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UI in the News

August, 2003

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Clark To Speak At UI (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Aug. 31)
Depending on which version of armchair strategy you prefer, retired four-star Gen. Wesley K. Clark is either a hapless George McClellan type, taking too long to make up his mind, or a good student of Napoleon, holding back his force until precisely the right moment. Throughout the summer, Clark has publicly dallied with the possibility of seeking the Democratic presidential nomination but remained noncommittal as not one, but two "Draft Clark" movements have sprung up on the Internet. Tantalizingly, the Little Rock resident has a speech scheduled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Sept. 19, just a few days after the next financial disclosure deadline for presidential candidates.
http://www.ajc.com/print/content/epaper/editions/today/news_f315392cb4de104b10d1.html

Clark Gauging Support For Candidacy (Houston Chronicle, Aug. 31)
Wesley Clark, the former NATO commander, sounds increasingly like a Democratic presidential hopeful as fervent supporters press him to announce his candidacy in September. Clark, 58, has demurred on whether he is running, asserting that he is traveling around the country to gauge reaction to his possible candidacy. In the meantime, he is making speeches challenging the Bush administration on foreign policy matters. America, he said, "is a nation in need of a new vision." Clark supporters and political watchers believe the telegenic, retired four-star Army general will run for the Democratic nomination. Clark plans to announce a decision before a Sept. 19 speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7bbfadc1096827461caefe68cceb27e7&_docnum=23&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=2cd8b55de6f74a6faac3737cf29bcca0

'Sun Rings' Noted In Column (St. Petersburg Times, Aug. 31)
In a column about the many aspects of music in life, it's noted that the Kronos Quartet and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researcher Donald A. Gurnett have been commissioned by NASA to create a musical performance called Sun Rings, based on signals recorded from space during the past 40 years.
http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/sptimes/index.html?ts=1062514052

Lederer Memoir Reviewed (New York Times, Aug. 31)
Katy Lederer arrives in Las Vegas for the first time, her brother, Howard, picks her up in his new Lexus and drives down the Strip to the Mirage casino. Las Vegas, Lederer observes, is "bright and cheap and all dolled up, like a drag queen," an appropriate simile for a city whose artificial beauty can exaggerate its ultimate sadness. But for Lederer, Las Vegas's brazen wealth is a revelation: "It was the first time in my life that I didn't feel lied to." The Lederer family, are the he stars of many lovely sketches in Lederer's memoir, "Poker Face" Katy, eager to belong, moves to Las Vegas to be closer to her relatives, to write poetry and to learn to play poker. "I believed that it would save us, that together, as a family, we could play our little games and still be happy," she explains. But she isn't very good at poker and eventually leaves for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA writing program.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/31/books/review/31HANSENT.html

UI Student, Antczak Quoted In Budget Cut Story (Dallas Morning News, Aug. 31)
The moment registration opens, Michele D. Hannah dives for courses with the fury of a fifth-year college student vexed by a constant riddle. "When will I get the classes I need to graduate?" said Hannah, Class of "I have no idea" at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA . Classes have gotten so tight, or so scarce, that Hannah says she trolls the university's web site like a day trader, checking every few hours for the stray course opening that might suddenly appear. But it probably will not. At many public universities, grappling with record budget cuts and enrollments at the same time, the classroom is no longer being spared. Another victim of budget cuts -- the departure of valued faculty members, or even their increased teaching time -- can have a domino effect, college officials say, because universities are so heavily dependent on the research grants professors secure from industry and government. "It is a tremendous cash cow," said FRED J. ANTCZAK , associate dean for academic programs at the University of Iowa, noting that the university takes in $350 million in research money each year. "If we start getting hurt on those figures, I don't know how we stay solvent." A version of the story also ran Aug. 24 in the VIRGINIAN-PILOT.

Clark May Announce Bid During UI Visit (Orange County Register, Aug. 30)
Wesley Clark, the retired four-star general who has been contemplating a run for president, has told close friends that he wants to join the Democratic race and is delaying a final decision only until he feels he has a legitimate chance of winning the nomination. In an interview, Clark said on Wednesday that he intended to announce his decision within two weeks. A possible date for an announcement is Sept. 19, when Clark, who has been highly critical of the Bush administration's foreign policy, is to deliver a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Santa Ana, Calif.

Squire Comments On Kerry Candidacy (USA Today, Aug. 29)
PEVERILL SQUIRE, an American politics expert at the University of Iowa, says that Democratic presidential candidate Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts is talking too much about his credentials on the campaign trail. "It's not enough to say he's been in the Senate for a while and has got a war record," Squire says.

Solow Comments on Ticketmaster Suit (Rolling Stone, Aug. 29)
Almost a decade after Pearl Jam stood before Congress and called for an investigation of Ticketmaster, a new band has taken up the cause. Jam band String Cheese Incident have sued the concert-ticketing giant for alleged antitrust violations, hoping to succeed where Pearl Jam failed in scaling back hefty service charges. At issue is whether the Boulder, Colo. group can sell tickets directly to its fans or whether it must go through Ticketmaster, which has exclusive contracts with most major U.S. venues. Antitrust expert JOHN SOLOW, a University of Iowa economics professor, calls SCI Ticketing's suit "more than a plausible claim" and adds, "This is not something that should be laughed at."
http://www.rollingstone.com/news/newsarticle.asp?nid=18594

Cities Discuss Annexing UI-owned Land (Polk County News Chief, Aug. 29)
After a rocky beginning, Eagle Lake City Council members and Winter Haven city commissioners reached a point where they could negotiate the hotly debated annexation of more than 100 acres north of State Road 540. The joint conflict resolution meeting between the two cities will be rescheduled to allow Eagle Lake time to review possible solutions being proposed by Winter Haven and develop a counterproposal. A date and time has not been set. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA owns 37 acres of the land in dispute. The News Chief is based in Polk County, FL.
http://www.polkonline.com/stories/082903/loc_citiesmeet.shtml

Kutcher Backlash Has Begun (Salon, Aug. 29)
As our love-hate relationship with celebrities becomes increasingly pathological and the speed with which celebrities enter and exit the public eye steadily increases, Ashton Kutcher plays both sides -- and wins consistently. Despite the less than stellar returns and reviews of his latest movie, "My Boss's Daughter," Kutcher has major hits both on TV ("That '70s Show," "Punk'd") and on the big screen ("Dude, Where's My Car?" "Just Married"), separating him from countless sitcom stars who have struggled to establish film careers. He's a teen heartthrob, which means he has the coveted and highly suggestible teenage girl demographic under his thumb, and he makes adult women swoon -- after all, his lanky '70s era appeal makes Justin Timberlake look like one of the Coreys (for you young'uns, I mean Corey Haim and Corey Feldman, chumpy teen idols of yesteryear). Kutcher attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.salon.com/ent/feature/2003/08/29/ashton/index_np.html

Nazareth Books Discussed In Amin Essay (The East Africa Standard, Aug. 29)
PETER NAZARETH
, a native of Uganda and a professor of African American World Studies at the University of Iowa, worked as a senior finance officer in the finance ministry of brutal Ugandan dictator Idi Amin until he was able to get out in 1973. His books In A Brown Mantle and The General Is Up tell of the horror of Amin's murder machine. Nazareth's first novel, In a Brown Mantle, forecast ldi Amin's coup and the subsequent expulsion of Asians from Uganda. The General Is Up, his second novel, also deals with the Amin regime. It, apart from being the tale of a psychotic buffoon who had the misfortune of ascending to leadership, also explores the dilemma of Asians after expulsion from Uganda. The Standard is based in Nairobi, Kenya.
http://www.eastandard.net/forum/forum240803001.htm

'Outside' Lists UI Among Top 10 Cities (Albuquerque Journal, Aug. 28)
'Outside' magazine has listed the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City among North America's Top 10 universities based on academic esprit and proximity to outdoors recreation.

Squire Comments On Kerry Campaign (USA Today, Aug. 28)
Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry's official announcement next week that he is running for president will be more than a formality. It looms as a pivotal moment in which the candidate needs to re-energize his campaign and convince skeptical Democrats that he is their best hope to win the White House. Analysts describe his stump style as lackluster and his syntax as muddled. On the campaign trail, as Kerry hugs and squeezes, jokes and hoists glasses of stout, he is trying to dispel an impression of aloofness. But PEVERILL SQUIRE, an American politics expert at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, says that Kerry is talking too much about his credentials. "It's not enough to say he's been in the Senate for a while and has got a war record," he says.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/nation/2003-08-28-kerry-relaunch_x.htm

Clark To Announce During UI Visit? (International Herald Tribune, Aug. 28)
Wesley Clark, the retired four-star general who has been contemplating a run for president, has told close friends that he wants to join the Democratic race and is delaying a final decision only until he feels he has a legitimate chance of winning the nomination. In an interview, Clark said on Wednesday that he intended to announce his decision within two weeks. A possible date for an announcement is Sept. 19, when Clark, who has been highly critical of the Bush administration's foreign policy, is to deliver a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This story originally appeared in the New York Times.
http://www.iht.com/articles/108094.html

Clark May Announce Bid During UI Visit (New York Times, Aug. 28)
Wesley Clark, the retired four-star general who has been contemplating a run for president, has told close friends that he wants to join the Democratic race and is delaying a final decision only until he feels he has a legitimate chance of winning the nomination. In an interview, Clark said on Wednesday that he intended to announce his decision within two weeks. A possible date for an announcement is Sept. 19, when Clark, who has been highly critical of the Bush administration's foreign policy, is to deliver a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This article also appeared in the Forth Worth, Tex. STAR TELEGRAM and the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/28/politics/28CLAR.html?ex=1062648000&en=09e8d2119f8008fd&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

UI To Judge Essay Contest (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Aug. 28)
From Oct. 6 through Dec. 8, Olive Garden is accepting essays for its eighth annual Pasta Tales national writing contest for writers between 7 and 16 years of age who answer in 250 words or less, "What is your favorite holiday meal with your family, and what makes it special?" Entries will be judged on creativity, adherence to theme, organization, grammar, punctuation and spelling. Judging will be done through the Quill and Scroll Society at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/epaper/editions/thursday/nfulton_f3d4b631b378d0db003a.html

Soap Opera Producer Studied At UI (Atlanticville, Aug. 28)
A profile of Gloria Monty, former executive producer of the daytime soap opera General Hospital, notes that she studied drama and speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Long Branch, N.J.
http://atlanticville.gmnews.com/news/2003/0829/Front_Page/040.html

Poet Studied Writing At UI (Hampshire Gazette, Aug. 28)
A story about a local man, Sean Vernon, who hosts open-mic poetry readings notes that he studied expository writing in graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and has been writing poetry for 10 years. The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www.gazettenet.com/08272003/entertai/8607.htm

Kutcher Attended UI (Fort Lauderdale Sun, Aug. 26)
A story about actor Ashton Kutcher's meteoric rise to fame says his
odyssey from Homestead, Iowa, to Hollywood began in 1997, when he entered the Fresh Faces of Iowa modeling competition on a whim and won. At the time he was a biochemical engineering major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/entertainment/news/celebrity/orl-livashton26082603aug26,0,4780763.story?coll=sfla-entertainment-headlines

Nagle, Parrott Comment On Old Cap Bell (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 26)
The bell at the Old Capitol building on the University of Iowa campus once again is pealing after two years of silence. The bell began sounding the start and end of classes again Monday as students began the fall semester, said university spokesman STEVE PARROTT. The bell hasn't routinely sounded since a fire at the Old Capitol silenced its predecessor nearly two years ago. "People associate the bell with their morning coffee," said GARY NAGLE, the University of Iowa architect who is overseeing the reconstruction of the Old Capitol. "If it's not there, they miss it terribly." The November 2001 fire caused $5.6 million in damage to the 162-year-old building. Fire officials concluded that the fire was accidentally started by workers removing an asbestos coating.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=36&u_sid=836217

