness and complex emotions unlike those of other animals. Most recently they have been investigating circuitry rather than specific locations, looking at pathways and connections that are central in creating social emotions, a moral sense, even the feeling of free will. There are specialized neurons at work, as well -- large, cigar-shaped cells called spindle cells. The body, it turns out, is as important as the brain. Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO, a neurologist at the University of Iowa Medical Center and the author of the book "Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow and the Feeling Brain," has pioneered the argument that emotions and feelings are linked to brain structures that map the body. From human social emotions, he said, both morality and reason have grown.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/12/09/science/09BRAI.html

Squire Comments On Kerry Broadcast (Boston Globe, Dec. 9)
Sen. John F. Kerry is ramping up his presidential campaign in Iowa in hopes of scoring impressively in its Jan. 19 nominating caucuses, transferring aides to his 100-person operation there and staging an unusual, 30-minute forum with undecided voters Sunday that will be broadcast statewide. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said he was unaware of a campaign broadcast quite like this one, though he expressed skepticism that it would receive any more viewers than the 30-minute biographical "infomercials" that candidates have been airing. "Unless this show gets a great deal of attention in advance, most people won't recognize it as anything special or important as they are changing channels looking for football or some other show," Squire said. http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/343/nation/Kerry_boosts_staff_in_Iowa+.shtml

UI Conducts Dairy Farmer Study (AgriNews, Dec. 9)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with the support of Iowa State Dairy Extension, Northeast Iowa Community Based Dairy Foundation and Swiss Valley Farms, is conducting a research study on joint and muscle pain in dairy farmers in northeast Iowa. The study, which will occur in mid-January, will be done by mailing questionnaires to 800 randomly selected dairy farms in Dubuque, Delaware, Clayton, Allamakee and Winneshiek counties. The questionnaire will take about 20 minutes to fill out, and will help the researchers at the UI to identify what areas of the body dairy farmers experience the most pain. Agri News is an independent agricultural newspaper published in Rochester, Minn.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/290298462466518.bsp

UI Physicist: Voyager 1 Near Solar System Edge (Space Daily, Dec. 9)
A University of Iowa space physicist says that NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft -- the most distant manmade object at some 90 astronomical units (AU) or 8.4 billion miles from the sun -- has provided a new estimate of the distance to the heliopause, the boundary between the sun's relentless solar wind and interstellar space. DON GURNETT, professor of physics in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and principal investigator for the plasma wave instrument on Voyager 1, will present his findings in a Dec. 8 talk during the 2003 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco. "Using the Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument, we started detecting a strong radio emission event in November 2002 that is continuing to the present time, the first to be observed during the current solar cycle. The new event is thought to be linked to a period of intense solar activity in April 2001," said Gurnett.
http://www.spacedaily.com/news/voyager1-03c.html

UIHC Doctor Tests Brain Tumor Therapy (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 8)
Twelve-year-old Thomas (T.J.) Tomeny has an aggressive brain tumor. It grew back after surgery last year and didn't respond to either chemotherapy or radiation. Then, in the spring, Thomas came to the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinic and was able to join a tiny test of an experimental radioactive drug -- and his tumor shrank by 33 percent after the first dose. But despite the improvement, he was told that he wouldn't be given any more of the drug after his third dose in August. He was approved for only three doses -- a condition made clear on the consent form the Tomenys signed in the spring when they agreed to participate. The UIHC doctor, SUE O'DORISIO, was in the earliest stage of testing different doses of a new medicine in children, to measure how much could safely be administered. On May 28, T.J. became Dr. O'Dorisio's third patient to receive the treatment -- a four-hour infusion of amino acids to protect his kidneys, followed by 15 minutes of the radioactive medicine. But after the third dose, Dr. O'Dorisio told T.J. 's father that Novartis would no longer supply the drug because it was so difficult to make and cost $17,000 for each dose.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB107083837533489500-search,00.html?collection=autowire%2F30day&vql_string=%27University+of+Iowa%27%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29(registration required)

Ramkumar Calls Pill Camera A 'Marvel' (Provo Daily Herald, Dec. 8)
Doctors have used small cameras on snaking tubes for years to check patients' intestinal troubles. These days, they're asking some patients to swallow the entire camera. With a single pill loaded with technology similar to a digital camera, doctors can view more than 50,000 still images captured during the trip through the final 20 feet of the small intestine that previously was visible only on X-rays. The pill, known as the M2A Capsule Endoscopy, is about the size of a multivitamin and is swallowed with a sip of water. The camera, encased in a white plastic capsule, takes pictures that are transmitted on a radio frequency. The images are captured in a recording device worn on a belt around the patient's waist. After eight hours, the belt is turned over to the doctor. The device is a "marvel of microelectronics," said Dr. DAVID RAMKUMAR, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, where patients since the beginning of the year have been swallowing the capsules to diagnose intestinal problems. The tiny camera "provides a view of that middle portion of the digestive tract that we have not had previously," Ramkumar said. The Daily Herald is based in Utah.
http://www.harktheherald.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=8384

Electrical Usage Up In Dorms (Rock Island Argus, Dec. 8)
Augustana College, like other colleges and universities nationwide, has invested thousands of dollars to upgrade dormitories' electrical systems to accommodate students' technology. In the past five years, the annual energy use in the University of Iowa's residence halls skyrocketed more than $200,000, said the UI's utilities financial analyst, MIKE DONNELLY. The 2 million kilowatt-hour electricity jump is directly attributable to the burgeoning number of electronic devices in the dorms, he said. Like Augustana, Iowa continually upgrades electric capacity in its student housing, said residence-services staffer MAGGIE VAN OEL. The university started with the oldest dorms and tries to do some work each year, she said. Iowa students can use as much electricity as they want, said Van Oel, but some appliances are forbidden. However, "They don't always follow the rules," she said. "They can't have kitchen grills, toaster ovens, space heaters or halogen lamps. And they can only have a 4-cubic-foot refrigerator. Some have tried to plug things into the air-conditioning-only outlets, which can blow the circuits. They usually don't do that after the first week, though." The Argus serves Rock Island, Ill.
http://www.qconline.com/archives/qco/sections.cgi?prcss=display&id=176844

Journalism Class Follows Campaign (Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 8)
As he enters Veterans Memorial Auditorium in Des Moines, GRANT SCHULTE surveys the scene of one of the year's largest Democratic Party fund-raising events in this crucial caucus state. The floor of the arena is set with 215 tables bearing salad plates and flickering candles. The stands above are filled with thousands of people waving posters and shouting their support for Gov. Howard Dean, Sen. John F. Kerry, and other candidates. The aroma of breaded chicken hangs in the air, as does a small blimp carrying a banner for Sen. John Edwards. With a reporter's notebook in hand, Mr. Schulte, a junior at the University of Iowa, is covering the Saturday-night dinner for his journalism class, "Presidential Politics." By virtue of simple geography, Mr. Schulte and 21 of his classmates have covered events like this one throughout the semester. They have attended political rallies not only on the campus but also in towns all over Iowa. They have pushed their way through crowds to question Senator Kerry, of Massachusetts, and Rep. Richard A. Gephardt, of Missouri, among others. Students in the class who also write for The Daily Iowan, the university's student newspaper, have participated in editorial-board meetings with Governor Dean and with Representative Kucinich, of Ohio. And one student in the class has flown with Mr. Dean, the former governor of Vermont who is the Democratic front-runner, on his campaign plane. BASIL TALBOTT, a professor of journalism and a former political reporter and editor at the Chicago Sun-Times, teaches the class with JANE SINGER, an assistant professor of journalism.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i16/16a03501.htm

UI Study: Elderly Substance Abuse Help Lacking (Baltimore Sun, Dec. 7)
A brief about a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study that finds fewer than one in five substance-abuse programs address the specific needs of older Americans. Although it's true that the rate of substance abuse is low (compared with other age groups) in people over 65, an estimated 10 percent to 15 percent are affected, usually by alcohol abuse. Those numbers are likely to increase as baby boomers age. http://www.sunspot.net/features/home/bal-hf.briefs07dec07,0,3501116.story