UI May Require Students To Have Insurance (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 26)

The University of Iowa may join other Big Ten schools in requiring students to carry health insurance. "We want to make sure students have health insurance so they can get the medical care they need so they don't have to interrupt their academic career to pay it off if something drastic were to happen," said RICHARD SAUNDERS, benefits director for the university. The university offers the Student Health Insurance Plan for graduate and undergraduate students, but "we're not saying it has to be our insurance," Saunders said. Students also could join their parents' insurance plan or choose among plans offered by several companies.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=36&u_sid=836314

Warren's Pacifier Research Cited (Ft. Wayne News-Sentinel, Aug. 26)

A story about a company that makes products to help wean children from pacifiers says that pacifier use beyond the age of two, which is quite common, can and usually does cause major problems, said JOHN WARREN, associate professor at the College of Dentistry at the University of Iowa. Warren recently completed a study on pacifier use and found that only half of the children who use pacifiers have given them up by 26 to 28 months -- the outside age that pacifiers can be safely used. (Giving it up after the child is 12 months is even better, experts say.) About 10 percent of pacifier users were still sucking away on them after age 4, according to the study. That's long enough to do some serious damage to teeth and jaws, he said.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/6615136.htm

Squire: Gay Marriage Debate Is 'Land Mine' (Detroit News, Aug. 25)

After escaping August's heat for its annual recess, Congress is set to dive into one of the most sizzling of hot-button issues: gay marriage. White House lawyers are studying how to keep legal marriage strictly between a man and a woman. The Senate plans hearings on how to stop gay marriage. And a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage is picking up increasing support. The issue could prove explosive in the upcoming presidential election. If Democrats endorse gay marriage, they risk alienating moderate voters. No leading Democratic presidential candidate has endorsed gay marriage. "It's a bit of a land mine out there," for Democrats, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor. "Most of the candidates are going to try to sneak around it as gingerly as possible."
http://www.detnews.com/2003/politics/0308/26/a04-253135.htm

UI Health Care Fans Make Showing Outside NBC Studios (Modesto Bee, Aug. 25)
A story about the fans who gather outside NBC studios in New York each morning to catch a glimpse of Today show personalities says crowd members clutch homemade signs, with many people wearing funny hats or outfits as if they were queuing up for "Let's Make a Deal." A group of young women, for example, was recently clad in identical shirts that say "UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE, BLOOD DONATION CENTER," with "I Bleed Black and Gold" (the school's colors) on the back.
http://www.modbee.com/life/mondaylife/story/7343700p-8266086c.html

Bryant Case Roundup Mentions UI Student Threats (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 25)

Shaquille O'Neal spoke out for the first time on Kobe Bryant's sexual-assault case: "Hopefully this will be resolved quickly. And hopefully it will be pain-free on both sides." ... John William Roche, a 22-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, was charged with threatening to kill Bryant's alleged victim. A friend described Roche as a "sports fanatic" who had been drinking all day when he allegedly left the message on the woman's answering machine.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/printedition/chi-0308250132aug25,1,2378827.story

UI Alumnus Opens Practice In Indiana (South Bend Tribune, Aug. 25)
Chris Jensen, M.D., opened his practice July 28 at Plaza Family Medicine, formerly the office of Hansel Foley, M.D., at 707 N. Michigan St., Suite 400. Jensen received his medical degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE and is board certified in family practice. The Tribune is based in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2003/08/25/business.20030825-sbt-MICH-B7-BUCHANAN___Express_1.sto

UI Student Charged In Death Threat Case (Denver Post, Aug. 25)
An editorial says that the man who's accused of having threatened the alleged victim in the Kobe Bryant sexual-assault case could be facing a lot of time behind bars and a hefty fine for doing something stupid in defense of a man he doesn't even know. A 22-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student is suspected of leaving a threatening telephone message at the home of the alleged victim, saying he would kill her. He was arrested by the FBI and now faces a felony charge of his own. If convicted, he could serve up to five years in prison and pay $250,000 in fines.
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~417~1589637,00.html

Jones Comments On Voting Machine Flaws (American Free Press, Aug. 25)\
A published report from a team of computer experts exposing a wide range of security flaws in a leading touch screen voting system has sent "shock waves across the country" and caused elections officials to question the use of electronic voting machines. "The story is only beginning," DOUGLAS W. JONES, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, told American Free Press. The publication, which touts itself as an "uncensored national weekly newspaper," is based in Washington, D.C.
http://www.americanfreepress.net/08_25_03/Concerns_Over/concerns_over.html

UI Alumnus Founds Autonomadic Bookmobile (New York Times, Aug. 25)
Shortly after 8 p.m. on Saturday, Tanya Sullivan and Okra P. Dingle walked onto a wooden stage at the Galapagos Art Space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where some 30 people had gathered. Over the next hour Ms. Sullivan freed herself from a straitjacket and lay on a bed of rusty nails. Mr. Dingle removed his shoes and socks and climbed a "ladder of swords," consisting of four machetes in a wooden framework, and then, balanced on the topmost blade, placed a cinder block on his head and smashed the block with a hammer. The performance brought to mind a circus sideshow, but it was the prelude to the New York opening of the Autonomadic Bookmobile, which for two years has traveled the country carrying books by Autonomedia, a small nonprofit Williamsburg publisher that prints criticism by authors like Dwight McDonald, Guy Debord and Michel Foucault. As the bookmobile arrived in New York on Friday from its base in New Orleans, Jim Fleming, 53, a founder of Autonomedia, sat in the South 11th Street loft that serves as the publishing company's editorial office and said his fascination with bookmobiles dated to his days at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the late 1960's, when he eagerly awaited a bookmobile carrying texts from university presses. "I could get books I couldn't find anywhere else," he said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/25/nyregion/25BOOK.html

Black Comments On 'Shopaholics' (MSN, Aug. 25)
A story about "shopaholics" - people who can't control the urge to shop - quotes DONALD BLACK, M.D., a University of Iowa psychiatry professor who specializes in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Black says compulsive shopping isn't a true compulsion at all, but instead an impulse control disorder. "A compulsion is a behavior that is produced to counteract an upsetting thought; for example, I'm contaminated or dirty, therefore I will deal with that anxiety by washing my hands more," he says. "There is no upsetting thought prompting compulsive shopping. It is a very pleasurable impulse, and people act on those impulses."
http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/SavingandDebt/P58684.asp

Squire: Clark Could Be Viable Candidate (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Aug. 24)
A story about the presidential aspirations of retired Gen. Wesley Clark, former NATO supreme allied commander, quotes PEVERILL SQUIRE, political analyst at the University of Iowa, as saying the Democratic field is "so fluid" that there is still an opportunity for Clark "to come in and make an impact." Squire and others wonder if Clark, who has never run for elective office before, "can take the nastiness that comes with being a candidate in American politics."
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/story_National.php?storyid=39722

Squire: Gay Marriage Debate Is 'Land Mine' (Salisbury Daily Times, Aug. 24)
After escaping August's heat for its annual recess, Congress is set to dive into one of the most sizzling of hot-button issues: gay marriage. White House lawyers are studying how to keep legal marriage strictly between a man and a woman. The Senate plans hearings on how to stop gay marriage. And a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage is picking up increasing support. The issue could prove explosive in the upcoming presidential election. If Democrats endorse gay marriage, they risk alienating moderate voters. No leading Democratic presidential candidate has endorsed gay marriage. "It's a bit of a land mine out there," for Democrats, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor. "Most of the candidates are going to try to sneak around it as gingerly as possible." The Times is based in Maryland.
http://www.dailytimesonline.com/news/stories/20030824/localnews/120232.html

Cooper Studies Elementary School Bathroom Practices (Kansas City Star, Aug. 24)
Once children leave kindergarten, they are often not given enough opportunity to go to the restroom in school, creating a problem that can lead to incontinence, a new study reports. Writing in the September issue of The Journal of Urology, researchers reported the results of a survey of 467 elementary school teachers in Iowa on handling students' restroom needs. The lead author, CHRISTOPHER S. COOPER of the University of Iowa, found that the liberal bathroom privileges generally extended to kindergartners were often abridged after they reached first grade.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/living/6595743.htm

UI Student, Antczak Quoted In Story On Budget Cuts (New York Times, Aug. 24)
The moment registration opens, Michele D. Hannah dives for courses with the fury of a fifth-year college student vexed by a constant riddle. "When will I get the classes I need to graduate?" said Hannah, Class of "I have no idea" at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Classes have gotten so tight, or so scarce, that Hannah says she trolls the university's web site like a day trader, checking every few hours for the stray course opening that might suddenly appear. But it probably will not. At many public universities, grappling with record budget cuts and enrollments at the same time, the classroom is no longer being spared. Another victim of budget cuts -- the departure of valued faculty members, or even their increased teaching time -- can have a domino effect, college officials say, because universities are so heavily dependent on the research grants professors secure from industry and government. "It is a tremendous cash cow," said FRED J. ANTCZAK, associate dean for academic programs at the University of Iowa, noting that the university takes in $350 million in research money each year. "If we start getting hurt on those figures, I don't know how we stay solvent." Versions of the story also ran Aug. 23 on the websites of the RUTLAND HERALD in Vermont and YAHOO! NEWS.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/24/national/24COLL.html

UI Student Quoted In Story On Budget Cuts (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 24)
The moment registration opens, Michele D. Hannah dives for courses with the fury of a fifth-year college student vexed by a constant riddle. "When will I get the classes I need to graduate?" said Hannah, Class of "I have no idea" at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Classes have gotten so tight, or so scarce, that Hannah says she trolls the university's web site like a day trader, checking every few hours for the stray course opening that might suddenly appear. But it probably will not. At many public universities, grappling with record budget cuts and enrollments at the same time, the classroom is no longer being spared. Another victim of budget cuts -- the departure of valued faculty members, or even their increased teaching time -- can have a domino effect, college officials say, because universities are so heavily dependent on the research grants professors secure from industry and government. A version of the story also ran Aug. 24 in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.

UI Student Charged In Threatening Phone Call (Detroit News, Aug. 23)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student was charged with threatening to kill the woman accusing Kobe Bryant of sexual assault. John William Roche, 22, was arrested Thursday afternoon for allegedly leaving a profanity-laced message on the accuser's answering machine July 27, according to a federal grand jury indictment. Roche is charged with making a threatening telephone call across state lines. If convicted, he faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. A version of the story also ran Aug. 23 in the KANSAS CITY STAR, the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, the LAS VEGAS REVIEW, the ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTIONand the COLUMBUS DISPATCH.

UI Student Charged In Threatening Phone Call (Virginian-Pilot, Aug. 23)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student was charged with threatening to kill the woman accusing Kobe Bryant of sexual assault. John William Roche, 22, was arrested Thursday afternoon for allegedly leaving a profanity-laced message on the accuser's answering machine July 27, according to a federal grand jury indictment. Roche is charged with making a threatening telephone call across state lines. If convicted, he faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. A version of the story also ran Aug. 23 in the PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE.