Rao Discovers Fructose Difficulty (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 7)
We're a nation consuming ever-greater quantities of sweets -- and we're suffering from an epidemic of gastrointestinal distress. It turns out the two could be related. SATISH RAO, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa medical school, was puzzled by patients coming in with abdominal pain, gas and diarrhea that seemed to defy explanation. Rao suspected fructose, a form of sugar that occurs naturally in fruit. Americans' consumption of fructose, mostly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, has skyrocketed. After conducting a series of tests, he concluded that most people cannot adequately digest more than about 25 grams of fructose. A can of Coke contains 16 grams, he said, and a glass of orange juice has 15 grams. The two of those consumed within a span of a couple of hours can overwhelm a person's ability to handle fructose.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/q/chi-0312070459dec07,1,6666263.story

Marner Says Parents Look For Role On Campus (Arizona Republic, Dec. 7)
Parents are taking an increasingly activist role on campuses across the country. One non-profit group, College Parents of America, is in the early stages of a membership campaign aimed at mimicking the lobbying success of AARP. Many parents figure that if they're spending thousands of dollars on their child's education, they ought to have a voice, experts say. Many administrators are comfortable with the trend. "If our parents are well informed about policies and where to refer their children in certain situations, they can be our partners rather than our adversaries," says BELINDA MARNER, assistant vice president for student services at the University of Iowa
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/1207parents07.html

Prof Says Police Attacking Miranda Rights (San Francisco Chronicle, Dec. 6)
It's been almost 40 years since the court's landmark Miranda v. Arizona ruling required officers to warn people arrested and questioned that they have the right to remain silent and to see a lawyer. The Supreme Court will consider at least two cases this term that may lead to changes in the rule. "Police "are asking to be unleashed, outside and inside the courtroom. They know they can't attack Miranda head-on. I see this is a backdoor attempt," said University of Iowa law professor JAMES TOMKOVICZ, who wrote a brief opposing the government in one of the other Miranda cases. The same story appeared in THE GUARDIAN, BALTIMORE SUN, NEWSDAY, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, ABCNEWS.COM, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, PALM SPRINGS (Calif.) DESERT SUN, NASHUA (N.H.) TELEGRAPH, PROVO (Utah) DAILY NEWS, BILLINGS (Mont.) GAZETTE, ATHENS (Ga.) BANNER HERALD, SPRINGFIELD (Mo.) NEWS LEADER, WICHITA EAGLE, GRAND FORKS HERALD, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, and numerous other media outlets.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2003/12/06/state1301EST0048.DTL

Herwaldt Urges Flu Shots (Rock Island Argus/Moline Dispatch, Dec. 6)
Health officials, seeing influenza outbreaks hit earlier than usual this year, and in a more potent strain, continue to urge people to get flu vaccines. They especially encourage vaccines for children ages six to 23 months, those over 50, and people with pre-existing medical conditions that can weaken their immune systems. "If some of the early indications continue to play out, this could be a very large flu season with a lot of flu cases and a lot of people who get seriously ill," Dr. LOREEN HERWALDT, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics epidemiologist, said.
http://www.qconline.com/archives/qco/sections.cgi?prcss=display&id=176752

Barclay Comments On Rolling Stone List (Fort Worth Star Telegram, Dec. 6)
While some have derided Rolling Stone's magazine's recent Top 500 Rock and Roll Songs list as dusty and musty and heavy on 1960s and 1970s rock, others think there's a reason. "It's strange not having a musical generation gap, like I had with my parents," writes WINSTON BARCLAY, assistant director of arts center relations at the University of Iowa. "My kids feel no compunction about listening to Pink Floyd or the Beatles or even Simon & Garfunkel. My 15-year-old has become an excellent guitarist," he continues, "and his primary models are Hendrix and Led Zeppelin, and he owns practically their entire discography. So there must be some musical values from that period that are proving to be of enduring appeal."
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/living/7420623.htm

Workshop Alumnus Brings Hometown To Life (Capital Times, Dec. 5)
UI WRITER'S WORKSHOP alumnus Anthony Bukoski makes the East End of his hometown of Superior, WI, come alive in his new collection of short stories, "Time Between Trains." The Capital Times is based in Madison, WI.
http://www.madison.com/captimes/books/topic/wisconsin/62708.php

Lewis-Beck: Unemployment Key In Presidential Races (The Economist, Dec. 5)
Productivity is up in the U.S. workplace but the unemployment rate is declining very slowly, with just 57,000 workers added to the payroll last month. Payrolls have now risen for four months in a row. Is the jobless recovery at last shaking off its sad epithet? A puzzle for economists, jobless recoveries are also a conundrum for psephologists, who study presidential elections. We know it's the economy, stupid, but is it growth or jobs that have most bearing on the way people vote? GDP growth of three percent in 1992 was not enough to save George Bush senior. Growth of 3.8 percent in 2000 was not enough to win the election for Al Gore. Professor MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa and Charles Tien of Hunter College think unemployment is a more decisive factor. In every election since the second world war, falling unemployment in the spring of election year has foretold victory for the party in charge of the White House. The sole exception was the Democrats' loss to General Dwight Eisenhower in 1952. Bush will take some comfort from this. As long as the unemployment rate keeps falling through the spring, he should be home and dry in next year's election. Unless, perhaps, he goes up against another decorated general.
http://www.economist.com/agenda/displayStory.cfm?story_id=2278730

Miller Comments On Caucuses (Knoxville News Sentinel, Dec. 5)
As Iowa goes, so goes the nation? Well, not exactly. The Hawkeye State has a ragged history when it comes to choosing Democratic presidential candidates who win the party's nomination or prevail in general elections. How Iowans look and act is more a mirror of what America used to be than the complex, multicultural society the nation has become. "There is a growing Latino population in Waterloo and Des Moines and there is a slightly larger contingent of African-American voters. But the typical Democratic voter is about 90 percent white," said University of Iowa pollster and political science professor ARTHUR MILLER. The same story appeared in the CAPITOL HILL BLUE newsletter.
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/politics/article/0,1406,KNS_356_2477663,00.html

Cooper Says It's Not Good To Hold It In (Virginian-Pilot, Dec. 5)
When you gotta go, you gotta go. So let them go, a group of doctors is advising elementary-school teachers. In a recent issue of a medical journal, five urologists from the University of Iowa found that most elementary teachers don't allow children to go to the bathroom if it's not during a scheduled break. That may fit the teacher's academic schedule, but it might imperil children's health, warned the study's lead author, UI professor of urology CHRISTOPHER COOPER. The Virginian-Pilot is based in Hampton Roads.
http://home.hamptonroads.com/stories/story.cfm?story=63164&ran=122313

IEM Provides Election Insights (Reason.com, Dec. 5)
Anxious to know who's going to be the Democratic presidential candidate next year? Peering even further into the future, who's going to be prez in 2005? Well, right now, according to the futures markets, it looks like Howard Dean is a shoo-in for the Democratic Presidential nomination and Bush will run away with the national election. At least, that's how the traders over at the Iowa Electronic Markets are bidding. The IEMs were set up in the 1980s, to test a proposition that market prices aggregate all sorts of information, especially prices in futures markets, and can thus be used to predict outcomes. GEORGE NEUMANN, University of Iowa professor of economics, is one of the principals behind the IEM.
http://www.reason.com/links/links120403.shtml

UI Instrument Headed For Mars (Mars Today, Dec. 4)
The European Mars probe, Mars Express and its lander, Beagle 2, is closing in on the red planet, as it gets nearer to a Christmas landing. One of the Mars Express instruments, with U.S. components, will use radar to seek evidence of underground water, either frozen or liquid. The instrument, the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding, is designed to discern boundaries between layers as deep as 5 kilometers (3 miles) under the surface. It will also examine the structure and variability of the Martian ionosphere, the top layer of the atmosphere. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa City, built the transmitter for the radar instrument. Versions of this article also appeared Dec. 4 on the web sites of ASTROBIOLOGY MAGAZINE, RED NOVA and SPACE REF,
http://www.marstoday.com/viewpr.html?pid=13135

Deer Hunt Provides Lyme Disease Data To UI Lab (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 3)
State health officials hope a special deer hunt this month will help determine how prevalent Lyme disease is in Iowa. The two-day hunts at five state parks and two county parks will provide data to researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S HYGIENIC LABORATORY.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=935271