Actor Kutcher Studied At UI (Star-Telegram, Aug. 23)
A transcribed debate between a reporter and her friend about the relative merits of actor and Iowa native Ashton Kutcher quotes the reporter's friend as saying that Kutcher is bright. "For heaven's sake, he majored in biochemical engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA," she says. The paper covers the Dallas/Fort Worth portion of Texas.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/startelegram/living/6592868.htm

Student Allegedly Makes Threat Against Woman (Dallas Morning News, Aug. 23)
A column of sports briefs reports that a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA liberal arts student allegedly left a death threat on the answering machine of the Colorado woman who accused Kobe Bryant of sexually assaulting her. "Bad enough on the face of it, but you're happy to note that the act of malicious stupidity also constitutes interstate threatening, a felony punishable up to five years and $250,000," the author of the brief writes.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dallas/sports/columnists/ksherrington/stories/082403dnspoallthumbs.b0e01.html

UI Student Charged In Threatening Phone Call (Toronto Star, Aug. 23)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student was charged with threatening to kill the woman accusing Kobe Bryant of sexual assault. John William Roche, 22, was arrested Thursday afternoon for allegedly leaving a profanity-laced message on the accuser's answering machine July 27, according to a federal grand jury indictment. Roche is charged with making a threatening telephone call across state lines. If convicted, he faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Versions of the story also ran Aug. 23 on the websites of the COOS BAY WORLD in Oregon, the ROCK HILL HEARLD in South Carolina, the TACOMA NEWS TRIBUNE in Washington, the DOYLESTOWN INTELLIGENCER in Pennsylvania, the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE in Florida, the CHICAGO DAILY SOUTHTOWN in Illinois, the LEDGER in Florida, ABS-CBN News in the Philippines, the WINNEPEG SUN in Canada, the MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS in South Carolina, the ST. PETERSBURG TIMES in Florida, the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota, the SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL, the WASHINGTON POST, the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER and many other news outlets.
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1061636442483&call_pageid=968867503640&col=1053692575155

IEM Called 'Granddaddy' Of Futures Markets (Rocky Mountain News, Aug. 23)
A story about future markets across the country in which investors can "bet" on, among other things, Kobe Bryant's guilt or innocence says the granddaddy of today's futures markets is the IOWA ELECTION MARKETS, conducted by the University of Iowa since 1988. IEM has conducted 49 markets covering 41 elections in 13 countries. By scrutinizing the habits of investors, it consistently bested pollsters.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/business_columnists/article/0,1299,DRMN_82_2203541,00.html

Fitch Ponders Use Of God's Name (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Aug. 23)

Fans of European soccer star David Beckham show their appreciation by filling the Internet with "Beck is God" posts, and some replica jerseys have replaced the name "Beckham" on the back with "God." The increasing use of God in this way isn't a sign that the culture as a whole is leaning away from God, said KRISTINE FITCH, an associate professor at the University of Iowa. Fitch works in the Department of Communication Studies, researching the way language helps to form culture. "If anything, U.S. culture is leaning more toward organized religion," she said. "Fundamentalism is stronger than it has ever been." Perhaps, Fitch theorizes, the increasing use of God on signs and in conversation is a form of subtle resistance to the increasing fundamentalism.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/614/4055005.html

Kutcher Attended UI (Washington Post, Aug. 23)
A story about actor Ashton Kutcher says the Iowa native was a biochemical engineering major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Kutcher told In Style magazine that if the acting thing hadn't panned out, "I would probably be finishing up my master's degree at MIT or Purdue, and going into genetic engineering and be very happy."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A40000-2003Aug24.html

Outside Ranks Iowa City Among Top 10 University Towns (USA Today, Aug. 22)
The September issue of Outside magazine, a popular publication that deals with outdoor recreation, listed Iowa City, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, as one of the country's best college towns, a list reproduced by USA Today. Outside describes Iowa City, "in the middle of miles of cornfields and set on the Iowa River," as "a pocket of sophistication with a small-town feel."

UI Student Charged With Threatening Kobe's Accuser (Denver Post, Aug. 22)
The FBI on Thursday arrested a 22-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student suspected of leaving a threatening phone message at the home of the Eagle County woman who accused NBA star Kobe Bryant of rape. Versions of this story also appeared in the PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS and ARIZONA REPUBLIC.
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~28682~1584716,00.html

Mystery Writer Grimes Attended UI (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 22)
A story about the novel "Foul Matter," a sendup of the publishing industry by mystery writer Martha Grimes, says Grimes graduated from the University of Maryland and did postgraduate work at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She wanted to be a poet and studied alongside Donald Justice and Philip Levine.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/08/22/DD255668.DTL

Jones Comments On Voting Security (Seattle Times, Aug. 21)
Bev Harris, a middle-aged woman who operates a small public-relations business out of her Renton home, would seem an unlikely person to be at the center of a national battle over electronic voting. Yet in recent months her muckraking, web-based journalism has helped energize a growing movement of citizens and computer scientists concerned about the potential for fraud in America's increasingly high-tech elections. Harris might have remained obscure if she had not stumbled across something on the Internet. While seeking information last January about a voting-machine company for a book she was writing, she found a web site "on about the 15th page of Google." The open, unprotected site held some 40,000 files that included user manuals, source code and executable files for voting machines made by Diebold, a corporation based in North Canton, Ohio. An analysis by computer scientists from Johns Hopkins and Rice universities brought the issue to a mainstream audience. To some, Harris' credibility has been undermined both by her provocative language and by her publication of articles on such venues as Scoop and Conspiracy Planet. "It's taken awhile for me to believe in her credibility because, while the facts she's reporting appear to be accurate and carefully researched, the tone appears to be alarmist," said DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa computer-science professor and member of the Iowa state board that certifies voting equipment.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2001574367_votefraud21m.html

McLeod: Commentary Is Free Speech Issue (Christian Science Monitor, Aug. 21)
This summer, threats to freedom of expression are mobilizing First Amendment lawyers and comedians concerned about the right to criticize - and be funny about it. Topping their list is a lawsuit filed this month by the Fox News Network against political satirist Al Franken and his publisher, Penguin. The charge: that Mr. Franken is violating the network's trademark on the phrase "fair and balanced" by using it in the title of a book being rushed to stores this week: "Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them: A Fair and Balanced Look at the Right." Those who find the lawsuit frivolous and an infringement on free speech include The Wall Street Journal and The Authors Guild. And legal observers say this case - and one earlier this summer involving director Spike Lee and a new cable channel "Spike TV" - contribute to the perception that intellectual property cases are getting out of hand. "As culture increasingly becomes fenced off and privatized, it becomes all the more important for us to be able to comment on the images, ideas, and words that saturate us on a daily basis. This is what makes it first and foremost a free-speech issue," says KEMBREW MCLEOD, a communications professor at the University of Iowa who has studied intellectual property and culture. "The problem is that courts and lawyers interpret it as an economic issue. Both positions make sense, it just depends on which we want to value more."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0821/p11s02-lire.html

Mystery Writer Grimes Attended UI (Contra Costa Times, Aug. 21)
A story about the novel "Foul Matter," a sendup of the publishing industry by mystery writer Martha Grimes, says Grimes graduated from the University of Maryland and did postgraduate work at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She wanted to be a poet and studied alongside Donald Justice and Philip Levine. This story originally appeared Aug. 20 in the New York Times.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/cctimes/6583251.htm

Squire: Gay Rights A 'Land Mine' For Politicians (Arizona Republic, Aug. 20)
After escaping August's heat for its annual recess, Congress is set to dive into one of the most sizzling of hot-button issues: gay marriage. Gay rights can be a sticky issue for both parties. President Bush has tried to make the GOP more welcoming to minorities. And even at the news conference where he declared his opposition to gay marriage, he urged Americans to be tolerant and "respect each individual." If Democrats endorse gay marriage, they risk alienating moderate voters. No leading Democratic presidential candidate has endorsed gay marriage. "It's a bit of a land mine out there," for Democrats, said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor. "Most of the candidates are going to try to sneak around it as gingerly as possible."
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0820gaymarriage20-ON.html

UI Ranking Noted (Omaha World Herald, Aug. 20)
Nebraska academic institutions came away unscathed in the annual rankings of "best" and "worst" traits among colleges and universities as discerned by students. The Princeton Review rankings, published annually since 1992, embarrass some colleges and universities with rankings in negative categories with frivolous titles. Iowa State University, for example, ranks 13th among schools where the "students (almost) never study," meaning the students surveyed there reported spending less time studying than those at most other schools. ISU also ranks 16th among "jock schools," implying an overemphasis on athletics. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA gets a No. 1 ranking among schools where professors "make themselves scarce," meaning students thought they weren't very accessible.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=36&u_sid=830709

Nygaard Comments On Demand For C-Sections (Seattle Times, Aug. 20)
A growing number of women are opting for C-sections, not for traditional medical reasons, but because they hope to avoid many of the unpleasant complications of normal childbirth. In Brazil, nearly 50 percent of women - and 90 percent of wealthy women - give birth by C-section, largely out of concern natural birth will ruin their sex lives. "The word on the street in Brazil is that a C-section keeps you semivirginal," said Dr. INGRID NYGAARD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa and co-author of an editorial this month in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology. The editorial concludes that while doctors should not routinely offer all pregnant women the choice, they should consider C-section requests from healthy women who plan to have only one or two children.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2001562404_csections20m.html

Mystery Writer Grimes Attended UI (New York Times, Aug. 20)
A story about the novel "Foul Matter," a sendup of the publishing industry by mystery writer Martha Grimes, says Grimes graduated from the University of Maryland and did postgraduate work at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She wanted to be a poet and studied alongside Donald Justice and Philip Levine.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/20/books/20GRIM.html?ex=1061956800&en=d46bc258d7552b1b&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Bathroom Privileges Study Highlighted (New York Times, Aug. 19)
Once children leave kindergarten, they are often not given enough opportunity to go to the restroom in school creating a problem that can lead to incontinence, a new study reports. Writing in the September issue of The Journal of Urology, researchers reported the results of a survey of 467 elementary school teachers in Iowa on handling students' restroom needs. The lead author, Dr. CHRISTOPHER S. COOPER of the University of Iowa, found that the liberal bathroom privileges generally extended to kindergartners were often abridged after they reached first grade. Eighty percent of the teachers said they set times for breaks, and more than half said they asked children to go at those times. One-third said they asked children who requested permission to go to the bathroom to wait for a break. The problem, the researchers said, is that from a developmental standpoint first graders are not much different from kindergartners for bladder control. When young children are not allowed to go on demand, Dr. Cooper said, they may begin to have accidents.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/19/health/19PATI.html

Hunnicutt Comments On Online Communities (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 19)
Online communities such as The Lunch Club (www.lunchclubnyc.com) are one of the many ways people are using the Internet to find friends while their peers are at the office. As telecommuting grows and unemployment remains high, interest in finding daytime friends is growing. Some experts are skeptical about the value of such groups. BEN HUNNICUTT, a leisure-studies professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, says that if people don't spend their time pursuing a new interest or skill, boredom may return. "I tend to be very suspicious of things like 'hanging out,' " he says.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB106124347219431300-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%22University+of+Iowa%22%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29 (subscription required)

Hygienic Lab Tests For Toxic Chemicals In Water (AgriNews, Aug. 19)
Federal environmental officials are trying to determine why water in parts of three Iowa towns is contaminated with a toxic chemical found in rocket fuel, ammunition and fertilizers. Perchlorate has been found in underground water in Hills in eastern Iowa, Napier west of Ames and Ewart, located in east-central Iowa near Montezuma. The EPA checked 179 spots in Iowa for perchlorate as part of a national survey in 2001. All but the three came up clean. Three years ago, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY tested water from 289 Iowa public water systems and didn't find any perchlorate, said lab water-quality expert Richard Kelley. The lab has been running samples for the past couple of years from Missouri and Nebraska and has found only one contaminated well, in North Platte, Neb.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/198095273909632.bsp

Community Organizer Is UI Alumna (Buffalo News, Aug. 19)
Led by 29-year-old Kim Harman, a community organizer from Chicago, Eastside PRIDE, a community organization in Buffalo, N.Y. has begun making inroads against business interests the organization believes are running roughshod over poor people and government neglect of the largely African-American East Side. Harman has a master's degree in urban and regional planning from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20030819/1044409.asp