Redlawsk: Edwards' Book May Boost Him In Iowa (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 3)
A story about the plethora of books coming out by "political wonks" as the presidential campaign heats up says that last week Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina came out with a book titled "Four Trials" (Simon & Schuster), which, according to a blurb by political thriller writer Richard North Patterson, is written "with the crackling drama of a novel." Edwards' book might help him in his bid for the Democratic nomination, even if he doesn't sell many copies at $24 each, noted DAVID REDLAWSK, an assistant professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "A book like Edwards' might give him a little bit of an extra push in Iowa, where people are paying extra attention," Redlawsk said. "Edwards' book really tells some stories that are quite independent from the campaign, the way things aren't usually done, so it might have legs of its own."
http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-et-tawa3dec03,1,7375728.story?coll=la-home-politics

Jogerst Studies Elder Abuse Reporting (WJXX-TV, Dec. 3)
Cases of elder abuse are underreported and are resolved inconsistently nationwide due to significant differences in laws between states, according to a new University of Iowa study released Monday. The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, is thought to be the first to compare rates of elder abuse to laws in all 50 states, said Dr. GERALD JOGERST, the university's interim head of family medicine and lead investigator on the study. Describing elder abuse as "a national problem," Jogerst said the new study examines abuse that occurs in private residences, not care facilities. WJXX is based in Florida. A version of the story also ran Dec. 3 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.firstcoastnews.com/health/news-article.aspx?storyid=11633

Ramkumar Calls Pill Camera A 'Marvel' (Billings Gazette, Dec. 3)
Doctors have used small cameras on snaking tubes for years to check patients' intestinal troubles. These days, they're asking some patients to swallow the entire camera. With a single pill loaded with technology similar to a digital camera, doctors can view more than 50,000 still images captured during the trip through the final 20 feet of the small intestine that previously was visible only on X-rays. The pill, known as the M2A Capsule Endoscopy, is about the size of a multivitamin and is swallowed with a sip of water. The camera, encased in a white plastic capsule, takes pictures that are transmitted on a radio frequency. The images are captured in a recording device worn on a belt around the patient's waist. After eight hours, the belt is turned over to the doctor. The device is a "marvel of microelectronics," said Dr. DAVID RAMKUMAR, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, where patients since the beginning of the year have been swallowing the capsules to diagnose intestinal problems. The tiny camera "provides a view of that middle portion of the digestive tract that we have not had previously," Ramkumar said. The Gazette is based in Montana. This story also appeared Dec. 3 on the website of MSNBC
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2003/12/03/build/health/30-stomachpill.inc

Gateway Founder Waitt Attended UI (The Age, Dec. 3)
A story about Gateway's change in focus from computers to consumer electronics and flat-screen televisions says the company's founder, Ted Waitt is a 40-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA dropout and son of a fourth-generation cattleman, who set up Gateway in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1985. He moved the company to San Diego in 1998 and later to suburban Poway. The Age is based in Australia. A version of the article also ran Dec. 3 on the website of the SYDNEY MORNING HERALD, also in Australia.
http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/12/03/1070351616472.html

Squire: Clinton Could Yet Jump In Race (Investor's Business Daily, Dec. 2)
A story about the prospects for a run for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination by Sen. and former First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton says Clinton's star power has fueled speculation she might still step in in 2004 if former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean stumbles. "She's the rare candidate who could jump in and probably go up to the top of the rankings right away," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "None of the Democratice candidates have completely broken away..."

Squire: Candidates Take Risk By Using Personal Stories (USA Today, Dec. 2)
A story about how candidates use examples of travails and challenges in their own lives to connect with voters - specifically how Democratic presidential candidate Dick Gephardt has done so - says that sometimes personal politics can backfire. "It didn't go down too well with a lot of people" when Al Gore linked his sister's cancer death to tobacco politics at the 1996 Democratic convention, says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. In a related sidebar, Squire says hardship is better left to TV ads and books. Face to face, he says, "it makes people uncomfortable. They begin to think that you're using it for political purposes rather than as a way of suggesting 'this is why I am the way I am.'"
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/nation/2003-12-02-cover-gephardt_x.htm

Dentist Attended UI (Lamar Daily News, Dec. 2)
Dr. Paul Yoon, a new dentist in Lamar, has joined Dr. Gilbert Sprout's practice. Yoon received his bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in chemistry and zoology. The paper is based in Colorado.
http://www.lamardaily.com/Stories/0,1413,121%257E7981%257E1804370,00.html