Playwright Visited Workshop (Interpress Service News Agency, Aug. 19)
Uganda's celebrated playwright and director, Charles Mulekwa, owes his success to the women who have instilled in him values that have inspired his writings. Mulekwa has written over 10 plays, some of which have won international awards. Mulekwa is traveling to the United States for his PhD program this month. During his 2002 fellowship at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, Mulekwa met American playwright August Wilson. He was given the role of co-directing Wilson's play "Jitney" when it was brought to the National Theatre in Uganda in March this year.
http://ipsnews.net/interna.asp?idnews=19719

Former Bartender Pleads Guilty In Bar Fire Case (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 19)
A former bartender who performed a bar stunt last year that burned at least six people -- including three northwest suburban women -- at a popular UNIVERSITY OF IOWA haunt pleaded guilty Monday to reckless use of fire, according to the Johnson County, Iowa, prosecutor. Troy Kline, 27, who worked at Et Cetera in Iowa City, acknowledged that he ignited a fire on the bar April 18, 2002. He admitted fueling the fire with grain alcohol but denied his actions were knowingly reckless, said J. Patrick White, the Johnson County attorney. Kline was placed on unsupervised probation and ordered to perform 100 hours of community service. But with the plea he avoids jail time, and the conviction can be expunged after one year if he avoids legal trouble.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/nearnorthwest/chi-0308190301aug19,1,7060626.story

Kutcher Attended UI (USA Today, Aug. 18)
Actor Ashton Kutcher is one of the biggest names in Hollywood. The actor, who has an off-screen reputation as savvy and confident, was college material - a biochemical engineering major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- when he entered the "Fresh Faces of Iowa" modeling contest after an agent saw him in a bar and suggested he enter. This year, In Style magazine asked him what would have happened if he hadn't been discovered. "I would probably be finishing up my master's degree at MIT or Purdue and going into genetic engineering, and be very happy," he said. "I could be happy no matter what I'm doing. Acting just happens to be what makes me the happiest." That explains why he had no problem dropping out and giving up Iowa for New York, where he signed with an agent and began walking the runways for Tommy Hilfiger, Versace and Calvin Klein.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2003-08-18-ashton-kutcher_x.htm

Redlawsk: Unions Are Electoral Force (Dallas Morning News, Aug. 18)
Although union membership slipped to less than 14 percent of the workforce, it accounted for 26 percent of the electorate in the 2000 presidential electorate. "The unions are just excellent at getting their members to spend a few hours on a cold night in January supporting their candidates," said DAVID REDLAWSK, assistant professor of political science at the University of Iowa.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dallas/politics/national/stories/081803dnnatlabor.1c502.html

Fitch Ponders Use Of God's Name (Tacoma News Tribune, Aug. 18)
Fans of European soccer star David Beckham show their appreciation by filling the Internet with "Becks is God" posts, and some replica jerseys have replaced the name "Beckham" on the back with "God." The increasing use of God in this way isn't a sign that the culture as a whole is leaning away from God, said KRISTINE FITCH, an associate professor at the University of Iowa. Fitch works in the Department of Communication Studies, researching the way language helps to form culture. "If anything, U.S. culture is leaning more toward organized religion," she said. "Fundamentalism is stronger than it has ever been." Perhaps, Fitch theorizes, the increasing use of God on signs and in conversation is a form of subtle resistance to the increasing fundamentalism. The article originally appeared in the RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER, and a version of the article ran Aug. 15 on the website of the NAPLES DAILY NEWS in Florida.
http://www.tribnet.com/entertainment/story/3682152p-3714645c.html

Brochu Wrote Monograph On T. Rex 'Sue' (Union City Reporter, Aug. 17)
A story about paleontology's roots in New Jersey says that currently on display at the Liberty Science Center is an exhibition named "A T. Rex named Sue," featuring a plaster cast of the largest, most complete and best preserved Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton to have ever been unearthed. Found in 1990 on a Sioux reservation in South Dakota by fossil hunter and namesake Susan Hendrickson, "Sue" has shattered long-held assumptions about T. Rex by giving scientists a more accurate picture of what the world was like when it roamed the earth. Sue's existence has resulted in the first full monograph of the species to be written. University of Iowa professor CHRIS BROCHU wrote it while he was doing his post-doctoral studies at Chicago's Field Museum. One of Sue's notable traits is the presence of what some scientists think is a wishbone, or furcula. Sue is the first known case of a wishbone being found in a T. Rex, and it strengthens the link proposed between dinosaurs and birds. The Reporter is based in New Jersey. This article also appeared Aug. 17 in the WEST NEW YORK REPORTER.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=10013702&BRD=1295&PAG=461&dept_id=142205&rfi=6

Warren's Pacifier Research Cited (The Beacon Journal, Aug. 17)
A story about a company that makes products to help wean children from pacifiers says that pacifier use beyond the age of two, which is quite common, can and usually does cause major problems, said JOHN WARREN, associate professor at the College of Dentistry at the University of Iowa. Warren recently completed a study on pacifier use and found that only half of the children who use pacifiers have given them up by 26 to 28 months -- the outside age that pacifiers can be safely used. (Giving it up after the child is 12 months is even better, experts say.) About 10 percent of pacifier users were still sucking away on them after age 4, according to the study. That's long enough to do some serious damage to teeth and jaws, he said. The Journal is based in Ohio.
http://www.ohio.com/mld/beaconjournal/business/6547035.htm

Jones Comments On Electronic Voting Flaws (Palm Beach Post, Aug. 16)
Florida elections officials say their confidence in electronic voting hasn't been shaken by a Johns Hopkins University report that claims a touch-screen system used in other states is vulnerable to fraud and hackers. The July 23 report -- which focused on a Diebold touch-screen system and is disputed by that company -- has heated up the national debate among elections administrators, voting machine makers and academics over the trustworthiness of computerized voting. Critics of electronic voting say that since the Diebold system had generally received high marks from government regulators, the Johns Hopkins report raises concerns about all touch-screen systems and the criteria state and local governments use to evaluate them. "If the standards are weak and the authorities aren't finding glaring security holes, are the other systems any better?" said DOUGLAS JONES, a University of Iowa computer science professor and member of that state's Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/localnews/content/auto/epaper/editions/saturday/local_news_f3d36a7a1027105d1090.html

Kregel Comments On Heat Deaths (Washington Post, Aug. 15)
People confined to very hot spaces with little air flow can die within hours, although the more usual death from hot environments occurs after days of exposure to moderately elevated temperatures. Vulnerability to heat depends so much on a person's age, health and body type that it is virtually impossible to predict how long people trapped in an elevator, subway car or other closed space might survive, several experts on heat illness said yesterday. "To die in an elevator in a few hours would be very unusual, although infants or the elderly would be clearly at higher risk," said KEVIN C. KREGEL, a physiologist and expert in heat-related illness at the University of Iowa. However, in places where the temperatures rise to 140 or 150 degrees Fahrenheit, such as closed cars parked in bright sun, deaths have occurred in less than two hours, almost always in small children, he said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A60454-2003Aug14.html

UI Student Competes To Be Best U.S. 'DJ' (Washington Post, Aug. 15)
UI student DJ SKWINT (aka BRANDON AU) is competing in the DMC/Technics U.S. DJ Championships in Washington, D.C. this weekend. Over the last few months, dozens of would-be superstar DJs have competed in regional qualifiers from Miami to Honolulu for the right to challenge defending champion Perseus and represent the United States at the World Championships, to be held next month in London. Now it's winner-take-all. DJ Jazzy Jeff will host the event, which will also feature a performance by rapper Pharoahe Monch of Organized Konfusion fame. On a more somber note, the late Jam Master Jay of Run DMC will also be honored. He'll be inducted into the DJ Hall of Fame for his contributions to the turntables, alongside icons such as Grandmaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A58116-2003Aug14.html

Columnist Recalls UI Parties Of His Youth (Vineland Journal, Aug. 15)
Todd Norden, now editor of the Living section of the Vineland Journal in New Jersey, remembers his joyful days of drinking and partying as a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Among his favorite Iowa City memories are Gabe's, the Iowa Memorial Union, and readings from renowned authors.
http://www.thedailyjournal.com/news/stories/20030815/localnews/64304.html

Alumnus Named Chancellor (Portage County Gazette, Aug. 15)
Virginia Helm becomes interim chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, the first woman to hold the position in the institution's history. Helm received her doctorate in educational administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.pcgazette.com/news/2003/aug03/helm8-8.htm

Denning Pens Article On Tuition Hikes (Chronicle, Aug. 15)
In an editorial that asks whether tuition is going up too fast at public universities, GERENE DENNING, an associate research scientist in the University of Iowa Department of Internal Medicine, writes: "Financial pressures and decreasing public support are leading to higher percentage increases at public institutions. However, in actual dollar amounts, many of them remain considerably less expensive than their private counterparts. If the new legislation leads to loss of federal financial-aid grants to students at these less-expensive public institutions, where will students turn -- to more-expensive private colleges, or to burdensome student loans?"
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i49/49b00402.htm

UI Cited As Great Place For Gay, Lesbian Professors (Chronicle, Aug. 15)
In 1993, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA became the first public university to extend health and other benefits to the partners of gay employees. Two years before that, the university's law school was the first to hire a lesbian faculty couple. Several senior professors are gay or lesbian, including the head of the department of women's studies. Since 1985, university policy has protected employees from discrimination based on sexual orientation.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i49/49a01205.htm

Hurtig Touts Hancher To UI Visitors (Chronicle, Aug. 15)
If you're considering a job at the University of Iowa, one of the things the recruiters will do is take you on a tour of Hancher Auditorium. They're particularly proud of the activities there. JUDITH HURTIG, artistic director of the performance space, notes that it's helpful in attracting job candidates from the coasts because "often, the perception is that Iowa is a cultural wasteland." In fact, Hancher has the reputation of being quite sophisticated and of commissioning interesting new works. Faculty members who are artistically talented can even make extra money. Last spring, when the Stuttgart Ballet gave two performances of Romeo and Juliet, the orchestra was made up of Iowa professors, who took in about $30,000 for their performance.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i49/49a01201.htm

Sanders: Caregivers Need Support (Times-Press, Aug. 14)
The elderly are not the only ones who need support as they grow older. The caregivers do as well. Caregivers are caring for the most treasured resources in the United States, older adults, said SARA SANDERS, PhD, LSW from the University of Iowa. "If you're not a caregiver now, you will be," she said. She noted one in four people is a caregiver, an individual who provides assistance. Sanders noted the numbers will start to double or triple as the population begins to age. (The newspaper is based in Streator, Ill.)
http://www.times-press.com/newsmain.php?storyid=6235

UI In 'Outside' Top 10 (Northwest Arkansas Times, Aug. 14)
With its hilly landscape and multitude of streams, Fayetteville and surrounding areas have long served as a haven for outdoor enthusiasts. Now, those features have helped rank the area among the nation's top 40 college towns. Outside Magazine, a publication focused on outdoor activities, set out to find the "coolest college towns, places where the outdoors and intellectual esprit mingle blissfully." The University of Arkansas' presence in Fayetteville and Northwest Arkansas, with its diversity of terrain and number of different activities available, earned it a spot at No. 23. The top 10 includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City.
http://www.nwanews.com/times/story_news.php?storyid=109295

Iowa Included On 'Outside' List (Bozeman Daily Chronicle, Aug. 14)
Montana State University is ranked No. 5 in Outside magazine's latest list of "40 Best College Towns," a ranking that can't hurt MSU's ongoing drive to recruit more students, especially out-of-state students. No. 1 on Outside's list is the University of California at Santa Cruz (for its surfing, scuba diving, kayaking, mountain biking, redwoods and beaches). Rounding out the top 10 are the University of Colorado at Boulder, Middlebury College in Vermont, Warren Wilson College in North Carolina, Simon Fraser University in Canada, Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, the University of Virginia, Northern Arizona University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA (yes, Iowa, for its lakes, mountain biking, kayaking, cliff climbing and cross-country skiing).
http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/articles/2003/08/14/news/01outsidemagbzbigs.txt

UI Student Enjoys Pool Job (Vernon Hills Review, Aug. 14)
Tom DiCicco, a 19-year old college student from Vernon Hills, has worked as a lifeguard at the local pool this season. "It's a summer job you can't beat," said DiCicco, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sophomore who is on the school's water skiing team and is majoring in business. "I've worked here for five summers starting out as a camp counselor and the last three as a lifeguard."
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/vh/08-14-03-82415.html

New Principal Has UI Credentials (Deerfield Review, Aug. 14)
Deerfield's Holy Cross School, which has been providing a Catholic education to elementary students since 1937, has hired its first male principal, David Burke. Burke comes to Holy Cross with many years of experience in education. He earned a master's degree in counseling from the University of Wisconsin and an administrative certificate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/de/08-14-03-85816.html

'Outside' Ranks Iowa City One Of Best (Laramie Boomerang, Aug. 13)
In the September issue of Outside magazine, a popular publication that deals with outdoor recreation, Laramie, home of the University of Wyoming, nabbed the 34th spot out of the 40 listed as the "best" college towns in the country. UW was ranked among such schools as the University of California at Santa Cruz (which was ranked No. 1), Montana State University, Dartmouth College and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "We're in good company," said Jay Fromkin, the University of Wyoming's public relations director. The Boomerang is based in Laramie, Wyo.
http://www.laramieboomerang.com/more.asp?StoryID=1804

UI Publishes 'Butterflies In Pocket' (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Aug. 13)
"Butterflies in Your Pocket: A Guide to Butterflies of the Upper Midwest," (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, $9.95) is a handy guide to the butterflies in our back yard. The foldout pocket guide offers names and brief information on 65 species of butterflies. It also has 16 panels of photos, which show some of the differences between females and males, seasonal forms and the upper-and undersides of wings. Although it is far from complete, the guide can answer many of your beginning butterfly questions and perhaps pique your interest in butterflies. And, best of all, it's the perfect take-along size and shape to tuck into your pocket or picnic basket.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1453/4024226.html

UI Recruiting Men To Nursing (NPR, Aug. 12)
A story about recruiting men to nursing features LINDA EVERETT, chief nursing officer at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, as well as a male UI nursing student. Everett says making nursing attractive to guys is a challenge. The student earned a degree in microbiology expecting a career in public health but nursing is where the jobs are. He says one of the appeals of nursing is that he can go anywhere in the country and get a job. This segment aired on Morning Edition.
http://discover.npr.org/features/feature.jhtml?wfId=1393114

UI May Open Detox Center For Students (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 12)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is considering opening a detoxification center for drunken students who run up against the law. One option would be a joint venture with Iowa City. The city's police chief has suggested a similar idea, saying someone who's arrested for public drunkenness doesn't necessarily belong in jail if there's an alternative.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2003/08/12/national0139EDT0427.DTL

Adams Comments On Celebrity Politicians (Christian Science Monitor, Aug. 12)
Six days after Arnold Schwarzenegger entered the race for governor of California, energizing headline writers across America and transforming a political situation which had been merely chaotic into a maelstrom of biblical scale, inquiring minds want to know: Why? Why give up a life of ease? Maybe Arnold wants to move up the celebrity ladder, as did Ronald Reagan and Jesse Ventura and Sonny Bono before him. They may want people to see them as substantive. Perhaps they are after a kind of fame more lasting than that of a box-office draw. "Last year's action movie hero can be forgotten, but once you're a governor, you're always a governor," says BLUFORD ADAMS, a University of Iowa English professor and author of "E Pluribus Barnum: The Great Showman and the Making of US Popular Culture".
http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0812/p01s01-uspo.html

IEM, Electronic Markets Praised (Hampton Roads Daily Press, Aug. 12)
Dubbed by critics as the "terrorism futures market" and "terrorism betting parlor," a Pentagon proposal to create a futures market in which people could vote with money on the odds of such future occurrences as terror attacks and suicide bombings drifted briefly across the political radar last week before being shot down by Democrats and Republicans alike. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, run by the University of Iowa, has been offering a futures market in presidential elections since 1988. In fact, a number of professors associated with that market, which has been more accurate than pre-election polling, were involved in early planning of the abandoned Pentagon project.
http://www.dailypress.com/news/dp-57088sy0aug12,0,6693381.story?coll=dp-headlines-topnews

O'Hara Comments On Post-Partum Depression (Naples Daily News, Aug. 12)
Most new mothers know the baby blues, that sad, weepy feeling that sweeps over them in those first weeks after giving birth. But a surprising number -- 10 to 15 percent -- also experience a far more serious illness called postpartum depression, whose symptoms can include feelings of hopelessness and thoughts of suicide. "A woman could be sufficiently depressed that she would hold the belief that her child was better off dead than alive, and this was a positive thing," said MICHAEL O'HARA, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City and an expert on postpartum depression. "It could be a very strongly held delusional belief driven by the depression." The Daily News is in Florida.
http://www.naplesnews.com/03/08/neapolitan/d949984a.htm

Cooper: Kids Need More Bathroom Breaks (WCVB-TV, Aug. 11)
Kids don't give up only naps after kindergarten. Moving on to first grade often means less access to go to the bathroom -- which can lead to unnecessary accidents or other urination problems. However, better training for teachers about children's normal and abnormal bathroom needs could help kids with their voiding, or urinating, practices, according to a University of Iowa Health Care study based on surveys of public elementary school teachers. The study, which appears in the September issue of the Journal of Urology, is believed to be the first to query teachers on the topic of young students and bathroom access. Children spend about half of their waking hours at school, so how much bathroom access they have is an important issue, said CHRISTOPHER COOPER, UI associate professor of urology and the study's principal investigator. "Pediatric voiding problems are fairly common and can be socially devastating for children. However, very little seems to be known about it from the teacher standpoint," Cooper said. "Most teachers aren't trained to recognize that it can be a health or medical problem." WCVB is in Boston. Versions of the same story appeared on the Web sites of KCRA-TV in Sacramento, NBC4-TV in Columbus, WTAE-TV in Pittsburgh, WLWT-TV in Cincinnati, WMAQ-TV in Chicago, NBC10-TV in Philadelphia, NBC6-TV in Miami, WKMG-TV in Orlando, WBAL-TV in Baltimore, WJAR-TV in Providence, WMUR-TV in Manchester, N.H., WAPT-TV in Jackson, Miss., WNBC-TV in New York City, and many other media outlets.
http://www.thebostonchannel.com/education/2397190/detail.html

Forsythe Comments On Failed Pentagon Plan (U.S. News & World Report, Aug. 11)
An editorial by CNN's Lou Dobbs, who says critics pulled the plug too early on the Pentagon's Policy Analysis Market, which would have allowed traders to speculate in an artificial market on economic and political events in the Middle East, including assassinations and terrorist attacks. As it turns out, Dobbs writes, "such markets are actually very successful at predicting nonfinancial outcomes and events. The best-known and possibly most successful example is the Iowa Electronic Markets, a system set up in 1988 at the University of Iowa as a way to examine the behavior of markets. Results from the IEM have been better at predicting the outcome of political elections than opinion polls. Since its inception, the system has successfully predicted the outcome of every presidential election. ROBERT FORSYTHE, board member and cofounder of the IEM, told me the way that the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency exchange was going to work appeared logical. '[It would have run] contracts whose payoffs were tied to the GDP of Iraq and Iran; that could make a lot of sense to me.'" A version of the story also ran Aug. 3 on the website of the NEW YORK DAILY NEWS.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/biztech/articles/030811/11dobbs.htm

Column Recommends IEM For Election Watchers (Village Voice, Aug. 11)
In response to a request for online election resources the writer of a column recommends the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (biz.uiowa.edu/iem/markets), "a Wall Street for political junkies that lets you trade shares tied to a candidate's fortunes. For example, if you think John Kerry's due for a popularity bump, scoop up his stock while it's on the ebb and wait for the magic to happen. Not only are the daily share prices an excellent indicator of who's hot, but there's money to be made; starting accounts can be opened for up to $500, and the whole shebang's actually regulated by the federal government."
http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0333/koerner.php

Gallery, Lightfoot, Lack Profiled (Sports Illustrated, Aug. 11)
UI students ROBERT GALLERY and ANDREW LIGHTFOOT and alumnus WILL LACK are profiled in a story about college football offensive linemen being the most intelligent players on the team. Gallery, a tackle who will start for the 2003 Hawkeyes, is an elementary education major who student-taught last spring, while Lightfoot, co-MVP of the 2002 Hawkeyes, is a student in the UI Carver College of Medicine. Lack, a four-year member of the Hawkeyes, is now a student at Harvard Medical School. This story is not on Sports Illustrated's Web site and can be found only in the print version of the magazine.

Neumann Comments On Terrorism Market (Time, Aug. 11)
GEORGE NEUMANN, University of Iowa economics professor, said that while a Pentagon plan to sell terrorism futures has been scrapped, the idea is still valid. "The PR has been bad," says Neumann. "But people are going to want to revisit these issues." Neumann is a director of the university's political stock market (Iowa Electronic Market), which has been more accurate than polls in predicting elections.
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1101030811-472877,00.html

Case Puts Spotlight On Research Ethics (The Cape Argus, Aug. 11)
For six months, Mary Nixon and 10 other orphans were relentlessly belittled for every little imperfection in their speech to test the theory that children become stutterers because of psychological pressure. Sixty-four years later, the experience still stings. Nixon, now 76, and some of the other test subjects sued the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA earlier this year over lifelong psychological problems they say stem in part from the 1939 experiment. The case has not only thrown a spotlight on an experiment some participants bitterly call the "Monster Study," it has also illustrated the way research ethics have evolved over the years. The Argus is based in South Africa. Versions of the story also ran Aug. 10 on the website of the BOSTON GLOBE, the CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER
http://www.capeargus.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=342&fArticleId=205579

Astronaut Cites Coleman's Accomplishments (Detroit Free Press, Aug. 11)
Sally Ride, shuttle astronaut and the first American woman to go into space, writes in a column about how few girls go into science and engineering professions. Among the success stories she does cite is that of Mary Sue Coleman, who, Ride writes, worked as a biochemist for 19 years investigating the immune system's response to cancer, particularly leukemia, before becoming the first woman president of, first, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1995 and the University of Michigan in 2002.
http://www.freep.com/voices/columnists/eride11_20030811.htm

O'Hara Comments On Post-Partum Depression (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Aug. 11)
Most new mothers know the baby blues, that sad, weepy feeling that sweeps over them in those first weeks after giving birth. But a surprising number -- 10 to 15 percent -- also experience a far more serious illness called postpartum depression, whose symptoms can include feelings of hopelessness and thoughts of suicide. "A woman could be sufficiently depressed that she would hold the belief that her child was better off dead than alive, and this was a positive thing," said MICHAEL O'HARA, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City and an expert on postpartum depression. "It could be a very strongly held delusional belief driven by the depression."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/4034952.html

Brochu Wrote Monograph On T. Rex 'Sue' (Secaucus Reporter, Aug. 10)
A story about paleontology's roots in New Jersey says that currently on display at the Liberty Science Center is an exhibition named "A T. rex named Sue," featuring a plaster cast of the largest, most complete and best preserved Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton to have ever been unearthed. Found in 1990 on a Sioux reservation in South Dakota by fossil hunter and namesake Susan Hendrickson, "Sue" has shattered long-held assumptions about T. Rex by giving scientists a more accurate picture of what the world was like when it roamed the earth. Sue's existence has resulted in the first full monograph of the species to be written. University of Iowa professor CHRIS BROCHU wrote it while he was doing his post-doctoral studies at Chicago's Field Museum. One of Sue's notable traits is the presence of what some scientists think is a wishbone, or furcula. Sue is the first known case of a wishbone being found in a T. rex, and it strengthens the link proposed between dinosaurs and birds. A version of the story also ran Aug. 10 on the website of the NORTH BERGEN REPORTER in New Jersey.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=9977686&BRD=1298&PAG=461&dept_id=142349&rfi=6

Greenberg: Antibiotics Offer Limited Defense (Centre Daily Times, Aug. 10)
Rather than trying to kill such nasty critters as E. coli or staph with antibiotics, future drugs may render the bugs deaf and blind to the signals of their peers. Decoding the microbial languages may be a first step toward new treatments for ills ranging from cystic fibrosis to anthrax. Traditional antibiotics are like saturation bombing, said PETER GREENBERG, a pathogen expert at the University of Iowa. Greenberg's research focuses, in part, on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a microbe that causes chronic infections in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. "Targeting the quorum sensing system is more like smart bombing," Greenberg said. "If you have a cystic fibrosis patient or a burn patient, you know it is probably Pseudomonas and can pull the smart bomb off the shelf." The Times is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/news/6501776.htm

Whitmore Finalist For Texas Tech Top Post (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Aug. 9)
A University of Iowa provost has been named as the sole finalist for the president's post at Texas Tech University and will be offered the job after a state-required waiting period. JON S. WHITMORE , a former dean of the University of Texas in Austin, was selected for his ability to raise funds and bring in top-notch faculty, said Brian Newby, a Tech regent and chairman of the search committee. The Gazette is based in Texas. Versions of the story also ran Aug. 9 in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS and the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.