UI Study Examines Elder Abuse (ABC News, Dec. 2)
Cases of elder abuse are underreported and are resolved inconsistently nationwide due to significant differences in laws between states, according to a new University of Iowa study released Monday. The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, is thought to be the first to compare rates of elder abuse to laws in all 50 states, said Dr. GERALD JOGERST, the university's interim head of family medicine and lead investigator on the study. Describing elder abuse as "a national problem," Jogerst said the new study examines abuse that occurs in private residences, not care facilities. The definition of abuse was divided into several categories, including physical, sexual, emotional, financial exploitation and neglect. States that require mandatory reporting and tracking of elder abuse reports have much higher investigation rates than states without such requirements, Jogerst said. The Iowa research follows a 1996 report that found only one in five cases of elder abuse is reported and substantiated.
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/Living/ap20031202_548.html
The Associated Press story also appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES; ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION; FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, Tex.; the TUSCALOOSA NEWS and TIMES DAILY, Ala.; The LEDGER, Fla.; CENTRE CITY DAILY TIMES, WILKES BARRE WEEKENDER, Penn.; NEWSDAY, N.Y.; BILOXI SUN-HERALD, Miss.; MACON TELEGRAPH, Ga.; WICHITA EAGLE, Kans.; and the OMAHA WORLD HERALD.

Rao Discovers Fructose Difficulty (Wichita Eagle, Dec. 2)
We're a nation consuming ever-greater quantities of sweets - and we're suffering from an epidemic of gastrointestinal distress. It turns out the two could be related. SATISH RAO, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa medical school, was puzzled by patients coming in with abdominal pain, gas and diarrhea that seemed to defy explanation. Rao suspected fructose, a form of sugar that occurs naturally in fruit. Americans' consumption of fructose, mostly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, has skyrocketed. After conducting a series of tests, he concluded that most people cannot adequately digest more than about 25 grams of fructose. A can of Coke contains 16 grams, he said, and a glass of orange juice has 15 grams. The two of those consumed within a span of a couple of hours can overwhelm a person's ability to handle fructose. The Eagle serves Wichita, Kans.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/living/7389751.htm

Ramkumar Calls Pill Camera A 'Marvel' (CBS News, Dec. 1)
Doctors have used small cameras on snaking tubes for years to check patients' intestinal troubles. These days, they're asking some patients to swallow the entire camera. With a single pill loaded with technology similar to a digital camera, doctors can view more than 50,000 still images captured during the trip through the final 20 feet of the small intestine that previously was visible only on X-rays. The pill, known as the M2A Capsule Endoscopy, is about the size of a multivitamin and is swallowed with a sip of water. The camera, encased in a white plastic capsule, takes pictures that are transmitted on a radio frequency. The images are captured in a recording device worn on a belt around the patient's waist. After eight hours, the belt is turned over to the doctor. The device is a "marvel of microelectronics," said Dr. DAVID RAMKUMAR, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, where patients since the beginning of the year have been swallowing the capsules to diagnose intestinal problems. The tiny camera "provides a view of that middle portion of the digestive tract that we have not had previously," Ramkumar said. This story also appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES; LOS ANGELES TIMES; DAILY DEMOCRAT, Calif.; FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL, Ind.; FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, Tex.; ABC NEWS; ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION; TUSCALOOSA NEWS and TIMES DAILY, Ala.; AKRON BEACON HERALD, Ohio; NEWSDAY, N.Y.; BILOXI SUN-HERALD, Miss.; NEWSDAY, N.Y.; CENTRE CITY DAILY TIMES, Penn.; the NEW WORK SUN; and several other newspapers.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/12/01/health/main586204.shtml

Budget Cuts Affect Technology At UI (WQAD-TV, Dec. 1)
State budget cuts are cutting into classroom technology at the University of Iowa. The manager of most of the classrooms used by undergraduates says her equipment budget for next year has been cut by 25 percent. DIANE MACHATKA says that means little new technology. But she says in terms of classroom technology, the University of Iowa is still equal to any other Big Ten Conference school in the country. Currently, 108 of 200 undergraduate classrooms at the university have computers with Internet access. Professors can access technology that allows them to post lecture notes and reading lists on the Web, or to convene online discussions for their students. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1546006&nav=1sW7JPf0