Whitmore Named Texas Tech President Finalist (Texarkana Gazette, Aug. 9)
A University of Iowa provost was named Friday as the sole finalist for the president's post at Texas Tech University and will be offered the job after a state-required waiting period. JON S. WHITMORE, a former dean of the University of Texas in Austin, was selected for his ability to raise funds and bring in top-notch faculty, said Brian Newby, a Tech regent and chairman of the search committee. The Gazette is based in Texas. A version of the story also ran Aug. 9 on the websites of the AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN, the AMARAILLO GLOBE NEWS, KAMC-TV, KLBK, and KCBD-TV, all based in Texas.
http://www.texarkanagazette.com/articles/2003/08/09/news/news13.txt

Jones 'Shocked' Computer Flaws Persist (Providence Journal Bulletin, Aug. 9)
A roundup of editorials cites a piece that originally appeared in the BERKSHIRE EAGLE in Pittsfield, Mass., which said that after the Florida election debacle, Americans, with their usual faith in technology, wanted to believe that if the whole system could be computerized, all problems could be solved. But researchers from the Information Security Institute at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore found that the software that runs the most popular touch-screen voting machine, the Diebold Election Systems AccuVote-TS, is riddled with flaws that could allow voters to cast as many votes as they pleased and let poll workers alter ballots without being detected. The machines apparently can also be hacked - accessed and manipulated - from a remote computer. A company spokesman said that many of the problems identified in a report by the researchers had already been corrected, but University of Iowa professor DOUGLAS W. JONES told The New York Times he was shocked to see it cited flaws he had pointed out five years ago. The Bulletin is based in Rhode Island.
http://www.projo.com/ap/ma/1060437380.htm

Pekin City Manager Is UI Alumnus (Peoria Journal-Star, Aug. 9)
Current Pekin City Manager Dick Hierstein interviewed Friday for the top city administrator's post in Marshalltown, Iowa, where he is a finalist for the job. News that Hierstein was eyeing a return to Iowa - where he once served as a city administrator in two communities - came as no surprise to current and former Pekin officials who knew of his interest in returning to that state some day. Hierstein, 55, is a Fort Madison, Iowa, native and is a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumnus. The Journal-Star is based in Illinois.
http://www.pjstar.com/news/topnews/g175017a.html

Forsythe Comments On IEM Predicting Election Results (Science, Aug. 8)
In 1776, English economist Adam Smith noted that a market made up of individuals, each acting in his own self-interest, tends to behave in a manner that's wiser and more farsighted than the individuals themselves. In the past half-century or so, economists have built upon this idea with the "efficient market hypothesis. Since 1988, the University Of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business has been predicting the outcomes of elections with a futures market. About 7,500 participants around the globe buy and sell shares whose values depend on the percentage of the popular vote each candidate gets. As election night approaches, the prices of those shares become a very accurate predictor of who will win. "Our average error is about 2.5 percent," says economist ROBERT FORSYTHE of the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "We typically do better than polls." The Iowa research group has also set up markets that accurately predict the box office returns of movies.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/301/5634/749?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&author1=Seife&searchid=1061228808408_6089&stored_search=&FIRSTINDEX=0&fdate=10/1/1995&tdate=8/31/2003

UI Student Helps Chicago Schools (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 8)
College students from around the country went to Chicago this summer to lend a hand in the city's public schools. The Summer Fellows Program, believed to be the first of its kind in the country, began as a pilot last year when 24 college students took part. This year, the Chicago Board of Education cast a much bigger net with the intention of major expansion. For some of the conscientious rookies, who have experienced classroom discipline problems firsthand and seen some children who can barely read or write, the summer's experiences so far have been eye-opening. But listen to Emily Hetzer of Naperville, a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "It's good to go where you are needed," she told Tribune reporter Ana Beatriz Cholo. "Teaching as a profession does make you feel good about what you are doing."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/chi-0308090233aug09,1,2983368.story

UI Student Is Character In Novel (New York Times, Aug. 8)
You don't step into Steven Rinehart's fiction seeking role models or even kindred spirits. The title of his story collection was "Kick in the Head," and that was precisely what most of his shiftless male protagonists badly deserved. Like Sam Lipsyte and Matthew Klam, Rinehart writes about men of a certain generation -- roughly defined, those now in their 30's -- who know they should act better, who know that a conscience is superior to a beer gut but who don't, in the end, really care -- or rather, who don't care enough to do anything about it. Andrew Bergman, the narrator of "Built in a Day," Rinehart's disturbingly comic first novel, is 32, a "goateed slacker with a scraggly soul patch and a few . . . piercings" who, in his 12 years as a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA undergrad, burned through "four advisers, seven majors and five department chairs." http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/10/books/review/10MILES.html?ex=1061092800&en=d56d5e98a0efbbe1&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Alumna Is Candidate For Superintendent (Adrian Daily Telegram, Aug. 8)
Six superintendent candidates will get their chance to meet the Tecumseh school board and community next week in three days of public interviews, among them Theresa Spencer, director of education technology for the East Detroit Public Schools. Spencer's bachelor's degree is from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and her graduate degrees, including a doctorate, are from Eastern Michigan University. The Telegram is based in Michigan.
http://www.lenconnect.com/articles/2003/08/08/news/news04.txt

Schmidt Comments On Job Satisfaction (MSNBC, Aug. 8)
A story that offers tips on finding a job one loves quotes FRANK SCHMIDT, Ph.D., professor of human resources at the University of Iowa Tippie College of Business, who says that an employee's personality is a big factor in job satisfaction. He says personality traits can be traced to the tendency for some to be emotionally stable and for others to be neurotic. These traits have a genetic component, notes Schmidt, but past and present experiences in and out of work also affect perception of a job.
http://www.msnbc.com/news/949722.asp

Weyer Comments On Well Contamination (KAAL-TV, Aug. 8)
Officials say the Johnson County, Iowa town of Hills is not alone with its drinking water problems. Some private wells have been contaminated with a substance used to make rocket fuel. The EPA doesn't know why. Meanwhile, a new study of about 100 private wells in 50 Iowa towns without municipal water systems shows they're contaminated too -- with nitrate, ammonia, pesticides, bacteria or arsenic. The study was funded by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Spokesman PETER WEYER says residents of communities like Hills who use private wells risk exposure to toxins that are detected and treated by municipal water systems. He says, however, in small towns, residents aren't willing or they don't have the resources to get on a public water system. KAAL is based in Minnesota. A version of the story also ran Aug. 8 on the website OMAHA CHANNEL.COM.
http://www.kaaltv.com/article/view/25554/

Gephardt Hopes for Strong UI Support (MSNBC.com, Aug. 8)
Democratic presidential candidate Richard Gephardt believes he will do well in the Iowa caucus, even though he supported the U.S. war in Iraq. As evidence, he says he is doing well in Iowa's Johnson County-Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a strong antiwar contingent.
http://stacks.msnbc.com:80/news/920475.asp

Jones Says Voting Machines Flawed (Toledo Blade, Aug. 8)

A national conference of computer security specialists concluded yesterday with almost universal agreement that touch-screen voting technology the federal government is spending hundreds of millions of dollars on since the 2000 Florida election debacle may be vulnerable to errors and tampering. DOUGLAS JONES, University of Iowa associate professor of computer science, reported finding flaws in the machines years before initial reports were published, and they still have not been corrected.
http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20030807/NEWS05/108070146

Kelzenberg Discusses Internships (PublicBroadcasting.Net, Aug. 8)

In a weakened economy with fewer jobs, competition from more experienced workers, and predictions of lower salaries, these students want to leave college with an ability to hit the ground running. An internship has increasingly been seen as an important tool for students about to move into the world of real work. But those same economic realities have led some to rethink an internship's worth. Paid internships do exist. DAVID C. KELZENBERG, internship coordinator at the career center of the University of Iowa, reports that most of his students pursue paid internships, though he notes a dip in the number available this summer. "I can create a better pool of students when interns are paid," he says. "[Students] need to be making money."
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/wxxi/news.newsmain?action=article&ARTICLE_ID=527424

Case Puts Spotlight On Research Ethics (Contra Costa Times, Aug. 8)
For six months, Mary Nixon and 10 other orphans were relentlessly belittled for every little imperfection in their speech to test the theory that children become stutterers because of psychological pressure. Sixty-four years later, the experience still stings. Nixon, now 76, and some of the other test subjects sued the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA earlier this year over lifelong psychological problems they say stem in part from the 1939 experiment. The case has not only thrown a spotlight on an experiment some participants bitterly call the "Monster Study," it has also illustrated the way research ethics have evolved over the years.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/cctimes/news/6477817.htm

UI Receives Odd Gifts (WJRT-TV, Aug. 8)

Iowa's three public universities want the option of saying "thanks, but no thanks." It seems grads of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State and Northern Iowa are giving their schools some pretty strange gifts. In June, the University of Iowa paleontology program received ten tons of rocks from a collector who died. The collection is worth $100,000 and includes fossils from 450 million years ago. Others have contributed vacation property. And one farm couple donated their collection of stuffed wild animals from Africa complete with lions and aardvarks. The university foundations are now examining offers before accepting them. Officials are trying to avoid having to sell stuff against the wishes of the donor. WJRT is in Flint, Mich.
http://abclocal.go.com/wjrt/news/030102_NW_bizarre_news.html

UI Alumna Named Editor (Lancaster Eagle-Gazette, Aug. 7)
Antoinette Taylor-Thomas, assistant metro editor at the Rockford (Ill.) Register Star, has been named managing editor of the Lancaster Eagle-Gazette. Taylor-Thomas started her career in 1991 as a staff writer at the Cedar Rapids Gazette in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. She is a Chicago native and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate. The newspaper is based in Ohio.
http://www.lancastereaglegazette.com/news/stories/20030807/localnews/15491.html

Jones: Voting System Flawed (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Aug. 7)

A national conference of computer security specialists in Washington yesterday concluded with almost universal agreement that new touch-screen voting technology the federal government is spending hundreds of millions of dollars on since the 2000 election debacle may be readily vulnerable to errors and tampering. The research of Aviel Rubin, of Johns Hopkins University's Information Security Institute, has been widely cited as proof that there are major problems because the new law encourages electronic voting. He said yesterday his research found "serious problems" with software for such machines and that the code for one popular machine was even widely available on the Internet. The machines of Diebold Elections Systems, a prominent maker located in North Canton, Ohio, were the target of Rubin's research and are in use around the country. Diebold, however, has counter-charged that Rubin used the wrong software, hardware and environment to conduct his test and failed to take into account the use of poll watchers who could prevent so-called smart cards from being used by more than one voter. Rubin said Diebold's charges about his research were not true. DOUGLAS JONES of the University of Iowa said he also found flaws in Diebold's machines years before Rubin published his results and that they had not been corrected.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/03219/209386.stm

Jones Says Company Ignored His Warning (Berkshire Eagle, Aug. 7)
After the Florida election debacle, Americans, with their usual faith in technology, wanted to believe that if the whole system could be computerized, all problems could be solved. Not so, say researchers from the Information Security Institute at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. They found that the software that runs the most popular touch-screen voting machine, the Diebold Election Systems AccuVote-TS, is riddled with flaws that could allow voters to cast as many votes as they pleased and let poll workers alter ballots without being detected. A company spokesman said that many of the problems identified in the report had already been corrected, but University of Iowa professor DOUGLAS W. JONES told The New York Times he was shocked to see it cited flaws he had pointed out five years ago.
http://www.berkshireeagle.com/Stories/0,1413,101~6267~1556518,00.html

Forsythe Explains Markets (Philadelphia News, Aug. 7)
The plan by retired Rear Adm. John Poindexter to fight terrorism by using a futures market to predict Mideast developments was universally panned. In fact, the initiative cost Poindexter his job. A columnist writes that Poindexter may have been on to something, and the media did us all a disservice by so easily dismissing him. His aim was to establish a web-based futures trading market where experts could bet on the prospects of a terror attack. It may sound crazy, but markets are great predictors of world events. The point here was that the collective consciousness of experts could be an effective intelligence-gathering technique. A similar model at the University of Iowa has achieved great success in handicapping political contests. "What it appears he was trying to do was expand his base of advisers," explained ROBERT FORSYTHE of the Iowa Electronic Markets, which does a better job prognosticating elections than any poll. "People who come to participate in a market like this have some information about outcomes and trade on that information. What we have discovered in certain situations is that these types of futures markets do incredibly well in collecting bits of information disseminated by thousands of people." Unfortunately, while it's difficult to explain this complex idea in 20-second sound bites, it was easy to inaccurately torpedo it in a few sentences.
http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/news/6476564.htm

Whitmore Visits Texas Tech (KCBD-TV.com, Aug. 6)
It appears Texas Tech is close to naming a new president. On Wednesday the second of two finalists visited the University, and an announcement could come as soon as Friday. JON WHITMORE came for a meet, greet and a tour Texas Tech University. Whitmore is currently provost and professor of theater arts at the University of Iowa.
http://www.kcbd.com/Global/story.asp?S=1391932

Stuttering Case Puts Spotlight On Research Ethics (CBSnews.com, Aug. 6)
For six months, Mary Nixon and 10 other orphans were relentlessly belittled for every little imperfection in their speech to test the theory that children become stutterers because of psychological pressure. Sixty-four years later, the experience still stings. Nixon, now 76, and some of the other test subjects sued the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA earlier this year over lifelong psychological problems they say stem in part from the 1939 experiment. The case has not only thrown a spotlight on an experiment some participants bitterly call the "Monster Study," it has also illustrated the way research ethics have evolved over the years.
A version of this Associated Press story also appeared on the web sites of KAAL-TV (Minn.), MSNBC, WHTM-TV (Pa.) and SALON.COM.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/08/06/health/main566882.shtml

Stuttering Case Puts Spotlight On Research Ethics (Newsday, Aug. 6)
For six months, Mary Nixon and 10 other orphans were relentlessly belittled for every little imperfection in their speech to test the theory that children become stutterers because of psychological pressure. Sixty-four years later, the experience still stings. Nixon, now 76, and some of the other test subjects sued the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA earlier this year over lifelong psychological problems they say stem in part from the 1939 experiment. The case has not only thrown a spotlight on an experiment some participants bitterly call the "Monster Study," it has also illustrated the way research ethics have evolved over the years.
A version of this Associated Press story also appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, SEATTLE TIMES, OMAHA WORLD HERALD, ARIZONA DAILY SUN, BALTIMORE SUN, ABCNEWS.COM, ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS, WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING SUN, NEW LONDON (Conn.) DAY, CHICAGO SUN TIMES, NEWARK STAR LEDGER, ATHENS (Ga.) BANNER HERALD, CANADA.COM, OTTAWA CITIZEN, ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER ENQUIRER, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, BILOXI SUN HERALD, BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS DEMOCRAT, GRAND FORKS HERALD, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, WILKES BARRE WEEKENDER, CENTRE DAILY TIMES (Pa.), WICHITA EAGLE, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, TUSCALOOSA NEWS, FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, KANSAS CITY STAR, LAKELAND (Fla.) LEDGER, TIMES DAILY OF ALABAMA, KATV-TV (Ark.), WCIV-TV (S.C.).
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/sns-ap-stuttering-study,0,892584.story?coll=ny-health-headlines

UI-Owned Land Is In Annexation Dispute (The Lakeland Ledger, Aug. 6)
An annexation dispute between the cities of Winter Haven and Eagle Lake, Fla., involves 37 acres of land owned by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20030806/NEWS/308060305/1021

UI Dean Supporters Participate In Internet Meeting (NewsHour, Aug. 5)
Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean, including several at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, meet on the Internet to support their candidate. NewsHour is the website of the Lehrer NewsHour on PBS.
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/media/july-dec03/internetpolitics_8-5.html

Workshop Alumnus Runs Seaport Museum (New York Times, Aug. 5)
A story about the South Street Seaport Museum in New York says its president, Peter Neill, attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP with classmates John Irving and Gail Godwin and subsequently wrote three published novels, "A Time Piece" (1970), "Mock Turtle Soup" (1972) and "Acoma" (1978). Eventually he put aside fiction writing for the imperative of earning a living, and became executive director of Schooner Inc., a New Haven program patterned after the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater Inc.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/05/nyregion/05PROF.html?ex=1060747200&en=cf34a6f1fd1b50c2&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

UI Medicine Alumnus Moves Practice (Aberdeen News, Aug. 5)
Dr. Jay D. Bachmayer will be relocating his internal medicine practice from Internal Medicine Associates to Avera United Clinic in Aberdeen, S.D. He began seeing patients Aug. 4 at Avera United Clinic, located on the Midland campus of Avera St. Luke's. Bachmayer, who is board-certified in internal medicine, is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. He completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of Nebraska College of Medicine.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/6461190.htm

IEM Cited In Story On Futures Markets (Business Standard, Aug. 5)
A story about futures markets says the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is offering markets in the 2004 U.S. presidential elections, in computer industry returns and in the U.S. Fed's rate cut announcements. The Standard is based in India.
http://www.business-standard.com/today/story.asp?Menu=26&story=20011

Carlson Vies For Iowa Supreme Court Judgeship (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 5)
A vacancy on the Iowa Supreme Court has attracted 18 applicants, including judges, attorneys and a law professor. The 15-member Judicial Nominating Commission will narrow the field to three nominees on Aug. 15. The finalists' names will be submitted to the governor for his appointment to the court. Among the candidates who have applied for the job is JONATHAN CARLSON, a law professor in Iowa City. The vacancy was created by the retirement of Justice Linda Neuman, the first woman appointed to the Iowa Supreme Court. She has served on the court since 1986. Neuman begins teaching a course at the University of Iowa College of Law this month.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=816789

Article: IEM Has Reliable Record (Boston Globe, Aug. 4)
An article about arguments why the Pentagon's planned futures market might have worked says that commodities traders have long used markets to protect themselves from future risks. But the idea is being applied ever more broadly by academic and commercial institutions. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS at the University of Iowa has accurately predicted the outcomes of the past four presidential elections, based on the prices of futures contracts associated with each candidate.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/216/business/In_defense_of_DARPA_programs+.shtml

Forsythe: Futures Reliable Indicators (Wired, Aug. 4)
Though there was an outcry over the Pentagon's terrorism futures market, a similar online exchange is in the works to predict what the U.S. government is up to. The American Action Market will offer various Washington "futures" that can be bet upon and traded. Examples include: Which country will the White House threaten next? Who will be the next foreign leader to move off the CIA payroll and onto the White House's "most wanted" list? Which corporation with close ties to the White House will be the next cloaked in scandal? The AAM will begin registering traders in September and plans to open for business Oct. 1 -- the same launch date proposed for the Pentagon's terrorism market, until it was shelved. BOB FORSYTHE, a University of Iowa professor who helped organize the Iowa Electronic Markets , which speculate on election results, agreed that futures are reliable indicators of what's going to happen next -- if the traders are knowledgeable. "You have to have informed traders or they don't work very well," he said. "Who are the informed traders in an assassination market, for example? The same's true for predicting the White House."
http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0,1283,59879,00.html

Alumnus Wins Tenure At Ithaca College (Ithaca Journal, Aug. 4)
At its February meeting, the Ithaca (N.Y.) College Board of Trustees granted tenure and/or promotion to 17 faculty members, including Greg Shelley, who was granted tenure and promoted to associate professor. Shelley, Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, joined Ithaca College as an assistant professor in 1996. He received his doctorate from the University of Utah, master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/news/stories/20030804/localnews/2141.html

Brochu Wrote Monograph On T. Rex 'Sue' (Jersey City Reporter, Aug. 3)
A story about paleontology's roots in New Jersey says that currently on display at the Liberty Science Center is an exhibition named "A T. rex named Sue," featuring a plaster cast of the largest, most complete and best preserved Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton to have ever been unearthed. Found in 1990 on a Sioux reservation in South Dakota by fossil hunter and namesake Susan Hendrickson, "Sue" has shattered long-held assumptions about T. Rex by giving scientists a more accurate picture of what the world was like when it roamed the earth. Sue's existence has resulted in the first full monograph of the species to be written. University of Iowa professor CHRIS BROCHU wrote it while he was doing his post-doctoral studies at Chicago's Field Museum. One of Sue's notable traits is the presence of what some scientists think is a wishbone, or furcula. Sue is the first known case of a wishbone being found in a T. rex, and it strengthens the link proposed between dinosaurs and birds.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=9947413&BRD=1293&PAG=461&dept_id=141721&rfi=6

Neumann Comments On Futures Markets (Toronto Star, Aug. 3)
A story about the U.S. Pentagon's plans to create a futures market where investors could speculate on assassinations and political coups in the Mideast says that one of the more nontraditional uses of futures contracts has been at the University of Iowa, where since 1988 the Iowa Electronic Markets has facilitated the buying and selling of futures in presidential election results. It's a way of taking established, proven economic theory and applying it to social and political science, said GEORGE NEUMANN, professor of economics and applied mathematics and one of the founders of the program. The markets - fuelled by the incentive of people involved to prevail by using their experience and knowledge - can better predict outcomes than a poll of the general population, he said. "I go out and ask a random sample of people something, I get answers from people who aren't interested, who haven't thought about the issue - and they'll still have an opinion," he said. "In the markets, you get a real selectivity principle going. Only those who think they know something about trading or about the underlying fundamental issue come in. The principle of putting your money where your mouth isn't doesn't operate in traditional survey questions, but it does operate here when you have something at stake."
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1059862507009&call_pageid=968350072197&col=969048863851