Student At Canadian University Considered UI (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 1)
In recent years, as competition has grown for slots at the most selective U.S. schools, American students increasingly have gone against the current, deciding that Canada is now the land of opportunity. The number of American university students in Canada has nearly doubled in the last five years, to more than 4,200 this year, according to the Canadian Embassy. Dan Seeman, a freshman at McGill University in Montreal, recalls feeling "pretty disillusioned about the whole college application process." Seeman finished high school with a 3.7 grade point average and an SAT score in the 1200s. He was admitted to three UC campuses and the universities of IOWA, Oregon and Colorado, but not his first choice, UCLA. Seeman began to research Canadian schools after a University of British Columbia recruiter visited his high school, and was drawn to McGill partly because it was in a French-speaking province. He had attended a French-language private elementary school in Berkeley.
http://www.latimes.com/la-me-canada1dec01,1,1451706.story

Ramkumar Calls Pill Camera A "Marvel" (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 1)
Doctors have used small cameras on snaking tubes for years to check patients' intestinal troubles. These days, they're asking some patients to swallow the entire camera. With a single pill loaded with technology similar to a digital camera, doctors can view more than 50,000 still images captured during the trip through the final 20 feet of the small intestine that previously was visible only on X-rays. The pill, known as the M2A Capsule Endoscopy, is about the size of a multivitamin and is swallowed with a sip of water. The camera, encased in a white plastic capsule, takes pictures that are transmitted on a radio frequency. The images are captured in a recording device worn on a belt around the patient's waist. After eight hours, the belt is turned over to the doctor. The device is a "marvel of microelectronics," said Dr. DAVID RAMKUMAR, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, where patients since the beginning of the year have been swallowing the capsules to diagnose intestinal problems. The tiny camera "provides a view of that middle portion of the digestive tract that we have not had previously," Ramkumar said. This story also ran in the DETROIT NEWS on Nov. 30.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=705&u_sid=933527

Baker Sees Improvements After Alcohol Ban (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 1)
Many Iowa colleges have adopted stricter alcohol policies in the past decade, yet a majority of schools still allow students 21 and older to drink in their dorm rooms. Ten of Iowa's 29 residential, four-year colleges do not permit alcohol anywhere on campus. The University of Iowa and the Franciscan University initiated the policies in recent years. "Having a no-tolerance policy on alcohol clearly has improved the environment in the residence halls," said THOMAS BAKER, associate dean of students at the University of Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=933201

First Provost Candidate Visits UI (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 1)
The first of six candidates for the University of Iowa's provost position will visit the campus today and Tuesday. SCOTT WAUGH, dean of the division of social sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles, will be the first to interview, said Steve Parrott, University of Iowa spokesman.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=933191

Dreher Comments On Nursing Database (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 1)
A medical database for nurses created by the University of Iowa's College of Nursing will soon be distributed to nurses around the globe. The college signed a contract with Cerner Corp., a medical information systems vendor, to begin worldwide distribution. The two hope to create a database of the most up-to-date nursing standards, which could be accessed by nurses wherever the patient may be, whether at home or at the hospital. "This is a really big deal for the college, but also for all of nursing," said MELANIE DREHER, dean of the College of Nursing. "It's a vehicle for putting nurses in touch with the most recent knowledge base and bringing that knowledge to the patient's bedside."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=933024

Medicine Alumnus Quoted In Rural Healthcare Story (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 1)
To boost rural health care in the state, the federal government recently awarded the University of Illinois' Rockford medical campus a $6.4 million grant spread over four years to foster research on rural health issues and help the school strengthen its rural medicine program. Dr. Larry Stalter, who was born and raised in Livingston County and has a medical office in Flanagan, has practiced in the county for the last 21 years. He also has welcomed medical students like Denice Smith for office rotations to gain firsthand experience in rural medicine. Stalter, who received his medical degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, seems to revel in the interaction afforded by practicing medicine in a rural setting. He sees his patients in the grocery store, the barbershop--almost everywhere. And house calls are part of the routine--especially in treating older patients.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-0312010156dec01,1,1270169.story?coll=chi-news-hed

Domino's Attorney Is UI Alumna (Jackson Citizen Patriot, Dec. 1)
A feature on Jackson attorney Edwina Wilson Divins, vice president and associate general counsel for Domino's Pizza, LLC, the international pizza company that has 7,332 locations in over 50 countries, says she graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law in 1987, where she received her juris doctorate. She was awarded a fellowship in comparative international law and completed internships in Europe and South America. The paper is based in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/business/jacitpat/index.ssf?/base/business-0/1070190383279740.xml