Author Yates 'Embittered' By Lack Of Tenure At UI (New York Times, Aug. 3)
A story about author Richard Yates (described as one of literature's nearly men -- no loser but never quite an outright winner) says his early and finest short story (as he liked to think), "A Really Good Jazz Piano," was turned down nine times, with gushing praise, by the best magazines in the United States. Only the devoted persistence of his agent, Monica McCall, got it into print. Yates's first published novel, ''Revolutionary Road,'' was a finalist for the National Book Award in 1962, and on the strength of the award publicity, he was hired by the director John Frankenheimer to do a screenplay of his friend William Styron's ''Lie Down in Darkness.'' Had it come off, Yates might, like his other friend Brian Moore, have supported a career in quality fiction with quality film work. But the project fell through. In later life, Yates taught creative writing (very well, apparently) at various universities. But he failed to get tenure at his main base, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- something that embittered him inordinately.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/03/books/review/03SUTHER.html?ex=1060488000&en=c35e2d577887358c&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

Author Morrell Taught At UI (Mansfield Journal, Aug. 3)
A story about novelist David Morrell's latest thriller, "The Protector," refers to the author as Professor Morrell and states that he was an English professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before becoming a full-time writer. The Journal covers central Ohio.
http://www.mansfieldnewsjournal.com/news/stories/20030803/localnews/981.html

UI Futures Market Eyed Powell Candidacy (Washington Post, Aug. 3)
Futures markets are everywhere, and have been for a while. In 1995, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA set up a scheme to let people buy futures with payoffs that depended on whether or not Colin Powell would accept the Republican presidential nomination. A Yes future would pay $1 if he accepted; a No future would pay $1 if he didn't. Once people had a bunch of futures in hand, they could trade them at whatever price they liked. Once Powell started his book tour, the Yeses rose while the Nos fell.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A14095-2003Aug2.html

Rietz: IEM May Succeed Because Of Impartiality (Newsweek, Aug. 3)
Could an online terror-futures market predict where Al Qaeda will strike next? Early last week the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency at the Pentagon was moving forward with trials of an Internet exchange for futures contracts on economic, civil and military events in eight Middle Eastern countries. The plug was pulled on the project. But academic studies show that orange-juice futures are often a more accurate indicator of weather than meteorologists. Since 1988, the Iowa Election Markets (IEM), conducted by the University of Iowa, has consistently bested pollsters when it comes to predicting presidential-election results. Its record piqued Pentagon interest and was one inspiration for studying terror futures. Why do markets work as crystal balls? It's not entirely clear, but part of the reason may be their impartiality. They tend to allow the best information to rise to the top and to override the bully factor, which is huge in the intelligence community. In any sector some voices will be forceful, others intimidated, "and all of that will influence the opinions that are shared," says Professor THOMAS RIETZ, one of the directors of the IEM. "It's a leap from elections to geopolitical risk, but you could see why someone would make that leap."
http://www.msnbc.com/news/947678.asp

Smiley's Ties To Writers' Workshop Cited (The Guardian, Aug. 2)
A feature on author Jane Smiley says that Barbara Grossman, who met Smiley when they were both members of the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, became her first editor at the publisher Harper and Row. "When I taught at the workshop in the early 80s the people were very wild and did a lot of drugs and a lot of drink," says Smiley. "But when I was actually in the workshop in the mid 70s everyone was very sober and dedicated to their work."
http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,12084,1010423,00.html

Father Uncertain Whether Daughter Can Attend UI (Peoria Journal Star, Aug. 2)
A story about Illinois' plans to borrow up to $1.5 billion to pay overdue bills to Medicaid providers quotes Rick Crossett, owner and operator of Ford Hopkins Drug Store in Macomb, who stopped serving new Medicaid clients last week and has had to withdraw thousands of dollars from his teen-age daughter's college fund to keep his business afloat. His daughter, Colleen, plans to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA this fall. "Now I'm starting to wonder if we won't be able to send her to an out-of-state school," he said. "For the state to basically borrow money from us is not the right way." The Star is based in Illinois.
http://www.pjstar.com/news/topnews/g177109a.html

UI's Futures Market Cited (Providence Journal Bulletin, Aug. 2)
An editorial about the Pentagon's futures market plan says a popular example of a successful futures market is a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA system that allows people to bet on election outcomes. The system reportedly outdoes pollsters at predicting winners. The Bulletin is based in Rhode Island.
http://www.projo.com/opinion/editorials/content/projo_20030803_3edpoin.6938e.html

UI Alumnus Managing Director Of Burwood Group (Bloomington Pantagraph, Aug. 2)
Burwood Group Inc., a Chicago-based technology consulting firm, has opened an office in Bloomington, according to Jeff Hartweg, the office's managing director. Hartweg, a native of Bloomington, has returned to the Twin Cities to operate the business after 10 years in Chicago, most recently with another technology consulting business. A graduate of Bloomington High School, he graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and received a master's degree in technology strategies from Northwestern University.
The Pantagraph is based in Illinois.
http://www.pantagraph.com/stories/080203/bus_20030802003.shtml

Squire Comments On Gephardt Support (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Aug. 2)
A story about the fading support in Iowa for Richard Gephardt's presidential run says that the Iowa caucuses traditionally are known for loose endorsements and candidate-shopping. But they say it is unusual for such a large proportion of designated "leadership team" members to disavow their endorsements so quickly, as they have in the case of Gephardt, a candidate who has worked so long to make Iowa a linchpin of his campaign. "You want to put together these sorts of lists to send the signal to the other camps, and to close observers, that things are going well," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. He said it was especially important in the case of Gephardt, coming off a disappointing showing in fund-raising for the second quarter. "This is the sort of thing they don't need at this point," Squire said, referring to the endorsement denials. "You don't want people jumping ship." A version of the story also ran Aug. 3 on the website of the JEWISH WORLD REVIEW.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/News/F2EEF4C27FFFAB5286256D760031C382?OpenDocument&Headline=Team+touted+by+Gephardt+fades+in+Iowa&highlight=2%2Csquire

IEM Cited In Story On Pentagon Futures Market (Houston Chronicle, Aug. 2)
A story examining the Pentagon's failed plan to launch a futures market that would have allowed traders to speculate on such things as the likelihood of a suicide bomber striking the Middle East says that other futures markets have been used to forecast outcomes in nonfinancial events. Since 1988, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has operated the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, in which traders buy and sell contracts forecasting results of presidential and other elections. Although the average bet is only $50, the theory is that requiring participants to put real money at risk filters out people who don't know much about the subject. With money at stake, one is likely to bet for the candidate he expects to win, not the one he wants to win. In theory, this market distills the best thinking of knowledgeable participants, the same way the stock market uncovers the consensus about whether a stock will go up or down. And studies have shown that the Iowa market identifies the eventual presidential campaign winner nearly 100 percent of the time. It's more accurate than standard polls about three-quarters of the time.
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/business/2024151

Pentagon Futures Market Modeled On IEM (Sydney Morning Herald, Aug. 2)
A story about the Pentagon's plans to create a futures trading market for speculative trading on events in the Middle East, a plan that was scrapped Tuesday, says the site was based on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, a real-money futures exchange at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BUSINESS SCHOOL, which beat the nine major polling groups in predicting the outcome of the past four presidential elections. The traders tend to be wealthy, well-educated young men, about 30 years old. Its accuracy is said to spring from the fact that people are motivated by money to get it right. Last year, four of the professors involved in the IEM formed a company to capitalize on their research. A 2002 Iowa University press release claimed they planned to develop markets for the Defense Department and other agencies to predict events such as when the development of ships or aircraft will be finished: "Markets could also be set up to predict outcomes of political events with defense implications, such as elections in volatile regions or when a peace accord between Israel and Palestine might be signed."
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/08/01/1059480548427.html

Columnist: Pentagon Futures Market Had Potential (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 1)
The author of a commentary reports that this week, after a Congressional backlash, the Pentagon detonated its plan to launch a futures-trading market to price the risk of terrorist attacks. When word of the "terror market" idea got out, the political calculus drained support from what critics called an absurd, even offensive, idea. "That's a shame: Done right, it might have been an indispensable tool," the columnist writes. For many years, an institution linked to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has run a futures market in elections. The predictions derived from prices set in these markets have often been far more accurate than polls -- unsurprisingly, since people put their money where their thoughts were.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB105969731318206200-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%22University+of+Iowa%22%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

Andrejevic Discusses Reality TV (Boston Globe, Aug. 1)
MARK ANDREJEVIC
, author of the forthcoming book "Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched" and a professor of media studies at the University of Iowa, is the author of a column (originally written for NEWSDAY) about reality TV. He writes: "The current spate of prank shows exhibits a palpably vicious edge, summed up by the attitude of 'Crank Yankers,' a Comedy Central show in which puppets act out crank phone calls. The goal is not to delight in the humorous foibles of people who don't realize they're being watched but to instill true terror and then burst in at the last moment with a laugh to let the victims know that they should be delighted because, after all, they're going to be on TV.'"
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/213/oped/_Reality_camera_goes_from_candid_to_cruel+.shtml

UI Study On Child Abuse Cited (Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star, Aug. 1)
An editorial urges Virginia lawmakers to preserve a ban on "lewd and lascivious cohabitation not because it improves the commonwealth's moral tenor--the average Virginian doesn't know the prohibition exists, let alone feel impelled to obey it--nor because our little colony would benefit from the Morality Police slapping the cuffs on unsanctified couplers. Social trends being what they are, the cops would soon run out of cuffs. Yet there is a compelling reason to keep the law: children. The cohabitation law gives the state's domestic-court judges formal grounding to deny custody to parents whose idea of acceptable child-rearing includes a live-in paramour." The editorial cites a 1992 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study that found that while "boyfriends" provided just two percent of all non-parental care, they committed almost half of all child-abuse offenses. The Star is based in Virginia.
http://www.freelancestar.com/News/FLS/2003/082003/08012003/1055830

IEM Is Inspiration For Pentagon Futures Market (Washington Post, Aug. 1)
John M. Poindexter, the retired rear admiral involved in the Pentagon's ill-fated plan to launch an online futures market for betting on Middle Eastern developments, will be leaving his job with a Defense Department research agency, a senior defense official said yesterday. The departure had been demanded by lawmakers outraged over the notion that the Pentagon should set up a system enabling people to profit from predictions of terrorist attacks and other events. Poindexter, who has not spoken publicly about the initiative since it sparked a political firestorm Monday, has headed the office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) responsible for developing the trading program. The project, known as the Policy Analysis Market, was conceived by Michael Foster, a math and computer science specialist who joined DARPA in 2000 as a program manager, on temporary assignment from the National Science Foundation, according to several people familiar with the project's history. One of his models for creating a market that could help the Pentagon predict events was the political futures market at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which has proven better than pollsters and pundits in predicting the outcome of presidential elections. A version of the story also ran Aug. 1 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A10810-2003Jul31.html

Whitmore Is Finalist For Texas Tech Top Post (ABC28, Aug. 1)
Texas Tech has announced its second candidate in its search for university president. JON WHITMORE will visit Lubbock Aug. 6 and 7. Whitmore is the provost and professor of theater arts at the University of Iowa. He also served as the dean of the College of Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin. Last week, Dr. Brady Deaton from the University of Missouri was the first finalist to visit Tech. ABC28 is based in Lubbock, Texas.
http://home.abc28.com/Global/story.asp?S=1384199

Kutcher Attended UI (Newton Kansan, Aug. 1)
A movie critic laments rumors of Hollywood's plans to produce the campy 1970s/1980s TV show "The Dukes of Hazzard" as a movie, particularly rumors that Ashton Kutcher, of "That 70s Show" and "Dude, Where's My Car?" may be cast as one of the hard-driving cousins. Writes the critic: "I know Kutcher has some intelligence, as he began his college career as an engineering major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA."
http://www.thekansan.com/stories/080103/acc_0801030002.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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