Valentine Comments On Radium In Water (Pensacola News Journal, Dec. 1)
The Escambia County, Fla. Health Department is investigating how harmful levels of radium could settle into water pipes -- as they await test results that might shed light on pollution in residents' drinking water. The Health Department launched its research into radium's behavior in water lines after Oct. 30 tests by the Escambia County School District appeared to show that tap water in two elementary schools contained higher levels of radium than the Hagler blending station that provides the schools' drinking water. New tests are planned to confirm the findings. The effort comes while local attorneys Lisa Minshew and Mike Papantonio - both spearheading separate, multimillion-dollar lawsuits over radium pollution - push allegations that radium is lingering in the Pensacola Bay Area water supply and local homes. The problem has been found in community water supplies in Iowa and Minnesota, where radium levels in tap water were deemed unsafe, even though the wells serving the communities met the safety standards, said RICH VALENTINE, an engineering professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and Don Swailes, drinking water chief for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
http://www.pensacolanewsjournal.com/news/120103/Local/ST003.shtml

UI Develops AI Program For Army (Evansville Courier & Press, Dec. 1)
Soldiers of the future might owe a lot to Tony and Ella. They're the creation of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers who are using artificial intelligence computer programs to simulate human soldiers and test the performance of proposed Army combat systems. The five-year, $17.5 million project is one of several under way as the Army tries to develop a more sophisticated fighting force that is agile, computer-networked and integrated with unmanned aircraft and robotic vehicles. Iowa researchers designed their two virtual soldiers with artificial intelligence programs that use digitized human anatomical data and mathematical models that predict human behavior. Tony and Ella will help researchers test how real troops would be affected as they operate new machinery and weapons systems. The paper is based in Indiana. Versions of the story also ran Nov. 30 on the websites of the EVERETT HERALD, Wash.; the RAPID CITY JOURNAL, S.D.; BOSTON GLOBE; FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM, Texas; AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, Ohio, and many other publications.
http://www.courierpress.com/ecp/local_business/article/0,1626,ECP_780_2468118,00.html

UI Weekend Hospital Care Study Cited (Real Simple, December 2003/January 2004)
The magazine devoted to helping people simplify their lives recommends the book "Simple Secrets of Healthy People." Secret No. 41: If you need serious medical attention on Saturday, don't wait until Monday to go to the hospital, when you assume it's better staffed. "You'll get the same care on the weekend," the book states. "According to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE study, if a weekend effect does exist, it is likely to have a relatively small impact on patient outcomes."

UI Press Publishes Writer Serge's 'Memoirs' (The Atlantic, December 2003)
A story about writer Victor Serge mentions his "Memoirs of a Revolutionary," which was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

Brinig Study Cited (Reason, Dec. 2003)
An article about the role of the government in promoting families, notes that fathers' rights activists, so often dismissed as angry men, make some excellent points -- including some aspects of their critique of the "marriage movement" and the "responsible fatherhood" advocates. They challenge the assumption that the primary cause of fatherlessness is men walking away from their wives and children. In fact, two-thirds of divorces are initiated by wives. To some extent, government policies contribute to the situation. Despite nominally gender-neutral child custody laws, in practice fathers are still at a disadvantage. What's more, the courts and the government are far more interested in enforcing child support than in enforcing non-custodial parents' access to the children. Some thought-provoking studies, particularly by University of Iowa law professor MARGARET BRINIG, suggest that women are more willing to end their marriages because they know they are likely to get sole custody of their children. Brinig and other scholars have also found that more frequent joint custody awards correlate with lower divorce rates. (Reason Online, the companion to the monthly print magazine, is updated daily with articles and columns on current developments in politics and culture.)
http://www.reason.com/0312/co.cy.divorcees.shtml

Hitchens Reviews UI Press-Published Memoirs (Atlantic, December 2003)
Christopher Hitchens, a contributing editor of The Atlantic and a columnist for Vanity Fair, reviews Victor Serge's Memoirs of a Revolutionary, published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.theatlantic.com/issues/2003/12/hitchens.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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